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Basic Immunology: Nuts and Bolts of the Immune System

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  • Basic Immunology: Nuts and Bolts of the Immune System

    1:28:41

    (2:07 - Main Presentation) Dr. Anthony DeFranco explores basic immunology, looking at the cells in the immune system, what they do and how they work. Recorded on 03/23/2011. [7/2011] [Show ID: 21376]

    Please Note: Knowledge about health and medicine is constantly evolving. This information may become out of date.

    More in the Immune System 101 playlist:

    Immune System 101: It’s a Jungle in There -- Mini Medical School for the Public Presented by UCSF Osher Center for Integrative Medicine
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  • IMMUNE SYSTEM MADE EASY- IMMUNOLOGY INNATE AND ADAPTIVE IMMUNITY SIMPLE ANIMATION

    25:09

    The immune system is the basic defence system of the body that protects us from harmful pathogens and diseases.

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    The immune system consists of various types of cells and different proteins that kill the harmful invading micro-organisms and protect our body from disease.
    In this video we will discuss about the human immune system. What is the basic structure of the Human Immune system and how it functions

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    Pathogens can rapidly evolve and adapt, and thereby avoid detection and neutralization by the immune system; however, multiple defense mechanisms have also evolved to recognize and neutralize pathogens. Even simple unicellular organisms such as bacteria possess a rudimentary immune system in the form of enzymes that protect against bacteriophage infections. Other basic immune mechanisms evolved in ancient eukaryotes and remain in their modern descendants, such as plants and invertebrates. These mechanisms include phagocytosis, antimicrobial peptides called defensins, and the complement system. Jawed vertebrates, including humans, have even more sophisticated defense mechanisms,[1including the ability to adapt over time to recognize specific pathogens more efficiently. Adaptive (or acquired) immunity creates immunological memory after an initial response to a specific pathogen, leading to an enhanced response to subsequent encounters with that same pathogen. This process of acquired immunity is the basis of vaccination.

    The immune system protects organisms from infection with layered defenses of increasing specificity. In simple terms, physical barriers prevent pathogens such as bacteria and viruses from entering the organism. If a pathogen breaches these barriers, the innate immune system provides an immediate, but non-specific response. Innate immune systems are found in all plants and animals. If pathogens successfully evade the innate response, vertebrates possess a second layer of protection, the adaptive immune system, which is activated by the innate response. Here, the immune system adapts its response during an infection to improve its recognition of the pathogen. This improved response is then retained after the pathogen has been eliminated, in the form of an immunological memory, and allows the adaptive immune system to mount faster and stronger attacks each time this pathogen is encountered.
    The complement system is a biochemical cascade that attacks the surfaces of foreign cells. It contains over 20 different proteins and is named for its ability to complement the killing of pathogens by antibodies. Complement is the major humoral component of the innate immune response. Many species have complement systems, including non-mammals like plants, fish, and some invertebrates.[33]

    In humans, this response is activated by complement binding to antibodies that have attached to these microbes or the binding of complement proteins to carbohydrates on the surfaces of microbes. This recognition signal triggers a rapid killing response.[55] The speed of the response is a result of signal amplification that occurs after sequential proteolytic activation of complement molecules, which are also proteases. After complement proteins initially bind to the microbe, they activate their protease activity, which in turn activates other complement proteases, and so on. This produces a catalytic cascade that amplifies the initial signal by controlled positive feedback.[56] The cascade results in the production of peptides that attract immune cells, increase vascular permeability, and opsonize (coat) the surface of a pathogen, marking it for destruction. This deposition of complement can also kill cells directly by disrupting their plasma membrane

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  • Immune System: Innate and Adaptive Immunity Explained

    7:11

    The immune system (or immunity) can be divided into two types - innate and adaptive immunity. This video has an immune system animation. The innate immune system consists of defenses against infection that are activated instantly as a pathogen attacks. Adaptive immunity (or acquired immunity) is a subsystem of the immune system that contains highly specialised systemic cells and processes that kill pathogens and prevent their growth in the body. Innate vs adaptive immunity: it’s important to realize that innate and adaptive immunity are different. Their differences are explained in the video in layman terms.

    Our immune system is a fascinating entity, that functions in quite a unique and efficient manner. Comprising of various types of cells, it is prepared for any kind of breach in the fortress of our body, and is equipped to fight off a staggering number of intruders.
    In this video, we give you a brief overview of the immune system, and the basic types of cells involved, along with the function they carry out.

    Each cell if the immune system carries out various roles, depending on the kind of threat the body is facing. However, they have certain basic roles which have been explained here.


    #science #animation #immunesystem



    0:00 - Introduction
    0:46 - Innate Immunity
    1:53 - Inflammation
    2:35 - Types of Immune cells
    4:20 - Adaptive Immunity


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  • Immune System, Part 1: Crash Course A&P #45

    9:13

    Our final episodes of Anatomy & Physiology explore the way your body keeps all that complex, intricate stuff alive and healthy -- your immune system. The immune system’s responses begin with physical barriers like skin and mucous membranes, and when they’re not enough, there are phagocytes -- the neutrophils and macrophages. It also features the awesomely named natural killer cells and the inflammatory response, and we'll explain how all of these elements work together to save the day if you happen to slip on a banana peel.

    Pssst... we made flashcards to help you review the content in this episode! Find them on the free Crash Course App!

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    Table of Contents
    Physical Barriers Like Skin and Mucous Membranes 2:01
    Phagocytes: Neutrophils and Macrophages 3:17
    Natural Killer Cells 4:29
    Inflammatory Response 5:29

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  • Understanding the Cells of the Immune System

    15:29

    A visual explanation of the cells of the immune system and their different functions that provide an immune response to an invading pathogen.

    Written notes on this topic are available at:

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    DISCLAIMER: This video is for education and entertainment only, and is not medical advice. This video should NOT be used for medical advice or to guide clinical practice. The Zero to Finals content should not be used in any way to guide medical decision making. Zero to Finals takes no responsibility for any actions taken or not taken based on the information provided. Local and national guidelines and senior clinicians are there to help you make decisions, not YouTube videos. If you need medical advice or information, seek it from an appropriately trained and licenced doctor or healthcare provider that can address your individual needs. Zero to Finals cannot guarantee the accuracy of information in this video. Please highlight any errors you notice in the comments below - thank you.

  • Your Immune System 101: Introduction to Clinical Immunology

    1:28:42

    More in the Immune System 101 playlist:

    Dr. Katherine Gundling, Professor, Division of Allergy and Immunology at UCSF presents an overview of the immune system, how it functions and what can go wrong. Recorded on 03/16/2011. [5/2011] [Show ID: 21375]

    Immune System 101: It’s a Jungle in There -- Mini Medical School for the Public Presented by UCSF Osher Center for Integrative Medicine
    (

    Explore More Health & Medicine on UCTV
    (
    UCTV features the latest in health and medicine from University of California medical schools. Find the information you need on cancer, transplantation, obesity, disease and much more.

    UCTV is the broadcast and online media platform of the University of California, featuring programming from its ten campuses, three national labs and affiliated research institutions. UCTV explores a broad spectrum of subjects for a general audience, including science, health and medicine, public affairs, humanities, arts and music, business, education, and agriculture. Launched in January 2000, UCTV embraces the core missions of the University of California -- teaching, research, and public service – by providing quality, in-depth television far beyond the campus borders to inquisitive viewers around the world.
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  • Human Physiology - Introduction to the Immune System

    8:48

    “Human Physiology” is a free online course on Janux that is open to anyone. Learn more at

    Created by the University of Oklahoma, Janux is an interactive learning community that gives learners direct connections to courses, education resources, faculty, and each other. Janux courses are freely available or may be taken for college credit by enrolled OU students.

    Dr. Heather R. Ketchum is an Associate Professor of Biology.

    Video produced by NextThought (

    Copyright © 2000-2014 The Board of Regents of the University of Oklahoma, All Rights Reserved.

  • The Immune System

    13:47

    Paul Andersen explains how your body protects itself from invading viruses and bacteria. He starts by describing the nonspecific immune responses of skin and inflammation. He then explains how we use antibodies to disrupt the function of antigens and mark them for destruction. He then explains both the homoral and cell-mediated immune response highlighting the importance of B and T lymphocytes. He finally describes the process of long term immunity.

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  • Understanding the Immune System in One Video

    15:17

    This video provides a visual overview of the immune system.

    Written notes on this topic are available at:

    Zero to Finals Medicine book:
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    Zero to Finals Paediatrics book:
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    US:

    Zero to Finals Obstetrics and Gynaecology book:
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    US:

    Website:
    Notes:
    Multiple Choice Questions:
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    DISCLAIMER: This video is for education and entertainment only, and is not medical advice. This video should NOT be used for medical advice or to guide clinical practice. The Zero to Finals content should not be used in any way to guide medical decision making. Zero to Finals takes no responsibility for any actions taken or not taken based on the information provided. Local and national guidelines and senior clinicians are there to help you make decisions, not YouTube videos. If you need medical advice or information, seek it from an appropriately trained and licenced doctor or healthcare provider that can address your individual needs. Zero to Finals cannot guarantee the accuracy of information in this video. Please highlight any errors you notice in the comments below - thank you.

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  • The Necessity of the Immune System

    1:53:55

    (March 30, 2010) David Lewis provides an overview of the human immune system, answering questions on how innate and adaptive immunity are integrated to optimize the immune response.

    During the final quarter of the Stanford Mini Med School, some of the most timely and important topics in contemporary medicine and the biosciences are addressed.

    Stanford Mini Med School is a series arranged and directed by Stanford's School of Medicine, and presented by the Stanford Continuing Studies program.

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  • Your Immune System: Natural Born Killer - Crash Course Biology #32

    15:02

    Hank tells us about the team of deadly ninja assassins that is tasked with protecting our bodies from all the bad guys that want to kill us - also known as our immune system.

    Crash Course Biology is now available on DVD!

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    Table of Contents
    1) Innate Immune System 1:45
    a) Mucous Membranes 2:54
    b) Inflammatory Response 3:44
    c) Leukocytes 4:45

    2) Open Letter 6:33
    a) Natural Killer Cells 6:56
    b) Dendritic Cells 7:57

    3) Acquired Immune System 8:36
    a) Antibodies 9:08
    b) Lymphocytes 9:48
    c) Cell-Mediated Response 10:17
    d) Humoral Response 13:00

    References
    Campbell Biology, 9th ed.



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  • Introduction to how the immune system works | Biology | Anatomy | Immunology

    3:16

    To purchase this DVD please visit

    Segment from the program The Immunological System: Recognition, Attack, and Memory.

    DVD Description
    Our Immune System DVD starts by looking at external barriers to microbial attack such as the skin and mucus membranes and non-specific internal defenses such as macrophages, natural killer cells, and the inflammatory response. The program then delves into the immune response including the recognition of invaders by antibodies and T-cell receptors, the destruction of invaders by antibodies and cytotoxic T-cells, and the immunity conferred by memory cells. A discussion of how vaccinations work and current AIDS research concludes the program.

  • Lecture 19 Immune System

    1:7:15

    Overview of Immune System physiology, including innate defenses, and adaptive defenses, B-cell function and T-cell function

  • Immune System for Dummies

    11:05

    Bio Immune System (T and B Cells) Screencast for Resch's 1A Class

  • Cells of the Immune System

    4:49

    - This tutorial looks at the differentiation of the cells of the immune system. Beginning with the stem cell, the tutorials maps the differentiation of the cells to their functional state. For more entirely FREE tutorials and accompanying PDFs visit

  • Immunotherapy: Boosting the immune system to fight cancer

    7:32

    The concept of 'teaching' the immune system to recognize and destroy cancer cells is over a century old, but the development of immunotherapeutic strategies for cancer was slow for many decades. However, much has been learned about the immune system in the meantime, and with the recent approval of two new immunotherapeutic anticancer drugs and several drugs in late-stage development, a new era in anticancer immunotherapy is beginning.

    The video takes an audio-visual journey through the different approaches that are being investigated to harness the immune system to treat cancer.

    For more, check out the Nature Reviews Drug Discovery poster:

  • Immunology Lecture 19 Immune Pathology

    39:05

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    Important immune pathologies placed on the immune system diagram for a quick reference and learning. Following pathologies are presented:

    Bruton's Agammaglobulinemia
    Hyper IgM Syndrome
    Selective Ig deficiency
    Common variable immunodeficiency
    DiGeorge Syndrome (Thymic Aplasia)
    IL-12 receptor deficiency
    Job's disease. Hyper IgE Syndrome
    Chronic Mucocutaneous Candidiasis
    Severe Combined Immunodeficiency
    Ataxia Telangiectasia
    Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome
    Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency
    Chediak-Higashi Syndrome
    Chronic Granulomatous Disease ...

    Disclaimer:
    This video is not intended to provide assessment, diagnosis, treatment, or medical advice; it also does not constitute provision of healthcare services. The content provided in this video is for informational and educational purposes only.
    Please consult with a physician or healthcare professional regarding any medical or mental health related diagnosis or treatment. No information in this video should ever be considered as a substitute for advice from a healthcare professional. ...
    Disclaimer:
    This video is not intended to provide assessment, diagnosis, treatment, or medical advice; it also does not constitute provision of healthcare services. The content provided in this video is for informational and educational purposes only.
    Please consult with a physician or healthcare professional regarding any medical or mental health related diagnosis or treatment. No information in this video should ever be considered as a substitute for advice from a healthcare professional.

  • Immunology wars: A billion antibodies

    2:52

    Our bodies can create billions of antibodies to fight off billions of potential diseases. But how do our immune systems turn a limited number of genes into such an incredible diversity of antibody proteins?

    You can find more on this topic at

    Nature Research has full responsibility for all editorial content, including Nature Video content. This content is editorially independent of sponsors.

  • Ruslan Medzhitov 1: Introduction to Inflammation

    36:30



    Ruslan Medzhitov provides an overview of the field of inflammation, outlines its role in pathology and homeostasis, and explains how Inflammation is generated.

    Talk Overview:
    Dr. Ruslan Medzhitov provides an overview of the field of inflammation and outlines its role in pathology and homeostasis. Medzhitov explains how Inflammation is generated when pathogens, allergens, or other perturbations are recognized by sensor cells that then release inflammatory mediators (cytokines and chemokines) to activate effector cells. Inflammation is then followed by a resolution phase that brings the system back to homeostasis.

    Why do we experience fatigue and loss of appetite, as well as other symptoms when we get ill? Sometimes what we associate with a pathogenic response and illness is the effect of inflammation. In his second talk, Medzhitov outlines the symptoms that we often feel when we get sick, like the lack of appetite (anorexia), and unveils the molecular mechanisms that explain why we have evolved this way. In addition, he compares and contrasts how anorexia affects the outcome of bacterial and viral infections.

    Speaker Biography:
    Dr. Ruslan Medzhitov is a Sterling Professor of immunology at Yale School of Medicine and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator. His laboratory studies the signals that initiate and control the process of inflammation, allergic reaction, and immune response. His laboratory also studies tissue biology, and the communication circuits that help to establish stable cellular communities within tissues.

    Medzhitov earned his bachelor's in Biology from Tashkent State University, and pursued a doctorate degree in biochemistry at the Moscow State University (1993). Medzhitov was a graduate student during the profound economic crisis that followed the collapse of the Soviet Union, which prevented him from performing any experimental work during his graduate studies. Being unable to do any experimental work didn’t stop Medzhitov, who continued his studies by reading the scientific literature at the Library for Natural Sciences in Moscow, and attending lectures. There, he encountered his passion towards studying immunology after reading a paper by Dr. Charles Janeway, where he described his theories on how the immune system works. Medzhitov, fascinated by these theories, contacted Janeway and started a collaboration that shaped the rest of his career. In 1993, Medzhitov received a 3-month Unesco fellowship to study bioinformatics with Russell Doolittle at the University of California, San Diego. In 1994, he continued his postdoctoral training at Janeway’s lab.

    For his scientific contributions, Medzhitov was elected member of the National Academy of Sciences (2010), and received the Shaw Prize in Life Science and Medicine (2011). Learn more about Medzhitov’s research at his lab website:

  • Basic Immunology Nuts and Bolts of the Immune System

    1:28:41

    Sa'atnya Immune System, Menjadi solusi untuk Kesehatan Diri Kita Dan Keluarga. Optimalkan Fungsi Immune System yg di cipkan oleh TUHAN untuk KITA semua. Inilah Pelajaran Terbaik Mengenal Lebih Dekat Dengan Immune System.

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  • Immunology Lecture Mini-Course, 1 of 14: Components of the Immune System

    1:1:22

    - Immunology Lecture 1 of 14: The Components of the Immune System. Harris Goldstein, M.D., director, Einstein-Montefiore Center for AIDS Research, professor of pediatrics and microbiology & immunology and the Charles Michael Chair in Autoimmune Diseases, delivers a mini-course that provides a comprehensive overview in basic immunology for graduate and medical students and for anyone interested in understanding how the immune system works. This mini-course was organized by the KwaZulu-Natal Research Institute for Tuberculosis and HIV (K-RITH) at the Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa to provide Sub-Saharan students, research trainees and HIV and TB investigators with a comprehensive course in immunology. (January 2010).

    See related lecture slides at:

  • Immunology 101: The Basics and Introduction to our Patient

    1:28:50

    (2:48 - Main Presentation) Katherine Gundling, MD, Associate Clinical Professor of Allergy and Immunology at UCSF, and Practice Chief of the Allergy/Immunology clinic at Moffitt Hospital examines the immune system. Learn the essential purpose of the immune system and how living with a primary disorder of immunity can affect daily life. [9/2013] [Show ID: 25130]

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    UCTV is the broadcast and online media platform of the University of California, featuring programming from its ten campuses, three national labs and affiliated research institutions. UCTV explores a broad spectrum of subjects for a general audience, including science, health and medicine, public affairs, humanities, arts and music, business, education, and agriculture. Launched in January 2000, UCTV embraces the core missions of the University of California -- teaching, research, and public service – by providing quality, in-depth television far beyond the campus borders to inquisitive viewers around the world.
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  • Module 3: Basic immunology

    1:2:14

  • Immune System Made Easy

    9:08

    This video is about the role of the immune system in fighting disease and importance of health and hygiene.

  • Immunology Lecture Mini-Course, 14 of 14: Evasion/Immune System by Pathogens

    48:57

    - Immunology Lecture 14 of 14: Evasion of the Immune System by Pathogens. Harris Goldstein, M.D., director, Einstein-Montefiore Center for AIDS Research, professor of pediatrics and microbiology & immunology and the Charles Michael Chair in Autoimmune Diseases, delivers a mini-course that provides a comprehensive overview in basic immunology for graduate and medical students and for anyone interested in understanding how the immune system works. This mini-course was organized by the KwaZulu-Natal Research Institute for Tuberculosis and HIV (K-RITH) at the Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa to provide Sub-Saharan students, research trainees and HIV and TB investigators with a comprehensive course in immunology. (January 2010).

    See related lecture slides at:

  • COVID-19 Immunology 101 for Non-immunologists by Akiko Iwasaki, Ph.D.

    8:11

    In collaboration with BioRender, Akiko Iwasaki, Ph.D., Professor of Immunobiology at Yale University School of Medicine, explores COVID-19 Immunology 101 for Non-immunologists.

    Acknowledgements:
    Dr. Akiko Iwasaki, PhD (Collaborator, narrator, content expert)
    Dr. Yanet Valdez Tejeira, PhD (Spanish subtitle contributor)
    Mahadi B. Alyami (@RTKase) (Arabic subtitle contributor)
    Nick Atanelov (@Nick_atanelov) (Georgian subtitle contributor)
    Anonymous (Turkish subtitle contributor)

    You can find and customize the figures used in this video by visiting the BioRender template library ( and search for tweetorial.

    The video is also available in Japanese:

    About BioRender:
    BioRender is the easy-to-use science illustration tool that’s quickly becoming a staple in academic institutions and labs around the world! You can access the program for free at

    BioRender COVID-19 Vaccine & Therapeutics Tracker

  • Basic Immunology Review

    1:15:03

    This lecture was delivered on 9/4/19 at New York Medical College. All rights belong to the original textbook publisher.

  • Immunology Lecture Mini-Course, 11 of 14: Mucosal Immunity

    57:49

    - Immunology Lecture 11 of 14: Mucosal Immunity. Harris Goldstein, M.D., director, Einstein-Montefiore Center for AIDS Research, professor of pediatrics and microbiology & immunology and the Charles Michael Chair in Autoimmune Diseases, delivers a mini-course that provides a comprehensive overview in basic immunology for graduate and medical students and for anyone interested in understanding how the immune system works. This mini-course was organized by the KwaZulu-Natal Research Institute for Tuberculosis and HIV (K-RITH) at the Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa to provide Sub-Saharan students, research trainees and HIV and TB investigators with a comprehensive course in immunology. (January 2010).

    See related lecture slides at:

  • 30. Immunology 1 – Diversity, Specificity, & B cells

    51:36

    MIT 7.016 Introductory Biology, Fall 2018
    Instructor: Adam Martin
    View the complete course:
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    Professor Martin introduces the topic of immunity, defined as resistance to disease based on prior exposure. Beginning with vaccines as an example, he gives an overview of the immune system, followed by its properties of specificity, diversity, and memory.

    License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA
    More information at
    More courses at

  • Immunology MicroFlix

    6:52

    Inmunology video of a Rhinovirus infection by MicroFlix for Pearson Education 2010

  • Immunology Map - Immune Cells

    11:57



    Introduction to the immune cells.


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  • Basic immunology review 1

    9:40

  • HIV: Basic Function of Immune System

    4:03

    This animation describes the various types of white blood cells and how they contribute to your body's immunity and defence against infection. Special attention is paid to CD4 cells, the primary target of HIV.
    Narrated by Dr. Mark Wainberg, Professor of Medicine and of Microbiology at McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, a Canadian AIDS researcher and activist.

    For more information please visit

  • Immunology of the Lung

    5:41

    Our lungs bring in vital oxygen and expel carbon dioxide. But they’re also an important immune site. They filter the air we breathe, repulsing invaders and repairing injury. But sometimes these powerful immune responses overreact, causing diseases such as asthma.

    Go to the Nature Immunology homepage:

    Nature has full responsibility for all editorial content, including Nature Video content. This content is editorially independent of sponsors.

  • Lecture 1-5: Introduction to the immune system

    7:00

  • BIOLOGY - The Immune System - Daniel Davis

    2:55

    Immunology Professor Daniel Davis explains how understanding the immune system could help to treat some cancer patients.

    Watch Daniel's full event from the Hay Festival:

  • Biological Sciences M121. Immunology with Hematology. Lecture 22. Immune System Over-Reactions.

    48:46

    UCI BioSci M121: Immunology with Hematology (Fall 2013)
    Lec 22. Immunology with Hematology -- Immune System Over-Reactions --
    View the complete course:

    Instructor: Craig M. Walsh, Ph.D.

    License: Creative Commons CC-BY-SA
    Terms of Use:
    More courses at

    Description: UCI BioSci M121 covers the following topics: Antibodies, antigens, antigen-antibody reactions, cells and tissues of lymphoreticular and hematopoietic systems, and individual and collective components of cell-mediated and humoral immune response.

    Recorded on November 20, 2013

    Required attribution: Walsh, Craig. Immunology with Hematology M121 (UCI OpenCourseWare: University of California, Irvine), [Access date]. License: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 United States License. (

  • 8. Cell Communication and Immunology

    49:54

    Frontiers of Biomedical Engineering (BENG 100)

    Professor Saltzman continues his discussion of cell communication in the body, extending the description to the nervous and immune system. Professor Saltzman describes the mode of signal transmission in neurons: action potential in the axon, and neurotransmitter release at the synaptic cleft. He also introduces elements of the innate and adaptive immune system. The adaptive immune system is presented as a host/foreign antigen recognition system involving immune cells (T, B, and macrophages), antibodies, and the major histocompatibility complex 1 and 2. Immune response by cytotoxic T cells, T helper cells, and B cells to antigen recognition are discussed in detail.

    00:00 - Chapter 1. Overview of the Nervous System
    05:28 - Chapter 2. Cell Communication in the Nervous System
    22:18 - Chapter 3. Overview of the Immune System
    28:26 - Chapter 4. Immune System Responses against Foreign Hosts
    40:24 - Chapter 5. Cytotoxic T-Cells and Antibodies

    Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

    This course was recorded in Spring 2008.

  • Understanding the Immune System

    3:40

    The immune system is a multi-layered defense system. In this video you will learn about your body’s innate and adaptive immune systems and how they work together to respond to bacteria, viruses, and cancer.

    Transcription:

    [00:00:07] Dr. Susan Love: I'm Dr. Susan Love and I'm Chief Visionary Officer of the Dr. Susan Love Research Foundation. Our mission is a future without breast cancer and we do that through innovative research into the cause and prevention of the disease. Impatient science is a series of videos that we've made to help you understand your diagnosis and treatment choices that you have.

    [00:00:26] Speaker 2: Your immune system is a multi-layer defense system that keeps you healthy by guarding against internal and external threats, and many other things that just aren't working properly in your body. Every day the cells that make up your immune system work together to manage these threats to your health.

    [00:00:42] Dr. Susan: There are really two teams that work together, the innate and the adaptive immune systems.

    [00:00:48] Speaker 2: The innate immune system is your first line of defense. It operates a bit like a neighborhood watch, looking out for all types of threats. The innate immune system includes teams of cells called neutrophils and macrophages. These are the cells that patrol for suspicious behavior and other threats to your body. They're everywhere, especially abundant in your skin and mucous membranes, like the lining of your mouth, nose, gut or lungs.
    They are the first responders, not only to bacteria and viruses, but also when your cells go rogue as in cancer. If the innate immune system comes into contact with a cancer cell, it knows the danger is too big for it to handle. At that point, they call in the next team the adaptive immune system.

    [00:01:30] Dr. Susan: The adaptive immune system is made up of highly specialized cells that respond to specific threats. Each one does something different, and you want the right cells to show up at the right time.

    [00:01:42] Speaker 2: Your B and T cells, also known as lymphocytes are the white blood cells that are the MVPs of your adaptive immune system. These cells, unlike the cells in the innate immune system, do not patrol. Instead they hang out in the lymph nodes, waiting to be called into action. When they receive a message from the innate team that a particular invader has been spotted, the cells of the adaptive immune system jump into action, producing the specific response necessary to take out the threat.

    [00:02:10] Dr. Susan: One of the most amazing things about the adaptive immune system is its memory. It has the ability to remember past threats that it was able to contain.

    [00:02:22] Speaker 2: If you were exposed to an infection or an abnormal cell, the adaptive immune system gets the message and develops a response that is specifically designed to neutralize it. If you get exposed to the same infection again, the adaptive immune system doesn't need a new response, instead, it remembers the intruder and sends out B cells and T cells that are already trained to contain it.

    [00:02:43] Dr. Susan: The immune system is really a very coordinated and complicated organization of cells working together. We're only just beginning to recognize its role in breast cancer.

    [00:02:53] Speaker 2: Immunology research is a promising new field of study that we hope will give us more powerful and more thorough tools to treat breast cancer. For more information about how the immune system can help fight cancer, watch our video called Immunology and Cancer.

    [00:03:07] Dr. Susan: Our mission at the Dr. Susan Love Research Foundation is the future without breast cancer. We do this through innovative research into the cause and prevention of the disease. You can join us at drsusanloveresearch.org to participate in our research or to help fund our research, because together, and it's going to take all of us, we can be the generation that ends breast cancer.

  • Lecture 4 Basic Immunology Part 1 of 3 by Dr. Hatem Hamdi Eleish

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    The Basic Immunology Course is given by Dr. Hatem Eleishi, Professor of Rheumatology, Cairo University (Egypt) and Director of Keprc Arthritis Center (Maadi, Cairo, Egypt). This is part 1 of 3 of Lecture Number 4 of the course. The title of Lecture 4 is THE PRICE OF HIGH TECH. Immunology in this course is presented in a very simplified way that suits under- and postgraduates. At the end of the course, attendees can find it quite easy to read and understand the most sophisticated topics in any Immunology text books. This Basic Immunology Course is a 6-lecture course. This course's material is updated every 6 months. To attend the next course, kindly communicate directly with Dr. Hatem Eleishi on mobile 00201222268065 or by email hatem@hatemeleishi.com

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    A quick look at the Basic Immunology in Medicine course offered by FOCIS.

  • Infectious Disease and Human Origins: Susan Kaech: Human Adaptive Immunity Against Viral Infections

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    (01:35 - Main Presentation) Infectious diseases have profound influences on the evolution of their host populations. In the case of humans, the host species has also shaped pathogen dynamics and virulence via a multitude of factors from changes in social organization, group size, and exploitation of varied habitats and their animals and plant resources to agriculture, technology, rapid long-distance travel, medicine and global economic integration - which all continue to shape epidemics and the human host populations. This symposium will explore how infectious agents and humans have shaped each other over the eons. [7/2020] [Show ID: 35850]

    Please Note: Knowledge about health and medicine is constantly evolving. This information may become out of date.

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  • Biological Sciences M121. Immunology with Hematology. Lecture 05. Principles of Adaptive Immunity.

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    UCI BioSci M121: Immunology with Hematology (Fall 2013)
    Lec 05. Immunology with Hematology -- Principles of Adaptive Immunity --
    View the complete course:

    Instructor: David A. Fruman, Ph.D.

    License: Creative Commons CC-BY-SA
    Terms of Use:
    More courses at

    Description: UCI BioSci M121 covers the following topics: Antibodies, antigens, antigen-antibody reactions, cells and tissues of lymphoreticular and hematopoietic systems, and individual and collective components of cell-mediated and humoral immune response.

    Recorded on October 7, 2013

    Required attribution: Fruman, David. Immunology with Hematology M121 (UCI OpenCourseWare: University of California, Irvine), [Access date]. License: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 United States License. (


  • Antibody Mediated Immune Response

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    Antibody Mediated Immune Response

  • Remdesivir Not Working So Far, Active Immunity vs. Passive Immunity

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    Please read and agree to the disclaimer before watching this video.
    . Please read disclaimer below before watching this video.
    ... Remdesivir Not Working So Far, Active Immunity vs. Passive Immunity

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    Remdesivir is not working so far


    Interpreting the confidence interval


    When confidence interval range includes unity (1.0) then the result is not significant.
    When p is equal or greater than 0.05 then the result is not statistically significant.



    ** Active immunity is when our immune system produces antibodies and cytotoxic cells against an offending agent.
    ** Passive immunity is when we provide antibodies from outside for immediate control of the disease. This allows enough time for our immune system to produce antibodies (if it can.)
    ** Autoimmunity is when our immune system starts attacking our own tissues as foreign material.
    ** Herd Immunity is when enough number of people in the community are immune to a disease to bring the R0 to 1.0 or lower.

    Active immunity vs., passive immunity


    Physiology of active immunity


    #drbeen #koolbeens #COVID-19 ...

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    This video is not intended to provide assessment, diagnosis, treatment, or medical advice; it also does not constitute provision of healthcare services. The content provided in this video is for informational and educational purposes only.
    Please consult with a physician or healthcare professional regarding any medical or mental health related diagnosis or treatment. No information in this video should ever be considered as a substitute for advice from a healthcare professional. ...
    Disclaimer:
    This video is not intended to provide assessment, diagnosis, treatment, or medical advice; it also does not constitute provision of healthcare services. The content provided in this video is for informational and educational purposes only.
    Please consult with a physician or healthcare professional regarding any medical or mental health related diagnosis or treatment. No information in this video should ever be considered as a substitute for advice from a healthcare professional.

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    Immunology Chapter 1: Immunology Overview

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    (03:11 - Blood and Immune System Disorders: A Patient Perspective - Alysia Vaccaro, 14:39 - Gene Therapy for Artemis Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (ART-SCID) - Jennifer Puck, 29:42 - Hematopoietic Stem Cell Gene Therapy for Primary Immune Deficiencies, 42:59 - Gene Correction in Sickle Cell Anemia - Mark Walters, 56:16 - Q&A) What impacts has stem cell research made for blood and immune system disorders? Hear the latest from experts in the field.

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    Alysia Vaccaro: Patient Perspective
    Jennifer M Puck, MD, UC San Francisco: Gene Therapy for Artemis Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (ART-SCID)
    Donald B. Kohn, MD, UCLA: Hematopoietic Stem Cell Gene Therapy for Primary Immune Deficiencies
    Mark C. Walters, MD, UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital Oakland: Gene correction in Sickle Cell Disease Recorded on 09/14/2020. [Show ID: 36332]

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    (
    Science and technology continue to change our lives. University of California scientists are tackling the important questions like climate change, evolution, oceanography, neuroscience and the potential of stem cells.

    UCTV is the broadcast and online media platform of the University of California, featuring programming from its ten campuses, three national labs and affiliated research institutions. UCTV explores a broad spectrum of subjects for a general audience, including science, health and medicine, public affairs, humanities, arts and music, business, education, and agriculture. Launched in January 2000, UCTV embraces the core missions of the University of California -- teaching, research, and public service – by providing quality, in-depth television far beyond the campus borders to inquisitive viewers around the world.
    (

  • Immunology 101 - Part 2: Adaptive Immunity

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  • Immunology - Helper T cells CD4+ and B cells - Lymphocytes

    1:27:48

    #Immunology #Thelpercells #CD4+ #Bcells #Lymphocytes #Plasmacells #Immunesystem #Immuneresponse #Tcells #Tcellactivation #Tcelldevelopment

    The T helper cells (Th cells), also known as CD4+ cells or CD4-positive cells, are a type of T cell that play an important role in the immune system, particularly in the adaptive immune system. As their name suggests, they help the activity of other immune cells by releasing cytokines, small protein mediators that alter the behavior of target cells that express receptors for those cytokines. These cells help to polarize the immune response into the appropriate kind depending on the nature of the immunological insult (virus vs. extracellular bacterium vs. intracellular bacterium vs. helminth vs. fungus vs. protist). They are generally considered essential in B cell antibody class switching, breaking cross-tolerance in dendritic cells, in the activation and growth of cytotoxic T cells, and in maximizing bactericidal activity of phagocytes such as macrophages and neutrophils.

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    Mature Th cells express the surface protein CD4 and are referred to as CD4+ T cells. Such CD4+ T cells are generally treated as having a pre-defined role as helper T cells within the immune system. For example, when an antigen-presenting cell displays a peptide antigen on MHC class II proteins, a CD4+ cell will aid those cells through a combination of cell to cell interactions (e.g. CD40 (protein) and CD40L) and through cytokines.

    B cells, also known as B lymphocytes, are a type of white blood cell of the lymphocyte subtype. They function in the humoral immunity component of the adaptive immune system. B cells produce antibody molecules; however, these antibodies are not secreted. Rather, they are inserted into the plasma membrane where they serve as a part of B-cell receptors. When a naïve or memory B cell is activated by an antigen, it proliferates and differentiates into an antibody-secreting effector cell, known as a plasmablast or plasma cell. Additionally, B cells present antigens (they are also classified as professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs)) and secrete cytokines. In mammals, B cells mature in the bone marrow, which is at the core of most bones. In birds, B cells mature in the bursa of Fabricius, a lymphoid organ where they were first discovered by Chang and Glick, which is why the 'B' stands for bursa and not bone marrow as commonly believed.

    B cells, unlike the other two classes of lymphocytes, T cells and natural killer cells, express B cell receptors (BCRs) on their cell membrane. BCRs allow the B cell to bind to a specific antigen, against which it will initiate an antibody response.

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