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Could The Universe Be Infinite? Secrets of a Dark Universe Documentary

  • Could The Universe Be Infinite? Secrets of a Dark Universe Documentary

    1:43:18

    13.8 billion years ago, the Universe began with the hot Big Bang. It's been expanding and cooling ever since, up through and including the present day. From our point-of-view, we can observe it for some 46 billion light years in all directions, thanks to the speed of light and the expansion of space. Although it's a huge distance, it's finite. But that's just the part we can see. What lies beyond that, and is that possibly infinite? Adam Stephens wants to know:

    The farther away we look in any direction, the farther back in time we see. The nearest galaxy, some 2.5 million light years away, appears to us as it was 2.5 million years ago, because the light requires that much time to journey to our eyes from when it was emitted. More distant galaxies appear as they were tens of millions, hundreds of millions or even billions of years ago. As we look ever farther away in space, we see light from the Universe as it was when it was younger. So if we look for light that was emitted 13.8 billion years ago, as a relic of the hot Big Bang, we can actually find it: the cosmic microwave background.

  • Dark Energy And Could The Universe Be Infinite? Secrets of a Dark Universe Documentary

    1:22:24

    In physical cosmology and astronomy, dark energy is a term that describes an unknown form of energy that affects the universe on the largest scales. The first observational evidence for its existence came from supernovae measurements, which showed that the universe does not expand at a constant rate; rather, the expansion of the universe is accelerating.[1][2] Understanding the evolution of the universe requires knowledge of the starting conditions and what it consists of. Prior to these observations, the only forms of matter-energy known to exist were ordinary matter, dark matter, and radiation. Measurements of the cosmic microwave background suggest the universe began in a hot Big Bang, from which general relativity explains its evolution and the subsequent large scale motion. Without introducing a new form of energy, there was no way to explain how an accelerating universe could be measured. Since the 1990s, dark energy has been the most accepted premise to account for the accelerated expansion. As of 2020, there are active areas of cosmology research aimed at understanding the fundamental nature of dark energy: is it a feature of measurement errors, or do modifications to general relativity need to be made
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  • Secrets of a Dark Universe Documentary - How Can the Universe be Infinite and Expanding

    47:18

    In the beginning - before the 1920s, these words had no place in our scientific understanding of the universe. Astronomers believed the cosmos to be eternal and unchanging. We knew of only one galaxy and a few million visible stars, and this was the scope of our observable universe.

    Then astronomer Edwin Hubble observed, courtesy of redshift, distant galaxies speeding away from each other and formulated Hubble's Law to explain the universe's uniform expansion. Redshift just refers to a distant celestial body's shift toward longer, or redder, wavelengths, compliments of the Doppler effect.

  • How Can the Universe be Infinite - Secrets of a Dark Universe Documentary

    6:35:20

    In the beginning - before the 1920s, these words had no place in our scientific understanding of the universe. Astronomers believed the cosmos to be eternal and unchanging. We knew of only one galaxy and a few million visible stars, and this was the scope of our observable universe.

    Then astronomer Edwin Hubble observed, courtesy of redshift, distant galaxies speeding away from each other and formulated Hubble's Law to explain the universe's uniform expansion. Redshift just refers to a distant celestial body's shift toward longer, or redder, wavelengths, compliments of the Doppler effect.

  • Mysteries of a Dark Universe

    25:01

    Cosmology, the study of the universe as a whole, has been turned on its head by a stunning discovery that the universe is flying apart in all directions at an ever-increasing rate.

    Is the universe bursting at the seams? Or is nature somehow fooling us?

    The astronomers whose data revealed this accelerating universe have been awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics.

    And yet, since 1998, when the discovery was first announced, scientists have struggled to come to grips with a mysterious presence that now appears to control the future of the cosmos: dark energy.

    On remote mountaintops around the world, major astronomical centers hum along, with state of the art digital sensors, computers, air conditioning, infrastructure, and motors to turn the giant telescopes.

    Deep in Chile's Atacama desert, the Paranal Observatory is an astronomical Mecca.

    This facility draws two megawatts of power, enough for around two thousand homes.

    What astronomers get for all this is photons, tiny mass-less particles of light. They stream in from across time and space by the trillions from nearby sources, down to one or two per second from objects at the edge of the visible universe.

    In this age of precision astronomy, observers have been studying the properties of these particles, to find clues to how stars live and die, how galaxies form, how black holes grow, and more.

    But for all we've learned, we are finding out just how much still eludes our grasp, how short our efforts to understand the workings of the universe still fall.

    A hundred years ago, most astronomers believed the universe consisted of a grand disk, the Milky Way. They saw stars, like our own sun, moving around it amid giant regions of dust and luminous gas.

    The overall size and shape of this island universe appeared static and unchanging.

    That view posed a challenge to Albert Einstein, who sought to explore the role that gravity, a dynamic force, plays in the universe as a whole.

    There is a now legendary story in which Einstein tried to show why the gravity of all the stars and gas out there didn't simply cause the universe to collapse into a heap.

    He reasoned that there must be some repulsive force that countered gravity and held the Universe up.

    He called this force the cosmological constant. Represented in his equations by the Greek letter Lambda, it's often referred to as a fudge factor.

    In 1916, the idea seemed reasonable. The Dutch physicist Willem de Sitter solved Einstein's equations with a cosmological constant, lending support to the idea of a static universe.

    Now enter the American astronomer, Vesto Slipher.

    Working at the Lowell Observatory in Arizona, he examined a series of fuzzy patches in the sky called spiral nebulae, what we know as galaxies. He found that their light was slightly shifted in color.

    It's similar to the way a siren distorts, as an ambulance races past us.

    If an object is moving toward Earth, the wavelength of its light is compressed, making it bluer. If it's moving away, the light gets stretched out, making it redder.

    12 of the 15 nebulae that Slipher examined were red-shifted, a sign they are racing away from us.

    Edwin Hubble, a young astronomer, went in for a closer look. Using the giant new Hooker telescope in Southern California, he scoured the nebulae for a type of pulsating star, called a Cepheid. The rate at which their light rises and falls is an indicator of their intrinsic brightness.

    By measuring their apparent brightness, Hubble could calculate the distance to their host galaxies.

    Combining distances with redshifts, he found that the farther away these spirals are, the faster they are moving away from us. This relationship, called the Hubble Constant, showed that the universe is not static, but expanding.

    Einstein acknowledged the breakthrough, and admitted that his famous fudge factor was the greatest blunder of his career.

  • Exploring an Unbelievable New Universe - How Can the Universe be Infinite and Expanding?

    50:41

    If the universe was infinite the early universe must also be infinite (because the universe can never expand at an infinite rate) and, assuming all of the universe has matter, must have contained an infinite amount of matter. Look at a black hole, it is infinitely dense and does not have infinite energy.

  • Exploring an Unbelievable New Universe - How Can the Universe be Infinite and Expanding?

    1:40:54

    The early universe could have just been infinitely small. If the universe was infinite the early universe must also be infinite (because the universe can never expand at an infinite rate) and, assuming all of the universe has matter, must have contained an infinite amount of matter.

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  • Hidden Universe - Dark Matter - Full Documentary HD

    53:10

    In the 20th century, telescopes advanced greatly in size, with apertures of optical scopes expanding from just five feet to over 30, and radio dishes growing from 30 feet across to 1,000. Discoveries kept pace: We have mapped the Milky Way with its 100 billion stars, for instance, and now accept that the universe has billions of galaxies, many anchored by a supermassive black hole at the center. But to address some of the most pressing cosmological questions today—what is dark matter? dark energy? is there life elsewhere?—space scientists agree that we need much bigger and much better eyes on the sky.
    NOVA examines how a simple instrument, the telescope, has fundamentally changed our understanding of our place in the universe. What began as a curiosity—two spectacle lenses held a foot apart—ultimately revolutionized human thought across science, philosophy, and religion. Hunting the Edge of Space takes viewers on a global adventure of discovery, dramatizing the innovations in technology and the achievements in science that have marked the rich history of the telescope.

  • THE UNIVERSE - Out of Nothing: Infinity | SPACETIME - SCIENCE SHOW

    48:20

    SPACETIME - SCIENCE SHOW: The beginning of everything was the Big Bang. The creation of our universe was set in motion. But what came before the big bang? And what happened right after the big bang? We are fascinated by the infinite vastness of the universe. A vastness inconceivable to anything we can imagine. But how do we know that the universe is infinite? These are the questions humanity has been preoccupied with since we looked up at the stars: where do we come from? Where are we going? And where is our place in the infinity of the cosmos?

    The Big Bang is the absolute starting point of our universe. The birth of space and time. But was there really nothing before that? A nothing beyond our imagination, or was there something before the big bang? What cosmologists and astrophysicists can say with certainty: Our universe came into existence exactly 13.8 billion years ago. And everything started from a single speck. A tiny speck where our three-dimensional universe, space, was buried. But where was this speck, this dot? There is no answer comprehensible for average human imagination. Only mathematics helps here. And it states: this three-dimensional, strongly curved speck was just there.

    After the big bang, our universe ballooned. And continues to expand today, maybe for all eternity. Nevertheless, astronomers define the universe as manageable: it is as big as the eye can see. It consists of what we can observe in principle. In order to discover and observe galaxies and stars, we need to light. The light of our central star, our sun, takes 8 minutes to reach us. The light of the nearest stars a few years. Tens of thousands of years from the next galaxies. The Hubble Space Telescope photographs galaxies several billion light-years away, and satellites measure the microwave radiation produced only 400,000 years after the Big Bang. With this data, cosmologists measure our universe in space and time.

    Let there be light! In this episode of Spacetime, Professor Ulrich Walter explains how out of nowhere our universe emerged. How it expanded, and what happened and continues to happen today. We focus on the question whether our Universe will last forever, or whether it is finite. What would happen at the end? We examine the phenomena that our cosmos holds: What are dark energy and dark matter? Why black holes exist and how do wormholes work? Are there really parallel universes? And what does the detection of gravitational waves mean for science? We look at the theories, methods and instruments that cosmologists use to track down the origin and function of our universe.
    The view into space gives us images of a fascinating and bewildering beauty. Landscapes of light and gas and stardust, shaped by cosmic wind and radiation. We are surrounded by an intangible infinity. A universe in which the earth is just a grain of sand on the beach of an ocean. But we are deciphering more and more secrets of the universe around us.

    About the documentary series SPACETIME
    Take a look at the Earth from space: Prof. Dr. med. Ulrich Walter has fulfilled the dream of mankind. In 1993 he traveled to Earth orbit. For the science format Spacetime, the astronaut once again sets off for the universe. In this reportage series, the physicist and professor of space technology presents current space travel trends and pioneering discoveries in space research.
    The challenges of the dream call Astronaut, the new race of the space nations to the moon or the discovery of further Earth-like exoplanets: In this documentary series, Ulrich Walter proves how lifelike science can be and what answers space travel offers to some of the fundamental questions of human existence.
    In Spacetime, the viewer learns about the visions that space research is currently pursuing and what insights will change our future forever.

    Watch all SPACETIME episodes


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    #Universe #bigbang #Spacetime

  • Does the Universe Have an Edge - Universe Expanding Faster Than We Though Documentary

    00

    The Milky Way is the galaxy we live in, one of the countless collections of stars and dust throughout the universe. It's a reality so basic, grade school kids learn it.

    Just 100 years ago, the nature of the Milky Way — and the universe itself — was still a matter of debate. On April 26, 1920, astronomer Harlow Shapley claimed our galaxy was the entire universe. Astronomer Heber Curtis countered that the blurry star clusters seen with a telescope were “island universes,” separate from, but analogous to, the Milky Way.

    Within five years, Edwin Hubble produced a reliable distance to one of the clusters we now know is our neighbor, the Andromeda Galaxy. His measurements showed that the gulf is so vast, Andromeda must be outside the Milky Way. Upon seeing a note from Hubble describing the results, Shapley said, “Here is the letter that destroyed my universe.” He wasn’t all wrong, though. In the years since, his prediction that our solar system is far from the Milky Way’s center was proven true.

  • The Dark Universe | How the Universe Works

    7:50

    Dark matter and dark energy are locked in an epic battle for control of the cosmos, and the winner will determine the fate of the universe.

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  • Dark Matter — The Greatest Mystery of The Universe | VICE on HBO

    11:37

    Dark matter and dark energy comprise the vast majority of our universe, but it is the biggest mystery in modern physics to figure out what they actually are.

    The five percent of matter we can perceive abides by the laws of physics as we understand them. But when scientists applied the laws of gravity to how fast nearby galaxies are rotation, the math didn't add up. The other 95% of our universe is known only as dark matter and dark energy and scientists around the world are scrambling to understand what these two forces are.

    ​Who knows what discoveries and impacts on our lives will come said Dr. Bruno Leibundgut, an astronomer at the European Southern Observatory, where he and his team are utilizing the most powerful telescope on Earth to figure out just how much the universe's expansion is accelerating.​

    And in an abandoned gold mine a mile beneath the Black Hills of South Dakota, scientists are using a massive tank of supercooled liquid xenon as they wait for photosensors to measure an elusive dark matter particle.​​

    Nuclear physicist and VICE correspondent Taylor Wilson went to meet the scientists working to solve the greatest mystery of the universe.

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  • The Dark Side of The Universe | What is The Dark Matter and How It Works

    58:44

    Dear viewers! This is an old documentary but one of the best in its kind. If you are interested in dark matter, this documentary probably explained in a very easy understanding way. If you don't like low-quality graphics, you may skip this video. Thank you for your understanding!

  • Before the Big Bang 8: Varying Speed Of Light Cosmology

    59:36

    Cosmologists challenging the foundations of physics are featured in this documentary on VSL. Variable Speed of Light (aka varying speed of light) suggests that it wasn't the expansion rate that was enormously higher than today in the early universe., but instead it was the speed of light. VSL theory is an alternative to the standard picture of inflationary cosmology and has mind blowing implications for the way we think about the origin of the universe and other mysteries of physics.We explore whether the big bang was really the beginning, is time quantum? how do we think about black holes in this framework, experimental probes of the theory and even the possibility for interstellar travel.
    VSL is a rival to inflationary cosmology and should you wish to learn more abut that, watch our film with the father of inflation Alan Guth ( and others) here:


    Please like and Subscribe. You can also find our other films in this series which features exclusive interviews with Stephen Hawking, Sir Roger Penrose, Alan Guth and many other leading cosmologists

    Below is a timeline of the VSL film
    SA =Stephon Alexander NA+ NIayesh Afshordi, JM =Joao Maguiejo and JohnM =John Moffat


    00:00 INTRODUCTION
    1:04 SA on his introduction to physics
    1:24 NA on above topic
    1:48 JM on above topic
    2:18 JohnM on above topic
    3:19 JM on Dirac and the history of changing constants
    3:57 JohnM on above topic
    4:13 JM on the importance of C in relativity
    5:02 SA on the horizon problem
    5:46 NA on above topic
    6:07 JohnM on his invention of VSL
    6:50 JM on the flatness problem
    8:27 NA on conservation of energy in an expanding universe
    9:13 JM on above topic
    10:04 JohnM on the conflict with Physical Reviews over VSL
    10:49 JM on rediscovering VSL
    11:41 JohnM on above topic
    12:03 JM on JohnM VSl theory
    12:21 JM on challenging the foundations of physics
    12:33 JohnM on above topic
    12:50 JM on an infinite speed of light
    13:41 SA on why VSl?
    13:58 NA on above topic
    14:27 JM on inflation
    14:40 NA on above topic
    15:25 JM on the fluctuations in the CMB
    16:10 NA on above topic
    16:30 JM on above topic
    17:19 JM on interstellar travel and cosmic strings
    18:10 JM on multiple models of VSL
    19:27 SA on string theory and VSL
    22:43 SA on Horava gravity
    23:30 NA on above topic
    23:51 JM on above topic
    24:23 NA on loop quantum gravity and Horava gravity
    25:13 JM on above topic
    27:07 JM on a length contraction and the Planck length
    28:32 JM on cyclic cosmology
    29:44 SA on singularity theorems
    30:48 NA on BGV theorem
    32:31 Jm on above topic
    33:53 NA on infinities, do they lead to contradictions?
    35:05 JohnM on the low entropy of the big bang
    35:54 NA on the above topic
    36:37 JM on the above topic
    37:42 John M on the multiverse
    38:47 JM on fine tuning
    39:31 NA on the above topic
    39:47 JM the above topic
    39:46 on the above topic
    40:15 NA on the above topic
    40:32 SA on the above topic
    42:18 JohnM observational tests
    43:38 NA on the above topic
    46:49 JM on varying alpha observations
    48:15 JohnM on the above topic
    48:46 NA on the primordial gravity waves
    49:10 JM on the above topic
    49:27 NA on the above topic
    50:20 JM on LIGo neutron stars
    50:45 Johnm on the above topic
    51:07 Jm on responding to George Ellis
    51:49 JohnM on the above topic
    52:09 Jm on the above topic
    53:06 Jm on future of VSl of Chern Simons time
    53:30 SA on the above topic
    55:15 Jm on the above topic
    56:39 NA on the black hole echoes
    59:06 Jm those numbers are the ones we have predicted

  • Sean Carroll - What Would an Infinite Universe Mean?

    2:35

    Do stars and spaces go on forever? Do the numbers of galaxies, and even of universes, have no end? Is our universe infinite in size and contents?

    For more information and video interviews with Sean Carroll click here

    For more videos on the meaning of an infinite universe click here

    For more Closer to Truth interview videos, please visit

  • Infinite Worlds: A Journey through Parallel Universes

    1:43:58

    The multiverse hypothesis, suggesting that our universe is but one of perhaps infinitely many, speaks to the very nature of reality. Join physicist Brian Greene, cosmologists Alan Guth and Andrei Linde, and philosopher Nick Bostrom as they discuss and debate this controversial implication of forefront research and explore its potential for redefining the cosmic order. Moderated by Robert Krulwich and featuring an original musical interlude, inspired by parallel worlds, by DJ Spooky.

    This program is part of the Big Ideas Series, made possible with support from the John Templeton Foundation.

    The World Science Festival gathers great minds in science and the arts to produce live and digital content that allows a broad general audience to engage with scientific discoveries. Our mission is to cultivate a general public informed by science, inspired by its wonder, convinced of its value, and prepared to engage with its implications for the future.
    Subscribe to our YouTube Channel for all the latest from WSF.
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    Original Program Date: June 13, 2009
    MODERATOR: Robert Krulwich
    PARTICIPANTS: Alan Guth, Brian Greene, Andrei Linde, Paul D. Miller, Nick Bostrom

    Introduction with Brian Greene 00:39

    Musical interlude 25:15

    Participant Introductions 33:49

    How do we know there was a Big Bang 35:50

    How do we get from a single universe to a multiverse. 47:14

    Is the universe expanding and how fast? 01:00:25

    What does six dimensional space look like? 01:08:00

    How do we know there is a multiverse? 01:13:48

    Bryce DeWitt on the multiverse concept 01:24:40

    What if we assume the universe is the simulation hypothesis? 01:37:14

    This program is part of The Big Idea Series, made possible with support from the John Templeton Foundation.

  • The Dark Matter Mystery - documentary

    38:31

    The Dark Matter Mystery - Exploring a Cosmic Secret
    is a documentary about Dark Matter.

    It is written by Franziska K. Lang and Dr. Rafael F. Lang
    and produced by the Volkssternwarte Laupheim e.V.

    The Dark Matter Mystery was originally produced
    for Planetariums in the FullDome-Format.
    It is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-
    NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

    For further information see


    This work is supported by the
    National Science Foundation
    #PHY - 1412965

  • How to Time Travel | How the Universe Works

    7:55

    Time traveling into the future is possible and fast-traveling astronauts do it all the time.

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  • Unsolved Mysteries of the Universe - Professor Ian Morison

    1:4:01

    There are many things that we do not understand about our Universe. This lecture will discuss some of the most perplexing of these and survey the instruments that are now being built and planned to help us fathom its mysteries.

    The transcript and downloadable versions of the lecture are available from the Gresham College website:


    Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website.

  • BBC The Beginning And End Of The Universe Series 1 1of2 The Beginning

    59:25

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  • A Journey to the End of the Universe

    30:01

    Could humans ever travel to other galaxies within their lifetime? The immense scale of the Universe seems to prohibit such voyages, after all the nearest galaxy is so far away that it takes light itself - the fastest thing in the Universe - 2.5 million years to complete the trip. Remarkably, there is a trick that might allow humans to accomplish this feat - join us today as we step onboard the constantly accelerating spaceship!

    Written and presented by Professor David Kipping.

    You can now support our research program and the Cool Worlds Lab at Columbia University:

    Chapters
    0:00 - Prologue
    2:57 - A Journey to Alpha Centauri
    11:27 - Returning from Distant Shores
    21:12 - Onward to the End

    Further reading and resources:

    ► Lee, J. & Cleaver, G., 2015, The Relativistic Blackbody Spectrum in Inertial and Non-Inertial Reference Frames:
    ► Yurtsever, U. & Wilkinson, S. 2015, Limits and Signatures of Relativistic Flight:
    ► Margalef-Bentabol, B., Margalef-Bentabol, J., Cepa, J., 2013, Evolution of the Cosmological Horizons in a Concordance Universe:
    ► Columbia University Department of Astronomy:
    ► Cool Worlds Lab website:

    Music is largely by Chris Zabriskie ( and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license ( in order of appearance;
    ► Cylinder Five (
    ► Music from Neptune Flux, The Oceans Continue to Rise
    ► Music from Neptune Flux, We Were Never Meant to Live Here
    ► Cylinder Two (
    ► Cylinder Four (
    ► Cylinder Eight (
    ► It's Always Darkest Before the Dawn by Hill, licensed through SoundStripe.com
    ► Cylinder Two (
    ► It's Always Darkest Before the Dawn by Hill, licensed through SoundStripe.com

    Video materials used:

    ► Intro/outro video by ESO/Mark Swinbank, Institute for Computational Cosmology, Durham University, Flying through the MUSE view of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field:
    ► Voyager 2 footage courtesy NASA JPL:
    ► Nautilus X videos from f r a g o m a t i k: and
    ► Ship passing Moon & Mars taken from Beer from Mars by MoonMan Pictures:
    ► A Journey to Alpha Centauri video by ESO./L. Calçada/Nick Risinger (skysurvey.org):
    ► Relativistic travel through a lattice by Ute Kraus:
    ► Earth time lapse footage taken onboard the International Space Station by NASA's Earth Science & Remote Sensing Unit
    ► Fly-through space footage from Space.com:
    ► A Flight Through the Universe, by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Miguel Aragon & Alex Szalay (Johns Hopkins), Mark Subbarao (Adler Planetarium):
    ► Galaxy spinning animation by spacetelescope.org:
    ► Expanding universe animation by EposChronicles:

    Films clips used:
    ► Agora (2009)
    ► Star Trek (1966 - 1969)
    ► Star Trek: The Motion Picture (1979)
    ► Interstellar (2014)
    ► The Expanse (2015 - present)
    ► 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)
    ► The Martian (2015)
    ► Passengers (2016)
    ► Alien (1979)
    ► Flame over India (1959)
    ► Star Trek: First Contact (1996)
    ► Prometheus (2012)
    ► Alien: Covenant (2017)
    ► Star Trek: The Next Generation (1987 - 1994)
    ► Planet Earth (2006)
    ► Elysium (2013)
    ► Alien: Resurrection (1997)
    ► Avengers: Endgame (2019)
    ► What Dreams May Come (1998)

    Special thanks to YouTuber Madd End for this fantastic artist's impression of the halo drive: Thumbnail image by Hazan:

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    #EndOfTheUniverse #ConstantAcceleration #CoolWorlds #InterstellarTravel

  • How the Universe Works - National Geographic The Universe - Space Discovery Documentary

    47:53

    ‘The Milky Way galaxy has died once before and we are now in what is considered its second life,’ the university announced in a statement. ‘Stars formed in two different epochs through different mechanisms. ‘There was a long dormant period between when star formation ceased. Our home galaxy has turned out to have a more dramatic history than was originally thought.’ A scientist called Masafumi Noguchi calculated the evolution of the Milky Way over the past 10 billion years.


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  • The Dark Side Of The Universe

    1:44:14

    For all we understand about the universe, 96% of what’s out there still has scientists in the dark. Astronomical observations have established that familiar matter—atoms—accounts for only 4% of the weight of the cosmos. The rest—dark matter and dark energy—is invisible to our telescopes. But what really is this dark stuff? How do we know it’s there? And what does it do? From the formation of galaxies to the farthest reaches of space, it appears that darkness rules. Without dark matter and dark energy, the universe today and in the far future would be a completely different place. We were joined by leading researchers who smash together particles, dive into underground mines, and explore the edges of the known universe in search of clues to nature’s dark side.

    This program is part of the Big Ideas Series, made possible with support from the John Templeton Foundation.

    The World Science Festival gathers great minds in science and the arts to produce live and digital content that allows a broad general audience to engage with scientific discoveries. Our mission is to cultivate a general public informed by science, inspired by its wonder, convinced of its value, and prepared to engage with its implications for the future.

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    Original Program Date: June 2, 2011
    MODERATOR: John Hockenberry
    PARTICIPANTS: Brian Greene, Glennys Farrar, Katherine Freese, Michael Turner, Saul Perlmutter, Elena Aprile, MOMIX

    Brian Greene's introduction on dark matter. 00:22

    What we don,t see by MOMIX 07:00

    John Hockenberry's Introduction. 16:17

    Participant Introductions 21:05

    Why do we know that there is dark matter? 25:10

    The lensing effect that reveals dark matter. 31:33

    A computer simulation of what dark matter was doing as the universe was expanding. 37:11

    Capturing Wimps with the XENON100. 41:40

    What the XENON100 detector looks like. 48:20

    Where do we go to find events that prove dark matter exists? 56:18

    If lensing is correct, could that determine an unknown force? 01:00:43

    Supersymmetry vs Another Universal Brane. 01:09:20

    Using a supernova to detect Dark Matter. 01:15:40

    How does a supernova tell you about dark matter? 01:21:20

    How did Einstein predict that dark energy existed? 01:26:18

    What is the counter explanation of dark energy? 01:30:40

    The ratio of dark energy makes a perfect environment for life. 01:35:30

  • Avengers 5 Will Center Around The Secret Wars Storyline

    15:08

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    The Marvel Cinematic Universe has become huge from its humble beginnings when Tony Stark emerged from a cave in a suit of armor. Since then it’s expanded, including his various Avengers team mates Captain America, Black Widow, Hawkeye, The Hulk, and Thor. Since then the roster has kept expanding with Black Panther, Ant Man & the Wasp, Doctor Strange, and Captain Marvel. And those are just the people that get their own movie. The entire cinematic end of the Marvel Cinematic Universe showed up to tackle Thanos in a record breaking epic final showdown. And it was fantastic, but where do you go from there? As always, the answers lie in the comics and a powerful being known as the Beyonder. More than an other dimensional being, he is the multidimensional being of unbelievable power who, like a being of unbelievable power, takes an interest in the mortal lives of the people in the Marvel Universe, placing them on a battleworld to sort out the question of good and evil once and for all. Twice. The Beyonder is exactly the kind of top foe to bring the various elements of the MCU back together again in an epic final showdown that has the potential to top even the epicness of Avengers: Endgame meaning that the MCU needs the Beyonder to be part of the fifth Avengers movie, even if it’s just to start the spark that eventually ends in Secret Wars.
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  • Mysterious Universe | Space Documentary

    59:26

    The Inspiration Behind Journey of the Universe

    We have a new story of the universe. Science has given us a new revelatory experience. It is now giving us a new intimacy with the earth. Thomas Berry, Dream of the Earth

    At its heart, this 60-minute documentary and book celebrate the collective inspiration of a lively and prolific 30-year-friendship between three visionaries in the fields of science, evolutionary philosophy, and world religions - Thomas Berry, Mary Evelyn Tucker, and Brian Thomas Swimme.

    Deeply inspired by Berry’s article titled “The New Story,” which observed how humans are in between stories--creation stories of the world’s religions and the scientific story of the evolution of the universe--both Brian and Mary Evelyn joined forces to co-write this epic narrative that translates our wondrous connection to the cosmos to a broader audience.

    We live in a universe of remarkable creativity that has evolved over some 14 billion years. The goal of Journey of the Universe is to tell the story of cosmic and Earth evolution drawing on the latest scientific knowledge, in a way that makes it profoundly relevant and deeply moving to the viewer. What emerges is an intensely poetic story, which evokes emotions of awe, excitement, fear, joy, and belonging.

    This story told in Journey of the Universe is a dramatic one. Throughout billions of years of evolution, triumph, and disaster have been only a hair's breadth apart. Violence and creativity are pervasive. The ability of matter to organize and re-organize itself is remarkable - from the formation of the first atoms to the emergence of life.

    The message of Journey of the Universe shows how we are not just a part of this astonishing process, we are at the very edge of evolution, a primate species that has found in its language and symbols the power to take over the very evolutionary process itself. But this control that we now exercise comes with a responsibility, and viewers of Journey of the Universe will not only be imbued with a sense of astonishment at all that has taken place, they will also come to feel the excitement in learning that now we live in a time when the human species is being asked to play a central role in activating the flourishing powers of Earth’s living systems.

    One of the aims of this project is to use the art of storytelling to capture the grandeur and drama of this epic of the universe - from the Big Bang, to where we are today in a moment of great transition. Carl Sagan was the first to remind us that We are all stardust, in Cosmos (a series co-created by one of the directors of the Journey film). Twenty-five years on, the Journey of the Universe will show us how the lineage of stardust can shape the way we feel about our own planet so that we might better cherish and protect what gave us life and nourishes us still.

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  • Amazing Journey From Earth to the End of the Universe - Do We Live In An Infinite Universe?

    59:32

    Could humans ever travel to other galaxies within their lifetime? The immense scale of the Universe seems to prohibit such voyages, after all the nearest galaxy is so far away that it takes light itself - the fastest thing in the Universe - 2.5 million years to complete the trip. Remarkably, there is a trick that might allow humans to accomplish this feat - join us today as we step onboard the constantly accelerating spaceship!
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  • Cosmic Journeys - Life: Destiny or Chance?

    25:16

    Are the universe and its physical laws so fine-tuned that the rise of life is inevitable? Or is life a fluke, a lucky roll of cosmic dice? We look for the answer in the rise of two important components of life, dust and water. It turns out that the universe is laden with water, a byproduct of dust kicked out and spread around by supernovas and black holes.

  • Blow Your Mind A Science Odyssey Mysteries of the Universe Documentary

    2:45:35

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    Part 2 of 5 - Complete serie A Science Odyssey here Subtitle available. The Mysteries of Science - Top Documentary Science, sometimes called science points, .

  • How the Universe works - Strangest Things Found in Deep Space Exploration

    1:16:33

    The Journey to the Edge of the Universe documentary film broadcast on National Geographic and Discovery Channels. It documents a space journey from ...

    Website: Like me on Facebook: Follow me on twitter: This documentary was made, produced ...

    Humanity is at a crossroads! on this 2015 documentary we will try to predict what will happened in the future: Nearly half of the Amazon rainforest has been ...

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    How the Universe works - Strangest Things Found in Deep Space Exploration (Full Documentary Films)

    How the Universe works - Strangest Things Found in Deep Space Exploration (Full Documentary Films)

  • PBS Documentary - Nova - Runaway Universe

    51:00

    PBS Documentary - Nova - Runaway Universe

    Two rival astronomy teams search for exploding stars, map gigantic galaxies, and grapple with the ultimate question: what is the fate of the universe? NOVA presents the first attempt to explore the riddle of dark energy- the mysterious repulsive force that some scientists believe counteracts gravity.

    Original air date: November 11, 2000

  • What Do We Know About Black Holes? | Secrets Of The Universe | Spark

    22:43

    Epic black holes, nuclear furnaces at the core of giant stars and volcanic pressure cookers inside planets - all across the immense reaches of time and space, the universe is being transformed by seething caldrons of energy.

    This episode looks into the dark side of the universe, the mysterious and monstrous black holes.

    First Broadcast in 2012. Content Provided By TVF. Any queries, contact us at hello@littledotstudios.com

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    #space #blackholes #alberteinstein #spacetravel #gravity #darksideoftheuniverse #science #telescope #technology #spacetechnology

  • Cosmic Journeys - Hubble: Universe in Motion

    50:02

    Since its launch 25 Years ago, the Hubble Telescope has returned images of unprecedented beauty of a dynamic and changing universe.

    In this episode of COSMIC JOURNEYS, Hubble’s most iconic images are bought to life to answer some of the most important questions facing astronomers today. Colliding galaxies, the birth and death of stars, jets of gas thrown out by material crashing into distant suns: these incredible images tech us valuable lessons about how galaxies are formed, what dark matter is and even the fate of the earth itself.

    ABOUT US
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    We believe there is no better time to inform ourselves about the world around us. Our partnership with MagellanTV is aimed to educate viewers on our complex world to prepare for our rapidly changing future. Through our videos we hope to capture a variety of important topics with the overall goal of promoting positive discussion and action.

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  • Is the Universe Infinite?

    23:54

    For more 4K space, and more great History and Science than you'll ever watch, check out our sister network...

    Explore the biggest question of all. How far do the stars stretch out into space? And what's beyond them? In modern times, we built giant telescopes that have allowed us to cast our gaze deep into the universe. Astronomers have been able to look back to near the time of its birth. They've reconstructed the course of cosmic history in astonishing detail.

    From intensive computer modeling, and myriad close observations, they've uncovered important clues to its ongoing evolution. Many now conclude that what we can see, the stars and galaxies that stretch out to the limits of our vision, represent only a small fraction of all there is.

    Does the universe go on forever? Where do we fit within it? And how would the great thinkers have wrapped their brains around the far-out ideas on today's cutting edge?

    For those who find infinity hard to grasp, even troubling, you're not alone. It's a concept that has long tormented even the best minds.

    Over two thousand years ago, the Greek mathematician Pythagoras and his followers saw numerical relationships as the key to understanding the world around them.

    But in their investigation of geometric shapes, they discovered that some important ratios could not be expressed in simple numbers.

    Take the circumference of a circle to its diameter, called Pi.

    Computer scientists recently calculated Pi to 5 trillion digits, confirming what the Greeks learned: there are no repeating patterns and no ending in sight.

    The discovery of the so-called irrational numbers like Pi was so disturbing, legend has it, that one member of the Pythagorian cult, Hippassus, was drowned at sea for divulging their existence.

    A century later, the philosopher Zeno brought infinity into the open with a series of paradoxes: situations that are true, but strongly counter-intuitive.

    In this modern update of one of Zeno's paradoxes, say you have arrived at an intersection. But you are only allowed to cross the street in increments of half the distance to the other side. So to cross this finite distance, you must take an infinite number of steps.

    In math today, it's a given that you can subdivide any length an infinite number of times, or find an infinity of points along a line.

    What made the idea of infinity so troubling to the Greeks is that it clashed with their goal of using numbers to explain the workings of the real world.

    To the philosopher Aristotle, a century after Zeno, infinity evoked the formless chaos from which the world was thought to have emerged: a primordial state with no natural laws or limits, devoid of all form and content.

    But if the universe is finite, what would happen if a warrior traveled to the edge and tossed a spear? Where would it go?

    It would not fly off on an infinite journey, Aristotle said. Rather, it would join the motion of the stars in a crystalline sphere that encircled the Earth. To preserve the idea of a limited universe, Aristotle would craft an historic distinction.

    On the one hand, Aristotle pointed to the irrational numbers such as Pi. Each new calculation results in an additional digit, but the final, final number in the string can never be specified. So Aristotle called it potentially infinite.

    Then there's the actually infinite, like the total number of points or subdivisions along a line. It's literally uncountable. Aristotle reserved the status of actually infinite for the so-called prime mover that created the world and is beyond our capacity to understand. This became the basis for what's called the Cosmological, or First Cause, argument for the existence of God.

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    We have partnered with MagellanTV with the goal of providing our viewers with insight regarding our uncertain future on Earth and beyond. Equipped with knowledge, we hope to inspire people to enact change and pave the way for a better tomorrow.

  • End of the Universe - National Geographic Documentary HD

    42:59

    The ultimate fate of the universe is a mind-bogglingly thing to think about. So what’s the final outcome for it all?
    One of the furthest reaches of time we dare to predict is the end of the universe. As far as we know this is the end of not only life as we know it but everything that’s ever existed. No more matter, no more light, no more particles, no more nothing. It’s a harrowing reality to fathom, but it’s one we need not worry about too much – if the universe does end, it will be in an unfathomable amount of time as it eclipses trillions upon trillions of years. We must be triumphant on the edge of nothingness as we look forth to the fate of the universe.

    The end of Earth, on the other hand, could come at any moment. There’s a number of cosmic events that could wipe this planet right off the universal map. Cataclysmic asteroids, gamma-ray bursts, close supernova blasts, a rogue black hole, and so on. There’s no shortage of astounding yet deadly phenomena in space.

    One thing we know for certain is that the Sun’s luminosity increases every billion years by 6%. Our planet will most likely be inhospitable to life in the next billion years. Fast forward 6 billion years and the ground beneath your feet will be completely vaporized. The ultimate fate of the universe is a mind-bogglingly thing to think about. So what’s the final outcome for it all?
    The science is anything but conclusive. The Universe might be infinite and never end, it might have never started, but have always been. It could be cyclical in nature with Big Bangs and slow burns occurring on universal eons of scales, or it could splatter out into the truest void.

    Our best theories of physics have come up with a few ideas throughout the years and suggest a number of options for the great cosmic deluge. Some hopeful technologists and transhumanists believe we could survive these apocalypses and float off into another universe or dimension. It all depends on what theory you subscribe to. Here are a few.
    The big crunch
    The Big Crunch could be the ending component to the Big Bang. This model of universal death occurs if the expansion of the universe stutters out and stops expanding. If the average density of the universe isn’t enough to stop expansion, then the universe in a sense will revert and then start to collapse onto itself.

    Michio Kaku talks about this when discussing dark matter and his view of the ultimate fate of the universe. The eventual state will be all matter and particles coming together into a black hole singularity. Then boom! This could have been the state that the universe was in when the Big Bang came about. Such an event like this could be evidence of a cyclical repetition of the universe and would confirm many ancient theories of the destiny of the universe. Astrophysicists and other scientists call this conformal cyclic cosmology. Once one universe collapses, it rebirths a new one.
    The dichotomy of forces would be like a great celestial wave riding on for trillions of years, just to pull back and crash out again into the infinite over and over again. This is also possible if there is a reversal in dark energy (which some scientists speculate is causing the current expansion effects we see.)

    Our current universal experience could be an iteration of an infinite many continuing on through the ages ad infinitum. We’ll explore the philosophical ramifications of this later.
    The big freeze
    Another popular theory of the end of the universe relies on the laws of thermodynamics and also understanding the true nature of dark energy. The Big Freeze or conversely Heat Death of the universe might come about as the universe continues to expand at an increasingly faster speed.
    If the universe continues to expand at an ever-increasing interval, there are a few things that are going to happen those concern physicists. Galaxies and all the stars and planets inside of them will be pulled farther from one another. Deep in the future, intelligent civilizations may look up into the night sky and see nothing as the stars have receded so far away from one another that no light can touch them.

    So long alien contact! Eventually, all the stars may be pushed so far from one another that there will be no more explosive reactive energy to make future stars and celestial bodies. And the lights go down in the universe, and they’ll never be live again. Epochs of time crash by with no clock to chart the voyage of the final void.

    Soon only the flickers of the infinitesimal particles will remain until their solemn death into nothingness. Colder and colder and the dynamic changes that once paved the way for the fiery life of suns and galaxies will come closer to reaching absolute zero. Once this state is reached, all movement stops.
    There is no existence at absolute zero and no energy. At this point, the universe has reached a maximum state of entropy and is no more.

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    Make sure to subscribe and leave a comment below.

  • What Triggered the Big Bang? | How the Universe Works

    7:45

    The Big Bang is one of science's most famous theories, but we now know it wasn't big and it wasn't a bang.

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  • Seeing the Beginning of Time 4k

    47:58

    For more 4K space, and more great History and Science than you'll ever watch, check out our sister network...


    Astronomers have begun one of the most far-reaching efforts to study the cosmos. They are building giant new telescopes, while marshaling vast computational power. These technologies are part of a historic quest: to peer into space and time, to find out how the universe gave birth to galaxies and planets, to discern the amazing world of gravity and test theories by Einstein and other scientists.

    ABOUT US
    Here at SpaceRip, we value the exploration of the unknown. We surpass boundaries for the sake of uncovering the mysteries of the cosmos and what they may tell us about our origin and our future. With our videos, we hope to educate our viewers on how we fit into the universe, and more so how we can do our part to better it.

    We believe there is no better time to inform ourselves about the world around us. Our partnership with MagellanTV is aimed to educate viewers on our complex world to prepare for our rapidly changing future. Through our videos we hope to capture a variety of important topics with the overall goal of promoting positive discussion and action.

  • Beyond the Cosmic Horizon

    18:53

    In 2012, scientists detected the most distant galaxy discovered to date. This galaxy is now expected to be over 46 billion light years from the Earth, at the very edge of the observable universe. But what differentiates the observable universe and the rest of the universe? Today, we examine how a 13 billion year-old universe can be hundreds of billions of light years in diameter, and what might be waiting for us behind the barrier of the cosmic horizon.

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  • Mystery of Space Time - How the universe works?| Discovery Science full documentary

    42:30

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  • Black Holes 101 | National Geographic

    3:11

    At the center of our galaxy, a supermassive black hole churns. Learn about the types of black holes, how they form, and how scientists discovered these invisible, yet extraordinary objects in our universe.
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  • Big Bang Theory in Telugu | The Journey of the Universe in Telugu Episode -1 | Telugu Badi

    13:02

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    The big bang theory describes the development of the universe from the time just after it came into existence up to today. It's one of several scientific models that attempts to explain why the universe is the way it is.

    The Big Bang Theory is the leading explanation about how the universe began. At its simplest, it says the universe as we know it started with a small singularity, then inflated over the next 13.8 billion years to the cosmos that we know today. Most cosmologists accepted the Big Bang, but several puzzles remained.
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  • Does the Universe Have a Mind? - Exploring Panpsychism with Philip Goff | Waking Cosmos

    1:27:25

    Does the Universe Have a Mind?
    My guest today is the philosopher Philip Goff, known for his defense of panpsychism, which is the idea that consciousness, —the distinctly interior and subjective nature of our minds, could in fact be a fundamental aspect of reality.

    With growing support for panpsychism in academia, it is a view that Goff believes could do for the philosophy of mind, what Darwin’s theory of evolution did for biology.

    In our conversation today, we discuss the reasons for believing that consciousness is an intrinsic part of reality, as well as the implications for both cosmology and life on this planet.

    We also explore how panpsychism, in conjunction with priority monism, could entail the existence of cosmic mind. This view, Philip has termed “Cosmopsychism.”

    If you enjoy the Waking Cosmos podcast and would like to support it, please visit my Patreon~

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  • The greatest unsolved mysteries of the universe: Dr Paul Francis

    1:5:56

    Which way do comets tails face? Does dark matter exist? Where did the universe come from and what is it made of? What's at the end of the universe? Dr Paul Francis discusses some of the 'greatest unsolved mysteries of the universe' at The Australian National University on 31 March 2010.

    This talk will explore the greatest unsolved problems of modern astrophysics, describe why they are hard, and discuss the efforts being made to solve them.

    Paul Francis is an astronomer at The Australian National University. He conducts research on comets, quasars, high redshift galaxies, and novel interactive teaching techniques. He grew up in London, studied at Cambridge and has worked with the Steward Observatory in Tucson, Arizona, with the University of Melbourne, and has been based at ANU since 1997.

  • Could the Universe End by Tearing Apart Every Atom?

    15:49

    Of all the unlikely ends of the universe, the Big Rip has to be the most spectacular. Galaxies ripped to shreds, dogs and cat first living together, then tragically separated by the infinitely accelerating expansion of space on subatomic scales. Good thing it's not going to happen. Or is it?

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    The universe is expanding, and that expansion is accelerating. We don’t know what’s causing that acceleration, but that hasn’t stopped us from giving it a name. We call this unknown influence dark energy. The observed acceleration is, for the most part, nicely described with a constant density of dark energy – the same amount of this stuff in every block of space. Which means if you increase the volume you increase the overall amount of dark energy – hence accelerating expansion. Mathematically we describe a constant energy density with the cosmological constant in the equations of Einstein’s general theory of relativity. But what if dark energy is NOT constant? What if the energy density in each patch of space increases over time? In that case, the acceleration itself could be … accelerating. That would be bad.


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    Richard Broman
    Scott Gossett
    Sigurd Ruud Frivik
    Tim Crookham
    Tim Stephani
    Tommy Mogensen
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    And a round of applause to Andreas Nautsch.

  • Does the Universe Have an Edge Documentary ★ Universe Expanding Faster Than We Though

    52:34

    The Milky Way is the galaxy we live in, one of the countless collections of stars and dust throughout the universe. It's a reality so basic, grade school kids learn it.

    Just 100 years ago, the nature of the Milky Way — and the universe itself — was still a matter of debate. On April 26, 1920, astronomer Harlow Shapley claimed our galaxy was the entire universe. Astronomer Heber Curtis countered that the blurry star clusters seen with a telescope were “island universes,” separate from, but analogous to, the Milky Way.

    Within five years, Edwin Hubble produced a reliable distance to one of the clusters we now know is our neighbor, the Andromeda Galaxy. His measurements showed that the gulf is so vast, Andromeda must be outside the Milky Way. Upon seeing a note from Hubble describing the results, Shapley said, “Here is the letter that destroyed my universe.” He wasn’t all wrong, though. In the years since, his prediction that our solar system is far from the Milky Way’s center was proven true.

  • Secrets of a Dark Universe Documentary - How Can the Universe be Infinite

    55:11

    n the beginning - before the 1920s, these words had no place in our scientific understanding of the universe. Astronomers believed the cosmos to be eternal and unchanging. We knew of only one galaxy and a few million visible stars, and this was the scope of our observable universe.

    Then astronomer Edwin Hubble observed, courtesy of redshift, distant galaxies speeding away from each other and formulated Hubble's Law to explain the universe's uniform expansion. Redshift just refers to a distant celestial body's shift toward longer, or redder, wavelengths, compliments of the Doppler effect.

  • New Mysteries of the Universe - How Can the Universe be Infinite and Expanding?

    00

    Space expands, and hence grows, by virtue of creating new space. ... In this way of thinking, the expansion of space is reflected in the distance between two such galaxies growing larger and larger over time. And that characterization of the expansion holds true whether the universe is finite or infinite.

  • How the Universe Works S06E06 - Secret History of Mercury

    43:41

    Discoveries of new planets have revealed countless worlds much stranger than Earth. ... Mercury is a deadly world, facing attacks from the sun, comets, and other planets, and even though it's the smallest planet in the solar system, it has a dangerous secret a dangerous secret that might one day threaten life on Earth.

  • Journey to the Edge of the Universe

    1:28:25

    National Geographic presents a beautifully created CGI (Computer-Generated Imagery) documentary which takes us from Earth to the edge of the 'observable universe'.

    Narrated stunningly by Alec Baldwin and using images taken from the Hubble telescope, Journey to the Edge of the Universe explores the science and history behind the distant celestial bodies in the solar system and ventures far beyond what we as a species has ever gone before.

    This epic odyssey across the cosmos, takes us from the Earth, past our star and nearby planets, out of our Solar System and to galaxies near and far beyond. This will take you to the edge of human understanding.

    When you finish this journey, you will have a greater awareness and understanding of the vastness of the enormous universe that the human mind can barely comprehend. We are but a spec of dust in an infinite universe.

    This video takes you on a journey unlike any other, and never forget that this isn't even 1% of what we humans understand of the bigger picture.

  • How the Universe Works Series 8 E02

    42:29

    How.the.Universe.Works.Series.8.Part
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  • The Cosmic Dark Ages

    15:21

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    We live in the stelliferous era. Somewhere between 10 and 1000 billion trillion stars fill the observable universe with light. But there was a time before the first star ignited. A time we call the cosmic dark ages.

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    Hosted by Matt O'Dowd
    Written by Matt O'Dowd
    Graphics by Aaron Havley
    Directed by Andrew Kornhaber
    Produced By: Kornhaber Brown

    In astronomy we study things that are very far away. It’s a powerful challenge because even the brightest objects are almost impossibly faint when you view them from the other side of the universe. But there’s an up side. If the light from some space object took billions of years to get to us then we see that object as it was billions of years ago. In this way we can peer back in time and literally see the past in motion. In fact we’re able to see some of the first stars and galaxies to ever form. But if we look beyond, both in distance and in time, there is … nothing. Darkness. For the hundred million years or so between the formation of the first atom and the formation of the first star there were no light sources in the universe. These were the cosmic dark ages. It’s a period of cosmic history rarely discussed because it’s hellishly difficult to observe. Fortunately scientists are devilishly clever. So what do we know about the time before stars?

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