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5 Technologies Helping Us Explore The Deep Ocean

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  • 5 Technologies Helping Us Explore The Deep Ocean

    9:48

    This episode is brought to you by the Music for Scientists album! Stream the album on major music services here: Check out the “For Your Love music video here:

    The ocean is the largest ecosystem on Earth, but it's still mostly unexplored. This is partially due to the challenges of ocean exploration, like bone-crushing pressure and the need to bring your own air. But here are five ways that we've pushed the limits of where we can explore.

    If you want to catch an ocean exploration livestream, you can find some of them here:




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  • This Incredible Animation Shows How Deep The Ocean Really Is

    3:29

    Just how deep does the ocean go? Way further than you think. This animation puts the actual distance into perspective, showing a vast distance between the waves we see and the mysterious point we call Challenger Deep.

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    #DeepSea #Ocean #TechInsider

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    This Incredible Animation Shows How Deep The Ocean Really Is

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  • Deep Sea Exploration - 360 | Into Water

    6:11

    For best 360 viewing experience on a phone, watch in the YouTube mobile app.

    In the final installment of National Geographic’s “Into Water” 360 series, dive into the midwaters off the coast of California with bioengineer and National Geographic Explorer Dr. Kakani Katija. She conducts deep water research at Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, developing technologies that can go deep below the surface to observe wildlife and collect data and specimens. She aims to study all aspects of life in the deep ocean and see how that knowledge can translate to technology and innovation. “Into Water: California” is the final stop on an around the world 360 tour that documents the work of female Explorers who’ve dedicated their careers to water related issues.
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    #NationalGeographic #IntoWater #360Video

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    National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible.

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    Deep Sea Exploration - 360 | Into Water


    National Geographic

  • Exploring the Alien World of Brine Pools

    5:47

    Very few humans have ever seen the mysterious brine pools in person. This is an alien landscape of underwater lakes so salty that they kill most fish who get too close. The brine pools, however, are also thriving ecosystems, host to many species, and with a unique microbiological makeup that makes them extremely valuable to study.

    As the OceanX team worked with the BBC on “Blue Planet II,” advisor scientists Dr. Sylvia Earle (of Mission Blue) and Dr. Samantha “Mandy” Joye descended in the Alucia submersibles to visit the brine pools and collect samples from this rarely visited ecosystem, which could lead to medical breakthroughs or provide clues to the origins of life.

    This video is a part of #OurBluePlanet, a joint venture between OceanX Media and BBC Earth to get people talking about the ocean. Join the conversation on Twitter: @OurBluePlanet

    #oceanx #submarine #womenshistorymonth

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  • The Deep Sea - Exploring the Zones

    5:54

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    Haley Chamberlain and Rob Nelson from the UntamedScience series Ecogeeks go deep with submarine builder Karl Stanley. But have no fear, this deep dive didn't get us wet... oh no. We stayed dry in our snug submersible on our quest to penetrate the 2000 foot depths.

    In this video we explore the zones of the deep sea: the Mesopelagic Zone, Bathypelagic Zone, Abyssopelagic Zone and Hadopelagic Zone. We explore the adaptations that animals have to live in the deep sea including bioluminescence and color.

    To read more go to or simply visit UntamedScience.com

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  • What Would a Trip to the Mariana Trench Be Like?

    10:49

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    Ever wanted to take a dive into the deepest parts of the ocean? Well, today you’re gonna have this opportunity! Now, how good are you at holding your breath? Not that good? Well not to worry. Hop on board of my submersible craft and join me in the voyage to the depths! Ready? Let’s dive!

    The Mariana trench begins at about 19,700 ft deep. It’s both the least explored and the most fascinating area for the scientists and adventurers alike. The Challenger Deep is the bottom of the Mariana trench, and its depth is 35,853 ft. Few people have been here, and very little is known about it yet. But scientists aren’t going to stop, and there’s hope we’ll soon find out what secrets the depths of the ocean hold. Ready? Let’s dive!

    Other videos you might like:
    Mariana Trench Creatures That Are Scarier Than Megalodon
    How Deep Is the Ocean In Reality?
    Who Lives at the Bottom of the Bermuda Triangle?

    TIMESTAMPS:
    Something interesting about orcas 1:03
    What decompression sickness is 1:47
    The dark part of the ocean 2:11
    Why blue whales are so awesome 3:14 ????
    The creature with eyes the size of frisbees 4:09
    The Midnight Zone 4:49
    “I don’t see you, but I’ll still eat you.” Brr! 5:20 ????
    Black dragonfish (It looks like something from a horror movie) 6:19
    It’s time to delve into the Abyss 7:24
    The black swallower (Now I'm scared) 8:01 ????
    The deepest shipwreck 8:48 ⛵️
    The deepest fish ever found 9:22
    The very bottom of the Earth 9:53

    #ocean #MarianaTrench #brightside

    SUMMARY:
    - At 65 ft, there’s a whole new world opening before your eyes: shallow coral reefs are standing beautifully not far from the shore.
    - 130 ft is the depth where we say goodbye even to recreational scuba divers — it’s the maximum allowed for them.
    - At 230 ft we meet whale sharks — the largest known fish species, weighing up to 60 tons.
    - And now we’re entering the dark part of the ocean: at 490 ft, just 1% of the light from the surface reaches us.
    - Going deeper now, and at 1,640 ft you’re going to see the last of the blue whales — no, not really the last of them, I mean, that’s the deepest they can swim.
    - At the depth of 2,723 ft we have reached the point where the Burj Khalifa, the tallest building in the world, would not even show its tip on the surface if it were put underwater.
    - The giant squid inhabits the depths of 2,950 ft. Just imagine the creature with eyes the size of frisbees!
    - The Midnight Zone. The pressure here is so huge that, if you somehow end up being here without a submersible, you’ll simply be crushed in a couple of seconds.
    - 4,200 ft down below, and we see the ferocious great white sharks — these ultimate predators feel great at such a depth.
    - See those huge nets? That’s because we’re now at the depth of 4,900 ft where the “catch-all” fishing method is used.
    - At 6,000 ft, if we were in the Grand Canyon, we’d be sitting at its lowest and deepest point.
    - Now, if we’re really careful, then at the depth of 6,600 ft, we’ll be able to see the black dragonfish — a nightmarish creature that dwells in the deep and dark parts of the ocean.
    - At 7,400 ft we’ll be saying goodbye to sperm whales — this is the deepest point they can dive.
    - At 15,000 ft, the monsters out of your worst nightmares pop up.
    - The black swallower can swallow prey that’s twice its size!
    - And now the deepest and darkest part of the ocean begins: we’re diving into the Mariana trench. Officially, it begins at about 19,700 ft deep.
    - Going lower and deeper, you won’t see any other kind of fish or vertebrate animal whatsoever — the pressure is just too much for such creatures.

    Music by Epidemic Sound

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  • First-ever deep-sea alligator food fall

    5:58

    Alligators were dropped to the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico in February 2019 for the first-ever experiment on what eats reptiles in the world’s deep oceans. This research will help us learn more about:

    1. deep-sea food webs
    2. ancient food webs (because maybe some species eating the gators had ancestors that ate now-extinct reptiles like mosasaurs)
    3. how materials created on land sustain and impact ocean food webs

    This research is by #woodfall scientists Craig McClain, Clifton Nunnally, and River Dixon.

    Note: this video and all the images and audio it contains are distributed under an attribution license. You are free to share this work if you credit it to us without implying that we endorse you or your use of this video. To reproduce or modify this video in any way, you must message us or send an email to scicomm@lumcon.edu.

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  • Exclusive: Deep-Sea Sharks and More Spotted by New Camera | National Geographic

    5:24

    National Geographic's remote imaging team uses drop-cam technology to explore deep ocean mysteries. In this video, mechanical engineer Alan Turchik explains how the drop cam works and reveals footage of underwater life never seen before in the Chagos Archipelago in the Indian Ocean. The camera captured images of a gulper shark, not previously known to occupy these waters. The January 2015 expedition was organized by the Bertarelli Foundation and led by Zoological Society of London researcher Tom Letessier. The National Geographic Society/Waitt Grants Program also supported the expedition.
    ➡ Subscribe:

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    DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY & PRODUCER: Kip Evans
    EDITORS: Connor Gallagher and Kip Evans
    DROPCAM FOOTAGE: Alan Turchik
    ADDITIONAL FOOTAGE: Luke Barnett, Richard Wollocombe, and Alan Turchik
    SENIOR PRODUCER FOR NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC: Jeff Hertrick
    SPECIAL THANKS: British Indian Ocean Territory Administration

    Exclusive: Deep-Sea Sharks and More Spotted by New Camera | National Geographic


    National Geographic

  • Dive into the Deep Dark Ocean in a High-Tech Submersible!

    14:22

    Come join Greg Foot on a scientific adventure diving down into the deep dark ocean! Starting on the deck of the 'Baseline Explorer', you’ll be lifted out into the waves, you’ll be cleared to dive, then you'll break the surface and head down, further and further, until you reach the side of an underwater volcano 250m under the surface, in the Twilight Zone just off the coast of Bermuda!

    Your guide is Greg Foot - the Science Guy on Blue Peter and popular host of the YouTube Channel BBC Earth Lab [and lots of other stuff on YouTube, TV, Radio and Stage - More about Greg at

    Greg’s drive was part of ocean charity Nekton's mission to deliver the XL Catlin Deep Ocean Survey. Nekton’s mission is to explore and research the ocean, the planet’s most critical, yet least explored, frontier. More info at
    Huge thanks to Nekton, XL Catlin, Project Baseline, Triton Submersibles, Global Underwater Explorers and all the crew on the Baseline Explorer.

    Shot & edited by Greg Foot. Additional footage courtesy of Nekton / XL Catlin Deep Ocean Survey. Thanks also to Alex4D.

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  • How did early Sailors navigate the Oceans?

    6:21

    Do you know how the early sailors navigate the oceans? The technology today makes it real easy to navigate the oceans. But it's very interesting to know how the early sailors managed to navigate without it. There's a lot of history on it. I tried my best to compile some important and interesting parts of it into this video. Hope you like it :)

    Brightly Fancy Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)

    Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0


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    Hawaiin Hawk - (CC 2.0)


    White Tern - Public Domain

  • Why the Ocean is Still Unexplored | Unveiled

    7:34

    While NASA makes headlines for exploring space, NOAA has been exploring the ocean... And discovering the mysteries of the deep. The oceans account for 99% of Earth's total living space, with 321 million cubic miles of water! And yet, we still no so little about them! But, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, there are good reasons why we haven't ventured to the bottom of the sea...

    In this video, Unveiled finds out why we haven't fully explored the ocean yet. What do you think? Why are the mysteries of the sea still unsolved?

    This is Unveiled, giving you incredible answers to extraordinary questions!

    Find more amazing videos for your curiosity here:
    What Will Cities Look Like in 100 Years? -
    What Is Earth's Twilight Zone? -

    Are you constantly curious? Are you a fiend for facts? Then subscribe for more from Unveiled ►

    #Ocean #NOAA #Environment

  • 5 Underwater Discoveries That Cannot be Explained!

    11:10

    The oceans of the Earth hold many secrets. Throughout the history of mankind, some stunning, scary, and sometimes simply inexplicable things have accumulated on the ocean floor. Scientists have discovered ancient cities, cemeteries of sculptures, even those abnormal zones where the laws of physics don’t work. The mysterious and frightening ocean can not only be a peaceful surface that gives life, but also an enraged devourer of civilizations! Now, we will try to figure out the most interesting and mysterious discoveries!

  • The Most Terrible Deep Sea Creatures Youve Never Seen Before

    10:30

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    Mind Warehouse ►

    The depths of the ocean are one of the most understudied areas in the world. Unfortunately, even in the 21st century, we have not been able to study the seabed in detail. It is located, by the way, thousands of meters below the surface of the water. However, this is where the most interesting and terrifying creatures on the planet live. In today's video we are gonna talk about the most amazing living creatures in the depths of the sea. Tell us in the comments, which of these animals would you like to see live. If you have the courage, of course.

    00:00 - Welcome!
    00:35 - Atolla jellyfish
    01:24 - Comb jelly
    02:11 - Sea spider (Preview)
    03:11 - Fangtooth
    03:53 - Anglerfish
    05:51 - Deep sea dragonfish
    06:57 - Humboldt squid
    07:55 - Taonius Borealis
    08:39 - Monsters of the reefs

  • Whats At The Bottom Of The Great Blue Hole?

    3:38

    The Great Blue Hole is a massive underwater sinkhole off the coast of Belize. In the winter of 2018, a submarine crew from Aquatica Submarines ventured to the bottom of the hole and made some unexpected discoveries.

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    What's At The Bottom Of The Great Blue Hole?

  • The Future of Ocean Farming: Innovations in Aquaculture

    4:07

    From veggie fish food to underwater cameras, U.S. ocean farming is evolving. Watch to learn some of these sustainable innovations.

    See our full collection of videos on The Future of Ocean Farming at

    Original video source:


    Ocean Today is an interactive exhibit that plays short videos on ocean related themes.

    Visitors can select from hundreds of videos on topics ranging from deep-­‐sea exploration, marine species, and restoration projects to hurricanes, oceans and human health, and climate science and research. These videos are a free resource and are available on our website at

  • Who Lives In the Deepest Place On Earth?

    9:56

    Who lives at the bottom of the Mariana trench? Scientists have finally revealed the Mariana Trench mystery. Take a look at the deepest creature ever caught there!

    The curiosity of human nature makes people look for secrets and mysteries far away from home, like in outer space or on other planets. Scientists have mapped only 5 percent of our planet’s seafloor. And if you’ve ever considered the ocean plain and boring, the video you’re about to watch will blow your mind.

    TIMESTAMPS
    The Mariana Trench is the deepest area 0:45
    The deepest-living fish in the world 2:40
    “Ethereal snailfish” 3:12
    A mysterious metallic sound 3:38
    Deep sea cucumber 5:50
    The deep sea anglerfish 6:20
    The barreleye fish 7:13
    The Champagne Vent 8:05
    The 4-inch amoeba 8:35

    SUMMARY
    The Mariana Trench is the deepest area you can find on Earth. Although almost everybody has heard the name, we have shockingly little data about this dark underwater place in the western Pacific Ocean.
    It’s a monumental task mapping the seafloor and taking pictures when the water pressure at the bottom is more than 1,000 times greater than that at the surface! The Mariana Trench houses the deepest parts of our planet.

    Music: The Cave of Poetry by Savfk ( is licensed under a Creative Commons license (
    Savfk YouTube channel:

    Location of the Mariana Trench: By I, Kmusser, CC BY 2.5


    Cut-out from original shown below: By By Masaki Miya et al. - Evolutionary history of anglerfishes (Teleostei: Lophiiformes): a mitogenomic perspective. BMC Evolutionary Biology 2010, 10:58 doi:10.1186/1471-2148- 10-58, CC BY 2.0


    Pseudoliparis swirei (Scorpaeniformes: Liparidae), hadal snailfish from the Mariana Trench: By Gerringer M. E., Linley T. D., Jamieson A. J., Goetze E., Drazen J. C. - Gerringer M. E., Linley T. D., Jamieson A. J., Goetze E., Drazen J. C. (2017). Pseudoliparis swirei sp. nov.: A newly-discovered hadal snailfish (Scorpaeniformes: Liparidae) from the Mariana Trench. Zootaxa, 4358 (1):161—177. doi:10.11646/zootaxa.4358.1.7, CC BY 3.0


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    Location of the Mariana Trench: By I, Kmusser, CC BY 2.5

    Deepest Depth in the Trench (Map view of the bathymetry of southern Mariana Trench area): By University of New Hampshire,



    Pseudoliparis swirei (Scorpaeniformes: Liparidae), hadal snailfish from the Mariana Trench: By Gerringer M. E., Linley T. D., Jamieson A. J., Goetze E., Drazen J. C. - Gerringer M. E., Linley T. D., Jamieson A. J., Goetze E., Drazen J. C. (2017). Pseudoliparis swirei sp. nov.: A newly-discovered hadal snailfish (Scorpaeniformes: Liparidae) from the Mariana Trench. Zootaxa, 4358 (1): 161—177. doi:10.11646/zootaxa.4358.1.7, CC BY 3.0

    Cut-out from original shown below: By By Masaki Miya et al. - Evolutionary history of anglerfishes (Teleostei: Lophiiformes): a mitogenomic perspective. BMC Evolutionary Biology 2010, 10:58 doi:10.1186/1471-2148-10-58, CC BY 2.0

    Deep-sea Holothurian: By NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research, 2016 Deepwater Exploration of the Marianas,

    Researchers solve mystery of deep-sea fish with tubular eyes and transparent head (The barreleye (Macropinna microstoma): By Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI),

  • How Deep Is the Ocean In Reality?

    17:26

    A whopping 94% of all life-forms on Earth are aquatic. Such a huge number of living beings who can't survive without water is understandable. After all, more than 70% of our planet's surface is covered with water. The World Ocean includes the Pacific Ocean, the Atlantic Ocean, the Indian Ocean, and the Arctic Ocean. There's enough water in the oceans to fill a 685-mile-long bathtub! One of the main nagging questions people have been asking for ages is How deep is the ocean in reality? Let’s find an answer to it.

    #marianatrench #deepplace #deepocean

    TIMESTAMPS
    Sunlit zone 1:21
    Twilight zone 6:17
    Midnight zone 10:19
    The abyss 13:17
    Trench zone 14:25

    Music:


    SUMMARY
    -The Sunlit zone stretches from 14.5 ft, that is is the depth of a standard Olympic diving pool, to 561 ft under the water’s surface, where RMS Carpathia found her last dwelling. This ship became famous after her participation in the rescue of the Titanic survivors.
    -At 656 ft, the twilight zone begins. That's where you can see the giant oarfish. At a depth of 1,453 ft, you could reach the height of the Empire State Building if somebody powerful enough decided to submerge it under the water. The giant squid lives as deep as 2,952 ft below the surface. This is where the Twilight zone ends.
    -At a depth of 3,608 ft, there's the deepest volcano recorded by scientists. At 12,795 ft below the water’s surface, there are Air France flight 447 black boxes. Airbus A330 crashed into the Atlantic Ocean in 2009. This is where the Midnight zone ends.
    -At a depth of 13,123 ft, the midnight zone ends, and the abyss lies ahead. 18,897 ft is the bottom of the abyss and the depth at which you can find the deepest shipwreck. SS Rio Grande sunk in 1941 in the South Atlantic and was discovered only in 1996.
    -At a depth of 19,685 ft, the abyss ends and gives way to the trench zone. At a depth of 36,070 ft, you will reach the very bottom of the ocean in its deepest point known to man: Challenger Deep.

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  • The Ocean is Way Deeper Than You Think

    6:53

    The Ocean is a deep and scary world that is completely removed from most of our lives. In this video I explore just how deep the ocean actually is while discussing some of the strange life down there... and other just plain weird and odd things about the ocean. Feel free to leave any comments and share what you found interesting, or anything else you think that I should have added!

    Music is by Ross Bugden, seriously, his channel is great.

    Song used is called Something Wicked

    Link to Ross's channel:
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    Videos explaining things. Mostly over topics like history, geography, economics and science.

    We believe that the world is a wonderfully fascinating place, and you can find wonder anywhere you look. That is what our videos attempt to convey.

    Currently, we try our best to release one video every two weeks. Bear with us :)

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  • 9 Incredible Science Facts You Probably Didnt Learn At School

    10:25

    Common scientific facts you won't believe are real

    How well did you perform at school? Were you among the best students or in the outsiders team? It doesn't really matter, because they probably didn't teach these science facts at school. Be ready to be amazed!

    Timestamps:
    01:49 How deep is the sea?
    03:29 The journey at the speed of light
    04:17 How high can we build?
    06:38 What organism lives the longest?
    08:38 Five places on Earth you should avoid
    09:33 Marie Sklodowska Curie

    Breathtaking journey to the centre of the Earth
    - 20 m - The roots of a camel thorn
    - 40 m - The deepest pool in the world
    - 60 m - Ancient underground cities
    - 105 m - The deepest underground station in the world. By the way, do you know where it is located? Leave your answer in the comments down below!
    - 1370 m - Permafrost in Yakutia
    - 1642 m - The depth of lake Baikal
    - 4500 m - Tautona gold mine
    - 6700 m - Fossilized algae
    - 12262 m - The deepest well in the world
    - 70000 m - The end of the Earth's crust
    - 6 381 000 m - The distance to the Earth's core

    What organism lives the longest?
    Do you know the answer to this question? Leave it in the comment section below. And no, it is not a turtle :)
    - Mayfly only lives for a day
    - Flies live for approximately 17 days
    - Honey bees live for 4 weeks
    - Bed bugs (oh these creatures!) live for 6 months
    - Octopus lives for 3 years
    - Rabbits live for 12 years
    - Lions can live up to 20 years old
    - Rhinoceros live for 40 years
    - Elephants live for 80 years (average human life)
    - Japanese spider-crab lives for 100 years
    - Bowhead whale lives for 200 years
    - Torriropsis Nutricula jellyfish is the only thing on Earth that lives forever!

    The explosion of Supernova
    According to the leading scientists, two stars will collide in the constellation cygnus. As a result, a supernova will occur, and a huge amount of energy will be ejected into space. It will be brighter that the light from a majority of stars in the galaxy. The consequences will be visible to the naked eye from the earth's surface. It will take place in 2022.

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    The following video might feature activity performed by our actors within controlled environment- please use judgment, care, and precaution if you plan to replicate.

  • How Deep Can A Submarine Go?

    7:31

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    What is the deepest submarines can go? Can submarines reach Mariana Trench? Can submarines go even deeper than that?

    On January 23, 1960, the Trieste touched down on the sandy soil at the bottom of Challenger Deep, the deepest part of the Mariana trench and deepest point in the world. At a depth of 35,815 feet (10,916 meters), the Trieste withstood an incredible 1.25 metric tons per square centimeter of pressure, although the single plexiglass window had cracked on the way down, giving American Don Walsh and Frenchman Jacques Piccard a good scare. Yet the Trieste was not a submarine, but rather a bathyscaphe, specifically designed to withstand the tremendous pressure. In today’s episode of the The Infographics Show, we ask, how deep can submarines go?


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  • What Did Scientists Really See In The Mariana Trench?

    5:15

    So what really lives at the bottom of the Mariana trench? Scientists have finally revealed the Mariana Trench mystery. Take a look at the deepest creature ever caught there!

    For copyright matters, please contact infotrendcentral@gmail.com

    #Mariana #Trench #Discovery

    What Did Scientists Really See In The Mariana Trench?

  • Mariana Trench: Record-breaking journey to the bottom of the ocean - BBC News

    2:14

    An American explorer has descended nearly 11km (seven miles) to the deepest place in the ocean - the Mariana Trench in the Pacific.

    Victor Vescovo spent four hours exploring the bottom of the trench with the risk of his submersible imploding if anything were to go wrong.

    The dive was later verified to be 10,972m and Victor became the first person to reach the deepest part of the Pacific Ocean.


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  • Deep Sea Wonders Episode 1: Exploring the Deep Wilderness

    9:27

    Deep Sea Wonders of the Caribbean is a five-part video series that promotes awareness of the Caribbean’s deep oceans. It features footage from an expedition by the E/V Nautilus, which was led by the renowned Professor Robert Ballard. The project which was initiated by local marine biologist, Dr. Judith Gobin who was invited onboard the ship, was executed by the National Institute of Higher Education, Research, Science and Technology (NIHERST) in collaboration with The University of the West Indies (UWI) and the Caribbean Council for Science and Technology (CCST). Footage and scientific findings at depths of 2,100 metres were uncovered for the first time in the region. The series features the following episodes:

    1. Exploring the Deep Wilderness… an introduction to deep-sea exploration in the Caribbean
    2. Beyond the Beaches… our Caribbean’s deep-sea environment and how organisms there have adapted
    3. Hot Sun Above, Cold Seeps Below… a unique look into Trinidad and Tobago’s deep ocean
    4. Grenada and the Jenny that Kicks… a unique look into Grenada’s deep ocean
    5. An Ocean of Opportunities… careers of the deep sea

  • Exploring the Deep Sea for Shipwrecks and Sunken Planes

    2:32

    For the past 32 years, Steven Saint Amour has been unearthing sunken ships and aircrafts from extreme depths that other crews simply cannot reach. As co-founder of the Eclipse Group, he specializes in deep-sea search and recovery and has become the go-to explorer for these types of missions. With advanced technology that can plumb depths of up to 6,000 meters (over 3.5 miles), Saint-Amour isn’t just recovering the seemingly impossible, he’s helping prevent future wrecks as well.

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  • Exploring Deepwater Ecosystems with eDNA

    10:31

    A team of ocean scientists and engineers from Lehigh University and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution are developing revolutionary new ways to study the biodiversity of deepwater ecosystems - with eDNA. eDNA, or environmental DNA, is free-floating genetic material that organisms leave behind in the water column, an almost invisible sign of their presence. Aboard NOAA Research Vessel Manta, eDNA was filtered and collected from seawater in the deep Gulf of Mexico, near Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary. With the use of eDNA as a more effective and less disruptive methodology, these scientists are unlocking the secrets of the deep ocean, and the incredible variety of animals that live there, one drop of seawater at a time.

    To learn more visit: and


    Video produced by Allison Albritton (Ocean Allison), Outreach Specialist; courtesy of Lehigh University, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, and the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research.


    This expedition was funded by the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research to Lehigh University, in collaboration with the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution’s Ocean Twilight Zone Project, funded as part of The Audacious Project housed at TED.

  • 7 Things We Dont Know About the Ocean

    10:31

    The ocean covers 70% of the planet, but humans still don’t know very much about it. In this episode, Hank discusses seven mysterious ocean topics.

    Hosted by: Hank Green
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    The Ocean Floor








    Beneath the Seafloor





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    The 52Hz Whale





    Abyssal Gigantism



  • LIFE AT 11 KM DEEP? The history of exploration of the Mariana Trench

    14:44

    Mariana Trench is the deepest and one of the most unexplored places on Earth. The water pressure here is so immense it can instantly crush almost any living organism. Only the brave few managed to go all the way down. How did they do it, and what did they find at the bottom?

    In this episode of HOW IT WAS, we will tell you about the Challenger Deep discovery, which is the world's deepest known point, at the southern end of the Mariana Trench. You will learn about the first manned descent to the Challenger Deep by Jacques Piccard and Don Walsh and about journeys to the bottom by James Cameron and Victor Vescovo. You’ll also find out how deep-sea microorganisms and fish adapted to high pressure; and why Mariana Trench was proposed as a site for nuclear waste disposal

    Cover and animation design made with

    Materials used:
    Office of Ocean Exploration and Research / National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration / U.S. Department of Commerce; Edie Widder and Nathan Robinson / National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/ NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research, 2016 Deepwater Exploration of the Marianas; CGTN, CCTV+, China24.

    Video used:
    This innovative fish farm could revolutionise seafood production | Pioneers for Our Planet / World Economic Forum / СС BY;
    Amazing Underwater Sea life | Royalty Free | Stock Footage | No copyright Videos / Royalty Free Stock Footage / СС BY;
    A Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, Then 'Crack' / VOA Learning English / CC;
    DEEPSEA CHALLENGE 3D Trailer | National Geographic;
    NBCDFW - Five Deeps Expedition interview with Victor Vescovo / The Five Deeps Expedition.

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  • Journey into the Deep Sea - VR | National Geographic

    9:00

    Set out on a virtual dive on the coral reefs of Palau with marine biologist and National Geographic Explorer Dr. Erika Woolsey as your guide. Swim with manta rays, sea turtles, and sharks while you explore beautiful and threatened coral ecosystems.
    ➡ Subscribe:

    About National Geographic:
    National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible.

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    Journey into the Deep Sea - VR | National Geographic


    National Geographic

  • Can Sea Water Desalination Save The World?

    13:29

    Today, one out of three people don’t have access to safe drinking water. And that’s the result of many things, but one of them is that 96.5% of that water is found in our oceans. It’s saturated with salt, and undrinkable. Most of the freshwater is locked away in glaciers or deep underground. Less than one percent of it is available to us. So why can’t we just take all that seawater, filter out the salt, and have a nearly unlimited supply of clean, drinkable water?

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    Can Sea Water Desalination Save The World?

  • New Deep-Sea Robot Will Help Us Explore Oceans Throughout the Solar System

    4:46

    Named for the Ancient Greek god of the Underworld, the Hadal Zone is the pitch-black part of our oceans below 6,000 meters. Now, imagine a fleet of robots able to roam freely in the parts of the ocean that have been almost impossible for humans to reach, and bring back what they see: such as lifeforms that can survive with zero sunlight, very little nutrition, under pressure that could crush a car. OceanX's research vessel #Alucia took engineers from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory to test a brand-new prototype that will one day explore these remote, unforgiving parts of our planet, and eventually, oceans throughout our solar system. With thanks to our partners at Bloomberg Philanthropies.

    #oceanx #womeninstem #oceanworlds

    Follow OceanX on our social channels:




  • Why Should We Explore the Deep Sea?

    9:20

    The Deep Sea is at the forefront of modern scientific research. The Nautilus exploration vehicle and the NOAA's Okeanus Explorer roam the depths each day, documenting new species that were unknown to science until now, and revealing the impact our species has had on the oceanic environment. Only once we understand these impacts, can we truly be able to change and mitigate the damage we have caused to these ecosystems.

    As a species, we are driven by a desire to understand and make sense of the universe around us. We identify and classify every animal we find, we have landed people on the moon and sent probes into deep space to uncover the secrets of the cosmos. We have photographed the surface of other planets, and witnessed our own blue planet as a speck in the distant infinity of space.

    Despite all this, we still have explored just 5% of Earth’s oceans. Most of that knowledge lies in shallow waters, while the depths beneath remain a mystery. To this day, we have caught only glimpses of the weird and wonderful life that thrives in the sunless world of bottomless trenches, and endless deserts punctuated with islands of activity. Every discovery challenges and re-builds our understanding, from phenomena like deep sea gigantism driving unique adaptation in deep sea life, to alien-like ecosystems, full of life-forms unlike any others we have encountered.

    VISIT THE BRAND NEW DEEP SEA HUB:

    #deepsea #wildlife #nature #animals #ocean #fish #science

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    CGI Snake by Chris Zabriskie is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license. 
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  • Exploring Earth’s Final Frontier With AUV Technology

    5:36

    NASA engineers are using autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) technology to explore the uncharted ocean floor.

    Subscribe here:

    The deepest depths of the ocean floor are finally being explored thanks to autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) technology. Swarms of underwater drones are helping researchers learn more about our most important, and least understood, natural resource.

    AUVs have helped researchers discover shipwrecks, collect valuable oceanographic data, and uncover new natural resources. They’re also capable of mapping the seabed, which can provide crucial understanding about the mechanisms of climate change.

    See the full article on AUV technology, here:

    Up next- Reducing Ocean Plastic With Edible 6 Pack Rings:

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  • A Walk on the Wild Side: Exploring the Ocean Floor with Digital Technology

    43:37

    The deep seafloor is one of the most remote places on earth, and despite tremendous efforts, our deep diving robots have only offered us a glimpse of this world. For the first time in history, state of the art digital scanning methods combined with today’s video gaming technology is allowing us to experience some of these deep sea places in all their glory.

    Join us for a scientific presentation featuring high definition videos of deep sea black smokers at the Ocean Networks Canada Endeavour node located on the Juan de Fuca Ridge off Vancouver Island.

    Dr. Tom Kwasnitschka is a visiting scholar at Ocean Networks Canada. He received his PhD in Geology from the Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Germany, and has been a researcher at the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel since 2007. His research focuses on robotic exploration of deep ocean environments, particularly in the field of volcanology of seamounts, very deep explosive volcanism, and the evolution of hydrothermal edifices as they rapidly change over time.

  • Deep Ocean Exploration and Deep Sea Mining by NIOT MoES

    19:12

    A major thrust of the Mission will be to look for metals and minerals. The United Nation’s International seabed Authority has allotted to India a site of 75,000 sq. km in the Central Indian Ocean Basin for exploitation of Polymetallic Nodules which are scattered on the seabed. The rock like material contained several valuable metals and minerals such as Manganese, Nickel and Cobalt.

  • The ROVs of Deep Ocean Exploration Webinar

    57:05

    GFOE engineers Chris Ritter and Bobby Mohr give you a virtual tour of the engineering behind NOAA's Deep Discoverer (D2) and Seirios remotely operated vehicles.

  • Innovative Technology for Exploration of Deep Sea Resources: 4K full version

    14:00

    The Cross-ministerial Strategic Innovation Promotion Program (SIP) is a national project under the Council for Science, Technology and Innovation (CSTI) to promote advancements of science,technology and innovation in Japan. Our program, Innovative Technology for Exploration of Deep Sea Resources, is one of issue in the eleven issues of the second term.
    In this research program jointly promoted by eight ministries and agencies, we aim to develop innovative technologies for exploration of deep sea resources. There are a variety of marine resources under the deep seafloor surrounding the Japanese islands. As a result of recent studies, potential sites of rare-earth deposits which are one of the valuable marine resources and essential for the sustainable development of our society have been identified under the seafloor at the depth between 2,000m and 6,000m in the Japanese Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ). These technologies will be transferred to industry, with a view to formulating a business model toward the future.

  • Amazing underwater submarines | Explore the deepest sea and ocean

    17:29

    Which ocean creatures do you love the most? Magnificent Sharks, colourful Clownfish or perhaps inquisitive Sea Turtles? Well in this video are shown the best underwater submarines which might help you to get closer to them than ever before. These submersible machines will amaze you! Enjoy this video and please SUBSCRIBE ►

    Links of all Techs Shown in this Video:

    SEAMAGINE AURORA
    TRITON 3300/3
    RINSPEED SQUBA
    THE SCUBSTER
    U-BOAT WORX

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  • Scientists See Ocean Floor via Sonar | National Geographic

    5:12

    April 21, 2011 — Scientists use cameras and sonar near the U.S. Virgin Islands to see the seafloor and find out how fish and other sea life use the underwater habitats, which include coral reefs and sea grasses.
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    About National Geographic:
    National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible.

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    Scientists See Ocean Floor via Sonar | National Geographic


    National Geographic

  • 5 Historical Shipwrecks Found by ROVs in the Deep Ocean

    11:54

    In this countdown, we examine a different topic than usual: the discoveries of historically significant wrecks discovered during ROV expeditions. Hopefully this will be an interesting change of pace from the usual sea creature videos. What do you think?

    Source Footage from NOAA:


    Music by Jim Gifford:
    Track one - Blue Wonder


    Track two - The Great Machine (Piano)


    Track three - Improv: The Shallows


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    What else lurks within the abyss?

  • SpaceX of deep sea exploration comes to London - first man to reach oceans five deepest points

    4:42

    Subscribe to the Evening Standard on YouTube:


    In 2019 US adventurer Victor Vescovo became the first person to pilot a manned submersible to the five deepest parts of the Earth's oceans. After his successful mission he brought the submarine vessel - the world's first reusable full-ocean-depth submersible nicknamed 'Limiting Factor' to London.

  • High-tech robots reveal details of the deep

    3:12

    On land, we map details of the Earth with our eyes and hands, and use satellite images to trace out broader regions. We take for granted what we can easily see until we try to map landscapes hidden beneath the ocean. Engineers at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute have designed two types of underwater robots to solve this problem. A torpedo-like, autonomous underwater vehicle, or AUV, first creates a map of the seafloor. Then, having examined these maps, MBARI scientists choose sites of interest to explore in more detail with a second underwater robot called a remotely operated vehicle, or ROV. The ROV collects samples and images of the targeted regions on the AUV map.

    This video was written and narrated by Laura Poppick, MBARI science writing intern.

  • The Future of Ocean Exploration

    12:26

    Bioluminescent sharks, deep sea mining, seafloor vents, underwater drones, and the disturbing effects of ocean acidification highlight the near future of oceanographic discovery.
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    Video by Bryce Plank and Robin West

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    Drums of the Deep by Kevin MacLeod:
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    Featured videos:
    Mining:
    Sonar mapping:
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    Robert Ballard's EV Nautilus:
    James Cameron's Deepsea Challenger:
    Wired's profile on HOV's vs ROV's:
    Onboard the Okeanos Explorer:

    With 95% of the ocean floor unexplored, the deep sea is Earth’s last frontier.

    Its pioneers are scientists leveraging the latest technology to cast light on the massive and incomprehensibly dark environment that extends more than 35,000 feet down. Until recently, this world was known only to our planet’s most unearthly species.

    This is the story of our largest biome—and the people devoting themselves to understanding it and saving it for future generations.

    40 years ago we discovered hydrothermal vents, which act as Earth's plumbing system, transporting chemicals and extreme heat from the molten core of our planet, helping to regulate the chemical makeup of the oceans.

    But this seemingly toxic environment is still home to life. Organisms that don’t need photosynthesis to survive can live down here. And with most of the seafloor left to explore, many species remain undiscovered. Studying these unlikely ecosystems can teach us about the earliest stages of life’s evolution here on Earth, and about the possibility of life on other planets.

    That’s why NASA is working with oceanographers to help plan the mission to explore Jupiter's ice-covered moon, Europa.

    And because these vents form in active volcanic zones, they also help us better understand how landforms and moves over time.

    Plus, the sludge that’s constantly spewing from the vents contains some of the most valuable metals known to man.

    [Guardian video journalist] “In the deep ocean, where the water is as dark as ink, lie riches that no treasure hunters have managed to retrieve. They are deposits of precious minerals, from cobalt to gold, that have tantalized miners and nations for decades...”

    In 2019, a Canadian company will make the first-ever attempt at extracting these minerals. Using the latest technologies and massive, custom designed vehicles, it aims to bring up $1.5 billion worth of metals from a single site 25km off the coast of Papua New Guinea. Nautilus says it will minimize environmental damage by using infrared cameras and sonar to pinpoint the exact location of ore deposits, allowing it to shred less of the ocean floor. But environmentalists aren’t buying it. Preserving a sensitive ecosystem 8,000 feet underwater from the impact of mining is just not that simple.

    Unfortunately, we may not have much choice. There’s growing demand for these metals, but dwindling supplies of them on land. Cobalt — for instance — is used in jet engines, lithium-ion batteries, and the computer or smartphone you’re watching this video on—and the machines we made it on.

    But this age-old clash between miners and environment is really just one chapter in a much larger story of technology development—innovations aimed at maintaining the delicate balance of the increasingly threatened ocean ecosystem.

    One such tool is the EK80 broadband acoustic echo sounder. It uses a range of frequencies to paint a much more comprehensive picture of the amount and types of species living in a selected area of water.

  • How Close Are We to Completely Mapping the Ocean?

    8:11

    We’ve mapped other planets to more detail than we have our own oceans. How close are we to a complete ocean map?

    “The Swim” Playlist -

    Read More:
    The Nippon Foundation-GEBCO Seabed 2030 Project

    “Seabed 2030 is a collaborative project between the Nippon Foundation and GEBCO. It aims to bring together all available bathymetric data to produce the definitive map of the world ocean floor by 2030 and make it available to all. It builds on more than 100 years of GEBCO's history in global seafloor mapping”


    Why The First Complete Map of the Ocean Floor Is Stirring Controversial Waters
    Read more:

    “It could also be potentially lifesaving: Even today, the lack of a detailed map can be deadly, as was the case when the USS San Francisco crashed into an uncharted mountain in 2005. “People have been excited about going to different planets,” says Martin Jakobsson, professor of marine geology and geophysics at Stockholm University, but “we haven’t been able to bring the attention to our own Earth in the same way as Mars. It hasn’t been easy to rally the whole world behind us.” Yet at the same time, some ecologists fear that such a map will also aid mining industries who seek profit in the previously unattainable depths of the Earth.”

    The Ocean: Haven’t We Already Mapped It?

    “Most of the seafloor that has been mapped thoroughly is close to shore. Thanks to all of the hydrographers that constantly survey the world’s coastlines, we now have nautical charts (specialized maps) that are used to safely navigate ships. Coastal areas are well surveyed and often re-surveyed because seafloor conditions continuously change, especially close to shore. Hydrographers make sure that ships have the information they need to navigate safely by detecting and reporting new hazards to navigation with each chart update.”
    ____________________

    How close are we to colonizing the moon, mapping the human brain and curing cancer? Join Seeker as we go in search of experts, academics and innovators who are racing to solve some of humanity’s biggest scientific challenges. We’ll dive into the facts and comb through the research to find the answers you’re looking for.

    Seeker explains every aspect of our world through a lens of science, inspiring a new generation of curious minds who want to know how today’s discoveries in science, math, engineering and technology are impacting our lives, and shaping our future. Our stories parse meaning from the noise in a world of rapidly changing information.

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  • Seabed Mining in the Deep Sea

    57:45

    (Visit:
    0:16 - Main Presentation - Lisa Levin
    28:24 - Audience Discussion

    Given the growing demand for deep sea metals created by electronic and green technologies, scientists are faced with decisions about whether to engage in baseline and impacts research that enables development of a new extraction industry, and whether to contribute expertise to the development of environmental protections and guidelines. Lisa A. Levin, distinguished professor of biological oceanography at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, addresses the ethical and societal challenges of exploitation in a relatively unknown realm. Series: Exploring Ethics [6/2018] [Show ID: 32160]

  • Deep Sea Wonders Episode 5: An Ocean Of Opportunity

    9:49

    Deep Sea Wonders of the Caribbean is a five-part video series that promotes awareness of the Caribbean’s deep oceans. It features footage from an expedition by the E/V Nautilus, which was led by the renowned Professor Robert Ballard. The project which was initiated by local marine biologist, Dr. Judith Gobin who was invited onboard the ship, was executed by the National Institute of Higher Education, Research, Science and Technology (NIHERST) in collaboration with The University of the West Indies (UWI) and the Caribbean Council for Science and Technology (CCST). Footage and scientific findings at depths of 2,100 metres were uncovered for the first time in the region. The series features the following episodes:

    1. Exploring the Deep Wilderness… an introduction to deep-sea exploration in the Caribbean
    2. Beyond the Beaches… our Caribbean’s deep-sea environment and how organisms there have adapted
    3. Hot Sun Above, Cold Seeps Below… a unique look into Trinidad and Tobago’s deep ocean
    4. Grenada and the Jenny that Kicks… a unique look into Grenada’s deep ocean
    5. An Ocean of Opportunities… careers of the deep sea

  • Why Some Countries Are Delaying COVID Booster Shots

    7:17

    Some countries are planning to wait up to 12 weeks to administer second doses of COVID-19 vaccines. Will this slow the virus?

    CoVID-19 News & Updates playlist:

    Hosted by: Hank Green

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  • Flying Scientists respond to burning Marine Science questions from Queenslanders

    8:40

    In response to the COVID-19 restrictions we are very excited to announce the release of the next ‘Virtual Flying Scientists’ video for 2020. This video responds to Queenslander's burning science questions about Marine Science.

    Keep an eye out during National Science Week 2020 for more videos in this series. The Flying Scientists Initiative is provided in collaboration with the Queensland Office of the Chief Scientist. The Flying Scientists are early career researchers helping to address the shortage of science-related events convened outside South East Queensland.

    Follow us on twitter @wosqld or on facebook @wonderofscienceprogram

    Visit our website for more information:

  • Why The Deep Ocean Matters - IET EngTalks

    1:27:06

    This December our next EngTalk reveals how a golden age of discovery is underway in the deep ocean. Scientists are making remarkable insights into this last vast wilderness, uncovering its living wonders and learning how the deep makes life possible everywhere else on Earth.

    Among the reasons to safeguard the deep from humanity’s encroaching impacts are the direct benefits to be gained, including bioinspiration for new materials and medicines from the denizens of the deep.

    Join us on 9 December when we welcome Dr Helen Scales, marine biologist, broadcaster and author, who makes a compelling case for preserving the deep from exploitation, while continuing to explore this vital part of the planet.

    EngTalks shine a light on the big engineering and technology topics of today. They are delivered by inspirational individuals passionate about influencing and informing their peers and the next generation of engineers. You can find out more on our EngTalks webpage theiet.org/impact-society/engtalks

    Stay in touch for the latest updates:
    Facebook: facebook.com/TheInstitutionofEngineeringandTechnology
    Twitter: twitter.com/TheIET
    Instagram: instagram.com/theiet
    LinkedIn: linkedin.com/school/iet

  • How AI -powered Self-driving cars, drones and submarines are changing our world

    5:56

    Discover more about the AI-driven tech that is helping shape the habits, behaviour and society of today and tomorrow.
    Everything from deep-sea exploration to getting a cheeky take-away is being reimagined with some form of automation.

    Technology developers are racing to create fully autonomous machines with the ability to make decisions on their own. How many of these smart machines already exist? And how much control are we willing to transfer to them?

    With thanks to
    The Small Robot Company
    Starship Technologies


    Driverless: Who is in control? is a cutting-edge exhibition at the Science Museum exploring the world of automation through interactive exhibits, thought-provoking objects and even a retro robot car.

    Open until 5th January 2021

    0:00 INTRODUCTION
    0:50 SELF DRIVING VEHICLES
    2:58 AUTONOMOUS DRONES
    3:59 SMART UNDERWATER VEHICLES
    4:43 BOATY MCBOATFACE
    5:22 THE FUTURE

    #AI #selfdriving #robots

  • How is Technology assisting Ocean Exploration and Research | CogX 2020

    59:34

    What’s beneath the Sea, How is Technology assisting Ocean Exploration and Research

    Oliver Steeds - Chief Executive - Nekton
    Jyotika Virmani - Executive Director - Schmidt Ocean Institute



    CogX is hosted by Charlie Muirhead Co-Founder and CEO, and Co-Founder Tabitha Goldstaub.

    Find out more at:

    CogX is an award-winning Festival with its roots in artificial intelligence. The fourth edition, June 8th to 10th 2020, adds a Virtual first experience and Global Leadership Summit, and builds on the huge success of the 2019 event, which brought together over 20,000 visitors. 2020 saw over 30,000 participants including 600+ speakers across 18 topic stages and 100+ side events.

    Our theme this year, “How do we get the next 10 years right?” with aims to:

    Move the conversation forward with concrete actions
    Inspire current and future generations of leaders
    Help reframe the climate emergency as the biggest economic opportunity in the last 200 years
    Help increase understanding of the current Covid-19 pandemic and champion innovative solutions

    CogX – Global Leadership Summit and Festival of AI & Breakthrough Technology

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