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COVID-19 Vaccines: MODERNA | PFIZER/BIONTECH | ASTRAZENECA

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  • COVID-19 Vaccines: MODERNA | PFIZER/BIONTECH | ASTRAZENECA

    43:41

    Official Ninja Nerd Website:
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    During this lecture Professor Zach Murphy will be discussing COVID-19 vaccines including Moderna, Pfizer/BioNTech, and Astrazeneca/Oxford.

    We are NOT sponsored and/or endorsed by Moderna, Pfizer/BioNTech, or Astrazeneca. We are presenting on RESEARCH and in no way is any of the information provided our own view or opinions.

    This will be a lecture packed with the process vaccine developers must go through; which includes a preclinical phase and phases I-III. Including information about OPERATION WARP SPEED and how this has expedited the normally lengthy vaccine process.

    We will then discuss how Moderna, Pfizer/BioNTech, and Astrazeneca vaccines work in the human body, preventing the SARS-CoV-2 virus and hopefully, ending this global pandemic.

    Finally-- Zach presents on all of the most current data that each of the vaccine companies have released outlining the vaccine procedure and how it will be administered, the vaccine efficacy (as a percentage), optimal storage temperature of the vaccine in order to remain viable, and the number of vaccine units these companies are capable of producing. We hope you enjoy this lecture and be sure to support us below!

    IMPORTANT INFO (MUST READ):
    One thing to emphasize that wasn’t harped on enough from this lecture is when these vaccines lead to an immunogenic reaction as we described above, which leads to formation of Memory B cells and Memory T cells. This is important because if we are exposed to the virus those memory cells are now primed and able to recognize and mount a powerful immune response against the virus.

    LASTLY, one additional point and clarification is when those cytotoxic T cells produce destructive molecules that damage host cells it’s important to realize that those are memory cytotoxic T cells primed by the Vaccine that damage host cells that ARE INFECTED with the SARS-COV-2 virus, NOT CELLS processing the vaccine.

    Big Takeaway:
    1. Vaccine stimulates antibody production to protect against virus IF INFECTED.
    2. Vaccine stimulates development of memory T and B cells to protect against virus IF INFECTED.

    References |
    Regulatory Affairs Professionals Society (RAPS) COVID-19 Tracker


    Outline:
    00:00 - Intro and Overview
    01:00 - Vaccine Development Phases Overview
    05:08 - Pre-Clinical Phase
    06:32 - Phase I
    08:29 - Phase II
    12:36 - How the Vaccines Work (Moderna and Pfizer/BionTech)
    21:16 - How the Vaccines Work (AstraZeneca/Oxford)
    25:33 - Vaccine Data (Moderna)
    30:30 - Vaccine Data (Pfizer/BionTech)
    35:21 - Vaccine Data (AstraZeneca)
    43:02 - Wrap-Up

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    #COVID19 #coronavirus #vaccines

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  • Coronavirus Update 118: AstraZeneca DNA COVID 19 Vaccine Explained

    14:12

    Professor Roger Seheult, MD discusses the AstraZeneca and Oxford DNA COVID-19 Vaccine: How it works, and what we know about the safety, efficacy, and side effects at this time.

    Dr. Seheult illustrates the differences and similarities between the AstraZeneca / Oxford vaccine candidate and those from Moderna and Pfizer / BioNTech.

    The complete data from each of these SARS CoV 2 vaccine trials have not been released nor peer-reviewed at this time, and none of the COVID 19 vaccines have received FDA authorization to date.

    Dr. Sheult explains some of the potential advantages of the AstraZeneca Oxford vaccine candidate including a lower cost and that it only requires regular refrigeration. (This video was recorded on November 24, 2020).

    Roger Seheult, MD is the co-founder and lead professor at
    He is Board Certified in Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Disease, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine and an Associate Professor at the University of California, Riverside School of Medicine.


    LINKS / REFERENCES:

    Johns Hopkins Tracker |

    Worldometer |

    AstraZeneca press release |

    AstraZeneca-Oxford Covid-19 Vaccine Up to 90% Effective in Late-Stage Trials (Wall Street Journal) |

    Why the AstraZeneca-Oxford Covid-19 vaccine is different (Vox) |

    Why the Pfizer and BioNTech vaccine is a cause for optimism — and skepticism (Vox) |

    AstraZeneca Registered Trial in US |

    Pfizer claims its Covid-19 vaccine is 90 percent effective so far. Here’s what we actually know. (Vox) |

    These Covid-19 vaccine candidates could change the way we make vaccines — if they work (Vox) |

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    RECENT PREVIOUS COVID-19 UPDATES:

    Please visit MedCram.com for the full series:
    - Coronavirus Update 117: Moderna vs. Pfizer COVID 19 Vaccine (mRNA vaccines)
    - Coronavirus Update 116: Pfizer COVID 19 Vaccine Explained (Biontech)
    - Coronavirus Update 115: Convalescent Plasma vs Monoclonal Antibodies for COVID 19 Treatment
    - Coronavirus Update 114: COVID 19 Death Rate Drops; NAC (N acetylcysteine) Data
    - Coronavirus Update 113: Remdesivir May Not Work for COVID 19
    - Coronavirus Update 112: Linoleic Acid; Vaccines; UK COVID 19 Data
    - Coronavirus Update 111: Masks; New Vitamin D Data and COVID 19; NAC
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 110: Trump's Risk Factors and COVID-19 Prognosis; Interferon
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 109: New Data From Europe As COVID 19 Infections Rise
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 108: High Risk COVID 19 Behaviors; Cases Rise in Europe
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 107: Monoclonal Antibodies for COVID 19 Treatment and Prevention?

    All coronavirus updates are at MedCram.com (including monoclonal antibody treatment vs convalescent plasma treatment, COVID vaccine, mRNA vaccine, COVID 19 prevention, Pfizer vaccine and Moderna vaccines, Biontech, AstraZeneca Oxford coronavirus vaccine, COVID 19 treatments, COVID-19 vaccine updates, and more).
    We offer over 60 medical topics (ECG Interpretation, DKA, influenza, measles, mechanical ventilation, etc.) on our website.


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    MEDIA CONTACT:

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    Video Produced by Kyle Allred

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    DISCLAIMER:

    MedCram medical videos are for medical education and exam preparation, and NOT intended to replace recommendations from your doctor.
    #COVID19 #SARSCoV2

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  • Coronavirus Update 117: Moderna vs. Pfizer COVID 19 Vaccine

    14:41

    Professor Roger Seheult, MD discusses the Moderna COVID-19 mRNA vaccine: How it works and what we know about the safety, efficacy, and side effects at this time.

    No mRNA vaccine has ever been approved by the FDA, but Moderna and Pfizer/BioNTech hope to receive emergency approval based on preliminary data from their ongoing vaccine trials.

    Moderna's two-dose vaccine regimen does not require special refrigeration (the Pfizer vaccine is supposed to be stored at -70 Celcius) but a variety of questions remain:
    Will the vaccine prevent transmission and asymptomatic spread?
    How long will immunity last?
    Will “94.5% effective” hold up to peer-review and additional data when it is gathered?

    (This video was recorded on November 17, 2020).

    Dr. Seheult is the co-founder and lead instructor at


    LINKS / REFERENCES:

    Johns Hopkins Tracker |

    Worldometer |

    Outcomes for Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in the United States During the Coronavirus Disease 2019 Pandemic (JAMA Cardiology) |

    Moderna’s Covid-19 vaccine is strongly effective, early look at data show (STAT) |

    mRNA Platform: Enabling Drug Discovery & Development (Moderna) |

    What is mRNA? (Moderna) |

    Moderna’s COVID-19 Vaccine Candidate Meets its Primary Efficacy Endpoint in the First Interim Analysis of the Phase 3 COVE Study (Moderna) |


    THE MEDCRAM WEBSITE:

    Visit us for videos on over 60 medical topics and CME / CEs for medical professionals:


    SUBSCRIBE TO THE MEDCRAM YOUTUBE CHANNEL:


    Get notified of new videos by hitting the bell icon:


    RECENT PREVIOUS COVID-19 UPDATES:

    Please visit MedCram.com for the full series:
    - Coronavirus Update 116: Pfizer COVID 19 Vaccine Explained (Biontech)
    - Coronavirus Update 115: Convalescent Plasma vs Monoclonal Antibodies for COVID 19 Treatment
    - Coronavirus Update 114: COVID 19 Death Rate Drops; NAC (N acetylcysteine) Data
    - Coronavirus Update 113: Remdesivir May Not Work for COVID 19
    - Coronavirus Update 112: Linoleic Acid; Vaccines; UK COVID 19 Data
    - Coronavirus Update 111: Masks; New Vitamin D Data and COVID 19; NAC
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 110: Trump's Risk Factors and COVID-19 Prognosis; Interferon
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 109: New Data From Europe As COVID 19 Infections Rise
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 108: High Risk COVID 19 Behaviors; Cases Rise in Europe
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 107: Monoclonal Antibodies for COVID 19 Treatment and Prevention?
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 105: FDA Authorized Treatments; COVID 19 Vaccine Update
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 103: Convalescent Plasma Treatment & the FDA; College Campuses Close

    All coronavirus updates are at MedCram.com (including monoclonal antibody treatment vs convalescent plasma treatment, COVID vaccine, mRNA vaccine, COVID 19 prevention, Pfizer and Moderna vaccines, Biontech, coronavirus vaccine, COVID 19 treatments, COVID-19 vaccine updates, and more).
    We offer over 60 medical topics (ECG Interpretation, DKA, influenza, measles, mechanical ventilation, etc.) on our website.


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    MedCram offers group discounts for students and a variety of medical programs, hospitals, and other institutions. Contact us at customers@medcram.com if you are interested.


    MEDIA CONTACT:

    Roger Seheult, MD
    Board Certified in Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Disease, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine.
    Associate Professor at the University of California, Riverside School of Medicine

    Media Contact: customers@medcram.com
    Media contact info:

    Video Produced by Kyle Allred

    FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA:






    DISCLAIMER:

    MedCram medical videos are for medical education and exam preparation, and NOT intended to replace recommendations from your doctor.
    #COVID19 #SARSCoV2

  • AstraZeneca Second Doses vs Moderna and Pfizer COVID Vaccines

    8:04

    Roger Seheult, MD of MedCram discusses new AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine data and compares second doses of the Oxford AZ vaccine with Pfizer and Modera vaccines. View all Dr. Seheult's videos at:

    (This video is MedCram COVID-19 update 136 and was recorded on November 9, 2021)

    Roger Seheult, MD is the co-founder and lead professor at
    He is Board Certified in Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Disease, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine and an Associate Professor at the University of California, Riverside School of Medicine.


    LINKS / REFERENCES:

    AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine: benefits and risks in context (European Medicines Agency) |

    Effectiveness of heterologous ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 and mRNA prime-boost vaccination against symptomatic Covid-19 infection in Sweden: A nationwide cohort study (ScienceDirect) |

    Coronavirus Update 118: AstraZeneca DNA COVID 19 Vaccine Explained (vs. Pfizer / BioNTech, Moderna) (MedCram) |

    All coronavirus updates are at MedCram.com (including more discussion on astrazeneca vaccine second dose, the COVID delta variant, moderna, pfizer booster, vaccine rollout, blood clots, AstraZeneca second doses, moderna vaccine, and more).


    SUBSCRIBE TO THE MEDCRAM YOUTUBE CHANNEL:


    Get notified of new videos by hitting the bell icon

    MEDCRAM WORKS WITH MEDICAL PROGRAMS AND HOSPITALS:

    MedCram offers group discounts for students and medical programs, hospitals, and other institutions. Contact us at customers@medcram.com if you are interested.


    MEDIA CONTACT:

    Media Contact: customers@medcram.com
    Media contact info:

    Video Produced by Kyle Allred


    FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA:






    DISCLAIMER:

    MedCram medical videos are for medical education and exam preparation, and NOT intended to replace recommendations from your doctor.

    #COVID19 #SARSCoV2 #Coronavirus

  • x
  • How the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine was developed

    13:31

    Bill Whitaker reports on the scientists and advances in biotechnology behind a COVID-19 vaccine that could help end the pandemic.

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    60 Minutes, the most successful American television broadcast in history, began its 52nd season in September. Offering hard-hitting investigative reports, interviews, feature segments and profiles of people in the news, the broadcast began in 1968 is still a hit in 2020. 60 Minutes makes Nielsen’s weekly Top 10 nearly every week and was the #1 weekly television broadcast three times last season.


    The program still averages more than 10 million viewers, more than double the audience of its nearest network news magazine competitor. The average audience for a 60 Minutes broadcast is 150% higher than those of the network morning news programs; the audience dwarfs the number of viewers drawn by the most popular cable news programs.


    About a million more people listen to the 60 Minutes radio simulcast in several major cities and on its companion podcast. Tens of thousands each week experience 60 Minutes online. The broadcast’s segments can be watched at 60Minutes.com and on the CBS All Access app. Its webcast, 60MinutesOvertime.com, offers content originally produced for the web, including behind-the-scenes video about the production of 60 Minutes stories and timely archival segments.


    60 Minutes has won every major broadcast award. Its 25 Peabody and 150 Emmy awards are the most won by any single news program. It has also won 20 duPont-Columbia University journalism awards. Other distinguished journalism honors won multiple times include the George Polk, RTDNA Edward R. Murrow, Investigative Reporters and Editors, RFK Journalism, Sigma Delta Chi and Gerald Loeb awards.

    60 Minutes premiered on CBS September 24, 1968. Bill Owens is the program’s executive producer. The correspondents and contributors of 60 Minutes are Sharyn Alfonsi, Anderson Cooper, John Dickerson, Norah O’Donnell, Scott Pelley, Lesley Stahl, Bill Whitaker and L. Jon Wertheim.

  • RNA Vaccines - Basis of Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines, Animation

    3:19

    The basis of upcoming Pfizer and Moderna coronavirus vaccines. How it works? Pluses and minuses. For comparison of different vaccines, as well as events of immune response, role of different immune cells (T-cells, B-cells, APC), see this video:
    This video is available for instant download licensing here:
    ©Alila Medical Media. All rights reserved.
    Support us on Patreon and get early access to videos and free image downloads: patreon.com/AlilaMedicalMedia
    All images/videos by Alila Medical Media are for information purposes ONLY and are NOT intended to replace professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified healthcare provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.
    Vaccines prepare the immune system, getting it ready to fight disease-causing organisms, called pathogens. A vaccine is introduced to the body to mimic infection, triggering the body to produce antibodies against the pathogen, but without causing the illness. Conventional vaccines usually contain a weakened or inactivated pathogen; or a piece of a protein produced by the pathogen, called an antigen.
    RNA vaccines are a new generation of vaccines. Instead of the antigen itself, RNA vaccines contain a messenger RNA – mRNA - that encodes for the antigen. Once inside the body’s cells, the mRNA is translated into protein, the antigen, by the same process the cells use to make their own proteins. The antigen is then displayed on the cell surface where it is recognized by the immune system. From here, the sequence of events is similar to that of a conventional vaccine.
    Some RNA vaccines also contain additional mRNA coding for an enzyme, which, after being translated in host cells, can generate multiple copies of the antigen-encoding mRNA. This essentially amplifies the production of antigen from a small amount of vaccine, making the vaccine more effective. These are called self-amplifying RNA vaccines.
    RNA vaccines are easier and safer to produce than conventional vaccines. This is because mRNA molecules can be synthesized in a cell-free system using a DNA template with a sequence of the pathogen; while conventional vaccines usually require a more complicated and risk-prone process of growing large amounts of infectious pathogens in chicken eggs or other mammalian cells. Without the risks of being contaminated by infectious elements or allergens from egg cultures, RNA vaccines are also safer for patients.
    Because protein synthesis occurs in the cytoplasm, RNA molecules do not need to enter the nucleus, so the possibility of them integrating into the host cell genome is low. RNA strands are usually degraded by cellular enzymes once the protein is made.
    The relative simplicity of the production process makes it easier to standardize and scale, enabling rapid responses to emerging pandemics. Other advantages include lower production costs, and the ease of tweaking RNA sequences to adapt to rapidly-mutating pathogens.
    On the minus side, it can be challenging to deliver mRNA effectively to the cells, since RNA sequences and secondary structures may be recognized and destroyed by the innate immune system as soon as they are administered intravenously. These limitations can be overcome by optimizing codons, using modified nucleosides to avoid recognition, and packaging RNA into protective nanoparticles.
    Another disadvantage is that most RNA vaccines require uninterrupted refrigeration for transportation and storage, which can be a hurdle for vaccine distribution. Research is ongoing to engineer thermostable vaccines.

  • x
  • COVID-19: Moderna CEO hopeful for COVID and flu combo vaccine in the future

    55

    #shorts #COVID19 #ModernaCEO #Moderna
    Moderna CEO Stéphane Bancel discusses developing combination vaccines that can create immunity for COVID, the flu, and other respiratory viruses.
    Don't Miss: Valley of Hype: The Culture That Built Elizabeth Holmes
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  • How Moderna And Pfizer-BioNTech Developed Vaccines In Record Time

    59:52

    The decision to pivot an entire business to focus on the coronavirus is an obvious one in hindsight, at least for Moderna, BioNTech and Pfizer, which succeeded beyond anyone’s expectations — and will reap billions of dollars in sales of their vaccines this year alone.

    It wasn’t such a clear decision in the early months of 2020, though that’s when Moderna’s chief executive, Stephane Bancel, and BioNTech’s chief, Ugur Sahin, starting turning their ships, they told CNBC in interviews for this documentary about the vaccine race, produced by CNBC senior health and science reporter Meg Tirrell and senior digital producer Sam Rega.

    “The night that China locked down Wuhan, I’m like: ‘When was the last time I know a city has been locked down because of an infectious disease?’” Bancel recalled. “And what goes through my mind is: what do the Chinese know that we don’t know?“

    Bancel said he awoke sweating at 4 a.m., realizing, “Jeez, there’s going to be a pandemic like 1918.”

    For Sahin, it was reading a paper in the Lancet in late January describing the outbreak in China.

    “I did a number of calculations, fast calculations, and realized it had already spread,” Sahin said. “And it was clear that it was already too late to stop the disease.”

    But he was convinced BioNTech, then focused mainly on personalized cancer therapies, may be able to do something. His company reached out to Pfizer, he said, proposing to work on a vaccine for the novel coronavirus using the same technology, messenger RNA, on which they’d already partnered to try to tackle the flu.

    “We had the first contact a few days after starting the project,” Sahin said. “At that time, Pfizer was not yet interested.”

    Albert Bourla, Pfizer’s CEO, confirmed Sahin’s account, saying in the earliest months of 2020, he was focused on maintaining the company’s operations in China. But by late February, he said, he’d determined Pfizer needed to work on a treatment and a vaccine.

    “What is the best approach?” Bourla said he asked his team.

    Kathrin Jansen, head of Pfizer’s vaccine research and development, said they assessed all existing technologies, including protein-based vaccines and vaccines using viral vectors.

    “They all have too few pros and too many cons,” she said.

    But messenger RNA was a risk; it had never been used before as an approved vaccine or drug.

    “I wrestled a little bit with the decision,” Bourla said. But after another meeting with the team, “they convinced me.”

    That’s when Sahin called a second time. The outbreak, by that point, was already in New York, he said. Reaching Jansen, he described the work that BioNTech already had underway, and asked if Pfizer would like to work together.

    “And I said: absolutely,” Jansen remembered. “Let’s talk about this.”

    At Moderna, it was never a question that messenger RNA would be the way forward; that was the technology around which the company was founded in 2010. But that didn’t mean questions didn’t exist.

    “Even going into March, there were voices that said vaccines were false hope,” recalled Dr. Stephen Hoge, Moderna’s president. “It did feel for a period of time that we needed to defend even the idea of trying.”

    “When we were thinking about how do we get into Phase 1, what does it look like to prepare for a pandemic, the eyes of the world felt as though they were looking at Moderna as this biotech ... ‘what are they trying to do?’” said Hamilton Bennett, Moderna’s senior director of vaccine access and partnerships.

    “It was only when we transitioned in that March notification from the WHO that this was a global pandemic, it’s an emergency, that I think people started to realize that what we’re doing isn’t playing in a sandbox trying to demonstrate our technology,” Bennett said. “We’re developing a vaccine that’s going to stop the pandemic.”

    The companies succeeded, in what became one of the greatest medical races in history. Here, they recall how it happened.

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    A Race Against Covid: How Moderna And Pfizer-BioNTech Developed Vaccines In Record Time

  • Top 8 Vaccines for Covid-19 | Comparison

    3:29

    In this video we have discussed about the Vaccines globally present for the Covid-19.
    These 8 vaccines shows the efficacy of 60-90 % depending upon the variant we are targeting. The top 8 vaccines that we have currently present includes the :
    Pfizer BioNtech
    Moderna
    Johnson and Johnson
    Astrazeneca /Covisheild
    Sputnik V
    Novavax
    Covaxin
    Sinovac/Coronavac

  • x
  • COVID 19 Vaccine Deep Dive: Safety, Immunity, RNA Production,

    34:29

    Professor Shane Crotty, PhD joins MedCram to answer a series of COVID vaccine questions including what are the chances of long-term side effects? How safe is RNA vaccine (i.e. Pfizer / BioNTech and Moderna Vaccines) technology? How long does mRNA from a vaccine stay in our cells? What else goes in vaccines? How long does immunity last? Why are T-Cells so important? Why does Pfizer's vaccine need to stay SO cold?

    Shane Crotty, PhD is a Professor at the La Jolla Institute for Immunology, Center for Infectious Disease and Vaccine Research, Crotty Lab. Professor Crotty also has an academic appointment with the University of California San Diego. He has earned the rare distinction of World Expert in vaccine research by Expertscape which place Professor Crotty in the top 0.1% of scholars publishing information on vaccines over the past 10 years. See his full bio here:
    Professor Crotty on Twitter:

    Interviewer: Kyle Allred, Physician Assistant, Producer and Co-Founder of MedCram.com

    See our new interview with Prof. Crotty on how virus mutations (UK variant and S. African variant) may be impacting COVID-19 transmission and vaccine efficacy.

    Research referenced in this video from Prof. Crotty and his team was published Jan. 6, 2021, in the prestigious Journal Science:

    New York Times article highlighting Prof. Shane Crotty's research:

    00:00 Introducing Prof. Shane Crotty's Research
    0:35 How long does COVID-19 immune memory last?
    0:57 The three primary aspects of immune memory: antibodies, killer T cells, and helper T cells
    2:25 The anatomy (protein makeup) of SARS-CoV-2
    3:02 Why is spike protein the primary target?
    5:17 Could a mutation allow SARS-CoV-2 to infect without spike protein?
    7:02 Utilizing lipid nanoparticles to deliver mRNA and the role of RNA normally
    9:52 What human cells does an RNA vaccine go into?
    10:36 How long does mRNA from a vaccine stay in human cells?
    11:44 What else goes in vaccines besides mRNA and lipid nanoparticles? Any preservatives or adjuvants?
    12:30 Why are adjuvants used in many vaccines?
    14:08 Protein production from mRNA
    15:00 Why utilize the extra step of mRNA to code for protein antigens?
    17:28 Are mRNA vaccines the future of vaccine development?
    19:18 Any chance for mRNA to enter our cells' nucleus?
    20:55 The immune response to a coronavirus vaccine
    23:17 Expected symptoms from immune response to a vaccine vs. vaccine side effects
    25:50 Should people who've had COVID-19 get vaccinated?
    27:27 Immunity from COVID vaccine vs. a natural infection
    28:30 Why does the Pfizer vaccine need to be stored so cold?
    29:04 What would you say to a family member who is nervous about a rushed vaccine and RNA technology?
    32:37 What about the possibility of long term side effects from RNA vaccines?
    33:30 What's next for Shane Crotty's research team?

    (This video was recorded on December 16, 2020).

    THE MEDCRAM WEBSITE:

    Visit us for videos on over 60 medical topics and CME / CEs for medical professionals:


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    PREVIOUS / RECENT MEDCRAM COVID-19 INTERVIEWS:

    Vitamin D and COVID 19: The Evidence for Prevention and Treatment of Coronavirus (SARS CoV 2) with Professor Roger Seheult, MD

    At Home COVID 19 Antigen Testing and Vaccine Update with Professor Michael Mina, MD

    All coronavirus updates are at MedCram.com ad-free (including more videos on the Pfizer vaccine, Moderna vaccines, BioNTech vaccine, vaccine side effects, COVID 19 vaccine mechanism, AstraZeneca Oxford coronavirus vaccine, side effects of COVID 19 vaccine, COVID 19 treatments, and more):

    We offer over 60 medical topics (ECG Interpretation, DKA, influenza, measles, mechanical ventilation, etc.) on our website and CME for clinicians.


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    Video Produced by Kyle Allred

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    DISCLAIMER:

    MedCram medical videos are for medical education and exam preparation, and NOT intended to replace recommendations from your doctor.
    #COVID19 #SARSCoV2 #Coronavaccine

  • Which COVID Vaccine Booster is Best? Pfizer vs. Moderna vs. J. Johnson

    16:01

    Roger Seheult, MD of MedCram explains COVID 19 booster data on Moderna, Pfizer-BioNTech, and Johnson & Johnson and the efficacy of each coronavirus booster vs. full vaccination.

    (This video was recorded on October 27, 2021)


    TOPICS IN THIS VIDEO INCLUDE:

    00:00 Which COVID-19 booster should I take?
    00:15 Pre-print study looking at outcomes for original vaccines and randomized booster combinations in the United States
    01:53 Side effects for various boosters given to patients with either J&J, Moderna, Pfizer original vaccines
    05:46 Preliminary booster efficacy data: how well do IgG bind to SARS-CoV-2 spike proteins?
    10:29 Preliminary data from Pfizer-BioNTech: Efficacy of a booster on top of fully vaccinated people in randomized, placebo-controlled trial


    Roger Seheult, MD is the co-founder and lead professor at
    He is Board Certified in Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Disease, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine and an Associate Professor at the University of California, Riverside School of Medicine.


    LINKS / REFERENCES:

    Pfizer And BioNTech Announce Phase 3 Trial Data Showing High Efficacy Of A Booster Dose Of Their COVID-19 Vaccine (Pfizer) |

    Heterologous SARS-CoV-2 Booster Vaccinations - Preliminary Report (medRxiv) |

    All coronavirus updates are at MedCram.com (including more discussion on the COVID delta variant, vaccine passport, and more).


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    Get notified of new videos by hitting the bell icon

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    MedCram offers group discounts for students and medical programs, hospitals, and other institutions. Contact us at customers@medcram.com if you are interested.


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    #COVID19 #SARSCoV2 #Coronavirus

  • CDC recommends Pfizer and Moderna COVID vaccines over Johnson & Johnson shot

    9:51

    COVID-19 cases are surging in parts of the country as the Delta and Omicron variants spread throughout major cities and towns. The Centers for Disease Control is no longer recommending the Johnson and Johnson vaccine, due to rare blood clots. Dr. Stanley Perlman, a pediatric infectious disease specialist, joins CBSN to discuss the pandemic and vaccines.

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  • Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines, side effects from second dose

    1:39

    Monica Coleman verifies what segment of society feels side effects after a second vaccine shot.

  • Does the AstraZeneca COVID vaccine cause blood clots? | DW News

    4:37

    Vaccinations with the Astra Zeneca coronavirus vaccine are being halted in Denmark, Norway and Iceland - for now. We asked an expert about how serious the concerns about the vaccine should be taken, and on how likely it is to be the cause of reported blood clots. Is not getting the jab more dangerous than waiting?

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  • mRNA Vaccines - Layman’s version , plus some FAQs, Animation.

    4:48

    The basis of upcoming Pfizer and Moderna coronavirus RNA vaccines. How it works? Plus some FAQs: Does mRNA vaccine change my DNA? Why do people want me to take the vaccine?
    For comparison of different vaccines, as well as events of immune response, role of different immune cells (T-cells, B-cells, APC), see this video:
    This video is available for instant download licensing here:
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    All images/videos by Alila Medical Media are for information purposes ONLY and are NOT intended to replace professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified healthcare provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.
    The purpose of a vaccine is to mimic an infection, activating the body’s immune response, but without causing the illness. Conventional vaccines usually contain a weakened or inactivated virus; or a piece of a viral protein, called an antigen. These viral elements do not cause disease, but they trick the immune system into thinking that an infection has occurred so that it responds by producing antibodies against the virus. RNA vaccines are a new generation of vaccines. Instead of a protein antigen, they contain mRNA, meaning messenger RNA. As its name suggests, mRNA is basically a messenger, carrying genetic message from DNA to protein. In order to function, a human cell needs to constantly produce proteins based on genetic information in its DNA. Because DNA is located in the nucleus of the cell, and protein synthesis occurs in the cytoplasm, an intermediate molecule is required to transmit the information. mRNA copies the information from DNA and brings it to the cytoplasm, where it is translated into protein. mRNA consists of 4 basic building blocks called A, U, C and G. The information it carries is the sequence of these letters. RNA vaccines contain mRNA strands that have the information for making the viral antigen, usually a viral spike protein. Once inside the body’s cells, the mRNA is translated into protein, the antigen, by the same process the cells use to make their own proteins. The antigen is then displayed on the cell surface where it is recognized by the immune system. From here, the sequence of events is similar to that of a conventional vaccine. RNA vaccines are easier and safer to produce than conventional vaccines. Conventional vaccines typically require growing large amounts of infectious viruses, usually in chicken eggs, and then inactivating them. Vaccines produced this way are at risks of being contaminated with LIVE viruses and allergens from egg culture. Such risks do NOT exist with RNA vaccines because mRNA molecules can be synthesized in a CELL-FREE system using a DNA template that contains information for making the viral protein. The mRNA is made from the same building blocks as natural mRNA, so it has the same chemical composition as natural mRNA. The relative simplicity of the production process makes it easier to standardize and scale, enabling rapid responses to emerging pandemics. In case the virus MUTATES, it’s also simple to change the mRNA sequence to match the mutation. Will RNA vaccines change my DNA? RNA vaccines do NOT change your DNA. This is because in order to do so, the mRNA must convert into DNA, enter the nucleus, and integrate into the cell’s DNA. This is a complex multiple-step process requiring action of several enzymes that the cell does NOT have. Instead, the cell has plenty of enzymes that can readily destroy the mRNA, so the mRNA is usually degraded after the protein is made. Why do people try so hard to convince others to take vaccine? The answer is herd immunity. When enough people in a community are vaccinated, the whole community, including the individuals that were not vaccinated, is protected against the disease. This phenomenon is known as herd immunity. Herd immunity is possible because a pathogen cannot spread without a sufficient number of vulnerable hosts. An analogy is the spread of wildfires. A wildfire only spreads where there is vegetation, or fuel, for it to burn; it would stop at a river, or a large open space. These are called firebreaks. Vaccinated individuals essentially serve as firebreaks, preventing spread of infections caused by pathogens. Herd immunity is important because not everyone can be vaccinated. Often, the very young, very old, and immunocompromised people must rely on vaccinated individuals to stop disease outbreaks. To note, however, that the number of vaccinated individuals must be great enough for community protection to occur, just like a firebreak must be large enough to stop a fire.

  • How do mRNA COVID-19 vaccines work?

    2:28

    The first COVID-19 vaccines represent an incredible record-breaking achievement in vaccine development. Not only were the Moderna and Pfizer/BioNTech vaccines created in record time, they also harness a never-before-used technology: immunization through mRNA. But how do these vaccines protect us and how do they differ from other vaccines? These first mRNA vaccines may pave the way for faster, more efficient vaccine development in the future.

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  • Covid-19 vaccines: Moderna vs. Pfizer vs. Johnson & Johnson comparison

    8:24

    We asked Dr. Stephen Thomas, chief of Infectious Diseases at SUNY Upstate Medical University, what we need to know about the vaccines right now and what we could learn in the coming months.

    Watch the video for a deeper explanation about the three vaccines currently available in the U.S. — Moderna, Pfizer/BioNTech and Johnson & Johnson. Moderna and Pfizer are messenger RNA, or mRNA vaccines and Johnson & Johnson is a viral vector vaccine. All three are designed to protect against Covid-19.

    According to the CDC, rather than inject the body with a weakened version of the coronavirus, these vaccines teach the body to make a protein which triggers an immune response. It’s those antibodies that our bodies produce that help keep us safe when confronted with the actual virus.

    Side Effects
    The mRNA vaccines have been administered to over 80 million people in the United States and they are safe and effective, Thomas said. Thomas was the lead principal investigator for the worldwide Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine trial.

    In data from the trials, Thomas noted, “The safety profile of these vaccines are all pretty similar, most people will experience some kind of pain at the site the vaccine was injected and most people say the pain is mild to moderate.

    Dr. Thomas also mentioned these other common side effects:
    • Mild to moderate headache
    • Mild to moderate fatigue
    • 30 to 40 percent of people might have muscle aches or joint pain
    • About ten to fifteen percent of people might develop a fever

    “The good news is if it’s going to happen to you, because it doesn’t happen to everyone, it happens pretty soon after you get vaccinated and once it starts it goes away within a couple of days,” Thomas said.

    “With Pfizer and Moderna rolling out over 80 million doses of vaccine the side effects continue to be the same as the data from the trials and we aren’t seeing any new side effects or more severe side effects,” he added.

    What about the variants?
    Work is being done in laboratories with the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines, testing people’s antibodies to see if the antibodies will neutralize the variants.

    Thomas said, “They are not as good at neutralizing those variants as they are against the predominant strain in the United States which is from China. But experiments are continuing and there is some concerning data there, which is why it’s important that we vaccinate as many people as possible, because it’s a race against the variants.”

    Thomas noted that the vaccines are still working at fifty to sixty-percent efficacy against the new variants.

    “Just to put it in context, the annual flu vaccine is about forty-five percent efficacious,” he said.

    How important is the two-dose vaccine time schedule?
    Thomas said it’s important to get these vaccines as close to the schedule as possible as they were tested in the trials. If a change is unavoidable, Thomas recommends delaying the second dose rather than getting it ahead of schedule.

    What is herd immunity and when will we have it?
    Herd immunity is achieved when enough of the population has become immune to a disease (generally through vaccinations) that it makes it difficult for that disease to spread.

    That would mean even those who are not immune would be protected.

    “Right now, about fifteen percent of the country has received at least one dose of vaccine, but that’s a far cry from the 70 to 80-percent that we are going to need to achieve herd immunity,” Thomas said.

    Thomas doesn’t think it’s going to be a vaccine supply issue, but more of a willingness for people to be vaccinated. “We’re vaccinating 2 million people a day, if that were to go to 3 million, and we have 320 million people in the country, we could achieve herd immunity by late summer.”

  • FDA to add warning about heart inflammation to COVID vaccines | Moderna | Pfizer |World English News

    6:13

    Health regulators in several countries have been investigating whether the Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna shots using new mRNA technology present a risk

    #FDA #Moderna #Pfizer

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  • Coronavirus Update 121: Johnson and Johnson Vaccine - Efficacy and Safety vs. Pfizer & Moderna

    11:49

    Professor Roger Seheult, MD explains the Johnson and Johnson / Janssen Pharmaceuticals vaccine candidate for COVID 19. Dr. Seheult illustrates how the Johnson & Johnson adenovirus vaccine works, the efficacy/safety (based on preliminary data), and how the vaccine compares to the Moderna vaccine and the Pfizer BioNTech vaccine. (This video was recorded on February 4, 2021).

    Roger Seheult, MD is the co-founder and lead professor at
    He is Board Certified in Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Disease, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine and an Associate Professor at the University of California, Riverside School of Medicine.

    Interviewer: Kyle Allred, Physician Assistant, Producer / Co-Founder of MedCram.com

    LINKS / REFERENCES:

    A Study of Ad26.COV2.S for the Prevention of SARS-CoV-2-Mediated COVID-19 in Adult Participants (NIH) |

    Johnson & Johnson Announces Single-Shot Janssen COVID-19 Vaccine Candidate Met Primary Endpoints in Interim Analysis of its Phase 3 ENSEMBLE Trial (Johnson & Johnson) |

    J&J one-dose Covid vaccine is 66% effective, a weapon but not a knockout punch (STAT) |

    One-shot COVID-19 vaccine is effective against severe disease (ScienceNews) |

    UK COVID Symptom Study |

    Doctor Explains The PREVENTION & TREATMENT For The Coronavirus | Roger Seheult & Lewis Howes (Lewis Howes YouTube Channel) |


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    - Coronavirus Update 120: Anticoagulants (Blood Thinners) Improve Hospital Outcomes (Full Dose)
    - Coronavirus Update 119: Pfizer BioNTech COVID Vaccine (Clinical Considerations)
    - Vitamin D and COVID 19: The Evidence for Prevention and Treatment of Coronavirus (SARS CoV 2)
    - Coronavirus Update 118: AstraZeneca DNA COVID 19 Vaccine Explained (vs. Pfizer / BioNTech, Moderna)
    - Coronavirus Update 117: Moderna vs. Pfizer COVID 19 Vaccine (mRNA vaccines)
    - Coronavirus Update 116: Pfizer COVID 19 Vaccine Explained (Biontech)
    - Coronavirus Update 115: Convalescent Plasma vs Monoclonal Antibodies for COVID 19 Treatment
    - Coronavirus Update 114: COVID 19 Death Rate Drops; NAC (N acetylcysteine) Data
    - Coronavirus Update 113: Remdesivir May Not Work for COVID 19
    - Coronavirus Update 112: Linoleic Acid; Vaccines; UK COVID 19 Data
    - Coronavirus Update 111: Masks; New Vitamin D Data and COVID 19; NAC
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 110: Trump's Risk Factors and COVID-19 Prognosis; Interferon
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 109: New Data From Europe As COVID 19 Infections Rise
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 108: High Risk COVID 19 Behaviors; Cases Rise in Europe
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 107: Monoclonal Antibodies for COVID 19 Treatment and Prevention?

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    #COVID19 #SARSCoV2 #Coronavirus

  • Mixing Vaccine Boosters For COVID 19

    4:46

    Roger Seheult, MD of MedCram explains the FDA recommendations for COVID 19 vaccine boosters.

    Roger Seheult, MD is the co-founder and lead professor at
    He is Board Certified in Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Disease, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine and an Associate Professor at the University of California, Riverside School of Medicine.

    (This video was recorded on October 21, 2021)

    LINKS / REFERENCES:

    Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update: FDA Takes Additional Actions on the Use of a Booster Dose for COVID-19 Vaccines (FDA) |


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  • x
  • The latest on the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine

    2:24

    As the company asks the FDA for final approval, Dr. Jen Ashton takes a look at the results of the phase 3 trials.

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  • Moderna Covid-19 vaccine is 95% effective and could prevent further infection

    2:01

    CNBC's senior health and science correspondent Meg Tirrell joins Shep Smith to discuss the second Covid-19 vaccine, from Moderna. The FDA will meet on Thursday. If they vote yes on the vaccine, the agency could authorize it as soon as Friday, prompting 6 million doses to be distributed across the U.S. starting next week. For access to live and exclusive video from CNBC subscribe to CNBC PRO:

    The staff of the Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday endorsed the emergency use of Moderna’s coronavirus vaccine, a critical step forward in winning formal clearance to be administered to the public as early as next week.

    The staff report is meant to brief the FDA’s Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee, which meets Thursday to review Moderna’s request for emergency use authorization.

    The group of outside medical advisors recommended Pfizer’s vaccine for emergency use last Thursday, and the FDA approved it the next day. The committee is expected to recommend Moderna’s vaccine. The FDA doesn’t have to follow the committee’s recommendation, but it often does.

    The FDA staff said it determined that the clinical trial results and safety data were “consistent with the recommendations set forth in FDA’s Guidance on Emergency Use Authorization for Vaccines to Prevent COVID-19.”

    “FDA has determined that the Sponsor has provided adequate information to ensure the vaccine’s quality and consistency for authorization of the product under an EUA,” it said.

    The announcement helped Moderna’s stock rise 1.5% just before the opening bell.

    The documents are “enormously encouraging,” said Dr. Paul Offit, a voting member on the committee, adding they show there are now two highly effective vaccines. He voted in favor of recommending Pfizer’s vaccine last week.

    Moderna is asking the FDA to approve the use in people age 18 and over, while Pfizer’s vaccine was cleared for use in people age 16 and older. The scant data in younger teens was a sticking point for the few members of the advisory committee who voted against authorizing Pfizer’s vaccine last week.

    The FDA said it recommends tracking cases of Bell’s palsy, a condition that causes a sudden freezing or weakness in facial muscles, if the vaccine is cleared for use. The agency said there were three cases in the vaccine group and one in the placebo group among the 30,000 trial participants. “Currently available information is insufficient to determine a causal relationship with the vaccine,” the agency wrote.

    Offit agreed that the condition is worth monitoring as the vaccine rolls out. “I’m not dismissing that yet,” he said in an interview with CNBC.

    When Merck submitted its data from its rotavirus vaccine trial, there were five cases of Kawasaki disease but none in the placebo group. That was “statistically significant” and caused Merck to change its label to note the cases.

    The most common side effects were pain at the injection site, fatigue, headache, muscle pain and chills, the FDA said, adding more severe reactions were more common after the second dose. Trial participants told CNBC in September the symptoms were uncomfortable, and at times intense, the participants said they often went away after a day, sometimes sooner, and that it was better than getting Covid-19.

    The FDA said 13 deaths were reported as of Dec. 3, with six in the vaccine group. Two deaths in the vaccine group were people over age 75 with preexisting conditions, the agency said. One case was a 72-year-old vaccine recipient with Crohn’s disease and short bowel syndrome who was hospitalized for thrombocytopenia and acute kidney failure.

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  • How are the Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines different?

    2:08

    Moderna says as soon as it gets approval, 6 million doses will be distributed to more than 3,000 locations.

  • Moderna reports COVID-19 vaccine still 93% effective after 6 months l GMA

    3:32

    Moderna's president, Dr. Stephen Hoge, discusses the results of the clinical trials and the vaccine's effectiveness against the delta variant, as well as the topic of booster shots.


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  • Moderna shares drop after company cuts Covid-19 vaccine outlook

    2:31

    CNBC's Meg Tirrell joins 'Squawk Box' to report on shares of Moderna, which have dropped after the company cut its Covid-19 vaccine sales outlook for the year. For access to live and exclusive video from CNBC subscribe to CNBC PRO:

    Moderna shares fell by more than 16% on Thursday after it cut its Covid-19 vaccine sales forecast for the year and missed earnings and revenue expectations for the third quarter.

    The company said some doses for delivery this year have been shifted to early 2022 amid production issues and as it prioritizes deliveries to low-income countries through COVAX, the U.N.-backed effort to share coronavirus vaccines. It now expects Covid vaccine sales of between $15 billion and $18 billion this year, down from an earlier projection of $20 billion.

    In releasing its third-quarter earnings, Moderna said it is now expecting to deliver between 700 million and 800 million doses this year, down from its previous expectations of between 800 million and 1 billion doses. The company also said it projects sales of $17 billion to $22 billion in 2022.

    By comparison, Pfizer has said it expects Covid vaccine sales of $36 billion this year and $29 billion in 2022.

    Here’s how Moderna did compared with what Wall Street expected, according to average estimates compiled by Refinitiv:

    EPS: $7.70 per share versus $9.05 per share expected
    Revenue: $4.97 billion versus $6.21 billion expected
    “We are humbled to have helped hundreds of millions of people around the world with our COVID-19 vaccine and yet we know our work is not done,” Moderna CEO Stephane Bancel said in a statement.

    He said the company is working to ensure the vaccine is available in low-income countries by providing approximately 10% of its 2021 volume to them, and “significantly more” volume next year.

    On a post-earnings call with investors, Bancel said the company’s supply chain became “more complex,” impacting international deliveries of its vaccine.

    “We’ve increased deliveries to many countries around the world,” he said. “At the beginning of the year, we supplied to just a few large countries.”

    Moderna Chief Financial Officer David Meline said the company continues to scale up its production network and is “working to achieve an increase quarter-over-quarter improvement starting in Q4.”

    Moderna’s Covid vaccine is the company’s only commercialized product. The earnings report comes two weeks after the Food and Drug Administration authorized booster shots of Moderna’s vaccine to tens of millions of Americans.

    The company said Thursday it anticipates commercial booster market sales could be up to $2 billion in 2022.

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  • What’s The Difference Between Pfizer And Moderna COVID-19 Vaccines? | TODAY

    3:41

    NBC’s Tom Costello joins TODAY to talk about the differences between the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines, explaining that the Moderna vaccine does not need to be kept as cold and there is some early evidence that it will protect against transmission.
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  • Moderna vaccine for covid | How it works, efficacy and side effects

    10:48

    Moderna vaccine covid | How it works, efficacy and side effects - This lecture explains about the moderna vaccine for covid 19 disease. it shares information regarding how moderna vaccine works against covid 19 and it also talks about the moderna vaccine efficacy rate and moderna vaccine side effects. Stay tuned to know the answer of following questions -
    What is moderna vaccine for covid?
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    What is the efficacy of moderna vaccine for covid?

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  • How the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine has performed so far

    3:12

    Important details about the newly approved Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine for COVID-19, like how well it works and what we've learned from other countries already using it.

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  • Why you cant compare Covid-19 vaccines

    7:02

    What a vaccine's efficacy rate actually means.

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    In the US, the first two available Covid-19 vaccines were the ones from Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna. Both vaccines have very high efficacy rates, of around 95%. But the third vaccine introduced in the US, from Johnson & Johnson, has a considerably lower efficacy rate: just 66%.

    Look at those numbers next to each other, and it's natural to conclude that one of them is considerably worse. Why settle for 66% when you can have 95%? But that isn't the right way to understand a vaccine's efficacy rate, or even to understand what a vaccine does. And public health experts say that if you really want to know which vaccine is the best one, efficacy isn't actually the most important number at all.

    Further reading from Vox:

    Why comparing Covid-19 vaccine efficacy numbers can be misleading:

    The vaccine metric that matters more than efficacy:

    The limits of what vaccine efficacy numbers can tell us:

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  • Preparing the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine

    6:50

    In this video, we will show you how to thaw, dilute, and administer the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine. We will also explain how it differs from other vaccines you may currently administer.

    Immunization Academy’s training videos are based upon WHO guidance documents and vetted by a panel of global health experts. Download English, French, Swahili and Hausa videos, and find more learning features and tools, at

  • Heres the key differences between Moderna and Pfizer vaccines: Leading vaccine researcher

    3:35

    Padmini Pillai, an immunoengineer at MIT, discusses the main issues with both the Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech COVID vaccines, including why one must be stored at much colder temperatures than the other. For access to live and exclusive video from CNBC subscribe to CNBC PRO:

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  • COVID-19: Is it OK to mix Pfizer and Moderna vaccines?

    1:50

    Dr. Peter Jüni, a member of Ontario’s COVID-19 Scientific Advisory Table, answers questions about COVID-19 vaccines including whether people should be concerned about mixing Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines.

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  • Moderna: Covid-19 vaccine has efficacy rate of 94.5%

    1:24

    CNBC's Meg Tirrell reports on Moderna's vaccine trial latest, which found a 94.5% efficacy rate. For access to live and exclusive video from CNBC subscribe to CNBC PRO:

    Moderna said preliminary phase three trial data shows its coronavirus vaccine is more than 94% effective in preventing Covid-19 — a result CEO Stephane Bancel called a “game changer.”

    The analysis evaluated 95 confirmed Covid-19 infections among the trial’s 30,000 participants. Moderna, which developed its vaccine in collaboration with the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said 90 cases of Covid-19 were observed in the placebo group versus five cases observed in the group that received its two-dose vaccine. That resulted in an estimated vaccine efficacy of 94.5%, it said.

    Shares of the company jumped more than 12% in premarket trading.

    The announcement comes on the heels of similar news last week from Pfizer’s late-stage Covid-19 vaccine trial as pharmaceutical companies across the world race against the clock to find ways to prevent the virus, which has spread to more than 54.4 million people, killing more than 1.3 million, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.

    Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar told CNBC on Monday that U.S. Food and Drug Administration will move “as quickly as possible” to clear Pfizer and Moderna’s coronavirus vaccines for emergency use.

    Bancel called it a “pivotal moment.”

    “Since early January, we have chased this virus with the intent to protect as many people around the world as possible. All along, we have known that each day matters,” he said in a statement. “This positive interim analysis from our Phase 3 study has given us the first clinical validation that our vaccine can prevent COVID-19 disease, including severe disease.”

    The Cambridge, Massachusetts-based company also said there were no “significant” safety concerns, adding the vaccine was generally safe and well tolerated with the majority of adverse events in participants being labeled as mild or moderate. Side effects included pain at the injection site and, after the second dose, fatigue, muscle pain and headaches.

    “Knowing that we have a vaccine that would help more people who would take it is just a wonderful feeling,” Bancel said in an interview with CNBC. “As you know a lot of people have been reluctant in surveys to take a vaccine because I think we’re worried about the politicization of a vaccine, they’re worried about what you get with a flu shot you know 50% to 60% efficacy.”

    With an efficacy rate of 95%, “that’s a game changer, I believe,” he said.

    Bancel said the company plans to test the vaccine in teens “very soon,” followed by children under the age of 12. “We have to be very, very careful because safety is priority No. 1,” he said in a separate interview on CNBC’s “Squawk Box,” adding most trials test vaccines on healthy adults first to assess safety.

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  • mRNA COVID-19 Vaccines

    17:43

    Learn more about the mRNA COVID-19 vaccines as Sandra Fryhofer, MD, MACP, provides details on each vaccine along with who should get them and when. For more information and the complete ACP 2021 Adult Immunization Video Series:

    #AdultImmunization #COVID19 #COVID19Vaccines #IRaiseTheRates

  • Difference between Moderna and Pfizer COVID-19 vaccines

    2:49

    Dr. Jen Ashton has what you need to know about the two vaccines.

  • FDA Advisory Panel Unanimously Recommends Moderna Booster Shots Against Covid

    5:25

    A Food and Drug Administration advisory panel has recommended Moderna booster shots for emergency use authorization for adults ages 65 and up; people in long-term care facilities; people with underlying medical conditions; and people at high risk of exposure to the coronavirus because of their job.» Subscribe to NBC News:
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    FDA Advisory Panel Unanimously Recommends Moderna Booster Shots Against Covid

  • Can I mix Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines?

    1:11

    Q: Can I mix the Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccine?
    A: Yes. They are considered equally effective and built on the same mRNA technology. ????✅

    Watch as Dr. Matthew Robinson, Medical Director of THP’s COVID-19 Vaccination Program, answers frequently asked questions about COVID-19 vaccines.

    THP is offering additional appointments for individuals ages 18+ who would like a first OR second dose of the Moderna mRNA vaccine. Learn more and book:

    #COVID19vaccine #mRNAvaccine #COVID19 #ThisIsOurShotCA

  • Pfizer, BioNTech announce Covid-19 vaccine candidate is 90% effective

    4:01

    U.S pharmaceutical giant Pfizer and German biotech firm BioNTech said their coronavirus vaccine was more than 90% effective in preventing Covid-19 among those without evidence of prior infection, according to data published Monday from their late-stage vaccine trial. CNBC's Meg Tirrell reports. For access to live and exclusive video from CNBC subscribe to CNBC PRO:

    Pfizer and BioNTech announced Monday their coronavirus vaccine was more than 90% effective in preventing Covid-19 among those without evidence of prior infection, hailing the development as “a great day for science and humanity.”

    “I think we can see light at the end of the tunnel,” Pfizer Chairman and CEO Dr. Albert Bourla told CNBC’s Meg Tirrell on “Squawk Box.” “I believe this is likely the most significant medical advance in the last 100 years, if you count the impact this will have in public health, global economy.”

    The announcement comes as drugmakers and research centers scrambled to deliver a safe and effective vaccine to help bring an end to the coronavirus pandemic that has claimed over 1.2 million lives worldwide.

    Scientists are hoping for a coronavirus vaccine that is at least 75% effective, while White House coronavirus advisor Dr. Anthony Fauci has said one that is 50% or 60% effective would be acceptable.

    U.S. stock futures skyrocketed as investors cheered the news. Futures on the Dow Jones Industrial Average surged 1,646 points, implying an opening gain of more than 1,630 points. By late morning, the Dow was up more than 1,000 points, a rise of 3.7%.

    Airline and cruise company stocks jumped in premarket trading — with some stocks rising by 20% and 30%. Both industries have been significantly affected by the global health crisis as travel restrictions and a resurgence in outbreaks continue to hurt demand.

    Pfizer’s results were based on the first interim efficacy analysis conducted by an external and independent Data Monitoring Committee from the phase three clinical study. The independent group of experts oversees U.S. clinical trials to ensure the safety of participants.

    The analysis evaluated 94 confirmed Covid-19 infections among the trial’s 43,538 participants. Pfizer and the U.S. pharmaceutical giant’s German biotech partner said the case split between vaccinated individuals and those who received a placebo indicated a vaccine efficacy rate of above 90% at seven days after the second dose.

    It means that protection from Covid-19 is achieved 28 days after the initial vaccination, which consists of a two-dose schedule. The final vaccine efficacy percentage may vary, however, as safety and additional data continue to be collected.

    Dr. Scott Gottlieb, a former FDA commissioner and a member of Pfizer’s board, told CNBC the vaccine could be available in limited use as early as late December and widely available by the third quarter of 2021.

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  • Concerns about AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine

    2:30

    Dr. Jen Ashton has the latest on reported cases of blood clots from the vaccine in Europe.

  • COVID-19: Moderna boss says all vaccines will be less effective against Omicron

    2:47

    The heads of vaccine manufacturers Moderna and Pfizer say they should know in two to six weeks whether the current vaccines will work against Omicron.

    There are fears that the number of mutations on the spike protein will render the vaccines ineffective - or less effective - against the new variant.

    Stephane Bancel of Moderna, said there were early indications his company's vaccine would be less effective.

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  • How the Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines compare l GMA

    2:23

    ABC News' Tom Llamas reports on how the two vaccines stack up on the key question of effectiveness.

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    #ABCNews #COVID19 #PfizerVaccine #ModernaVaccine #Pfizer #Moderna #COVID19Vaccine

  • CDC: Pfizer, Moderna Vaccines Reduce Risk Of COVID Infection By 91%

    3:44

    The CDC has announced that the Pfizer and Moderna Covid-19 vaccines can reduce the risk of infection by 91 percent as U.S. daily cases reach their lowest point in more than a year. NBC News’ Erika Edwards explains the CDC’s findings and how the report could impact lifting the remaining Covid-19 restrictions. 

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    #Covid #vaccines #News

  • COVID-19 Vaccine Q&A | Pfizer vs Moderna Vaccines

    3:28

    Chair of the Department of Immunology at Roswell Park, and NYS COVID-19 Clinical Task Force Member, Kelvin Lee, MD, discusses the differences and similarities between the Pfizer vs Moderna COVID-19 vaccines.

  • Pfizer, Moderna And J&J COVID-19 Vaccines: What Are The Differences? | TODAY

    4:15

    A third coronavirus vaccine from Johnson & Johnson could soon be on the way. What is the difference between the three coronavirus shots from Johnson & Johnson, Pfizer and Moderna? NBC senior medical correspondent Dr. John Torres joins Weekend TODAY to weigh in, and reminds reviewers that “any shot you can get at this point is the best shot for you to get.”
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    Pfizer, Moderna And J&J COVID-19 Vaccines: What Are The Differences? | TODAY

  • COVID-19: Canadas Moderna vaccines risk expiring due to hesitancy and preferences

    2:01

    Canada's COVID-19 vaccination numbers are starting to plateau, despite having more than enough vaccines to inoculate those remaining.

    The country has received more than 66 million doses of vaccine, but nearly 20 percent of eligible Canadians have yet to take a single dose. Now, pharmacists in Ontario are warning thousands of excess doses of the Moderna vaccine are about to expire because not enough people are taking them.

    As Seán O'Shea reports, the injection rejections are also being blamed on a public preference for a different shot.

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  • Kamala Harris gets Moderna COVID-19 vaccine

    2:22

    Vice President-elect Kamala Harris on Tuesday received her first dose of the Moderna COVID -19 vaccine in front of the media as part of a growing effort to convince the American public the inoculations are safe.

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  • Moderna CEO Bancel: Future Covid vaccine booster will likely target omicron variant

    3:00

    Moderna CEO Stephane Bancel joins CNBC's 'Squawk Box' to discuss the company's Covid-19 vaccine and future booster strategies against the concerning omicron variant. For access to live and exclusive video from CNBC subscribe to CNBC PRO:

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  • The COVID-19 Vaccines from Johnson & Johnson and AstraZeneca: Whats in Them and How Do They Work?

    11:20

    Learn about the composition and delivery mechanism for the new classes of COVID-19 vaccines based on adenovirus from Johnson & Johnson and AstraZeneca with Dr. Jonathan Genzen, COO of ARUP Laboratories and an Associate Professor at the University of Utah School of Medicine.

  • Mixing AstraZeneca & Pfizer Vaccines Generates Robust Immune Response Against Covid 19: Oxford Study

    4:17

    A study in the UK has found that mixing different Covid-19 vaccines triggers a strong immune response. The Com-Cov study tested mixed doses of Covid vaccines on 850 volunteers aged 50 & above. It showed that all combinations- two doses of AstraZeneca, two doses of Pfizer or one-one dose of both- generated good immunity. The researchers were looking at the feasibility of mixing vaccine doses to further boost immunity. Watch the video to know more.
    #mixeddoses #covidvaccines #vaccinebooster

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  • COVID-19 vaccines: Pfizer vs Moderna - are more people choosing one over the other?

    2:48

    Kenneth Mak, director of medical services at Ministry of Health, responds to a journalist's question on whether more people in Singapore are choosing to get the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine over the Moderna vaccine.

    Singapore is speeding up its vaccination programme and increasing its daily doses by 70%:

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