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COVID : The TRUTH about how long is someone CONTAGIOUS or infectious with coronavirus

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  • How long after being infected with COVID-19 does someone become contagious?

    52

    How long after being infected with COVID-19 does someone become contagious?
    Dr. Chris DeFlitch, Vice President & Chief Medical Information Officer

    Penn State Health is committed to keeping the public informed and helping people find the most up-to-date, reliable information about coronavirus disease 2019, also known as COVID-19.

    We continue to work closely with public health officials to protect the health and safety of all of our patients, visitors and team members. We are assessing the risk of exposure pursuant to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and PA Department of Health.

    You can learn more about Penn State Health’s response to COVID-19 here:

    Dr. Chris DeFlitch, Vice President & Chief Medical Information Officer

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  • How Long Are People Contagious When They Are Sick with COVID-19?

    2:53

    Dr. Hank Bernstein explains the difference between quarantine and isolation during the COVID-19 pandemic. For information about COVID-19 and the vaccines, visit For information about all vaccines, visit

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  • How Long Are You Contagious with COVID-19? | UC San Diego Health

    1:34

    How long is COVID19 contagious? And what should you do if you think you’ve been exposed? In this video, learn more about the CDC recommendations on self-isolation following possible COVID-19 exposure or symptoms.

    All patients should follow their doctor’s recommendations for accessing care and leaving isolation. If you feel sick, unless it’s an emergency, try to call ahead so the doctor can direct you to the right place for care and possible testing.

    This video was filmed on April 16, 2020. As doctors and scientists work quickly to figure out the best ways to fight COVID19, this information may become out of date. For the most up to date information and recommendations, please visit the CDC’s website,

    UC San Diego Health was the first health system in the region to treat patients with COVID-19. Like hospital systems elsewhere, we have seen an increase in patients who are in need of specialized care during the COVID-19 (novel coronavirus) pandemic. We are caring for these patients at our Hillcrest and La Jolla locations in San Diego County and are well-prepared to treat more as needed. And we are embracing new ways, including telehealth, to continue seeing our other patients to keep them healthy. Get updates for UC San Diego Health patients and visitors here:

    Other Resources:




  • COVID-19 Update 18: When are patients really infectious?

    9:44

    Individuals are infectious with COVID-19 when they're shedding the virus, which means that the virus replicates in the cells of their upper or lower respiratory tract. In this video, we will examine published articles discussing viral shedding, the incubation period (mean incubation period was 5.2 days) and the serial interval, by examining the results of 77 COVID-19 transmission pairs.

    The study found that infectiousness starts 2.3 days before symptom onset. That patients are most infectious 0.7 days before symptom onset.They also found that 44% of infectiousness or infections occurred in the pre-symptomatic phase making it difficult to track.

    #medmastery #coronavirus #COVID19 #sarscov2 #coronaviruschina #coronavirustruth #coronavirusdeaths #WHO #wuhan #infection #pandemic #publichealth
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    Links for reference:


    -----------------------------------------------------------
    More updates by Dr. Wiesbauer:
    COVID-19 Update 1: How to tell if a pandemic is likely to occur or not–R0 and the serial interval:
    COVID-19 Update 2: How to stop an epidemic - Herd immunity:
    COVID-19 Update 3: Symptoms of COVID-19:
    COVID-19 Update 4: Clinical characteristics of COVID-19:
    COVID-19 Update 5: Estimating case fatality rates for COVID-19:
    COVID-19 Update 6: Seasonality: will COVID-19 go away in the summer?:
    COVID-19 Update 7: This is probably the most important picture of the whole Coronavirus-epidemic:
    COVID-19 Update 8: Zinc and chloroquine for the treatment of COVID-19?:
    COVID-19 Update 9: Hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin for the treatment of COVID-19–Review of study by Didier Raoult:
    COVID-19 Update 10: Is COVID-19 an airborne disease? Will we all need to wear face-masks against SARS-CoV-2?
    COVID-19 Update 11: How exactly the coronavirus becomes airborne.
    COVID-19 Update 12: Attack rates of COVID-19 depend on face-to-face time spent with infected persons:

    COVID-19 Update 13: Randomized Controlled Trial of Hydroxychloroquine in Patients with COVID-19:

    COVID-19 Update 14: Are children contributing to the spread of COVID-19?

    COVID-19 Update 15: Can we disinfect and reuse N95 masks?:


    COVID-19 Update 16: Effectiveness of surgical masks for prevention


    COVID-19 Update 17: How an app can get us out of lockdown

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    Useful resources:
    For checking daily developments of cases, deaths and more:



    Other useful resources:
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    New England Journal of Medicine:

    Github collaboration:

    CDC:

    WHO:

    Nucleuswealth:

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    Internist & Founder at Medmastery
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    Please Note: Medmastery's videos, medical lectures, medical illustrations, and medical animations are for medical education and exam preparation purposes, and not intended to replace recommendations by your doctor or health care provider.

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  • How Contagious is COVID-19?

    3:31

    Transmission of SARS-CoV-2 occurs via droplet transmission, contact transmission, and aerosol transmission. Droplet transmission occurs when respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes are inhaled by a person nearby. Contact transmission occurs when a person touches a contaminated surface and then their mouth, nose, or eyes. Aerosol transmission occurs when respiratory droplets containing the virus mix into the air and then are inhaled. COVID-19 is stable for up to 24 hours on cardboard, 2-3 days on plastic and stainless steel and up to three hours in aerosols, which include fog, mist, dust, air pollutants, and smoke. Therefore, it is possible to get infected by touching contaminated objects or through the air.
    The incubation period is the time between infection and symptom onset for an illness. Estimates for COVID-19’s incubation period vary from 2-14 days, but it is generally assumed to be around 5 days. There is more debate about the latent period, which is the time between infection and infectiousness. It is now thought that people can be infectious before showing symptoms, and so the latent period is shorter than the incubation period.
    An imported case occurs when a traveler is infected in one area and is reported as sick in another area. Local transmission occurs if that traveler infects others, or if there is a cluster of cases locally and the spread is easily traced. Community transmission occurs when there is no clear source of infection.
    Infectivity can be measured using R0. R0 is important epidemiology jargon, short for reproduction number. It is the number of cases, on average, that an infected person will cause during their infectious period. So if R0 =2, then an infected person will infect an average of 2 other people while they are infectious. There are two important variants of the R0. The basic reproduction number represents the maximum potential of a pathogen to infect people – basically what would happen if an infectious person entered a community with no prior immunity. The effective reproductive number describes the current vulnerability of a population based on whether people have immunity thanks to vaccination or prior exposure. The effective R0 decreases over the course of the outbreak. Note that both basic and effective reproduction number depend on factors such as environment and demographics in addition to the pathogen’s infectiousness. The goal of public health interventions is to bring R0 down to less than 1, as this would cause the disease to die out over time.
    The seasonal flu has an R0 ranging from 0.9 – 2.1. There is a lot of debate about the R0 of COVID-19, with estimates from more recent data ranging from 2.7-4.2. The variance in these estimates is largely due to differing model assumptions and a lack of data. For example, models which assume the possibility of being infectious before symptom onset have estimates that are around 0.5 higher.
    These high R0 estimates mean there is much greater potential for spread of COVID-19 than for the flu. How much greater? For the purpose of this example, let’s say that the flu has an R0 of 1.5 and COVID-19 has an R0 of 3. After three cycles of infection, 11 people have had the flu, and 40 people have been infected with COVID-19. After ten cycles of infection, this becomes 171 people with the flu, and over 88,000 people with COVID-19.

    3D Models from:

  • How contagious are people with asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2?

    8:44

    How contagious are people with asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2, and how does the immune system respond to asymptomatic infection? The potential for SARS-CoV-2 to be spread by people who never exhibit symptoms of disease or those who exhibit delayed symptom onset is a serious concern and possible contributing factor to the pandemic spread of this virus. Not surprisingly, “stealth transmission,” as it is sometimes called, is especially difficult to identify and contain. But in order to effectively fight the spread of disease, we need to better understand how this virus behaves, especially as it pertains to asymptomatic cases.

    References:

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    Visit for more.

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  • Delta Variant Versus Previous COVID 19 Infection vs. Vaccines

    16:18

    Roger Seheult, MD of MedCram explains how natural immunity (from a previous COVID-19 infection) compares with vaccines (Pfizer, Moderna, AstraZeneca) VS. the Delta coronavirus variant. (This video was recorded on July 24, 2021).

    Correction: Strasbourg is in France (near the German border), not in Germany.

    TOPICS IN THIS VIDEO INCLUDE:

    00:00 Is natural immunity from previous COVID-19 infection strong enough against Delta variant?
    00:32 Research study of 50,000+ patients from the Cleveland Clinic
    03:07 Qatar airport study shows previous infection with SARS-CoV gives reasonable immunity against reinfection
    05:46 UK data suggests low risk of COVID-19 reinfection among population
    07:04 Study on antibody response effectiveness (from vaccines and natural infection) at neutralizing several COVID-19 variants, including Delta
    13:33 Monoclonal antibodies shown to have little effectiveness against Delta variant
    14:31 Patients urged to get both doses of Pfizer or Moderna, especially for protection against Delta variant
    14:59 MedCram resources for medical providers treating COVID-19 patients and the case for lung ultrasounds

    Roger Seheult, MD is the co-founder and lead professor at
    He is Board Certified in Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Disease, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine and an Associate Professor at the University of California, Riverside School of Medicine.

    See the video Dr. Seheult references about Lung Ultrasound in COVID 19:

    LINKS / REFERENCES:

    Can You Get Delta Variant if You Already Had COVID-19? (Healthline) |

    Necessity of COVID-19 vaccination in previously infected individuals (medRxiv) |

    Associations of Vaccination and of Prior Infection With Positive PCR Test Results for SARS-CoV-2 in Airline Passengers Arriving in Qatar (JAMA) |

    New national surveillance of possible COVID-19 reinfection, published by PHE (GOV.UK) |

    Study highlights need for full Covid vaccination to protect against Delta variant (STAT) |

    All coronavirus updates are at MedCram.com (including more discussion on delta variant covid, delta plus variant COVID, COVID delta variant, and more).


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    #COVID19 #Deltavariant #Coronavirus

  • How long does the coronavirus last inside the body ?

    2:31

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    How long does the coronavirus last inside the body

    The novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, is the virus responsible for causing the illness COVID-19. Most people who develop COVID-19 symptoms improve without treatment in 2–6 weeksTrusted Source. However, this does not necessarily reflect how long the virus itself remains active in the body.

    COVID-19 has an incubation period, meaning it can be days before a person notices symptoms. In the case of SARS-CoV-2, a person can transmit the virus 48 hoursTrusted Source before developing symptoms.

    Many people experience mild symptoms, while some experience no symptoms at all. This can make it difficult to tell who has the virus.

    How long the virus lasts in the body depends on the individual and the severity of the illness. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) advise that people who test positive for COVID-19 should isolate themselves for the following amount of time:

    However, the virus may remain in the body at low levels for up to 3 monthsTrusted Source after diagnosis. This may mean some people get a second positive test result even after they recover, although this does not necessarily indicate the virus is still transmissible.

    As of October 2020, there is no evidence that a person with mild or moderate symptoms can transmit SARS-CoV-2 more than 10 days after the first positive test result.

    How long do symptoms last?
    Early in the COVID-19 pandemic, health organizations advised that, for most people, symptoms would last a short amount of time. However, since then, people have reported that their symptoms last much longer than this.

    A July 2020 CDC report found that 35%Trusted Source of people who had mild cases of COVID-19 were not back to their usual state of health 14–21 days after testing positive. Among those aged 18–34 years with no chronic medical conditions, one in five had not returned to their usual state of health.

    This suggests that, for some people, COVID-19 symptoms last longer than original estimates, even in mild cases. By comparison, over 90% of people with influenza, or flu, recover within approximately 2 weeks of having a positive test result.

    People who require hospital treatment or who experience “long COVID” may also have longer-lasting symptoms. Long COVID, or post-COVID syndrome, is a name for a collection of symptoms that some people continue to experience months after their initial illness.

    The symptoms of post-COVID syndrome can includeTrusted Source, but are not limited to:

    severe fatigue
    trouble sleeping
    shortness of breath
    headaches
    muscle weakness
    heart palpitations
    low-grade fever
    trouble concentrating
    memory lapses
    mood changes
    skin rashes
    nausea or vomiting
    diarrhea

    #covid #covidsecondwave #coronavirussecondwave #secondwavecoronavirus #coronavirus #covidsymptoms #covidinsidethebody #Howlongdoesthecoronaviruslastinsidethebody #coronavirussymptoms #covidanimation #covid19

  • How many days should you wait to get tested after COVID-19 exposure?

    3:07

    Dr. Jen Ashton answers viewers’ latest coronavirus questions.

  • x
  • COVID-19 infection among vaccinated people: What you need to know

    2:03

    As the delta variant continues to spread across the country, new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) show vaccinated people can still spread COVID-19. Breakthrough infections of the highly contagious delta variant also have been reported. This new information has led to questions surrounding the effectiveness of the current COVID-19 vaccines.
    ____________________________________
    For the safety of its patients, staff and visitors, Mayo Clinic has strict masking policies in place. Anyone shown without a mask was recorded prior to COVID-19 or recorded in an area not designated for patient care, where social distancing and other safety protocols were followed.

    FOR THE PUBLIC: More health and medical news on the Mayo Clinic News Network.

    FOR THE MEDIA ONLY: Register at to access clean and nat sound versions of this video on the Mayo Clinic News Network.

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  • WATCH: How long should I wait to go out after testing positive for coronavirus?

    1:14

    Most people who test positive for COVID-19 recover, but the experiences by those who have tested positive are still so varied. But some wonder how long to wait after symptoms recede before going back out into the world. Dr. Ashish Jha, director of the Harvard Global Health Institute, said “we’re still learning what the right strategy is.” Jha spoke with PBS NewsHour’s William Brangham on July 9 to answer viewer questions about the latest information related to the coronavirus, especially as many states start reopening, despite rising case counts.

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  • How soon can I get a vaccine/booster after COVID-19 infection?

    1:55

    Dr. Darien Sutton answers viewers' health and COVID-19 questions.

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  • Myth: Asymptomatic people are not contagious and do not spread COVID-19

    1:06

    Learn more COVID-19 myths at

  • Delta Variant: Top 10 COVID Questions and How to Prepare

    22:27

    A coronavirus (COVID-19) variant has become dominant in the USA and Roger Seheult, MD of MedCram responds to 10 common questions including:

    00:00 If someone is fully vaccinated or already had COVID, how worried should they be about the Delta Variant?
    02:16 Should we be getting booster COVID vaccine doses?
    05:36 Will there continue to be more variants, perhaps even variants more challenging that the Delta variant?
    07:24 Is Long COVID occurring in the fully vaccinated?
    08:26 When is this surge going to peak? Can we learn from other countries?
    12:52 Are more children getting hospitalized with COVID 19 Delta variant?
    14:03 What happens when school starts?
    16:06 Have treatment and testing strategies changed for Delta variant?
    19:45 What can we do to protect ourselves and our communities from the coronavirus Delta variant and future COVID mutations?

    This video was recorded on August 6, 2021

    Roger Seheult, MD is the co-founder and lead professor at
    He is Board Certified in Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Disease, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine and an Associate Professor at the University of California, Riverside School of Medicine.

    Interviewer: Kyle Allred, Physician Assistant, Producer, and Co-Founder of MedCram.com

    LINKS / REFERENCES:

    COVID-19 Ventilator Course:

    Lung Ultrasound in COVID 19:

    Delta Variant vs. Previous COVID-19 Infection | MedCram:

    Delta Variant vs. Vaccines | MedCram:

    10 Tips If You Get COVID-19 | MedCram:

    Worldometer:

    Covid-19 Breakthrough Infections in Vaccinated Health Care Workers
    List of authors | NEJM:



    WHO calls for halting COVID-19 vaccine boosters in favor of unvaccinated |

    AMA Physicians Survey |

    Covid-19 Breakthrough Infections in Vaccinated Health Care Workers | NEJM:

    Six Month Safety and Efficacy of the BNT162b2 mRNA COVID-19 Vaccine | MedRxiv:

    The key numbers from the CDC’s new assessment of the delta variant | WP:

    All coronavirus updates are at MedCram.com (including more discussion on delta variant covid, delta plus variant COVID, COVID delta variant, Delta variant in US, Delta variant Canada, and more).


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    MedCram offers group discounts for students and medical programs, hospitals, and other institutions. Contact us at customers@medcram.com if you are interested.


    MEDIA CONTACT:

    Media Contact: customers@medcram.com
    Media contact info:

    Video Produced by Kyle Allred


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    DISCLAIMER:

    MedCram medical videos are for medical education and exam preparation, and NOT intended to replace recommendations from your doctor.

    #COVID19 #Deltavariant #Coronavirus

  • How the COVID-19 virus is transmitted

    1:39

    The COVID-19 virus spreads mainly between people in close contact with each other. It spreads most easily in crowded settings, closed spaces with poor ventilation or through prolonged contact with an infected person. Learn more on:

  • COVID-19 FAQ: If I recovered from coronavirus, am I still contagious?

    07

    Dr. David Priest addresses common coronavirus FAQs including this one around being contagious after recovering from the virus.



    Get coronavirus updates at:

    #COVID19 #coronavirus #recovery #physician #patientcare

  • WHO’s Science in 5 on COVID-19: Immunity after recovery from COVID-19 - 23 December 2020

    4:11

    Science in 5 series - episode #18 /How long does your immunity last after you recover from COVID-19? Can you get reinfected? Why do you need to continue with preventative measures? Dr Maria Van Kerkhove explains on Science in 5.

  • Clearing confusion on asymptomatic spread of COVID-19

    2:14

    Confusion abounds about the difference between asymptomatic and pre-symptomatic infections when it comes to the pandemic coronavirus. Dr. John Lynch, medical director of infection prevention and control at Harborview, explains asymptomatic means someone doesn't show symptoms the entire time they have this coronavirus in their body.

    Pre-symptomatic describes the period of time before someone develops signs of illness. But, whether someone is asymptomatic or presymptomatic doesn't really matter to the general public. Either way, anyone carrying the coronavirus can spread the disease.

    I think what we really want to send home is that you can have no symptoms, feel well and transmit this virus to other people, Lynch says.

    That's why the practices of wearing a mask, washing your hands, and physical distancing are so important to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

  • Will Chinas zero-COVID policy beat Omicron at Winter Olympics? | To the point

    26:07

    The Winter Olympics in Beijing are looming ever closer. And China is being put to the test as it battles to contain outbreaks of the highly-contagious Omicron strain of COVID-19. China has adopted a zero-COVID policy. That means strict restrictions in public life in many parts the country. Will it work? Or might it backfire?

    To the point asks: Olympic struggle - How to beat Omicron?

    _

    0:00 Intro
    4:04 How long can China maintain its 'zero-COVID' policy?
    5:23 How is the 'zero-COVID' policy working?
    8:43 Strict lockdowns cannot contain Omicron
    11:56 More tough lockdowns will hurt Xi Jinping
    15:34 How dangerous is Omicron?
    19:52 Is China safer than Europe?
    23:40 Vaccination is the only way out of the pandemic

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    #ToThePoint #Omicron #ZeroCovid

  • COVID-19 Animation: What Happens If You Get Coronavirus?

    7:28

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    This video 3D animation on COVID-19: What Happens If You Get Coronavirus is a collaboration between Nucleus Medical Media and our friends at the What If Channel. To watch super interesting hypothetical scenarios on the human body, humanity, the planet and the cosmos, please visit the What If Channel at
    #covid-19 #coronavirus #omicron

  • x
  • How omicron broke through coronavirus vaccines

    3:30

    The highly transmissible omicron variant of the coronavirus has taken over as the dominant strain in the United States, resulting in breakthrough infections among the vaccinated.

    Omicron has sparked alarm both internationally and in the United States, where it accounted for more than 98 percent of new infections during the week ending Jan. 8, according to the most recent data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    The variant has an unusually high number of mutations that make it significantly more contagious and capable of eluding the body’s first line of immune defenses. Read more: Subscribe to The Washington Post on YouTube:

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  • People who recover from Covid-19 but still test positive arent contagious: Study

    2:04

    Bertha Coombs joins 'The News with Shepard Smith' to report on a new study which showed people who recovered from Covid-19, but still tests positive don't actually spread the virus onto others. This was based on examining the NBA study bubble. For access to live and exclusive video from CNBC subscribe to CNBC PRO:

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  • Can you transmit COVID after vaccination?

    55

    Keith Armitage, MD, infectious disease physician and Medical Director, UH Roe Green Center for Travel Medicine & Global Health, discusses transmission of COVID-19 after vaccination.

  • Partner Call: Ten Truths about COVID-19

    59:47

    Dr. Messonnier gave late-breaking information about the COVID-19 vaccine. Dr. McDonald shared updates on CDC’s COVID-19 Emergency Response. Dr. Brooks discussed ten important truths about COVID-19 and provide the facts and data behind each, as well as answered questions about the recently updated quarantine guidance from CDC.
    Resources:

    This video can also be viewed at

  • COVID-19 Delta Variant - Masks for Fully Vaccinated People Explained

    4:00

    Dr. Stuart Cohen, Director of Hospital Epidemiology and Infection Control at UC Davis Medical Center, explains why the COVID-19 Delta variant is more easily transmitted than previous variants, how masks should still play a role in keeping you safe (even if you are vaccinated) and why getting a COVID-19 vaccine is vital for preventing future variants of the novel coronavirus.

    Learn more about Delta and masking:
    For the latest information and resources on COVID-19, visit
    See the latest news from UC Davis Health:

    #covid19 #deltavariant #coronavirus #delta #ucdavis

  • Why Are Vaccinated People Testing Positive For COVID?

    4:36

    Despite more Americans getting vaccinated and boosted, there remains a lot of concern about breakthrough COVID cases. What are they, and who’s getting sick? NBC News medical contributor Dr. John Torres and investigative and consumer correspondent Vicky Nguyen join TODAY with everything you need to know ahead of the Christmas holidays.

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  • The Delta Variant: Current Evidence and Literature - COVID-19 | SARS-CoV-2 | Vaccine Efficacy

    1:11:44

    Official Ninja Nerd Website:
    You can find the NOTES and ILLUSTRATIONS for this lecture on our website at:


    In this lecture Professor Zach Murphy will be presenting on The Delta Variant: Current Evidence and Literature - COVID-19 | SARS-CoV-2 | Vaccine Efficacy- as of August 16, 2021.

    During this lecture we will be providing you with the most up to date evidence and literature discussing the Delta Variant and current state of the COVID-19 pandemic. We will begin this lecture by referring to the whiteboard on the current variants of concern and their pathophysiology. Next, we will take a look at current research supporting variants of concern and their relevant attributes. We will then be discussing the research defining the viral load of the Delta variant, and will then support this with evidence from a variety of reputable sources including UpToDate and the CDC. The next chapter of this lecture is a brief discussion on the overall transmissibility of the Delta variant. We look at the transmissibility or the spreadability of this Delta variant in comparison to ancestral strains and the Alpha variant. We will support these findings with current evidence on transmissibility from Public Health England and the CDC. Following this discussion, we move into the severity of the Delta variant in comparison to ancestral strains and the Alpha variant. Once again, we utilize the whiteboard and recently published articles to support our findings on the severity of the Delta variant. We will then transition into the prevalence / most affected populations in regard to the Delta variant. We support our lecture through the use of articles / research studies published by Public Health England, CDC, and The New York Times. The next chapter of our lecture is a discussion on the symptoms and treatment of COVID-19, particularly those affected by the Delta variant. We highlight the different symptoms patients are presenting with in comparison to ancestral strains and the Alpha variant. Finally, we conclude this lecture with a very important discussion on vaccine efficacy, and the potential risk of reinfection rates in regard to the Delta variant. We hope you enjoy this lecture and be sure to support us below!

    References:

    Table of Contents:
    0:00 Lab
    0:08 The Delta Variant Introduction
    0:40 Variants of Concern / Pathophysiology
    8:42 Viral Load
    10:44 Transmissibility
    14:27 Severity
    18:55 Prevalence / Populations Affected
    28:32 Symptoms associated with Delta Variant
    33:04 Treatment of COVID-19
    45:43 Vaccine Efficacy | Pfizer/BioNTech + Moderna + AstraZeneca
    1:01:14 Prevention, Masks, NPI
    1:04:20 Reinfection Rates
    1:10:09 Comment, Like, SUBSCRIBE!

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  • COVID-19 Delta Variant More Contagious Than Chicken Pox: Report

    1:50

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says the COVID-19 delta variant is more contagious than the common cold, chicken pox, even Ebola, according to a report in the Wall Street Journal. Kris Sanchez reports.

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  • How Coronavirus Kills: Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome & COVID 19 Treatment

    11:05

    How COVID-19 causes fatalities from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) by pulmonologist and critical care specialist Dr. Seheult of
    This video illustrates how viruses such as the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 can cause pneumonia or widespread lung inflammation resulting in ARDS.
    Includes evidenced-based ARDS treatment breakthrough strategies: Low tidal volume ventilation, paralysis, and prone positioning.

    Note: this video was recorded on January 28, 2020, with the best information available. Acute respiratory distress is, of course, not the ONLY way COVID 19 causes fatalities (other causes include heart failure, thrombosis (stroke), etc.)

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    Topics from our COVID-19 pandemic series include: coronavirus spread, How Hospitals & Clinics Can Prepare for COVID-19, The ACE-2 Receptor - The Doorway to COVID-19 (ACE Inhibitors & ARBs), Flatten The COVID-19 Curve, Social Distancing, New Outbreaks & Travel Restrictions, Possible COVID-19 Treatments, Italy Lockdown, Global Testing Remains Limited, Coronavirus Epidemic Update 32: Data from South Korea, Can Zinc Help Prevent corona virus? Mortality Rate, Cleaning Products, A More/Less Severe Virus Strain? More Global COVID-19 Outbreaks, Vitamin D May Aid Prevention, Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), Rapid antigen tests, mutations, COVID-19 in Iran & more.

    MedCram.com has medical education topics explained clearly including: Respiratory lectures such as Asthma and COPD. Renal lectures on Acute Renal Failure, Urinalysis, and The Adrenal Gland. Internal medicine videos on Oxygen Hemoglobin Dissociation Curve / Oxyhemoglobin Curve and Medical Acid Base. A growing library on critical care topics such as Shock, Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA), aortic stenosis, and Mechanical Ventilation. Cardiology videos on Hypertension, ECG / EKG Interpretation, and heart failure. VQ Mismatch and Hyponatremia lectures have been popular among medical students and physicians. The Pulmonary Function Tests (PFTs) videos, how coronavirus causes morbidity and mortality, and Ventilator-associated pneumonia lectures have been particularly popular with RTs. NPs and PAs have provided great feedback on Pneumonia Treatment and Liver Function Tests among many others. Mechanical ventilation for nursing and the emergency & critical care RN course is available at MedCram.com. Dr. Jacquet teaches our EFAST exam tutorial, lung sonography & bedside ultrasound courses. Many nursing students have found the Asthma and shock lectures very helpful. We're starting a new course series on clinical ultrasound & ultrasound medical imaging in addition to other radiology lectures.

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    #coronavirus #COVID19 #ARDS

  • COVID : The TRUTH about how long is someone CONTAGIOUS or infectious with coronavirus

    6:28

    In this medical video, we talk about how long someone who got infected with coronavirus is contagious or infectious. Virus shedding by infected persons leads to the spread of coronavirus. This can cause covid infection to transmit from one person to another. Based on latest research, this is an update on the need for quarantine. This corona virus is highly contagious / infectious. So isolating the infected person is important. The video also discussed a return to work after coronavirus infection once the person is not considered infectious or contagious.

    Please note the information and news about COVID19 coronavirus contagiousness are constantly changing so please consult your doctor for the latest recommendations.

  • Dr. Jason Bowling on how long COVID-19 is contagious

    2:18

    Dr. Jason Bowling on how long COVID-19 is contagious. Video courtesy of University Health System.

  • How long are you contagious if you have COVID-19?

    1:18

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate up to 40% of coronavirus transmission happens before people feel sick.

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  • Can a person be contagious more than five days after positive COVID test?

    1:23

    Yes, a person still can be contagious more than five days after their first positive COVID test.

  • When are you no longer contagious?

    2:03

    ABC13 spoke with a health expert to answer this question.

  • Omicron - Incubation And Contagious Period

    21:07

    Omicron continues to spread and we are starting to learn more and more about how this variant differs from previous variants. In this video we discuss the incubation period of the virus, or how long after you are exposed do you typically develop symptoms. We discuss how this differs from previous variants with some theories as to why. We also talk about how long you may be contagious and touch on the new CDC guidelines.

    The median incubation period for Omicron seems to around 3 days per the more recent data out of Norway, Nebraska, and the UK. With this being said, 0-8 days has been reported, so we cannot completely count on the 3 day number. This seems to be similar in vaccinated, unvaccinated, and previously infected although the data on unvaccinated is limited.



    This faster incubation period and increased transmission may be because Omicron seems to replicate much much faster in the upper airways than Delta does.



    The CDC shortened their quarantine period to 5 days with another 5 days masked in public. This seems to be an attempt to get people back to work more quickly, rather than a statement that you are only contagious for 5 days. Data suggests you are most contagious 1-2 days before symptoms and 2-3 days after symptoms, but may extend beyond this.


    Learn more about Omicron in the videos below!
    Modeling Omicron Spread - Surge Data, Hospitalizations, Deaths

    Omicron - How Good Are Vaccines (Pfizer, Moderna, AstraZeneca)

    Omicron And COVID-19 - Outpatient Treatments And Staying Out Of The Hospital

    Omicron Symptoms – What To Look Out For And Expect

    Omicron Severity of Disease in Unvaccinated, Vaccinated, and Previously Infected: New COVID Variant

    Omicron The New COVID-19 Variant: Everything You Should Know And More

    Omicron And COVID-19 Mutations: How, How Often, And Why Does This Virus Mutate?


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    There will be a running series of videos using the most up to date information on COVID-19, but this is an evolving field and new videos may come out that contradict that previous information. That is okay and is the nature of a fast paced and evolving clinical scenario. Stick with us as we work to unveil the intricacies of COVID-19, it's clinical significance, and the societal implications. ***This is strictly educational and not to be mistaken as clinical recommendations, please verify all information with accepted guidelines and practice patterns.***

    DISCLAIMER
    THIS VIDEO DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. The information, including but not limited to, text, graphics, images and other material contained on this website are for informational purposes only. No material on this site is intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment and before undertaking a new health care regimen, and never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read, watched, or listened to on this video, or any other videos, reports, texts tweets or other sources.

  • The science behind COVID-19: When are you contagious?

    2:34

    Read more here:

  • How long are you contagious after testing positive for COVID-19?

    1:52

    Dr. Corey Hebert reviews how long you are potentially contagious after first testing positive for COVID-19.

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  • Contagious For Weeks After Severe COVID-19 Infection? Viral Shedding, PCR Cycle Threshold, And More!

    14:32

    A question that remains unanswered is how long you may be contagious after you have had COVID-19. A handful of studies have worked to answer this question after mild infection with many quoting viable viral shedding for 8-12 days after symptom onset. What about after severe infection though? New data suggests that you may remain contagious with viable viral shedding for more than 3 weeks after symptom onset! Additionally, the study dove into PCR cycle thresholds in these patients as related to viable viral shedding. Is there a PCR cycle threshold that confirms or eliminates viable viral shedding in those with severe COVID-19? Check out the video for an explanation and discussion on all these things and more!

    Link to the study:


    Epidemiology/Transmission/Reinfection in COVID-19 Playlist:


    If you enjoy the content and feel inclined, here are some ways in which you can support us! Funds will go towards purchasing better equipment/software, dedicating more time to the channel, and continuing to strive towards taking this channel to the next level!

    PayPal:


    Buy Us A Coffee:
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    YouTube Membership tab:
    It has a “Join” button at the top right corner of our Channel’s home page. We appreciate you!

    Become a WBDR Patreon Patron:
    Get exclusive perks, merchandise, and more!


    We love to get involved in the #FOAMed world through Twitter as well. Come check us out, we would love to hear from you! @WhiteBoardDoct1


    There will be a running series of videos using the most up to date information on COVID-19, but this is an evolving field and new videos may come out that contradict that previous information. That is okay and is the nature of a fast paced and evolving clinical scenario. Stick with us as we work to unveil the intricacies of COVID-19, it's clinical significance, and the societal implications. ***This is strictly educational and not to be mistaken as clinical recommendations, please verify all information with accepted guidelines and practice patterns.***

    DISCLAIMER
    THIS VIDEO DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. The information, including but not limited to, text, graphics, images and other material contained on this website are for informational purposes only. No material on this site is intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment and before undertaking a new health care regimen, and never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read, watched, or listened to on this video, or any other videos, reports, texts tweets or other sources.

  • CDC shortens quarantine for people exposed to Covid-19

    1:57

    Dr. Carlos Del Rio, Emory School of Medicine executive associate dean, suggests day 1 to 6 to quarantine and masking, but if the patient tests negative on day 7 to end the quarantine. This could reduce the strain on health workers, he says. Meg Tirrell joins Shep Smith to discuss what the Covid-19 test turnaround times are across the U.S., as well as new CDC recommendations for quarantining. For access to live and exclusive video from CNBC subscribe to CNBC PRO:

    The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is considering shortening its recommended two-week quarantine period for people who have come in contact with people who have it — a change welcomed by some medical experts who say the relaxed guidelines would be easier for people to follow.

    Current CDC guidelines recommend that anyone exposed to a person with the coronavirus quarantine at home for 14 days, even if they test negative for the virus. Scientists say that helps prevent further spread of the disease before they start showing symptoms or from those who don’t develop any symptoms.

    However, CDC Director Robert Redfield said in late October that those guidelines were made when diagnostic testing wasn’t as readily available as it is today. At the time, Redfield said the agency was trying to determine whether a quarantine period could be shortened to as little as seven days with a negative Covid-19 test.

    “It’s data driven, it’s under evaluation, obviously we don’t want people to be quarantined for 14 days unnecessarily,” Redfield said during an Oct. 21 press briefing at the CDC’s headquarters in Atlanta.

    Dr. Henry Walke, the CDC’s incident manager for Covid-19 response, said the agency is now finalizing those new guidelines to recommend a quarantine period for seven to 10 days with a negative Covid-19 test, according to The Wall Street Journal. Agency officials are still determining the exact length of the quarantine and what type of test would be needed to end it, the Journal reported on Tuesday.

    “CDC is always reviewing its guidance and recommendations in the light of new understandings of the virus that causes COVID-19, and will announce such changes when appropriate,” CDC spokesperson Belsie Gonzalez told CNBC on Wednesday.

    Adm. Brett Giroir, assistant secretary of health who leads the federal government’s testing efforts as part of the White House coronavirus task force, said during a press call on Tuesday that there’s beginning to be “a preponderance of evidence that a shorter quarantine complemented by a test might be able to shorten that quarantine period from 14 days” to a shorter period.

    “We are actively working on that type of guidance right now, reviewing the evidence, but we want to make absolutely sure,” Giroir told reporters. “These kind of recommendations aren’t willy-nilly. They’re worked on with a variety of experts.”

    ‘Should have done this sooner’

    The shorter quarantine period could make it easier for people to follow the CDC’s recommendations since most people were likely shortening the two-week period on their own, Dr. Scott Gottlieb, the former Food and Drug Commissioner, said on Wednesday.

    For people who have Covid-19 but are asymptomatic, meaning they never develop symptoms, chances are they will no longer be very contagious after seven to 10 days, Gottlieb said. The number of people who will contract the infection two weeks after their exposure is also “very small,” he said.

    “I mean, frankly, we probably should have done this sooner,” Gottlieb told CNBC’s “Squawk Box.” “Asking people to quarantine for a full two weeks, to self-isolate for a full two weeks because of an exposure is just going to drive people not to comply with the rules. We’re better off doing something that’s practical.”

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  • COVID-19: HOW LONG ARE YOU REALLY CONTAGIOUS FOR?

    10:14

    SELF-ISOLATION PART 2SELF-ISOLATION RULES CONFUSING YOU? Part 2 has Dr Dev Patel examining timelines of COVID19 disease within the body based on current data. If you missed part 1 make sure you watch this, in which he goes through the essentials of the Government’s advice on this. Please visit the NHS website for more information esp if you wish to check if you fit into the high risk group and may need to ‘shield’. Note, some cases of re-infection have been evidenced and if you get symptoms after a presumed or proven episode of COVID19 you must self-isolate again. If this happens to a member of your household but not you (and you followed the 14 day self-isolation advice when they began their FIRST episode of symptoms), you do not have to self-isolate again if they get a recurrence of symptoms BUT if you can, my advice would be to do so as a precaution. His underlying note is that until we eradicate COVID19 from the globe, we will be a threat to each other and must behave - where at all possible - with that in mind.

  • Delta Variant Of COVID-19 Is ‘By Far The Most Contagious, Says Doctor

    2:58

    Dr. Ashish Jha, dean of the Brown University School of Public Health, tells TODAY that the Delta variant of COVID-19 is “by far the most contagious variant of the virus we have seen throughout the whole pandemic” but says people who have been vaccinated needn’t worry. But he worries about “large pockets” of Americans who are still unvaccinated, and has doubts about whether President Biden’s goal will be reached: “I’m not sure we’re going to hit that number.”

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    #Covid #Vaccines #Coronavirus

  • COVID-19 | How long after infection would my antibody test turn positive?

    48

    For more information about COVID-19 visit:

  • Omicron variant has shorter incubation period, nearly 20 times more contagious than other strains

    1:27

    A Nevada health expert says symptoms for the Omicron variant are showing up much faster than other strains of the virus. “This is probably one of the fastest expanding waves that we’ve had yet,” said Dr. Daliah Wachs, a board certified family physician.

  • A Shot Of Truth Episode 78: How contagious is the Omicron variant?

    36

    While data is collected regarding the Omicron variant, it is important to get your COVID vaccine and booster shot, and to stay up-to-date with information as it is released. #AShotOfTruth

  • COVID-19 Frontline Ep 28: Do patients remain contagious after recovering from COVID-19?

    2:28

    Dr. Cui Wei, Chair of ICU, and Head of Expert Panel for COVID-19 Patients in Wenzhou commissioned by Zhejiang Provincial Health Commission, shares research findings on whether recovered patients still share the COVID-19 virus.

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  • Can doctors tell if you’re no longer contagious?

    1:35

    Dr. Jen Ashton answers viewers’ COVID-19-related questions.

  • Omicron is ‘an astronomically contagious disease,’ medical expert says

    6:22

    ABC News’ Linsey Davis speaks with Dr. Alok Patel of Stanford Children’s Health on the rapid spread of omicron as it becomes the most dominant variant in the U.S.

  • Omicron is now the second most contagious virus on the planet

    42

    How contagious is omicron? Dr. Claudia Hoyen of University Hospitals says the new variant is second only to measles.

    With federal health officials announcing Monday that omicron now accounts for 73 percent of new infections as COVID cases surge nationwide, a Cleveland doctor is offering more context behind the variant’s contagion status.

    “When we look at the factors surrounding how contagious these viruses can be, the most contagious virus we think of is measles,” explained Dr. Claudia Hoyen, Pediatric Infection Control for UH Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital. “That has a factor of about 18. This new variant of COVID-19 has a factor of 15, so it is the second most contagious virus on the planet currently.”

    Her comments came during a joint press conference with Cleveland Clinic officials Tuesday morning in which a variety of medical experts addressed their concerns about the current spike in new infections.

    READ MORE:

  • How Long Are You Contagious? Dr. Mallika Marshalls Answers COVID Questions

    3:55

    Dr. Mallika Marshall is answering COVID-related questions from viewers.

  • Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast: What is viral shedding?

    18:35

    When a person is infected with a virus, the virus multiplies in the body and can be released into the environment through sneezing, coughing or even speaking. This release is called shedding and viral shedding is how COVID-19 is spread from person to person. How long a person who has COVID-19 will shed virus is still unknown.

    On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic’s Vaccine Research Group, discusses viral shedding and why asymptomatic carriers of COVID-19 are a big concern.

    This interview was recorded on Aug. 10, 2020. Information in this post was accurate at the time of its posting. Due to the fluid nature of the COVID-19 pandemic, scientific understanding along with guidelines and recommendations may have changed since the original publication date.

    More information on COVID-19:

    Dr. Poland has served as a consultant for Merck & Co. Inc., Medicago Inc., GlaxoSmithKline plc, Sanofi Pasteur, Emergent BioSolutions Inc., Dynavax Technologies Corp., Genentech Inc., Eli Lilly and Co., Kentucky BioProcessing Inc. and Genevant Sciences Corp., and Janssen Pharmaceuticals Inc. He is a paid scientific adviser for Johnson & Johnson. Honoraria: Elsevier.

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