This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn more

Chris Hadfield Returns to Earth

  • Chris Hadfield Returns to Earth

    7:04

    2013-05-14 - After five months aboard the International Space Station (ISS), CSA Astronaut Chris Hadfield and his Expedition 34/35 crewmates Tom Marshburn and Roman Romanenko made a successful undocking from the ISS and a triumphant return to Earth in their Soyuz TMA-07M spacecraft.

    Landing in Kazakhstan at 10:31 pm EDT, Hadfield would emerge from the Soyuz in good health, helped by the local ground crew. Hadfield became the first Canadian Commander of the ISS during Expedition 35, performed over 130 science experiments, and was at the center of an impressive social media campaign that captured the attention and support of people from around the world.

    Credits: Canadian Space Agency and NASA

    Expedition 34-35 Web page:

    Find out more about this video:

  • Chris Hadfield retires

    2:27

    Mon, Jun 10: For the first time since he touched down on Earth, Cmdr. Chris Hadfield landed back on Canadian soil and revealed the next step in his journey. Mike Armstrong reports. For more info, please go to

  • ISS commander Chris Hadfield returns to Earth

    3:05

    ISS commander Chris Hadfield returns to Earth

    Subscribe to the Guardian HERE:

    Chris Hadfield, commander of the International Space Station, who became an internet sensation after his rendition of David Bowie's Space Oddity, returns to Earth. He landed in Kazakhstan with his two crewmates, wrapping up a five-month mission. Hadfield made history on Monday when he released the first music video shot in space, a zero-gravity version of David Bowie's hit song.

  • Leaving Earth - Commander Chris Hadfield

    4:28

    I made this after hearing the Commanders recent TED talk, I thought the music fitted well.

    The song is Surface of the Sun by John Murphy

  • GOING BLIND DURING A SPACEWALK - Astronaut Chris Hadfield on London Real

    5:41

    BUSINESS ACCELERATOR - Starting soon:
    2021 SUMMIT TICKETS:


    NEW MASTERCLASS EACH WEEK:

    Astronaut Chris Hadfield on going blind while spacewalking.
    FULL EPISODE:
    Chris Hadfield is a retired Canadian astronaut who was the first Canadian to walk in space. An engineer and former Royal Canadian Air Force fighter pilot, Chris Hadfield has flown two space shuttle missions and served as commander of the International Space Station.

    Chris, who was raised on a farm in southern Ontario, was inspired as a child when he watched the Apollo 11 Moon landing on TV. He attended high school in Oakville and Milton and earned his glider pilot licence as a member of the Royal Canadian Air Cadets. He joined the Canadian Armed Forces and earned an engineering degree at Royal Military College. While in the military he learned to fly various types of aircraft and eventually became a test pilot and flew several experimental planes. As part of an exchange program with the United States Navy and United States Air Force, he obtained a master's degree in aviation systems at the University of Tennessee Space Institute.

    In 1992, he was accepted into the Canadian astronaut program by the Canadian Space Agency. He first flew in space aboard STS-74 in November 1995 as a mission specialist. During the mission he visited the Russian space station Mir. In April 2001 he flew again on STS-100 and visited the International Space Station (ISS), where he walked in space and helped to install the Canadarm2. In December 2012 he flew for a third time aboard Soyuz TMA-07M and joined Expedition 34 on the ISS. He was a member of this expedition until March 2013 when he became the commander of the ISS as part of Expedition 35. He was responsible for a crew of five astronauts and helped to run dozens of scientific experiments dealing with the impact of low gravity on human biology. During the mission he also gained popularity by chronicling life aboard the space station and taking pictures of the earth and posting them through Twitter, Facebook, Google+, and Tumblr to a large following of people around the world. He was a guest on television news and talk shows and gained popularity by playing the International Space Station's guitar in space. His mission ended in May 2013 when he returned to earth. Shortly after returning, he announced his retirement, capping a 35-year career as a military pilot and an astronaut.

    Chris Hadfield's website:
    Chris Hadfield on Twitter:

    SUBSCRIBE ON YOUTUBE:


    LONDON REAL TV:


    London Real Academy:
    BUSINESS ACCELERATOR:
    LIFE ACCELERATOR:
    BROADCAST YOURSELF:
    SPEAK TO INSPIRE:
    #LondonReal #Motivation

  • Scott Kelly adjusting back on Earth after year in space

    3:50

    Astronaut Scott Kelly says it was easier to spend nearly a year in space than to get used to gravity again back on Earth. He lived on the International Space Station for 340 days. NASA continues testing him to learn how extended space travel impacts the human body. In his first network interview, Kelly spoke with Manuel Bojorquez about how he's doing a week after his return.

  • Chris Hadfield returns to Earth

    1:45

    A Soyuz space capsule carrying a three-man crew, including Commander Chris Hadfield, returning from a five-month mission to the International Space Station lands safely on the steppes of Kazakhstan.

  • Astronaut Chris Hadfield Answers the Webs Most Searched Questions | WIRED

    39:48

    Retired astronaut Chris Hadfield answers the internet's most searched questions about himself. What inspired Chris Hadfield to become an astronaut? What did Chris Hadfield learn in space? What awards has he won? What's his IQ? Chris answers all these questions and much, much more!

    If you’re interested in learning more about Chris Hadfield his first book, New York Times bestseller 'An Astronaut's Guide To Life On Earth' has been translated into 25 different languages. And if your children are interested, Chris's second book, 'The Darkest Dark,' is a New York Times bestselling children's book. His website is

    The College of Southern Nevada Planetarium, Southern Nevada’s only public planetarium, is the astronomical heart of Las Vegas. In addition to providing CSN and visiting K-12 students with a unique way to engage with their coursework, the CSN Planetarium hosts public shows and free telescope viewing every Friday and Saturday night.

    Still haven’t subscribed to WIRED on YouTube? ►►
    Get more incredible stories on science and tech with our daily newsletter:

    Also, check out the free WIRED channel on Roku, Apple TV, Amazon Fire TV, and Android TV. Here you can find your favorite WIRED shows and new episodes of our latest hit series Tradecraft.

    ABOUT WIRED
    WIRED is where tomorrow is realized. Through thought-provoking stories and videos, WIRED explores the future of business, innovation, and culture.

    Astronaut Chris Hadfield Answers the Web's Most Searched Questions | WIRED

  • Astronauts first reaction on return to Earth after almost six months

    1:02

    A Soyuz capsule carrying two Russians and one American landed in Kazakhstan on Thursday, ending the astronauts' nearly six months aboard the International Space Station. The capsule carried Russians Alexander Samokutayev and Elena Serova and NASA's Barry Wilmore, who blasted off for the space station on Sept. 26.The capsule landed upright in heavy fog southeast of the town of Dzhezkazgan on the Kazakh steppes. Despite the poor visibility, recovery workers arrived within several minutes and all three astronauts were extracted within a half-hour.They were taken to recliner-style chairs set up near the capsule, to begin their readjustment to gravity and undergo brief medical tests. All three appeared in good condition, and Serova smiled broadly as she sat in the chair bundled up against temperatures a few degrees below freezing.

  • Astronaut Chris Hadfield and Chef Traci Des Jardins Make a Space Burrito

    10:51

    Keeping in mind the challenge of mixing food ingredients in micro-gravity, chef Traci Des Jardins concocts a recipe for spicing up astronaut Chris Hadfield's meals on board the International Space Station. Commander Hadfield also shares with Jamie and Adam the foods he misses most after spending six months in space.

    Subscribe for more videos (and click the bell for notifications):
    Twitter:
    Facebook:
    Instagram:


    #AdamSavage #ChrisHadfield

  • Shuttle astronaut collapses during welcome home ceremony

    2:38

    SHOTLIST
    Ellington Field, Houston, Texas - 22 September 2006
    1. Astronaut Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper speaking at welcome home ceremony, begins to sway and collapses. She is supported, then lowered to floor by fellow crew members.
    2. Cutaways of audience, pull back to wide - applauding
    3. SOUNDUP: (English) Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper, Astronaut:
    Boy if that's not a little embarrassing.
    4. Cutaway of Atlantis crew patch
    5. Astronaut Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper speaking, collapses again and is lowered to the ground
    File: Lyndon B Johnson Space Centre, Houston, Texas - Unknown Date
    6. Various of Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper training
    7. Various of Atlantis crew posing for pictures in front of NASA jets
    STORYLINE:
    An astronaut collapsed twice Friday, a day after she returned to Earth in the shuttle Atlantis, and officials attributed her wobbles to the adjustment from 12 days at zero gravity.
    Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper left the welcome-home ceremony at the hangar at Ellington Field, in Houston, Texas, but was not taken to a hospital.
    NASA officials and her husband Glenn Piper both said she was doing fine.
    Piper blamed his wife's collapse on the combination of effects from her recent return, a relatively warm hangar and the excitement of the ceremony.
    Piper, the fifth of the six astronauts to speak, appeared to be confused before her legs buckled during her address.
    NASA officials and crew members braced her and lowered her to the ground. She stood up again, and the crowd applauded.
    Boy, if that's not a little embarrassing, she said.
    After speaking for another 30 seconds or so, she again appeared confused and gripped the podium before starting to collapse. Fellow crew members stepped to her side and lowered her to the floor.
    Two NASA officials then helped her leave through a side door, and she was allowed to return home by early afternoon, according to Smith Johnston, the crew's flight surgeon, who was at Piper's side when she fell.
    Astronauts typically lose 10 percent to 14 percent of their blood volume while in space, usually regaining it in a day or two, Johnston said.
    The Atlantis crew returned to Earth on Thursday after performing the first construction work on the International Space Station since the Columbia disaster three-and-a-half years ago.
    They performed three gruelling spacewalks to hook up a seventeen-and-a-half-ton addition, which included a giant set of electricity-producing solar panels.
    Piper, 43, of St. Paul, Minnesota, is a US Navy Commander and was a mission specialist and cosmic electrician aboard the shuttle.
    She carried out two of the spacewalks, joining an elite club of only six other US women and a single Russian woman who have walked in space.


    You can license this story through AP Archive:
    Find out more about AP Archive:

  • Celebrity astronaut Hadfield returns to Earth

    1:13

    The Canadian Space Agency was abuzz Monday, May 13 2013 as astronaut Chris Hadfield and two colleagues returned to Earth after five months living on the International Space Station. The Gazette has compiled the best NASA video and still footage from the mission, set to Hadfield's reworking of the David Bowie classic Space Oddity. (Re-edited by Dario Ayala, narrated by James Mennie. Additional video Peter McCabe. / THE GAZETTE)

  • Chris Hadfield Returns To Earth After 147 Days In Space

    1:58

    Astronaut Chris Hadfield says he is happily readapting to the heavy pull of gravity after a six-month space mission that turned him into a global celebrity.

    The Canadian tweeted shortly after returning to Earth following his stay on board the International Space Station (ISS).

    Safely home, he wrote, adding it was wonderful to smell and feel spring.

  • Cooking Dried Space Food For Astronaut Chris Hadfield ????????‍???? | MasterChef Canada | MasterChef World

    5:52

    Using pre dried space food, the cooks make a dish for astronaut Chris Hadfield ????????????‍????
    Subscribe and never miss a MasterChef moment :

    Welcome to MasterChef World!

    The best MasterChef moments from the history of the world's favourite Cooking TV show from across the globe.

    Challenges, recipes, how-to's and of course the biggest cooking fails and meltdowns.

    Whether you are a fan of MasterChef, Junior MasterChef, MasterChef the Professionals or Celebrity MasterChef, you're in the right place.

    #masterchef #masterchefcanada #chrishadfield

  • What Did This Cosmonaut Miss About Earth After a Year in Space? | National Geographic

    5:16

    What does it mean to long for home in the most extreme and profound way? As NASA, SpaceX, and other organizations set their sights on flying humans to Mars, they’re also looking to cosmonauts like Mikhail Kornienko, who recently spent almost a year in the International Space Station, to learn about how extended time in space has changed his body and challenged him mentally.
    ➡ Subscribe:

    #NationalGeographic #Cosmonaut #Space

    About National Geographic:
    National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible.

    Get More National Geographic:
    Official Site:
    Facebook:
    Twitter:
    Instagram:

    Landing in Kazakhstan after spending almost an entire year orbiting the Earth in the International Space Station, cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko inhaled the air of the Steppes and said it was “possible to cut it with a knife and spread it on bread.”

    What does it mean to long for home in the most extreme and profound way? As NASA, SpaceX, and other organizations set their sights on flying humans to Mars, they’re also looking to cosmonauts like Kornienko to learn about how his extended time spent in space has changed his body, and challenged him mentally.

    Read more in Mars: Inside the High-Risk, High-Stakes Race to the Red Planet from the November 2016 issue of National Geographic Magazine.


    VIDEO: Maxim Arbugaev
    EDITOR: Edythe McNamee
    PRODUCERS: Kurt Mutchler, Edyther McNamee, Elena Sheveiko
    ADDITIONAL FOOTAGE: NASA, NASA Johnson Space Center, NASA Earth Observatory

    What Did This Cosmonaut Miss About Earth After a Year in Space? | National Geographic


    National Geographic

  • Can You Cry In Space?

    1:25

    ISS commander Chris Hadfield demonstrates what happens to tears if they start 'falling' in Space. -- Astronaut Chris Hadfield's Amazing Photos of Earth From Space:

    Credit: CSA

  • You Are Here: Astronaut Chris Hadfield shares images of Earth

    5:20

    Hadfield is one of the most accomplished astronauts in history and his new book, You Are Here: Around the World in 92 Minutes, reveals a visually stunning tour of Earth from his adventures aboard the International Space Station. He joins CBS This Morning to discuss his breathtaking photos.

  • NASA Television Video File- MS 13 Hatch Closing Undocking Landing - February 6, 2020

    19:24

    Expedition 61 Crew, Record-Setting Astronaut Christina Koch Return to Earth

    Expedition 61 Commander Luca Parmitano of ESA (European Space Agency), Soyuz commander Alexander Skvortsov of Roscosmos and NASA Flight Engineer Christina Koch landed safely on Earth near the town of Dzhezkazgan, Kazakhstan, Feb. 6 after bidding farewell to their colleagues on the complex and undocking their Soyuz MS-13 spacecraft from the Poisk Module on the International Space Station. Koch completed a 328-day, 139-million mile mission on the orbital outpost --- the longest spaceflight ever conducted by a woman in history and the second longest single spaceflight by a U.S. astronaut. Parmitano and Skvortsov wrapped up a 201-day mission in space spanning 85.2 million miles.

  • Astronaut Chris Hadfield on 13 Moments That Changed His Life | WIRED

    16:32

    Astronaut Chris Hadfield reflects on 13 important moments from his life and career, from learning to fly to being blinded temporarily in space to recording his famous cover of David Bowie's Space Oddity.

    Still haven’t subscribed to WIRED on YouTube? ►►
    Get more incredible stories on science and tech with our daily newsletter:

    Also, check out the free WIRED channel on Roku, Apple TV, Amazon Fire TV, and Android TV. Here you can find your favorite WIRED shows and new episodes of our latest hit series Tradecraft.

    ABOUT WIRED
    WIRED is where tomorrow is realized. Through thought-provoking stories and videos, WIRED explores the future of business, innovation, and culture.

    Astronaut Chris Hadfield on 13 Moments That Changed His Life | WIRED

  • WATCH NASA: Astronaut Spacewalk #RealTimeTracker NASA FEED | 24/7 Earth Viewing cameras

    00

    Nasa Astronauts at work! 24/7 Live Views from the International Space Station, Earth is seen from cameras aboard the International Space Station. Watch the Earth roll Captured from the International Space Station.

    THIS WILL SHOW PRE-RECORDED FOOTAGE -
    As the Space Station passes into a period of night every 45 mins video is unavailable - during this time, and other breaks in transmission, recorded footage is shown.
    When back in daylight the live stream of earth will recommence

    Real-Time ISSTracker: Location Tracking of the International
    Track the location of the International Space Station in real-time.

    Currently, live views from the ISS, an external camera mounted on the ISS module called Node 2. Node 2 is located on the forward part of the ISS. The camera is looking forward at an angle so that the International Docking Adapter 2 (IDA2) is visible. If the Node 2 camera is not available due to operational considerations for a longer period of time, a continuous loop of recorded HDEV imagery will be displayed. The loop will have “Previously Recorded” on the image to distinguish it from the live stream from the Node 2 camera. After HDEV stopped sending any data on July 18, 2019, it was declared, on August 22, 2019, to have reached its end of life. Thank You to all who shared in experiencing and using the HDEV views of Earth from the ISS to make HDEV so much more than a Technology Demonstration Payload!

    The ISS passes into the dark side of the earth for roughly half of each of its 90-minute orbits. As the Space Station passes into a period of night every 45 mins video is unavailable - during this time, and other breaks in transmission recorded footage is shown when back in daylight earth will recommence. As seen from the Nasa ISS live stream on the International Space Station -
    A real astronaut view of Earth! Captured by ISS HDEV cameras on board the International Space Station.

    By the courtesy of International Space Station:
    UStream live Feed From the NASA HDEV live cameras aboard the ISS. Watch the earth roll
    nasa.gov

    SPACE (Official)

    We love ❤ Space
    Do you?

    Music (CC)
    Garden Music Kevin MacLeod

  • How Astronauts Get Home from Space

    9:53

    How does an astronaut gets back to earth from space? Felix Baumgartner made it seem like all you need is to jump back to earth from outer space, but its a lot more complex than that!
    Subscribe for more! ► ◄
    Stay updated ► ◄
    For copyright queries or general inquiries please get in touch: hello@beamazed.com
    Credit:

  • Astronaut Chris Hadfield Debunks Space Myths | WIRED

    11:33

    Retired astronaut Chris Hadfield helps debunk (and confirm!) some common myths about space. Is there any sound in space? Does space smell like burnt steak? Is NASA working on warp speed?

    ONE STRANGE ROCK airs Mondays at 10/9c on National Geographic.

    Still haven’t subscribed to WIRED on YouTube? ►►
    Get more incredible stories on science and tech with our daily newsletter:

    Also, check out the free WIRED channel on Roku, Apple TV, Amazon Fire TV, and Android TV. Here you can find your favorite WIRED shows and new episodes of our latest hit series Tradecraft.

    ABOUT WIRED
    WIRED is where tomorrow is realized. Through thought-provoking stories and videos, WIRED explores the future of business, innovation, and culture.

    Astronaut Chris Hadfield Debunks Space Myths | WIRED

  • Soyuz undocking, reentry and landing explained

    20:45

    How does an astronaut return to Earth from the International Space Station? What does it feel like to re-enter the atmosphere? How does the Soyuz capsule function? Watch and find out. This video is based on an actual lesson delivered to the ESA astronaut class of 2009 (also known as the #Shenanigans09) during their ESA Basic Training. It features interviews with astronauts who have flown on the Soyuz and dramatic footage of actual landings.

    Produced by the ESA Human Spaceflight and Operations (HSO) Astronaut Training Division, Cologne, Germany, in collaboration with the HSO Strategic Planning and Outreach Office, Noordwijk, The Netherlands, with special support from Roskosmos.

    Narration Voice: Bernard Oattes

    Technical Experts: Stephane Ghiste, Dmitriy Churkin (HSO-UT)

    Content Design: Stephane Ghiste, Dmitriy Churkin, Raffaele Castellano, Matthew Day (HSO-UT)

    Animation & Video Editing: Raffaele Castellano (HSO-UT), HSO-K

    Project Coordination: Matthew Day, Stephane Ghiste, Dmitriy Churkin (HSO-UT)

    Special thanks to:
    Martin Schweiger (Orbiter software:
    Nikita Vtyurin, Andrew Thielmann (Orbiter Soyuz model)
    Lionel Ferra (HSO-UT)
    Oleg Polovnikov (HSO-UT)
    Frank De Winne (HSO-A)
    Paolo Nespoli (HSO-A)
    Antonio Rodenas Bosque (HSO-UT)
    NASA
    ROSCOSMOS
    S.P. Korolev Rocket and Space Corporation Energia
    Aerospace Search and Rescue Service of the Russian Federation

    Parachute footage: Cambridge University Spaceflight

    Surfer footage: copyright Red Bull Media House

    Footage from inside Soyuz capsule courtesy of RSC Energia has limited rights:

    a) These data are submitted with Limited Rights under Agreement among the Government of Canada, Governments of Member States of the European Space Agency, the Government of Japan, the Government of the Russian Federation and the Government of the United States of America concerning co-operation on the civil International Space Station.

    These data may be used by the receiving co-operating agency and its contractors and subcontractors, provided that such data shall be used, duplicated or disclosed only for the following purposes, which are related to the Cooperating Agency Space Station Program for ISS:
    1) Use for ESA astronaut training
    2) Use for educational purposes
    These data shall not be used by persons or entities other than the receiving Cooperating Agency, its contractors or subcontractors, or for any other purposes, without the prior written permission of the furnishing partner state, acting through its cooperating agency.

    b) This notice shall be marked on any reproduction of these data in whole or part.

    Also watch:
    Journey to the ISS Part 1: The launch sequence explained


    Watch Part 2: Soyuz rendezvous and docking explained


    Captions available in English, French, German, Italian, Russian, Romanian (with thanks to Alexa Mirel) and Spanish. Click on the CC button to switch between languages.

  • 16x9 - Rocket Man: Canadas top astronaut Chris Hadfield

    15:01

    He's piloted the fastest planes, flown on two space shuttle missions and been the first Canadian to walk in space. Now Chris Hadfield is preparing for the mission of a lifetime.

  • Chris Hadfield: The astronauts guide to flat Earth theory | Big Think

    3:31

    Chris Hadfield: The astronaut's guide to flat Earth theory
    New videos DAILY:
    Join Big Think Edge for exclusive video lessons from top thinkers and doers:
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    To the average person, there appears to be a growing number of people who believe — somehow — that the world is actually flat and that we are all being lied to by world governments. Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield has actually been to space and has seen that the world is round, but is unphased by these so-called flat-earthers. He flatly (pun intended) denies a global conspiracy, and says that perhaps the best way to deal with such willful ignorance is just to ignore it. After all, he posits, if you wrestle with a pig, the best you can be is a pig wrestler. It's folky wisdom like that which puts Chris into another stratosphere of intelligence. Chris Hadfield is the author of An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth: What Going to Space Taught Me About Ingenuity, Determination, and Being Prepared for Anything
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    CHRIS HADFIELD:

    “Good morning, Earth.” That is how Colonel Chris Hadfield—writing on Twitter—woke up the world every day while living aboard the International Space Station for over five months. Since blasting off from Kazakhstan in December 2012, Hadfield has become a worldwide sensation, harnessing the power of social media to make outer space accessible to millions and infusing a sense of wonder into the collective consciousness not felt since man first walked on the moon. Called “the most famous astronaut since Neil Armstrong” by the BBC, Hadfield, now safely back on Earth, continues to bring the glory of science and space travel to everyone he encounters.

    Hadfield is the pioneer of many firsts. In 1992, he was selected by the Canadian Space Agency as a NASA Mission Specialist – Canada’s first fully-qualified Space Shuttle crewmember. Three years later, he was the first Canadian to operate the Canadarm in space, and the first Canadian to board a Russian spacecraft as he helped build the Russian space station ‘Mir’. In 2001, he performed two spacewalks - the first Canadian to do so - and in 2010 the CSA and NASA announced Hadfield’s third mission: commanding the International Space Station (ISS)—again a first for a Canadian.

    Hadfield launched into space on December 19, 2012 and took command of the ISS in March. His multiple daily Tweets and photographs from space made people see the world differently. His accessibility, whether answering questions such as, “How do you wring out a washcloth in space,” via Skype or collaborating with The Barenaked Ladies for a song sung by nearly a million people simultaneously, endeared him to all while he orbited Earth.

    A heavily decorated astronaut, engineer, and pilot, Hadfield’s many awards include receiving the Order of Ontario, the Meritorious Service Cross, and the NASA Exceptional Service Medal. He was named the top Test Pilot in both the US Air Force and the US Navy, and has been inducted into Canada’s Aviation Hall of Fame. He is also commemorated on Canadian postage stamps, Royal Canadian Mint silver and gold coins, and on Canada’s new 5 dollar bill.
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    TRANSCRIPT:

    Chris Hadfield: When the very first balloon was launched that could carry people it was in Paris in the late 1700s and it was Montgolfier the brothers, they had hydrogen balloons and hot air balloons and it was the cutting edge of science. It was the cutting edge of technology. We just learned how to capture a gas like hydrogen that would be lighter than air as you could take a balloon and the first balloon rose and Ben Franklin was there and it was huge and magnificent, all of those scientists. And it rose but it got out of control and it went and landed out in the countryside 15 miles away from Paris and the peasants there attacked it with pitchforks because they thought it was an alien coming from space. The schism between learned understanding and scientific pursuit and the common perception of what was normal was that close just 15 miles away. It was an enormous gap between what we knew and what we were doing and what a lot of folks knew yet or what had become part of common knowledge. So there's nothing new about the speed with which we're inventing things and the ability for people to understand what's going on. There's a recent populous sort of wave of anti-science as if that's something new. It's mostly because social media has given everybody what appears to be an equal voice. On the corner of Hyde Park in London there's Speakers Corner and that used to be the Internet where yo...

    For the full transcript, check out

  • Sleeping in Space

    2:44

    2013-04-12 - It's bedtime on the ISS. CSA Astronaut Chris Hadfield shows us how astronauts sleep in space.

    Credits: Canadian Space Agency and NASA

    Expedition 34-35 Web page:

    Sleeping in space Web page:

    Find out more about this video:

  • Space Oddity

    5:31

    NEW YOUTUBE SERIES (Rare Earth):

    Rest in peace, Starman.

    A revised version of David Bowie's Space Oddity, recorded by Commander Chris Hadfield on board the International Space Station.

    Composition: “SPACE ODDITY”
    Written by David Bowie
    Published by Onward Music Limited

    (Note: This video cannot be reproduced and is licensed for online music use only.)

    With thanks to Emm Gryner, Joe Corcoran, Andrew Tidby and Evan Hadfield for all their hard work.

    Captioning kindly provided by CHS (

    From the album “Space Sessions: Songs From a Tin Can.” Available everywhere now.
    CD/LP:
    Download:
    Stream:

  • Astronaut Chris Hadfield

    3:50

    Astronaut Colonel Chris Hadfield speaks on what drove him to spaceflight, and what continues to drive him to achieve.

    Captioning provided by CHS

    Find out more:

    Twitter: twitter.com/Cmdr_Hadfield
    Facebook:
    Google+: plus.google.com/113978637743265603454/posts/p/pub

  • SpaceX Crew Dragon Returns from Space Station

    13:18

    The SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft undocks from the International Space Station on March 8, 2019 after nearly 5 days aboard the orbiting laboratory during the company’s Demo-1 mission for NASA’s Commercial Crew Program and descends to re-enter the Earth’s atmosphere. Just over 5 hours later, the uncrewed spacecraft splashes down in the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Florida and is recovered by SpaceX teams.

  • Chris Hadfield and Heart Health in Space

    1:43

    2013-02-14 - February is heart health month, not only on Earth, but in space as well. Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield is the test subject for two Canadian experiments, BP Reg and Vascular, projects that monitor the effects of weightlessness on the cardiovascular system. In this video Hadfield describes BP Reg, which is lead by Dr. Richard Hughson of the University of Waterloo. Results of these experiments could help us to better understand the human cardiovascular system and mechanisms that lead to fainting, which in turn could help reduce injury especially for the elderly.

    Credits: Canadian Space Agency and NASA

    Expedition 34-35 Web page:

    BP Reg Web page:

    Find out more about this video:

  • The First Thing Captain Scott Kelly Did On Earth After 340 Days In Orbit

    8:05

    Captain Scott Kelly, astronaut and record-holder for most consecutive days spent in space by an America, reveals what his first stop was upon landing back on Earth.

    Subscribe To The Late Show Channel HERE:
    For more content from The Late Show with Stephen Colbert, click HERE:
    Watch full episodes of The Late Show HERE:
    Like The Late Show on Facebook HERE:
    Follow The Late Show on Twitter HERE:
    Follow The Late Show on Google+ HERE:
    Follow The Late Show on Instagram HERE:
    Follow The Late Show on Tumblr HERE:

    Watch The Late Show with Stephen Colbert weeknights at 11:35 PM ET/10:35 PM CT. Only on CBS.

    Get the CBS app for iPhone & iPad! Click HERE:

    Get new episodes of shows you love across devices the next day, stream live TV, and watch full seasons of CBS fan favorites anytime, anywhere with CBS All Access. Try it free!

    ---
    The Late Show with Stephen Colbert is the premier late night talk show on CBS, airing at 11:35pm EST, streaming online via CBS All Access, and delivered to the International Space Station on a USB drive taped to a weather balloon. Every night, viewers can expect: Comedy, humor, funny moments, witty interviews, celebrities, famous people, movie stars, bits, humorous celebrities doing bits, funny celebs, big group photos of every star from Hollywood, even the reclusive ones, plus also jokes.

  • In Canada

    4:57

    A polite song from two brothers who are just hoping your day is going okay.

    Brother Dave wrote this. More from him at

    The Canada Song © 2012
    Written and composed by David Hadfield
    Lead Vocals -- Chris Hadfield, Dave Hadfield
    Guitar -- Dave Hadfield
    Bass -- Stuart Steinhart
    Background vocals -- Liz Levine, Maggie Torelli
    Audio - recorded at The Cutting Edge Recording Studio
    Audio - engineered, mixed, and mastered by Gary Long

    Video: VMG Cinematic
    Producers: Alyssa Milot & Mark Campbell
    Director: Ken Simpson
    Cinematographer: Alex Dacev
    Camera Assistant: Josh Johnston
    Art Director: Angela Newell
    Editor: Patrick Collins

    With special thanks to Evan Hadfield and Aaron Murphy, who put it all together, and to Mario DeFalco, esq - an important man for important times.

  • An Astronauts View of Earth

    4:00

    What it's like to see the Earth from orbit.
    Special thanks to Col. Chris Hadfield for chatting with me.

    Space imagery courtesy of NASA and the ESA



    Music by Kevin MacLeod New Frontier
    And Eureka by Huma-Huma

  • Chris Hadfields fear of heights: The CN Tower makes me uncomfortable.

    3:19

    Canadian Astronaut Chris Hadfield explains how he perform a space walk with a fear of heights.

  • Chris Hadfields Mission Reflections

    1:54

    2013-05-12 - With a breathtaking view of our planet around him, CSA Astronaut Chris Hadfield reflects upon his mission, his upcoming return to Earth and his connection with the public. Canada's first Commander of the International Space Station thanks everyone who followed and made this mission a shared experience.

    Credit: Canadian Space Agency

    Expedition 34-35 Web page:

    Find out more about this video:

  • The Life of Canadian Astronaut Chris Hadfield.

    15:01

    Insight into the life of Astronaut Chris Hadfield.

    Captioning provided by CHS

    Find out more:

    Twitter: twitter.com/Cmdr_Hadfield
    Facebook:
    Google+: plus.google.com/113978637743265603454/posts/p/pub

  • Raw video: Astronaut Chris Hadfield on life in space & return to Earth

    11:55

    The Canadian astronaut spoke to Breakfast Television's Kevin Frankish via Skype from Houston, where Hadfield is recuperating from his five-month space odyssey.

  • Chris Hadfields Life Advice Will Leave You SPEECHLESS - One of the Most Eye Opening Speeches

    10:12

    Col. Chris Hadfield, the mustachioed Canadian Astronaut and Commander of the International Space Station, gives one of the most eye opening interviews you will ever hear.
    ►Inspired? Get Hadfield's book, An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth:
    ►See more of Chris Hadfield's photos from space:

    Subscribe to our channel here:

    Special thanks to London Real for partnering with us on this video! For the full interview, subscribe to their channel:

    Every single thing that you learn really just gives you more comfort. It's something I counsel kids all the time: if someone is willing to teach you something for free, take them up on it. Do it. Every single time. All it does is make you more likely to be able to succeed. And it's kind of a nice way to go through life.
    ― Chris Hadfield

    If you know someone who could use this video, share it with them!
    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    ►Follow MotivationHub




    ►Speaker

    Chris Hadfield

    Follow Chris:
    YouTube:



    Learn more:

    ►Music:

    Really Slow Motion
    Buy Really Slow Motion music:
    Amazon :
    iTunes:
    Spotify:
    Bandcamp:

    Borrtex
    Bandcamp:
    Soundcloud:
    Instagram:
    Youtube:
    iTunes:

    ►Video footage:
    All video footage used is either licensed through either CC-BY or from various sources.

    ►Disclaimer:
    This video was fully edited and licensed by the team at MotivationHub.

    Help us caption & translate this video!

  • The Launch Experience: Chris Hadfield describes launching into orbit on the Joe Rogan Experience

    3:53

    Retired Col. Chris Hadfield talks about what it's like to launch into orbit aboard both the Space Shuttle, and the Soyuz on the Joe Rogan Experience podcast. Follow @Cmdr_Hadfield @joerogan or visit joerogan.net to listen to more podcasts.



    This video may contain copyrighted material & is the property of the respective authors, artists and labels.

  • Chris Hadfields Space Kitchen

    2:27

    2013-02-18 - Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield shows us his kitchen in space and prepares a 0-g treat. Free-floating food-eating ensues, complete with a tumbling tortilla.

    Credits: Canadian Space Agency and NASA

    Expedition 34-35 Web page:

    If this whets your appetite to learn more about eating in space, check out the Eating in space Web page: and visit the Living in Space Exhibition Web page:

    Find out more about this video:

  • Chris Hadfield Launches to Space

    1:54

    Today, Chris Hadfield launched to space on the Soyuz with his two crew mates, Roman Romanenko and Thomas Marshburn.

    Captioning provided by CHS

    Find out more:

    Twitter: twitter.com/Cmdr_Hadfield
    Facebook:
    Google+: plus.google.com/113978637743265603454/posts/p/pub

  • Why astronaut Chris Hadfield is a legend - Truthloader

    2:07

    Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield has returned to earth following a four-month stay on the International Space Station. We take a look at how he's inspired a new generation to learn more about space, and the sometimes bizarre, usually brilliant experiments of one of the best known astronauts of recent years. We also take a look at his cover of David Bowie's Space Oddity, recorded to mark his return to Earth.

    Check out Chris Hadfield's twitter:
    And his videos on the NASA YouTube channel:

    Subscribe to our channel:

    More Truthloader Investigates:
    Formula-E electric racecars unveiled:
    Biggest solar flare of 2013:
    Bacteria to lose weight:
    Lost continent found off Brazil:
    Robots to warn you if you smell:
    What has Star Trek done for us?:
    The fuel-free plane:
    Should we be scared of peak oil?:
    Virgin Galactic's maiden flight:
    To space on nuclear bombs:
    Who owns your DNA?:

    More videos from Truthloader:
    Syria's internet blackout and the propaganda war:
    Anonymous - Can you stop an idea?:
    Plane crash caught on film in Bagram, Afghanistan:
    The 3D printed gun available for download:
    The sun explodes out solar mass ejection:
    Tax havens and offshore accounts around the world:
    What does Israel's airstrike on Syria mean for the Middle East?:
    Ten reasons bees are amazing:
    Guantanamo Bay - How did the US end up in Cuba?:

    Check out our Top 20 videos playlist:

    Follow us on Facebook:

    Follow us on Twitter:

    Read our reddit:

    Truthloader is a channel dedicated to citizen journalism. We find the best examples of crowd-sourced video and independent content, then use our expertise to add context and analysis. We respond to the stories you're interested in, so if you've got a story you'd love us to get to the bottom of, tweet us, Facebook us, or respond to our videos with a comment - and perhaps check out our reddit.

  • Chris Hadfield hands over ISS command

    1:42

    Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield handed over command of the International Space Station to Russia's Pavel Vinogradov on Sunday, ahead of his expedition team's return to Earth.

  • Canadian hands over command of ISS ahead of return to Earth

    1:47

    SHOTLIST
    1. Wide of ground control, with big screen showing ISS crew
    2. SOUNDBITE (English) Chris Hadfield of Canada, outgoing space station commander:
    All of that going on, simultaneously, so that we could go outside, successfully execute the EVA (extra-vehicular activity) and in fact, as indications are right now, stopped the leak and leave the space ship even healthier than it was. So for me, my initial objectives, my dreams for how this might go and the realisation of what this crew can do together as a group of six men from all around the planet, of what all of those control centres all around the planet can do, for me this was just personification of what the international space station is and what the people mean to it. This is a human research vessel. We shared it with millions of people around the world and we've done our absolute best to accomplish the work on board.
    3. Ground control
    4. SOUNDBITE (English/Russian with translation) Chris Hadfield of Canada, outgoing space station commander, handing over to incoming commander Pavel Vladimirovich Vinogradov
    Hadfield: I pass command of the international space station to Pavel ... Congratulations.
    Vinogradov: Thank you, I accept the command of this station. We will look after it as much and as carefully as all the predecessors, and previous crews, and we wish you good luck to our guys tomorrow. Thank you, thank you so much.
    Hadfield: Congratulations, you guys are now Prime Crew!
    5. UPSOUND (English) ground control with big screen showing ISS crew, then full-screen of crew:
    You, the crew of expedition 35, have been nothing short of tremendous. Not only have the efforts of expedition 35 been extraordinary, but you've managed to bring us all along with you on your space odyssey. And for that, we thank you.
    STORYLINE
    Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield handed over command of the International Space Station to Russia's Pavel Vinogradov on Sunday, ahead of his expedition team's return to Earth.
    The handover ceremony came a day after two astronauts made a rare, hastily planned spacewalk to fix a serious ammonia leak.
    Flakes of frozen ammonia coolant were spotted on Thursday drifting from the long frame that holds the solar panels on the left side of the ISS.
    Barely 48 hours later, Thomas Marshburn and Christopher Cassidy replaced an old pump in an effort to plug the leak.
    NASA has never staged such a fast, impromptu spacewalk for a station crew and Hadfield paid tribute to his team and the ground control centres on Earth.
    For me, this was just personification of what the international space station is and what the people mean to it, he said.
    Hadfield, along with American Thomas Marshburn and Russian Roman Romanenko, is to return to Earth late on Monday.
    The Expedition 35 members have been at the ISS since December.
    Their colleagues from Expedition 36, Chris Cassidy of the United States and Russians Pavel Vinogradov and Alexander Misurkin, arrived in March.
    Hadfield used his time orbiting Earth to upload video diaries, songs and photos to social media sites in an effort to interest a new generation in the wonders of space exploration.
    The Canadian celebrated his final hours on board the space station by recording his take on David Bowie's Space Oddity .



    You can license this story through AP Archive:
    Find out more about AP Archive:

  • Chris Hadfield back to Earth

    2:48

    Sun, May 12: Today, Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield transferred command of the International Space Station to his Russian colleague. Paul Johnson is in Kazakhstan awaiting Hadfield's return to Earth. For more info, please go to

  • The best photos of Earth taken from space | Chris Hadfield

    5:16

    New videos DAILY:

    Join Big Think Edge for exclusive video lessons from top thinkers and doers:

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Flying three missions to space, the now-retired astronaut Chris Hadfield took around 45,000 photos. He shares how difficult it is to take pictures in space when your day is highly structured. But the times you can do it - there's a chance to capture something magical.

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    CHRIS HADFIELD

    “Good morning, Earth.” That is how Colonel Chris Hadfield—writing on Twitter—woke up the world every day while living aboard the International Space Station for over five months. Since blasting off from Kazakhstan in December 2012, Hadfield has become a worldwide sensation, harnessing the power of social media to make outer space accessible to millions and infusing a sense of wonder into the collective consciousness not felt since man first walked on the moon. Called “the most famous astronaut since Neil Armstrong” by the BBC, Hadfield, now safely back on Earth, continues to bring the glory of science and space travel to everyone he encounters.







    Hadfield is the pioneer of many firsts. In 1992, he was selected by the Canadian Space Agency as a NASA Mission Specialist – Canada’s first fully-qualified Space Shuttle crewmember. Three years later, he was the first Canadian to operate the Canadarm in space, and the first Canadian to board a Russian spacecraft as he helped build the Russian space station ‘Mir’. In 2001, he performed two spacewalks - the first Canadian to do so - and in 2010 the CSA and NASA announced Hadfield’s third mission: commanding the International Space Station (ISS)—again a first for a Canadian.







    Hadfield launched into space on December 19, 2012 and took command of the ISS in March. His multiple daily Tweets and photographs from space made people see the world differently. His accessibility, whether answering questions such as, “How do you wring out a washcloth in space,” via Skype or collaborating with The Barenaked Ladies for a song sung by nearly a million people simultaneously, endeared him to all while he orbited Earth.


     


    A heavily decorated astronaut, engineer, and pilot, Hadfield’s many awards include receiving the Order of Ontario, the Meritorious Service Cross, and the NASA Exceptional Service Medal. He was named the top Test Pilot in both the US Air Force and the US Navy, and has been inducted into Canada’s Aviation Hall of Fame. He is also commemorated on Canadian postage stamps, Royal Canadian Mint silver and gold coins, and on Canada’s new 5 dollar bill.

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    TRANSCRIPT:

    Chris Hadfield: Life on board a spaceship is so busy. People just don’t know. Mission Control schedules your time, there’s this line moving across your computer screen that shows what you’re doing every five minutes for your entire six months on a spaceship.


    So it is a dictated and controlled environment up there, and nowhere does it ever say, “Go look out the window.” But you just can’t help yourself. Every time you get ahead of that line, if you give yourself an extra three or four minutes you float through the station on the handrails, you pull yourself down into the cupola window, and you take another look at the world.


    And it is so many things all at once. It’s beautiful—it’s just raw, constantly changing beauty pouring by and around you.


    It’s instructional: You learn so much about the world. You see how everything actually fits together, and the history of it, and the geology and the geography of it.


    But it’s also a feeling of great privilege, of like awe, of like you’ve just walked into the most magnificent art gallery on earth, or into the Sistine Chapel, or into a rain forest or somewhere where suddenly you’re just overwhelmed with the place that you are. It’s an amazing stolen moment, and I stole as many of those as I could.


    As astronauts we train more than anybody knows. I had photographers train me. I got qualified to not just use a 35 mm digital camera but Hasselblad cameras with 70 mm film and Aeroflex cameras—and I became an IMAX cameraman and helped make two IMAX movies—and Linhof cameras and the whole gamut of complex photography. With all of those photographers talking about not just portraiture and not just inside, but how to take a good picture of the world and what parts of the world we haven’t seen yet. Some places have a lot of cloud cover, and maybe one day you’ll get a great picture of the Panama Canal or a part of the Amazon that’s never been photographed because it’s always so cloudy.


    So...

    For the full transcript, check out

  • Part One: Astronaut Chris Hadfield on return to Earth

    2:42

    It's great to be back on the planet, Hadfield told Breakfast Television's Kevin Frankish.

  • Chris Hadfield depicts Earths beauty from space

    3:47

    Subscribe to BBC News
    Subscribe to BBC News HERE
    Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield has published a book of photographs looking back at Earth from the ''unique and privileged'' vantage point of the International Space Station.
    It depicts some of the highlights of the planet, including Mauritania's Sahara ''eye,'' and Venice and New York City by night.
    Check out our website:
    Facebook:
    Twitter:
    Instagram:

  • Star astronaut Chris Hadfield returns to earth

    2:01

    The universe's most popular spaceman completes his mission, as Minnie Stephenson reports.

  • Chris Hadfield: How looking at 4 billion years of Earth’s history changes you

    6:35

    New videos DAILY:

    Join Big Think Edge for exclusive video lessons from top thinkers and doers:

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Look up—you can see the greatest feat of human cooperation orbiting 254 miles above Earth. As commander of Expedition 35 aboard the International Space Station (ISS), Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield understands the difficulty of cultural barriers in team work, and the life or death necessity of learning to communicate across those divides. The ISS is a joint project between five space agencies, built by people from 15 different nations—and each of them has a different take on what is normal. Hadfield explains the scale of cultural differences aboard the spaceship: What do you do on a Friday night? What does yes mean? What does uh-huh mean? What is the day of worship? When do you celebrate a holiday? How do you treat your spouse or your children? How do you treat each other? What is the hierarchy of command? All of those things seem completely clear to you, but you were raised in a specific culture that is actually shared by no one else. Here, Hadfield explains his strategy for genuine listening and communication. Whether it's money, reputation, or your life that's at stake, being sensitive and aware of people's differences helps you accomplish something together—no matter where you’re from. Amway believes that ​diversity and inclusion ​are ​essential ​to the ​growth ​and ​prosperity ​of ​today’s ​companies. When woven ​into ​every ​aspect ​of ​the talent ​life ​cycle, companies committed to diversity and inclusion are ​the ​best ​equipped ​to ​innovate, ​improve ​brand image ​and ​drive ​performance. Chris Hadfield features in the new docuseries One Strange Rock and is the author of An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth: What Going to Space Taught Me About Ingenuity, Determination, and Being Prepared for Anything

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    CHRIS HADFIELD

    “Good morning, Earth.” That is how Colonel Chris Hadfield—writing on Twitter—woke up the world every day while living aboard the International Space Station for over five months. Since blasting off from Kazakhstan in December 2012, Hadfield has become a worldwide sensation, harnessing the power of social media to make outer space accessible to millions and infusing a sense of wonder into the collective consciousness not felt since man first walked on the moon. Called “the most famous astronaut since Neil Armstrong” by the BBC, Hadfield, now safely back on Earth, continues to bring the glory of science and space travel to everyone he encounters.







    Hadfield is the pioneer of many firsts. In 1992, he was selected by the Canadian Space Agency as a NASA Mission Specialist – Canada’s first fully-qualified Space Shuttle crewmember. Three years later, he was the first Canadian to operate the Canadarm in space, and the first Canadian to board a Russian spacecraft as he helped build the Russian space station ‘Mir’. In 2001, he performed two spacewalks - the first Canadian to do so - and in 2010 the CSA and NASA announced Hadfield’s third mission: commanding the International Space Station (ISS)—again a first for a Canadian.







    Hadfield launched into space on December 19, 2012 and took command of the ISS in March. His multiple daily Tweets and photographs from space made people see the world differently. His accessibility, whether answering questions such as, “How do you wring out a washcloth in space,” via Skype or collaborating with The Barenaked Ladies for a song sung by nearly a million people simultaneously, endeared him to all while he orbited Earth.


     


    A heavily decorated astronaut, engineer, and pilot, Hadfield’s many awards include receiving the Order of Ontario, the Meritorious Service Cross, and the NASA Exceptional Service Medal. He was named the top Test Pilot in both the US Air Force and the US Navy, and has been inducted into Canada’s Aviation Hall of Fame. He is also commemorated on Canadian postage stamps, Royal Canadian Mint silver and gold coins, and on Canada’s new 5 dollar bill.

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    TRANSCRIPT:

    Chris Hadfield: High above our heads is the International Space Station. It’s an amazing, complex thing—the most complicated thing we’ve ever built in space, one of the most complex international projects ever conceived and ever completed. But the keyword of that is international. It is a place built by people from all around the planet, 15 different countries.


    And that just sounds sort of theoretical, until you start thinking: different languages, different units measureme...

    For the full transcript, check out

Menu