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8 Medical Procedures That Are Improving Lives

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  • 8 Medical Procedures That Are Improving Lives

    5:08

    Medical technology continues to advance and help doctors continue to treat patients. From face transplants to LASIK eye surgery watch the video below for 8 medical procedures that are improving lives.

    MORE MEDICAL CONTENT:
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    #Medicine #Surgery #TechInsider

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    8 Medical Procedures That Are Improving Lives

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  • This Surgical Procedure Saves Lives By Exposing The Brain

    3:15

    This procedure exposes the brain to remove tumors. Brain tumors pose a serious challenge for surgeons. So how do we access this tumor, without injuring the adjacent healthy brain? Craniotomy is the answer. The procedure allows surgeons to access the tumor through the skull.

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    Following is the transcript of the video:

    Here's how the procedure works.

    The surgeon makes an incision in the skin over the skull. They'll often use MRI or CT scans to determine exactly where to cut. Next, they drill small holes and lift a section of skull called a bone flap. That exposes a protective layer called the dura. The neurosurgeon inserts a small microscope. Then they can safely remove the tumor. Finally, they replace the bone flap and screw it in place. The procedure might be finished, but the work is far from over.

    Complications can include; infection, seizures, swelling of brain tissue.

    Even after a successful surgery, patients can experience neurological issues.

    We have to make sure that the patient [is] continuously training the function and sometimes even relearn[ing[ these things, which might have been lost during surgery.

    It is very rewarding if you go back to the patients and you see that everything which has been discussed has been achieved. And the patient regains hope for his future life. And we were able to deliver all the excellent care we were talking about. Craniotomy has many uses beyond aiding in tumor removal. It's also used to treat aneurysms, abscesses, and epilepsy. Craniotomy can also help relieve brain pressure caused by injury.

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  • 10 First Aid Mistakes Explained by a Professional

    7:35

    Do you know how to administer first aid? Almost all of us remember some basic things about the rules of providing first aid. But is our knowledge correct, or is what we know too fragmented to be useful? Knowing basic first aid methods is very important, but it’s crucial to perform them correctly so as not to compromise the life you’re trying to save.

    TIMESTAMPS:
    Tilting your head back during a nosebleed 0:40
    Forcing a fainted person to sit up 1:29
    Putting heat on a sprain or fracture 1:59
    Trying to remove debri from your body 2:31
    Treating a burn too quickly 3:05
    Going straight into the Heimlich maneuver for choking victims 3:37
    Putting something in a seizing person’s mouth 4:10
    Prioritizing mouth-to-mouth resuscitation for heart attack victims 4:52
    Not knowing what you’re doing 5:43
    Using a tourniquet for a bleeding wound 6:17

    Music by Epidemic Sound

    SUMMARY:
    - Tilting your head back can make the blood travel from your nose to your throat, which means you could find yourself choking on or swallowing blood.
    - When someone faints, our immediate course of action is to try to sit them up, especially when shaking them doesn’t seem to be helping. Instead of all that, always start by checking their breathing and pulse.
    - Ice should be used for acute situations, like suddenly spraining your ankle. Heat is for chronic conditions, like back pain.
    - If the tool you use isn’t sterile or if you underestimate how deep the wound is, you risk getting an infection and doing further damage.
    - If the water is to actually help the skin, you need to hold the burn under it for at least 20 minutes.
    - The Red Cross has updated their guidelines on how to give first aid to choking victims, so instead of going straight for the Heimlich maneuver, here’s what you’re supposed to do instead. Stand behind the victim, lean them forward, and give their back 5 quick blows with the heel of your hand.
    - In a panic-induced state at seeing someone having a seizure, a lot of people immediately try to block the person’s mouth for fear of the victim biting their own tongue. This is actually dangerous for the victim and for the person trying to help.
    - A common mistake is to think that mouth-to-mouth resuscitation is more important than chest compressions.
    - The first line of action in all serious first aid situations is to call for help, and let a professional guide you through what you need to do.
    - If someone has a deep wound in their arm or leg, applying a tourniquet can stop the blood flow to the entire limb, which can actually starve the tissues of oxygen and possibly lead to amputation. Using a tourniquet should never be the first choice.

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  • What The COVID Vaccine Does To Your Body

    5:34

    Is the coronavirus vaccine safe? Now that the first COVID19 vaccine from Pfizer is being released, how do mRNA vaccines work?
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    There’s a lot of excitement right now around the record-speed vaccines for COVID19, some of which are already starting distribution in parts of the world. But given that these are mRNA vaccines - a relatively new technology that has not been widely used before - we wanted to explain how they work, and what happens in your body from the moment the needle touches your skin.

    Written by Gregory Brown and Mitchell Moffit
    Editing by Luka Šarlija

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  • Craniotomy and Craniectomy

    5:49

    - This 3D medical animation depicts two operations, called craniotomy and craniectomy, in which the skull is opened to access the brain. The normal anatomy of the skull and tissues surrounding the brain are shown, including arteries and veins. The animation lists the common reasons for these procedures, and briefly introduces intracranial pressure.

    Video ID: ANH13109


    Transcript:

    Your doctor may recommend a craniotomy or a craniectomy procedure to treat a number of different brain diseases, injuries, or conditions.

    Your skull is made of bone and serves as a hard, protective covering for your brain. Just inside your skull, three layers of tissue, called meninges, surround your brain. The thick, outermost layer is the dura mater. The middle tissue layer is the arachnoid mater and the innermost layer is the pia mater. Between the arachnoid mater and the pia mater is the subarachnoid space, which contains blood vessels and a clear fluid called cerebrospinal fluid. Blood vessels, called bridging veins, connect the surface of your brain with the dura mater. Other blood vessels, called cerebral arteries, bring blood to your brain.

    Inside your skull, normal brain function requires a delicate balance of pressure between the blood in your blood vessels, the cerebrospinal fluid that surrounds your brain, and your brain tissue. This is called normal intracranial pressure. Increased intracranial pressure may result from: brain tumors, head injuries, problems with your blood vessels, or infections in your brain or spinal cord. These conditions put pressure on your brain and may cause it to swell or change shape inside your skull, which can lead to serious brain injury.

    Your doctor may recommend a craniotomy to remove: abnormal brain tissue, such as a brain tumor, a sample of tissue by biopsy, a blood clot, called a hematoma, excess cerebrospinal fluid, or pus from an infection, called an abscess.

    A craniotomy may also be done to: relieve brain swelling,
    stop bleeding, called a hemorrhage, repair abnormal blood vessels, repair skull fractures, or repair damaged meninges.

    Finally, a craniotomy may also be done to: treat brain conditions, such as epilepsy, deliver medication to your brain, or implant a medical device, such as a deep brain stimulator.

    The most common reason for a craniotomy is to remove a brain tumor.

  • Nutrition for a Healthy Life

    4:26

    Constant exposure to our environment, the things we eat, and stresses from both inside and outside our bodies all cause us to age over time. This film explores those biological processes of aging, how we can maintain health throughout our lives with healthy lifestyles, and how scientists are learning more about the specific nutrients that can positively impact health.

    Learn more about agingresearch.org/NutritionFilms

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  • Medical Treatments and Beyond with Prof. David Veale

    1:2:42

  • Nebuliser Therapy Training from Intersurgical

    14:35

    The Nebuliser Therapy Training video from Intersurgical looks at how a jet nebuliser works, nebuliser delivery systems, nebuliser performance factors and where nebulisers are used. For further information or to make an enquiry visit our website

  • Improving the Lives of People with Sickle Cell Disease

    1:1:11

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) describes a group of inherited disorders that can cause red blood cells to develop in an abnormal rigid sickle or crescent shape. In addition to sudden, excruciating pain events known as pain crises, SCD can lead to strokes, organ damage, joint and bone problems, and other severe health consequences.

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  • 8 Best Things to do After a Workout

    11:52

    These are 8 things you should do after your gym/home workouts. By taking these steps you'll be impressed with your improved recovery rate and strength levels. Find out exactly how things like cold showers, supplementation post-workout, and foam-rolling can all improve your workout experience. Also learn the best foods to eat after a workout to maximize recovery, strength, and size gains.
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    Whether you want to burn fat or build muscle, your workout is just one piece of the puzzle. You'll definitely want to do certain things after your workout to maximize recovery and speed up your progress. And this can range from eating certain foods and taking specific supplements all the way to manipulating your body temperature in order to boost recovery and strength.

    So I'm going to go over all that today starting first with one of my favorite things to do after any workout and that's contrast therapy. Essentially you would expose a limb or your entire body to a hot temperature for a period of time, and then you would immediately expose it to a very cold temperature for a period of time... and you would repeat this process several times. In very interesting study researchers compared contrast therapy to things like cold water immersion, hot water immersion, passive recovery, stretching, and active recovery (13).

    Keep in mind all of these things are believed to be helpful with reducing soreness and speeding up recovery. But researchers found that contrast therapy led to greater improvements in the areas of muscle soreness and post-recovery strength levels than every other recovery method. It also reduced muscle inflammation, improved mobility, and muscle range of motion significantly. This means that contrast therapy can help you recover from workouts faster than almost any other method.

    Now the easiest way to perform contrast therapy that anyone can do starting today is by switching between a very cold and hot shower. You can switch back and forth, doing a minute of each for a total of ten minutes. However, my personal favorite way to do this is by using a sauna in combination with an ice plunge. You would get your body really warmed up in a sauna by staying in there for at least a few minutes and then once you're really warmed up you would jump into the ice plunge, which is basically freezing cold water. Now if you don't have access to an ice plunge you can do something similar by using the sauna at your gym and then immediately taking a cold shower for at least a minute and then doing that back and forth for a few rounds. If on the other hand, you do want to try an ice plunge you can find one in most traditional Russian and Korean bathhouses.   

    The next thing you'll want to do after a workout is instead of having a sports drink like vitamin water, drink some Tart Cherry Juice because it's specifically great at reducing post-workout muscle soreness. Multiple studies show that consuming tart cherry after resistance training reduces muscle protein breakdown and muscle soreness while speeding up the rate of recovery. (1) One of these studies was specifically focused on eccentric exercise. For those of you that don't know the eccentric portion of an exercise is when you extend and elongate the muscle as opposed to the concentric portion which is when you contract and shorten the muscle. So for example with exercises like bench press, bicep curls, and squats the eccentric portion would be when you're lowering the weight down.

    Although both concentric and eccentric ranges of motion will break down muscle tissue, the eccentric portion is believed to do the most muscle damage in the form of microscopic tears. So this study was especially interesting because it aimed to find out if tart cherry consumption before and after eccentric exercise would have a protective effect on muscle damage symptoms. (2) So they set up the experiment by having college students either drink twelve ounces of a tart cherry juice blend or a placebo twice a day, once in the morning and once at night for eight days straight. And the scientists found that the group taking the placebo still had a strength loss of 30% even 24 hours after finished the eccentric exercise. And after 96 hours they still had a 12% reduction in strength in the muscles targeted with the eccentric exercise. On the other hand, the group taking the tart cherry juice instead of the placebo only experienced a 12% strength loss after 24 hours and after 96 hours they actually had a 6 percent strength boost above baseline. So in other words, the tart cherry juice reduced strength losses after their workout and helped them recover faster. The reason that tart cherries provide these benefits is that they contain special flavonoids and anthocyanins, which are a group of substances that have antioxidant effects on the body...

  • Pregnancy and Cardiovascular Disease April 8, 2021

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    LIVESTREAM RECORDING
    APRIL 8, 2021
    GRAND ROUNDS CONFERENCE

    Pregnancy and Cardiovascular Disease: Multidisciplinary Approach and Personalized Care

    Houston Methodist DeBakey Heart & Vascular Center, Grand Rounds Conference featuring Valeria Duarte, MD, as she discusses her presentation, Pregnancy and Cardiovascular Disease: Multidisciplinary Approach and Personalized Care.

    SPEAKER:
    Valeria Duarte, MD
    Cardiologist
    Adult Congenital Heart Disease. Advanced Cardiac Imaging
    Houston Methodist DeBakey Heart & Vascular Center, Houston Methodist Hospital

    INTRODUCTION:
    Karla M. Kurrelmeyer, MD, FACC, FASE
    Medical Director, Department of Cardiology
    Associate Professor of Clinical Cardiology, Academic Institute
    Assistant Clinical Member, Research Institute
    Houston Methodist DeBakey Heart & Vascular Center, Houston Methodist Hospital

    ** This medical education program may contain graphic content. **
    _________________________________

    A DeBakey CV Education event

    Presented by Houston Methodist DeBakey Heart & Vascular Center.

    Building on Dr. Michael E. DeBakey’s commitment to excellence in education, Houston Methodist DeBakey CV Education is an epicenter for cardiovascular academic and clinical educational programs that support the provision of optimal care to patients suffering from cardiovascular conditions and diseases.

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    DeBakey CV Education:


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    Want concise, relevant reviews of the hottest topics in CV medicine? Subscribe for FREE to the Methodist DeBakey Cardiovascular Journal for quarterly, peer-reviewed issues delivered to your door.

  • Shoulder Surgery Rehab: Exercises for 7-12 Weeks After Surgery| Martin Kelley, DPT of Penn Rehab

    9:54

    Martin Kelley, DPT of Penn Rehab reviews a number of progressive exercises for the second phase of recovery, six weeks after shoulder surgery including: extensions, internal rotations, horizontal abductions, resistance, and single-arm raise inclines.

    #ShoulderSurgery #ShoulderRehab #PennMedicine

    0:00 - Introductions
    0:24 - Exercise 1: Shoulder Extension
    1:17 - Exercise 2: Shoulder Internal Rotation
    2:17 - Exercise 3: Horizontal Abduction
    3:26 - Exercise 4: Stick Device Resistance
    5:53 - Exercise 5: Arm Extensions
    6:52 - Exercise 6: Table Slide
    7:23 - Exercise 7: Ball Rolls
    8:32 - Exercise 8: Single Arm Raise Incline
    9:33 - Conclusion

  • Live COVID-19 Question / Answer with Roger Seheult, MD - June 7, 2020

    57:56

    We're gathering your COVID-19 questions from the week to ask Dr. Seheult, and we will respond to new questions during the live-stream.

    Join us at for the full video library and CME / CEUs for clinicians.

    Speakers:
    Roger Seheult, MD
    Co-Founder and Lead Instructor at
    Board Certified in Internal Medicine, Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine
    Associate Clinical Professor at the University of California, Riverside School of Medicine

    Kyle Allred, PA
    Co-Founder and Producer at
    Conference Director

    Quick links to some recent COVID 19 updates:
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 80: COVID-19 Retractions & Data (Hydroxychloroquine, ACE Inhibitors):
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 79: COVID-19 Vaccines to Keep an Eye On - mRNA, Antigen, Others:
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 78: Mask Controversy; Vaccine Update for COVID-19
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 77: Remdesivir Update; COVID-19 in Mexico
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 76: Antibody Testing False Positives in COVID-19:
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 75: COVID-19 Lung Autopsies - New Data:
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 74: Vitamin D & COVID 19; Academic Censorship:
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 73: Relapse, Reinfections, & Re-Positives - The Likely Explanation:
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 72: Dentists; Diabetes; Sensitivity of COVID-19 Antibody Tests:
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 71: New Data on Adding Zinc to Hydroxychloroquine + Azithromycin:
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 70: Glutathione Deficiency, Oxidative Stress, and COVID 19:
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 69: NAC Supplementation and COVID-19 (N-Acetylcysteine):
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 68: Kawasaki Disease; Minority Groups & COVID-19:
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 67: COVID-19 Blood Clots - Race, Blood Types, & Von Willebrand Factor:
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 66: ACE-Inhibitors and ARBs - Hypertension Medications with COVID-19:
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 65: COVID-19 and Oxidative Stress (Prevention & Risk Factors):
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 64: Remdesivir COVID-19 Treatment Update:
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 63: Is COVID-19 a Disease of the Endothelium (Blood Vessels and Clots)?
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 62: Treatment with Famotidine (Pepcid)?
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 61: Blood Clots & Strokes in COVID-19; ACE-2 Receptor; Oxidative Stress:
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 60: Hydroxychloroquine Update; NYC Data; How Widespread is COVID-19?
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 59: Dr. Seheult's Daily Regimen (Vitamin D, C, Zinc, Quercetin, NAC):
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 58: Testing; Causes of Hypoxemia in COVID-19 (V/Q vs Shunt vs Diffusion):
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 57: Remdesivir Treatment Update and Can Far-UVC Disinfect Public Spaces?
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 56: What is “Forest Bathing” & Can It Boost Immunity Against Viruses?

  • Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Current Treatments and Future Therapies

    59:02

    Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) affects millions of people and can lead to vision loss. Prompt treatment for the “wet form” of AMD is important to prevent permanent vision changes. Dr. Do discussed treatments and future therapeutic areas.
    Speaker: Diana V. Do, MD

  • JDRF Virtual Type 1 Diabetes Discovery Event: Research Deep Dive - 23 June 2020

    1:25:39

    Discover the latest progress in type 1 diabetes research, listen to JDRF-funded researchers talking about current projects, and watch a panel discussion between Dr Gavin Bewick, Dr Eleni Beli, Kris Wood and JDRF's Director of Research Partnerships, Rachel Connor.

    7.30 pm – Welcome – Sadie Munro, Fundraising Development Manager, JDRF (recording starts)

    7.35 pm – JDRF’s research overview – Conor McKeever, Research Communications Manager, JDRF.

    7.50 pm – JDRF free resources available – Abbie Burrell-Rann, Community Engagement Officer, JDRF.

    7.55 pm – Supporting JDRF from home: Virtual Events – Sadie Munro, Fundraising Development Manager, JDRF.

    8 – 8.05 pm – Comfort break

    8.06 pm – Welcome back – Sadie Munro, Fundraising Development Manager, JDRF.

    8.07 pm – Panel Discussion – with Dr Gavin Bewick, Dr Eleni Beli and Kris Wood. The discussion will be chaired by Rachel Connor.

    9 pm – Thanks and close.

    Once you have registered for the event password protected joining details will be sent out to you the day before the event.

    Rachel Connor

    Rachel is JDRF’s Director of Research Partnerships. She works with the UK type 1 diabetes research community to make sure as many good research ideas get funded as possible, developing partnerships between JDRF and other organisations who might not always focus on type 1 diabetes. Working closely with international colleagues, she makes sure that unique research opportunities in the UK can be developed in line with JDRF’s global research strategy.

    Dr Gavin Bewick

    Gavin is Reader in Endocrinology and Metabolism at King’s College London. For his JDRF research, Dr Bewick is exploring ways to improve the health, performance and number of beta cells in the body, so that people with type 1 can be less reliant on insulin pumps and injections – or even, one day, live without them completely.

    Dr Eleni Beli

    Eleni is a JDRF Advanced Postdoctoral Fellow, based at Queen’s University Belfast. She is researching the causes of diabetic retinopathy, a common complication of type 1 diabetes. Her research will look at whether having type 1 affects the daily cycle of the immune system and, if so, if that is linked to the development of retinopathy. The research could lead to a better understanding of how – or, in this case, when – to treat retinopathy to have the best results.

    Kris Wood

    Kris has lived with type 1 diabetes for 8 years. He has taken part in a number of research trials which have focused on a potential vaccine, a treatment to delay onset (prolong honeymoon period) and a treatment for diabetic neuropathy complications. He also summited Kilimanjaro in 2014 with 19 other T1Ds.

    Conor McKeever

    Conor is JDRF’s Research Communications Manager. He works closely with JDRF-funded researchers to communicate their work to supporters, staff and the general public. Across print, web, social media and events, he aims to raise awareness of – and money for – JDRF’s research programme.

  • Vitamin D and COVID 19: The Evidence for Prevention and Treatment of Coronavirus

    1:24

    Professor Roger Seheult, MD explains the important role Vitamin D may have in the prevention and treatment of COVID-19. Dr. Seheult is the lead professor at
    Dr. Seheult illustrates how Vitamin D works, summarizes the best available data and clinical trials on vitamin D, and discusses vitamin D dosage recommendations.

    Roger Seheult, MD is Co-Founder of MedCram and an Associate Professor at the University of California, Riverside School of Medicine and Assistant Prof. at Loma Linda University School of Medicine. He is Quadruple Board Certified: Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Disease, Critical Care, & Sleep Medicine

    Interviewer: Kyle Allred, Producer & Co-Founder of MedCram.com

    REFERENCES:

    The National Human Activity Pattern Survey (NHAPS)... (J. of Exposure A. and Env. Epidem.) |

    Aging decreases the capacity of human skin to produce vitamin D3 (The J. of Clin. Invest.) |

    Racial differences in the relationship between vitamin D... (Osteoporosis Int.) |

    Decreased bioavailability of vitamin D in obesity (The American J of Clin. Nutrition) |

    Vitamin D Insufficiency and Deficiency and Mortality from Respiratory Diseases ... (Nutrients) |

    Vitamin D supplementation to prevent acute respiratory tract infections: systematic review and meta-analysis... (BMJ) |

    Randomized trial of vitamin D supplementation to prevent seasonal influenza A... (The American J.of Clin. Nutrition) |

    Vitamin D and SARS-CoV-2 infection... (Irish J. of Med. Sci.) |

    Factors associated with COVID-19-related death... (Nature) |

    Editorial: low population mortality from COVID-19 ... (Alimentary Pharm. & Therap.) |

    The role of vitamin D in the prevention of coronavirus ... (Aging Clin. & Exper. Res.) |

    25-Hydroxyvitamin D Concentrations Are Lower in Patients with ... SARS-CoV-2 (Nutrients) |

    Vitamin D deficiency in COVID-19: Mixing up cause and consequence (Metabolism) |

    Low plasma 25(OH) vitamin D level... increased risk of COVID-19... (The FEBS J.) |

    The link between vitamin D deficiency and Covid-19... |

    SARS-CoV-2 positivity rates... with circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels (PLOS One) |

    Vitamin D status and outcomes for... COVID-19 (Post. Med. J.) |

    Vitamin D Deficiency and Outcome of COVID-19... (Nutrients) |

    “Effect of calcifediol treatment...” (J. of Steroid Bio. Molec. Bio.) |

    Vitamin D and survival in COVID-19 patients... (J. of Steroid Bio. Molec. Bio.) |

    Effect of Vitamin D3 ... vs Placebo on Hospital Length of Stay...: A Multicenter, Double-blind, RCT |

    Short term, high-dose vitamin D... for COVID-19 disease: RCT [SHADE study] (Postgrad. Med. Journal) |

    Association of Vitamin D Status... With COVID-19 Test Results (JAMA Network Open) |

    Evaluation, treatment, and prevention of vitamin D deficiency: an Endocrine Society clinical practice guideline (JCEM) |

    Vitamin D Fortification of Fluid Milk ... A Review (Nutrients) |

    Analysis of vitamin D level among asymptomatic and critically ill COVID-19 patients... (Scientific Reports from the Journal Nature) |

    MEDCRAM.COM

    Visit us for videos on over 60 medical topics and CME / CEs for clinicians:
    All coronavirus updates are at MedCram.com (COVID-19 developments, cholecalciferol, vitamin d benefits, vitamin D biochemistry, vitamin B12 etc.)

    Media contact:

    MedCram medical videos are for medical education and exam preparation, and NOT intended to replace recommendations from your doctor.
    #COVID19 #SARSCoV2 #VitaminD

  • Helping Kids with Severe Eczema

    3:00

    A research team from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases has found that wet wrap therapy combined with education on long-term skin care can dramatically improve the lives of children with severe eczema.

  • Say This, Not That: Patient Experience Video

    16:08

    Healthcare lingo can be confusing and intimidating. With any communication it is not what you say, but how you say it. Providing patient care that means more and confuses less, can be as simple as knowing the right thing to say or not to say.

  • Improving C-Section Recovery: The ERAS Program Helps You Heal

    3:29

    What is C-section recovery like? In this video, we walk you through the Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) program used at the Von Voigtlander Women’s Hospital at Michigan Medicine to aid women when recovering from cesarean surgery. The ERAS program is designed to help you heal more quickly, manage your pain more effectively and get you up and active post C-section as soon as possible. By focusing on three main areas; pain management, eating and drinking, and getting you moving while you are still healing, Michigan Medicine is here for you every step of the way with information, education and support as you go through your childbirth journey.

    How long do you have to wait to drink fluids, eat food, or drive a car? When can you start working out again? Is post C-section pain normal? When can you actually lift your baby? If you’ve just had a C-section, or have one planned, it’s likely that questions like these are among those racing through your head. While common, cesarean sections are serious operations, and there is a lot to consider, particularly when it comes to healing. Michigan Medicine has you covered on everything you need to know to navigate your pregnancy, delivery and postpartum healing.

    Check out Michigan Medicine's childbirth resources:


    Learn more about prenatal and childbirth care from Michigan Medicine's nationally ranked Von Voigtlander Women's Hospital team:


    View a list of locations where our childbirth providers see patients:

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    #csectionrecovery #postcsection #csectiondelivery #csection

  • Environmental Hygiene: Best Practices to Use When Cleaning and Disinfecting Patient Rooms

    8:43

    We are pleased to announce a new video resource you can use to compliment the infection prevention education program in your organization—Environmental Hygiene: Best Practices to Use When Cleaning and Disinfecting Patient Rooms. This free, 10-minute video was developed to highlight key environmental cleaning best practices that should be used in all healthcare settings. Make sure your environmental services team is equipped with the tools they need to provide a clean and safe environment for your patients, visitors, and workforce.

    This video was made possible through collaboration between the Oregon Patient Safety Commission and the Oregon Healthcare-Associated Infection Program at the Oregon Health Authority, with funding made possible (in part) by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Epidemiology and Laboratory Capacity Grant. The views expressed do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the Department of Health and Human Services, nor does the mention of trade names, commercial practices, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

    Spanish translations for the Infection Prevention Education video series are all available on the Oregon Patient Safety Commission YouTube Channel:

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  • What Is Ejection Fraction And Its Link To Heart Failure?

    2:02

    In this whiteboard session, Robert Hobbs, MD, cardiologist in Cleveland Clinic's Section of Heart Failure and Transplantation Medicine at the Heart & Vascular Institute, outlines what the ejection fraction is, normal to severe ejection fraction ranges (how well the heart squeezes) and its correlation to heart failure.

  • LIVE: George Floyd murder trial continues for Derek Chauvin former police officer accused

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    #GeorgeFloydMurdertrial #GeorgeFloyd #DerekChauvin
    George Floyd murder trial continues for Derek Chauvin former police officer accused.
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  • JDRF Virtual Type 1 Diabetes Discovery Event: Type 1 Diabetes, Food and Nutrition - 13 October 2020

    1:44:57

    Watch our virtual Discovery Event to find out more about type 1 diabetes, food and nutrition, with guest speakers Steven Ponder, creator and author of 'Sugar Surfing', and Aisling Pigott Jones.

    Stephen is a Paediatric Endocrinologist, who also lives with his own type 1 diabetes diagnosis. Joining us too is Aisling Pigott Jones, Paediatric Diabetes Dietitian, Aisling Pigott Jones, who offers advice and tips on food and nutrition for people living with type 1.

    JDRF Virtual Discovery Events are also a chance to virtually meet other families and individuals affected by type 1 diabetes, and to hear the latest progress in type 1 diabetes research. These events are free of charge to join.

    Find out when the next free Virtual Discovery Event is, at: jdrf.org.uk/discoverydays

  • 8 surprising ways to reduce your risk of heart disease

    1:30

    See how getting a dog could help prevent heart disease, plus more heart-friendly habits you can adopt today. Get more healthy living tips from the Mayo Clinic App:

  • Hip Replacement: A Patient Guide

    58:24

    This guide provides patients, their families, and loved ones, with information they'll need before, during, and after hip replacement surgery.

  • Stress and COVID 19: Improving The Immune System, Anxiety, and Depression

    51:28

    Professor Seheult, MD details fascinating research and links between stress, anxiety, depression, and our immune systems including:
    How do Olympic athletes optimize health in preparation for competition?
    How do stress, anxiety, and depression impact our immunity at the cellular level?
    What are the implications of this for COVID-19?

    (This video was recorded on March 8, 2021)

    Roger Seheult, MD is the co-founder and lead professor at
    He is Board Certified in Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Disease, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine and an Associate Professor at the University of California, Riverside School of Medicine.


    TOPICS IN THIS VIDEO INCLUDE:

    00:00 Overview of topics covered by Dr. Seheult
    00:36 Impact of COVID-19 on mental health for patients and healthcare workers
    02:22 Data on anxiety and depression during the COVID-19 pandemic
    03:35 Criteria used to measure and diagnose depression
    04:33 Connections between depression, anxiety, and the immune system
    06:52 Research on how stress, fear, and anxiety affect immune system function and physiology
    17:00 Discovery of “inflammasomes,” their role in the immune system, and how exercise helps
    21:12 Exercise to boost the immune system
    22:55 Why exercise intensity matters: moderate versus heavy exertion
    29:35 How elite athletes keep their immune systems robust
    36:10 Obesity and increased risk of infections and inflammation
    37:57 Post-exercise carbohydrates and inflammation reduction
    39:15 Polyphenols from fruits and vegetables have anti-inflammatory, antiviral, antioxidative and immune cell signaling effects
    40:35 Study on exercise reducing depression and inflammation in university students
    46:09 When not to exercise during COVID-19 pandemic
    47:08 Studies and recommendations on cardiopulmonary considerations for student-athletes
    50:23 Summary of topics covered, and can saunas have the same positive immune benefits as moderate exercise?


    LINKS / REFERENCES:

    Top E.R. Doctor Who Treated Virus Patients Dies by Suicide (NYT) |

    Association of Home Quarantine and Mental Health Among Teenagers in Wuhan, China, During the COVID-19 Pandemic (JAMA) |

    Chronic stress, glucocorticoid receptor resistance, inflammation, and disease risk (PNAS) |

    Synergistic effects of psychological and immune stressors on inflammatory cytokine and sickness responses in humans (Science Direct) |

    Anxiety about coronavirus can increase the risk of infection — but exercise can help (The Conversation) |

    NLRP3 inflammasome-driven pathways in depression: Clinical and preclinical findings (Science Direct) |

    The inflammasome: Pathways linking psychological stress, depression, and systemic illnesses (Brain, Behavior, and Immunity) |

    The compelling link between physical activity and the body's defense system (Science Direct) |

    Exercise reduces depression and inflammation but intensity matters (Science Direct) |

    Cardiopulmonary Considerations for High School Student-Athletes During the COVID-19 Pandemic: NFHS-AMSSM Guidance Statement (SAGE) |


    THE MEDCRAM WEBSITE:

    Visit us for videos on over 60 medical topics and CME / CEs for medical professionals.

    All coronavirus updates are available at MedCram.com (including more discussion on COVID stress, anxiety, mental health awareness, and depression).


    MEDCRAM WORKS WITH MEDICAL PROGRAMS AND HOSPITALS:

    MedCram offers group discounts for students and a variety of medical programs, hospitals, and other institutions. Contact us at customers@medcram.com if you are interested.


    MEDIA CONTACT:

    Media Contact: customers@medcram.com
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    Video Produced by Kyle Allred

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    DISCLAIMER:

    MedCram medical videos are for medical education and exam preparation, and NOT intended to replace recommendations from your doctor.
    #COVID19 #SARSCoV2 #MentalHealth

  • 8 Prosthetic Devices Changing Lives

    3:34

    Prostheses improve lives and give greater independence to their wearers. Technological advances and prosthetic companies are making them even better.

    MORE INNOVATIVE INVENTIONS CONTENT:
    Meet The 24-Year-Old Whose Prosthetic Limbs Are Changing Lives

    8 Medical Procedures That Are Improving Lives

    Ford’s Delivery Robot Walks On Two Legs Like A Human


    ------------------------------------------------------

    #Prosthetics #3DPrinting #TechInsider

    Tech Insider tells you all you need to know about tech: gadgets, how-to's, gaming, science, digital culture, and more.

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    8 Prosthetic Devices Changing Lives

  • Medical procedures that are improving life.

    6:13

    Medical procedures that are improving life.



    Medical procedures that are improving life





    #medicaldevices, medical devices manufacturing, medical devices business, medical devices engineering, medical devices for home, medical devices john oliver, medical devices amendment rules 2020, medical devices india, medical devices industry, medical devices sales

    #medicalprocedures for nurses, #medical procedures that are improving lives, medical procedures for nurses in hindi, medical procedures for medical assistants, medical procedures animation, medical procedures to remove belly fat, medical procedures that are saving lives, fear of medical procedures, simple medical procedures, hypnosis for medical procedures

  • What Its Like To Get Laser Eye Surgery

    11:01

    Published on Nov 16, 2019
    Business Insider's Michelle Yan has been nearsighted since she was 9 years old. After laser eye surgery, she has 20/20. She walks us through the pre-surgery steps, the actual surgery, as well as the recovery process.

    MORE MEDICAL TECH:
    8 Medical Procedures That Are Improving Lives

    13 Medical Procedures Changing The Health World

    Lifelike Medical Robot Actually Bleeds


    ------------------------------------------------------

    #Lasik #Surgery #TechInsider

    Tech Insider tells you all you need to know about tech: gadgets, how-to's, gaming, science, digital culture, and more.

    Visit us at:
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    What It's Like To Get Laser Eye Surgery
    Category
    Science & Technology

  • Comfort Positioning for Medical Procedures

    22:34

    Medical procedures represent some of the most stressful and potentially traumatizing aspects of pediatric health care. From immunizations to catheterizations to even simple ear exams, young children often demonstrate fear and anxiety and struggle to hold still. One proven technique used to comfort children during medical procedures, making the procedure easier for child, family, and medical staff, involves the use of comfort positions or comfort holds. This video, created by the Child Life Department at Dell Children's Medical Center, demonstrates the effectiveness of positioning for procedures and provides examples of specific techniques.

  • DD CARES Best Practices: Adapting medical procedures for patients with DD

    5:29

    Part of the DD CARES Best Practices series on improving primary care, emergency care and community follow-up, this video demonstrates common practice errors as well as strategies that can help a patient with a developmental disability tolerate a difficult procedure.

  • NHS Improving Lives through Better Diagnosis - BHRUT

    4:39

    Find out how BHRUT has improved both the outcomes and experiences of cancer patients through enhanced diagnosis.

  • Team Clotting episode 3: future treatments for haemophilia A

    2:18

    People with haemophilia A who have developed inhibitors to factor VIII have a particular challenge in managing the condition, running the risk of life-threatening bleeding on a daily basis. In episode three of our “Team Clotting” animated series, learn about the future prospects for haemophilia A treatment and new approaches that could help people who suffer from this disease.

    Haemophilia A is an inherited bleeding disorder in which a person’s blood doesn't clot properly due to a lack or insufficient levels of a blood-clotting protein known as factor VIII. Roche is developing novel approaches in the hopes of advancing management of this serious disorder.
    To learn more about haemophilia, visit

    Subscribe to our YouTube channel now:

    Get in touch with us:






    Roche has been committed to improving lives since the company was founded in 1896 in Basel, Switzerland. Today, Roche creates innovative medicines and diagnostic tests that help millions of patients globally.

    Roche is a leader in research-focused healthcare with combined strengths in pharmaceuticals and diagnostics. Roche is the world’s largest biotech company, with truly differentiated medicines in oncology, immunology, infectious diseases, ophthalmology and neuroscience.

    For more information and insights visit:

  • DD CARES Best Practices: Adapting medical procedures for patients with developmental disabilities

    6:11

    Part of the DD CARES Best Practices series on improving primary care, emergency care and community follow-up, this video demonstrates common practice errors as well as strategies that can help a patient with a developmental disability tolerate a difficult procedure.

  • 30th Anniversary Scientific Symposium: “Advancing Science, Improving Lives: A Window to the Future”

    2:22:26

    This scientific symposium concluded the commemoration of NINR's 30th Anniversary. It featured distinguished scientific speakers and include panel discussions on the science of sleep and precision health.

    The event brought together scientists, healthcare professionals, and members of the public to examine the advancements in nursing science that build the foundation for clinical practice and enhance the health of the nation.

    Speakers Included:

    Patricia A. Grady, PhD, RN, Director, NINR; Afaf I. Meleis, PhD, DrPS(hon), FAAN, Professor of Nursing and Sociology, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing; David F. Dinges, PhD, Director of the Unit for Experimental Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine; Nancy Redeker, PhD, RN, FAHA, FAAN, Beatrice Renfield Term Professor of Nursing, Yale University School of Nursing; Terri Weaver, PhD, RN, FAAN, Dean, The University of Illinois at Chicago College of Nursing; Yvette Conley, PhD, Vice Chair for Research, Health Promotion & Development, University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing; Bernice L. Coleman, RN, PhD, Assistant Professor in Biomedical Sciences and Translational Medicine and Acute Care Nurse Practitioner, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles; Jessica M. Gill, PhD, RN, Tenure-Track Investigator and Lasker Clinical Research Scholar, NINR Division of Intramural Research.

  • Ordinary Medicine: Extraordinary Treatments, Longer Lives and Where to Draw the Line

    1:16:15

    (Visit:
    0:15 - Introductions
    1:53 - Main Talk
    1:02:57 - Q & A

    Where is the line between ‘enough’ and ‘too much’ treatment? That is the topic of Sharon Kaufman's book that explores how any technology or practice that prevents death became the ordinary standard of care. She and palliative care doctor Dawn Gross discuss how improving technologies for extending life intensify debates about the issues surrounding aging and dying. Recorded on 05/25/2017. Series: UCSF Osher Center for Integrative Medicine presents Mini Medical School for the Public [9/2017] [Show ID: 32348]

  • The Point: Medical services greatly improved in Xinjiang

    23:47

    For more:


    In this episode, Liu Xin interviewed Kaiser Abdukerim, president of Xinjiang Medical University. He said the infant mortality rate in Xinjiang has significantly dropped, as part of the region's family planning program, and access to medical care for everyone has also soared over the past few decades.

    Subscribe to us on YouTube:
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  • Team Clotting episode 2: introducing inhibitors to fight haemophilia A

    2:28

    The formation of a blood clot is an important process that stops a person from bleeding, but it only happens if all members of your body’s “clotting team” are working together. In episode two of our “Team Clotting” animated series, learn about the impact of inhibitors to factor VIII on the treatment of haemophilia A.

    Haemophilia A is an inherited bleeding disorder where a person’s blood doesn't clot properly due to a lack or insufficient levels of a blood-clotting protein known as factor VIII. Roche is developing novel approaches in the hopes of advancing management of this serious disorder.
    To learn more about haemophilia, visit

    Subscribe to our YouTube channel now:

    Get in touch with us:






    Roche has been committed to improving lives since the company was founded in 1896 in Basel, Switzerland. Today, Roche creates innovative medicines and diagnostic tests that help millions of patients globally.

    Roche is a leader in research-focused healthcare with combined strengths in pharmaceuticals and diagnostics. Roche is the world’s largest biotech company, with truly differentiated medicines in oncology, immunology, infectious diseases, ophthalmology and neuroscience.

    For more information and insights visit:

  • Parkinsons Tremors Controlled by Deep Brain Stimulation Procedure

    1:29

    Steve suffered from Parkinson's over the course of 8 years. As the disease progressed, the tremors got worse interfering with many aspects of his day-to-day life. Unable to control the tremors through medication, Steve and his wife researched deep brain stimulation (DBS). DBS implants electrodes in the brain releasing electrical impulses to regulate abnormal impulses. Once Steve was able to get comfortable with having the surgery, he came to University Hospitals to have the device implanted in his brain.

    To learn more about DBS and our Movement Disorders Center at UH, visit:

  • Forensic Medicine Review | Class 8| Legal Procedure and Medical Law and Ethics

    59:38

    #Forensic_Medicine

    Topic:Legal procedure and Medical Law and ethics

    Subject : Forensics medicine
    Series :45 minutes review class on Forensic Medicine
    Class no:8th
    Guest: Adrita mourin
    Sylhet MAG Osmani College

    Session:2016-17
    Hons in Forensic Medicine

    Host: Khandaker Alima Ive
    Rajshahi Medical College
    Session:2017-18


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  • How technology is making a difference in SA

    8:53

    Hear leading metro clinicians describe how using telehealth is making a difference to their patients throughout rural and regional South Australia, and how the latest developments of tablet-based home services such as tele-monitoring and home based tele-rehab, along with advancements in point of care testing, is changing and improving lives.

  • Improving health and improving lives with LabCorp

    1:33

    Learn how our talented team of nearly 65,000 are making a difference for patients when it counts. No matter your role, as part of the LabCorp enterprise, you’ll improve health and improve lives across the globe.

  • Improving lives: Engaging employees in healthcare communications

    18:13

    Patrick Hoggard, Vice President of Medical and Scientific Services at Zoetic Science, Ashfield Healthcare, describes how Ashfield support the career development of their staff and the benefits that can come with working for a large-scale organisation.

    Recorded 1 February 2017 at a MedComms Networking event in Oxford. Produced by NetworkPharma.tv

    = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =

    ABSTRACT:

    Ashfield Healthcare comprises a large-scale network of communications agencies, specialist centres of excellence (for example PR, creative and marketing, and events management) and collaborators, enabling a broad array of integrated, multichannel services. For employees, being part of this larger network gives many benefits. You are part of an expert, multifaceted team, offering opportunities for collaboration and working on a wide range of different projects. Offices around the world enable client work across time zones, and there is flexibility in terms of work location and hours. Twenty 20 per cent of Ashfield employees work part-time for three or four days a week.

    Ashfield make significant investments into their leadership and management programmes, to ensure that managers are enabled to coach and stretch their people to bring out the best in them. Each employee on the digital and creative sides is given 100 hours a year, i.e. three weeks, ‘Lab time’, in which they are free to investigate any area of interest that is of value to the business, and are provided with follow-on support to take their ideas forward. Bespoke training, mentoring and coaching are provided for all employees, and a full-time training manager oversees core group and individual employee training. In 2015/16, Ashfield ran 35 training courses. Besides leadership and management, these covered industry knowledge, business skills and marketing skills. Digital skills training is soon to be added to the mix.

    Written by Penny Gray, Freelance Medical Writer

    = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =

    We are building a library of free webcasts, like this one, for the global MedComms Community and others at and we’d welcome your suggestions for new topics and speakers.

    Full details of this MedComms Networking event are at

    Patrick’s presentation (PDF format) is at

    Patrick’s Linkedin page is at

    More about Ashfield Healthcare Communications can be found at

    Filming and technical direction by Mario Crispino, Freelance Cameraman & Editor

    [For the avoidance of doubt: this video is intended to be freely accessible to all. Please feel free to share and use however you like. Cheers, Peter Llewellyn, Director NetworkPharma Ltd and Founder of the MedComms Networking Community activity at

  • Beyond the 30 Million Word Gap

    4:17

    At the McGovern Institute for Brain Research at MIT, John Gabrieli's lab is studying how exposure to language may influence brain function in children.

  • ACP celebrates 100 years of Leading Internal Medicine, Improving lives

    2:50

    In 2015, ACP celebrates a century of internal medicine leadership, innovation, and excellence in medical knowledge and information as the largest medical specialty organization and the second-largest physician group in the United States.

  • World-First Experimental Treatment at The Princess Margaret Saved Mesothelioma Patient’s Life

    2:49

    Photographer Karl Richter worked at a factory for a couple of years in his early 20s to help pay for university. But the job exposed him to asbestos and almost 40 years later, he was diagnosed with an aggressive type of cancer called mesothelioma.

    He received a world-first experimental treatment at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre known as S.M.A.R.T. (Surgery for Mesothelioma After Radiation Therapy).

    Eight years after his diagnosis, Karl is doing very well. He now encourages everyone to support the Princess Margaret Home Lottery.

    “Even if you don’t win, you are funding work that is saving lives and improving lives for so many people and you might need it yourself one day.”

    Learn more how funds from the Princess Margaret Home Lottery are advancing cancer research and care:

  • What first foods can babies eat? Learn complementary feeding best practices!

    2:27

    Nomsa’s daughter presents a report in school about her baby brother and how her mom feeds them.

    ---

    Stunting prevents children all over the world from achieving their full potential. The impact of stunting reaches far beyond height – it impairs a child’s brain development, performance in school, and learning ability for the rest of their life – and it can begin even before a baby is born.

    We are committed to addressing the problem of stunting in collaboration with the DG Murray Trust, the Perinatal Mental Health Project, Philani Nutrition, the Western Cape Dept. of Health, UNICEF, and the South African National Department of Health.

    The Grow Great campaign is a national movement to end stunting in South Africa by 2030. The Grow Great educational series, created by the Stanford Center for Health Education in collaboration with the Grow Great team in South Africa, promotes impactful health behaviors among caregivers during the most critical development period in a child’s life: the fi­rst 1,000 days (conception – 2 years old).

    ---

    At Digital MEdIC, we are advancing health education to improve lives worldwide. We are a part of the Stanford Center for Health Education, and represent the University’s commitment to improving health worldwide.

    Learn more:

    Expanding Knowledge. Improving Lives.

  • SPARK for Autism - Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Childrens Hospital

    2:07

    Do you want to SPARK a better understanding of autism? Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children's Hospital are working with the Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative to find thousands of people with autism and their families to create the nation's largest autism study. It's simple– register online, contribute a saliva sample using a collection kit from your own home, and you can earn up to $50 for your efforts.

    Visit to learn more or join the study.

  • Team Clotting episode 1: the clotting cascade’s role in haemophilia A

    3:25

    The formation of a blood clot is an important process that stops a person from bleeding, but it only happens if all members of your body’s “clotting team” are working together. To learn how the clotting cascade works, watch episode one of our “Team Clotting” animated series.

    Haemophilia A is an inherited bleeding disorder where a person’s blood doesn't clot properly due to a lack or insufficient levels of a blood-clotting protein known as factor VIII. Roche is developing novel approaches in the hopes of advancing management of this serious disorder.
    To learn more about haemophilia, visit

    Subscribe to our YouTube channel now:

    Get in touch with us:






    Roche has been committed to improving lives since the company was founded in 1896 in Basel, Switzerland. Today, Roche creates innovative medicines and diagnostic tests that help millions of patients globally.

    Roche is a leader in research-focused healthcare with combined strengths in pharmaceuticals and diagnostics. Roche is the world’s largest biotech company, with truly differentiated medicines in oncology, immunology, infectious diseases, ophthalmology and neuroscience.

    For more information and insights visit:

  • U.S. Food and Drug Administration Approves Bristol Myers Squibb’s and bluebird bio’s Abecma ...

    1:48

    U.S. Food and Drug Administration Approves Bristol Myers Squibb’s and bluebird bio’s Abecma (idecabtagene vicleucel), the First Anti-BCMA CAR T Cell Therapy for Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

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