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Covid-19: how it will change the world | The Economist

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  • Covid-19: how it will change the world | The Economist

    12:58

    Even when covid-19 is under control, the long-term effects of the virus will be far-reaching. How will the coronavirus pandemic—and the way it has been handled—change the world? Read more here:

    Further reading:

    Find The Economist’s most recent coverage of covid-19 here:

    Sign up to The Economist’s daily newsletter to keep up to date with our latest covid-19 coverage:

    Which emerging markets are being harmed the most by covid-19:

    Read our briefing on the debt the rich world will be left with:

    How would-be autocrats are using the pandemic to grab more power:

    Read about China’s plans to crush new outbreaks of covid-19:

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  • How covid-19 could change the financial world order | The Economist

    9:58

    America has dominated global finance for decades. But could covid-19 tip the balance of financial power in China's favour?

    Further reading:

    Sign up to The Economist’s daily newsletter to keep up to date with our latest covid-19 coverage:

    Find The Economist’s most recent coverage of covid-19 here:

    Read Matthieu Favas’ special report here:

    How the pandemic is driving America and China further apart:

    Fu Ying: why China and America must co-operate on covid-19:

    Read our article on China’s aim to launch the world’s first official digital currency:

  • x
  • How will covid-19 change travel? | The Economist

    10:45

    The covid-19 pandemic has devastated the travel industry. But as vaccines are rolled out and global travel slowly picks up, how will the industry evolve, and will holidays ever be the same again? Read more here:

    Sign up to The Economist’s daily newsletter to keep up to date with our latest coverage:

    Read our special report about the future of tourism:

    Read about why Covid-19 has had such a devastating impact on the travel industry, and how the industry is adapting:

    How ‘staycations’ are helping the hotel industry survive:

    Read about how the hospitality industry is adapting to remote workers:

    Hygiene is becoming increasingly important for holidaymakers:

    Is hydrogen the key to greener air travel?

  • Covid-19: how to fix the economy | The Economist

    10:54

    Governments will have to deal with the economic fallout from the pandemic for decades to come. If they get their response wrong, countries risk economic stagnation and political division. Read more here:

    Find The Economist’s most recent coverage of covid-19 here:

    Read our special report on the economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic:

    How the pandemic is reshaping banking:

    Why America’s economy is beating forecasts:

    How the covid-19 pandemic is forcing a rethink in economic policy-making:

    How recessions create long-term psychological and economic scars:

    What past pandemics can teach us about the economic effects of pandemics:

  • x
  • Covid-19: what will happen to the global economy? | The Economist

    10:06

    The covid-19 pandemic has caused economic chaos and uncertainty. Zanny Minton Beddoes, our editor-in-chief, and Edward Carr, our deputy editor, answer your questions about the global economy

    Further reading:

    Find The Economist’s most recent coverage of covid-19 here:

    Sign up to The Economist’s daily newsletter to keep up to date with our latest covid-19 coverage:

    Read our briefing on the damage covid-19 has done to world trade:

    Article: How resilient are the banks?

    Our leader on why most investors and some firms are upbeat about the world economy:

    Daily Chart: America’s stockmarket just had its best quarter in 20 years:

    Read about the euro area’s economic stimulus:

    Can Hong Kong remain a global financial centre?

    Questions
    00:25 - Will the economic shock caused by imposing lockdowns prove more costly than the pandemic itself?
    01:52 - How could an economic recession shift the global balance of power?
    02:34 - Will this be a chance for China to become the global financial hub?
    04:53 - Which countries are most vulnerable to the effects of covid-19 and why?
    06:22 - What will the impact on the jobs market be for those graduating in 2020?
    08:43 - Has the pandemic made globalisation look like a liability?

  • Covid-19: why your life will never be the same again | The Economist

    9:34

    Across much of the world, covid-19 restrictions are starting to ease. The Economist has crunched the data to calculate how close countries are to pre-pandemic levels of normality—but will life ever be the same again? Read more here:

    Search the interactive normality tracker:

    How life is halfway back to pre-covid norms?:

    Read all of coronavirus coverage:

    Track the spread of coronavirus:

    Read about post-covid life:

    Why some countries won’t have widespread vaccinations, ever:

    How will covid-19 change travel?:

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  • How covid-19 is boosting innovation | The Economist

    19:04

    Covid-19 has accelerated the adoption of technologies and pushed the world faster into the future. As businesses and organisations look towards the post-pandemic era, what lessons can be learned about innovation? Read more here: Film supported by Mishcon de Reya

    Chapters
    00:00 - How has covid-19 boosted innovation?
    01:20 - Drone deliveries
    04:20 - How crises lead to innovation
    06:47 - How restaurants have innovated
    09:29 - Inequality between companies
    10:48 - Some start-ups have thrived
    12:57 - Working from home
    14:15 - E-learning: benefits and challenges

    Sign up to The Economist’s daily newsletter:

    See our most recent business coverage:

    Find our most recent science and technology coverage:

    Sign up to The Economist’s new weekly newsletter, Simply Science:

    What does innovation actually mean? Listen to The Economist’s Babbage podcast:

    Find all episodes of Babbage, our science and technology podcast:

    Read about creative destruction in the times of covid-19:

    How will the coronavirus crisis change the world of commerce?

    Why the pandemic is ushering in the dawn of digital medicine:

    What do quantum computers reveal about innovation?

    Find out why covid-19 is driving demand for drone delivery:

    After years of dithering companies are embracing automation:

    Why spy agencies have big hopes for AI:

    How food-delivery wars have heated up during the pandemic:

    Why educational technology has come of age during the pandemic:

    Read about how the pandemic is widening educational inequality:

    The next big thing in retail will come with Chinese characteristics:

  • Will covid kill globalisation? | The Economist

    14:08

    Covid-19 has been the third major disruption to globalisation within the past twelve years. The pandemic will not kill globalisation off, but it will deepen the cracks. Read more here:

    Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube:

    For more from Economist Films visit:
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  • Covid-19: why travel will never be the same | The Economist

    7:47

    Covid-19 has devastated global travel and—as the industry recovers from the effects of the pandemic—tourism will be increasingly localised and complicated. This won’t just affect foreign holidays; it could disrupt the workings of the globalised world. Read more here:

    Further reading:

    Find The Economist’s most recent coverage of covid-19 here:

    Sign up to The Economist’s daily newsletter to keep up to date with our latest covid-19 coverage:

    Read our article on what awaits tourists as lockdowns are lifted:

    The World If: aviation doesn’t recover from covid-19:

    Read our leader on how people will have to adapt to the covid-19 pandemic long term:

    Has covid-19 killed globalisation?

    How to pandemic-proof the planet:

    See data on how speedy lockdowns saved lives:

    The science behind social-distancing measures:

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  • Covid-19: how bad will it be for the economy? | The Economist

    6:33

    The coronavirus pandemic has killed thousands of people, crashed stockmarkets around the world, driven 10m Americans to claim unemployment and caused businesses to haemorrhage money. With economies in turmoil, how bad will the damage be?

    Sign up to The Economist’s daily newsletter to keep up to date with our latest covid-19 coverage:

    Find The Economist’s most recent coverage of covid-19 here:

    Find Philip Coggan’s weekly column here:

    Read our leader on the trade-offs the pandemic are forcing governments to face:

    Read our article on rich countries trying radical economic policies to counter covid-19:

    Read our leader on how to prevent a covid-19 slump, and protect the recovery:

  • How coronavirus is changing the world | DW Documentary

    46:50

    How are democracies and authoritarian states reacting to the coronavirus pandemic? An investigative team is looking for clues worldwide and interviewing virologists, health experts and citizens. Where is the fight against COVID-19 working and where isn’t it?

    Nine months after the new coronavirus first appeared, the documentary The Pandemic Spreads finds some initial answers to these questions. The film takes the viewer on a journey around the world: We dive into seven different countries and analyze their ways of handling the virus. We return to the putative beginnings of the pandemic in Wuhan in China. We see how Taiwan reacted to the virus earlier and more decisively than almost any other country in the world, as Europe and North America were still lulling themselves into a false sense of security. In retrospect, it is clear that the Western democracies saw the coronavirus as a local Chinese problem for far too long. Yet research from France and other European countries suggest it was probably already among us here in Europe at the end of 2019. Our viral world tour also takes us to the outsiders of the pandemic: Sweden, for example. At first the Swedes' special approach was still seen as daring, but months later it seems to have gone disastrously wrong.The biggest health and economic crisis in recent history has underlined recent global political developments: as the world power USA sinks into corona chaos, its rival China seems to have hit its stride. Will Beijing’s authoritarian regime come out on top of the crisis through its aggressive and consistent approach to the virus? The Pandemic Spreads shows how COVID-19 is changing our world for good.

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  • Covid-19: why the economy could fare worse than you think | The Economist

    8:47

    Three months after lockdown was relaxed in China, its economy is now running at around 90% of normal levels. Although 90% may sound fine, for many it could be catastrophic. Read more here:

    Further reading:

    Sign up to The Economist’s daily newsletter to keep up to date with our latest covid-19 coverage:

    Find The Economist’s most recent coverage of covid-19 here:

    Read our leader on lifting lockdowns:

    Tracking the economic recovery:

    How covid-19 is undoing progress in curbing poverty:

    See the data: unemployment and unemployment insurance in America:

    Britain’s public debt is rising to its highest level in decades:

  • Inflation: could covid-19 cause prices to rise? | The Economist

    7:59

    In the past two decades inflation has puzzled economists by remaining low in good times and bad. Could the pandemic cause it to rise?

    Sign up to The Economist’s daily newsletter to keep up to date with our latest coverage:

    Find all of our finance and economics coverage:

    Read our special report about how inflation is losing its meaning as an economic indicator:

    How to make economic policy fit for a world of low inflation:

    Why a surge in inflation due to the pandemic looks unlikely:

    The World In 2021: governments must judge if the economic recovery needs more help:

    Why economists’ models of inflation are letting them down:

    How most emerging markets overcame high inflation:

    Why the Fed made its biggest inflation-policy change in decades:

  • Christine Lagarde: How covid-19 will shape Europe | The Economist

    10:35

    Europe has been widely criticised for its slow response to the covid-19 pandemic. Christine Lagarde, president of the European Central Bank, discusses the long-term damage and whether things might have been different had there been more female leaders.

    Chapter titles
    00:00 - Covid-19 in Europe
    00:52 - How covid-19 worsens inequality
    03:35 - Why female leaders have performed better
    05:10 - How to have more female leaders
    06:38 - Europe’s stimulus & economic recovery
    08:29 - Central banks & digital currencies

    Further content:

    Listen to more of this webinar in an episode of The Economist Asks podcast:

    Sign up to The Economist’s daily newsletter to keep up to date:

    Find all of our coverage of covid-19:

    See our data tracking the coronavirus across Europe:

    How covid-19 threatens Europe’s success at fighting inequality:

    Why gender equality in Europe is still a long way off:

    See our most recent glass ceiling index:

    Covid-19 school closures are widening Europe’s class divisions:

    Why Europe has fallen behind on covid-19 vaccination:

    Europe’s delays in covid-19 vaccine delivery are causing tempers to flare:

    Introducing The Jab—a new podcast about the world’s vaccination roll-out:

    How Europe is dodging responsibility for its vaccine fiasco:

    Will covid-19 vaccines work against new variants of the virus?

    There will be enough vaccines for all—but only if rich countries share:

    Germany’s economic prospects for this year have darkened:

    Read about Covid-19 and repression in Turkey:

    How the lockdown has helped Greece to digitise:

    Will central-bank digital currencies break the banking system?

    Why European banks need new chiefs:

  • Covid-19: is working from home really the new normal? | The Economist

    8:47

    The covid-19 pandemic has accelerated a shift towards remote working. This could affect not just people’s working lives, but the shape of cities, gender equality and even how we measure time. Read more here:

    Further reading:

    Find The Economist’s most recent coverage of covid-19 here:

    Sign up to The Economist’s daily newsletter to keep up to date with our latest covid-19 coverage:

    Read about an early analysis of furlough schemes here:

    Covid-19 is changing business in some potentially beneficial ways:

    How the pandemic has widened generational divides in the labour market:

    Read our briefing on the resilience of businesses during covid-19:

    The pandemic could change how GDP is estimated:

    Read our leader about the harm the pandemic is doing to large Western cities:

  • The new coronavirus: how should the world respond? | The Economist

    10:57

    The new coronavirus is shutting down planet Earth. What lessons can the rest of the world learn from China, Singapore and South Korea? Find all of The Economist's coverage of covid-19 here:

    Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube:

    Further reading:

    Covid-19 interactive web-based map from the John Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Centre:

    “What the world has learned about facing covid-19” The Economist, March 5th 2020:

    “Covid-19 is now in 50 countries, and things will get worse” The Economist, February 29th 2020:

    “Tough quarantine measures have spread across China” The Economist, January 30th 2020

    “What is the Wuhan coronavirus?” The Economist, January 24th 2020:

    “The coronavirus discovered in China is causing global alarm” The Economist, January 23rd 2020:

    For more from Economist Films visit:

  • HOW COVID CHANGED OUR WORLD- Impact of Covid Pandemic on the World

    9:45

    Impact of Covid Pandemic on the World.
    The COVID-19 pandemic, also known as the coronavirus pandemic, is an ongoing pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). It was first identified in December 2019 in Wuhan, China. The World Health Organization declared the outbreak a Public Health Emergency of International Concern in January 2020 and a pandemic in March 2020. As of 29 January 2021, more than 101 million cases have been confirmed, with more than 2.19 million deaths attributed to COVID-19.

    Symptoms of COVID-19 are highly variable, ranging from none to severe illness. The virus spreads mainly through the air when people are near each other.[b] It leaves an infected person as they breathe, cough, sneeze, or speak and enters another person via their mouth, nose, or eyes. It may also spread via contaminated surfaces. People remain infectious for up to two weeks, and can spread the virus even if they do not show symptoms


    WHY SECOND COVID WAVE IS SO DEVASTATING

  • Stockmarket v economy: the impact of covid-19 | The Economist

    9:04

    American stockmarkets have enjoyed a record-breaking streak, even though the country’s economy faces the deepest recession in living memory. Why is stockmarket performance so seemingly cut off from current events, and what does this tell us about how the economy works? Read more here:

    Further reading:

    Find The Economist’s most recent coverage of covid-19 here:

    Sign up to The Economist’s daily newsletter to keep up to date with our latest covid-19 coverage:

    Read our leader on America’s economy and its banks:

    What Wall Street’s results tell you about America’s economy:

    Americans need more guidance from the Fed:

    Read about the economies that have started to bounce back:

    Why stimulus policies must shift as economies start to recover:

    Listen to our “Checks and Balance” podcast: will covid-19 change the politics of poverty in America?

    Read about China’s stockmarket:

    Read our article on the resilience of banks:

  • Did covid-19 leak from a Chinese lab? | The Economist

    11:28

    For most of 2020 the theory that covid-19 leaked from a Chinese lab was dismissed as unlikely. In the past few months it has gained currency. Our experts explain why. Read more here:

    00:00 - Where did covid-19 come from?
    00:44 - What evidence is there?
    02:06 - Why was the lab-leak theory dismissed?
    03:23 - Could the lab leak have been deliberate?
    04:07 - Could covid-19 be man made?
    05:51 - How are the origins being investigated?
    07:23 - Will China be held accountable if there was a lab leak?
    08:26 - Expert opinion: what do you think happened?
    09:26 - Could it always remain a mystery?

    Find all our coverage of covid-19 here:

    Listen to an episode of Babbage, our science and technology podcast, asking where covid-19 came from:

    Podcast: How biosecurity shows the lab leak is feasible:

    Listen to The Jab, our podcast about the vaccination race:

    There have been 7m-13m excess deaths worldwide during the pandemic:

    What will it cost to end the pandemic?

    A new weapon in the war against SARS-CoV-2 has been found:

    How covid-19 brought together biomedical technologies that will transform human health:

    More evidence emerges of India’s true death toll from covid-19:

    How much should you worry about the “Indian variant”?

    What is “black fungus”, the infection linked to covid-19 in India?

    Europe’s vaccination campaign has gathered pace, though not everywhere:

    Why might covid-19 booster vaccinations be needed?

    Do incentives of cash or gifts for covid-19 vaccines work?

    How improving ventilation will help curb SARS-CoV-2:

  • How to crunch covid-19 data | The Economist

    6:55

    Data analysis has been crucial to better understanding, tracking and preventing the spread of covid-19. The Economist's data journalists give an insider’s steer on how their analysis and presentation of data has shaped our coverage of the pandemic.

    See all our data journalism in The Economist's graphic detail section:

    Keep up to date with our data journalism by signing up to “Off the Charts,” our new weekly newsletter:

    Find all our coverage on the coronavirus pandemic here:

    See our covid-19 risk estimator:

    How this risk model estimates odds of hospitalisation and death:

    Find out how we built our covid-19 risk estimator:

    See our covid-19 excess death tracker:

    New data show that leading covid-19 vaccines have similarly high efficacy:

    Evidence from Britain shows the vaccines are very effective:

    The same covid-19 mutations are appearing in different places:

    How the pandemic triggered America’s first female recession in 50 years:

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  • Covid-19: Bill Gates predicts the end of the pandemic | The Economist

    8:23

    Bill Gates had long warned of the risk that a new virus would go global. Now he explains to Zanny Minton Beddoes, our editor-in-chief, how—and when—the covid-19 pandemic is likely to end.

    To find out more read here:

    00:00 Introduction
    00:50 Are we spending enough?
    01:51 Why aren't we spending the billions to save the trillions?
    03:35 What is realistic for the global coverage of a vaccine?
    04:55 Will anti-vaxxers be a problem?
    06:07 How far has this set back progress in the emerging world?

    Further reading:

    Find The Economist’s most recent coverage of covid-19 here:

    Sign up to The Economist’s daily newsletter to keep up to date with our latest covid-19 coverage:

    Bill Gates on how to fight future pandemics:

    See our data on tracking covid-19 excess deaths around the world:

    The pandemic shows the urgency of reforming care for the elderly:

    Read about economic recovery in emerging-market countries:

    Official economic forecasts for poor countries are too optimistic:

    Read our article on America’s delayed second stimulus package:

    Why the true number of Africa’s covid-19 cases must be much higher than official figures:

    Covid-19 testing labs are being overwhelmed:

  • How the coronavirus pandemic is changing the world | Fareed Zakaria

    33:03

    Visit to get our entire library of TED Talks, transcripts, translations, personalized talk recommendations and more.

    The coronavirus pandemic is more global, dramatic and unusual than any crisis we've seen in a long time, says journalist Fareed Zakaria. Listen as he shares his perspective on how we can recover from the economic fallout, why certain countries were able to avoid major outbreaks and what this might mean for the balance of global power. (This virtual conversation is part of the TED Connects series, hosted by head of TED Chris Anderson and current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rodgers. Recorded April 9, 2020)

    The TED Talks channel features the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and more. You're welcome to link to or embed these videos, forward them to others and share these ideas with people you know. For more information on using TED for commercial purposes (e.g. employee learning, in a film or online course), submit a Media Request here:

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  • Understanding the Economic Shock of the Covid-19 Crisis

    4:18

    Predicting the path ahead has become nearly impossible, but we can speculate about the size and scale of the economic shock.


    Economic contagion is now spreading as fast as Covid-19 itself. Social distancing, intended to physically disrupt the spread, has severed the flow of goods and people, stalled economies, and is in the process of delivering a global recession. Predicting the path ahead has become nearly impossible, as multiple dimensions of the crisis are unprecedented and unknowable. Pressing questions include the path of the shock and recovery, whether economies will be able to return to their pre-shock output levels and growth rates, and whether there will be any structural legacy from the coronavirus crisis. This Explainer explores several scenarios to model the size and scale of the economic shock and the path ahead.

    Based on the HBR article by Philipp Carlsson-Szlezak, Martin Reeves and Paul Swartz

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  • Covid-19: what you need to know about the second wave | The Economist

    10:19

    The world now faces the threat of a second wave of coronavirus outbreaks. Zanny Minton Beddoes, The Economist’s editor-in-chief, and Slavea Chankova, our health-care correspondent, answer your questions.

    Further reading:

    Find The Economist’s most recent coverage of covid-19 here:

    Sign up to The Economist’s daily newsletter to keep up to date with our latest covid-19 coverage:

    The Economist explains: the science behind social distancing:

    Read about the steroid that has been found to reduce covid-19 deaths:

    Read our article about tourism after lockdown:

    Why covid-19 raises the risk of violent conflict:

    The impact of India’s lockdown on its economy:

    Question timecodes:
    00:49 - In what ways will the second wave be different to the first wave?
    01:44 - Assuming a second wave happens, what is the likelihood that people will comply with another lockdown?
    02:37 - Can we expect further waves until we reach herd immunity?
    03:30 - How can the world collaborate to stop the spread of covid-19?
    04:48 - What impact is covid-19 having on elections in the democratic world?
    06:11 - What happens if another virus comes up before we find a vaccine for covid-19?
    06:53 - Will the stockmarket decline again with the second wave?
    07:47 - What do you think are the positive effects of the pandemic?
    09:07 - Can countries afford another long-term lockdown?

  • Living with Covid-19: Two scenarios for the world economy

    2:30

    With or without a second wave in the COVID-19 pandemic, the effects of the coronavirus will be severe. It triggered the most severe global economic recession in nearly a century, causing enormous damage to health, jobs, and well-being. Without a vaccine, the path to recovery will be uncertain. Two scenarios are possible: a single-hit or a second wave which would cause world GDP to plummet. Unemployment would soar, with young people among the hardest hit. What can governments do? Strengthen their healthcare systems, support businesses and households, invest in people and the environment.

    Find out more at

    Get the latest OECD content delivered directly to your inbox! Subscribe to our newsletters:
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    ©OECD Video 2020
    Ivan Porras, Rory Clarke

    Edited: 18/03/21

  • How Will Life Change After COVID-19 / Episode 16 - The Medical Futurist

    9:43

    Life will never be the same after COVID-19. Even after the billions of people under lockdown will be able to resume their life, we will not be able to travel that freely or enjoy the supply chains of the world so easily. Sustainability, solidarity, and healthcare will finally take center stage.

    There will be changes at every level of our lives. Maybe we should forget about handshakes forever. Maybe we will see people wearing masks everywhere. And we will unintentionally keep our distance and be more cautious around our elderly. New habits will arise from properly washing hands to better overall hygiene and to entirely new travel habits.

    In this video, I talk about exciting topics such as:
    - the concept of immunity passport and new ways of traveling
    - whether online meetings, classes, and remote work will become the new default
    - how artificial intelligence will take a larger role in healthcare
    - the importance of portable, point-of-care devices
    - the future of the doctor-patient relationship

    ... and various other things. Check them out, and share your opinion about these in a comment!

    Read our magazine for more about digital health and the future of medicine:

    Join our Patreon community to get access to exclusive content and meet like-minded medical futurists:

    #DigitalHealth #COVID19 #Coronavirus

  • Covid-19: what’s really going on in Russia? | The Economist

    9:32

    Vladimir Putin claims Russia has covid-19 “under total control”, but whistleblowers say the official figures are fabricated. As well as leading to many more deaths, this could dent Mr Putin’s popularity for years to come. Read more here:

    Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube:

    Further reading:

    Find The Economist’s most recent coverage of covid-19 here:

    Sign up to The Economist’s daily newsletter to keep up to date with our latest covid-19 coverage:

    Read our leader on Putin’s term extension:

    Read our article on Russia’s economy during covid-19:

  • Can Brazil Survive Bolsonaro? | The Economist

    14:08

    Since coming to power President Jair Bolsonaro has shaken democracy, accelerated deforestation in the Amazon and played down the danger of the coronavirus pandemic, with calamitous results. Could Brazil survive another four years of his leadership?

    Read the special report here:

    Find all of our coverage of the Americas:

    Read all of coronavirus coverage here:

    How Jair Bolsonaro isolated himself in his reckless handling of covid-19:

    The future of bolsonarismo:

    Brazil’s army is trying to distance itself from Jair Bolsonaro:

    The winding up of the Lava Jato anti-corruption taskforce is a victory for Brazil’s old politics:

    Why many Brazilians increasingly can’t afford food:

    Joe Biden and Jair Bolsonaro square off over the Amazon:

    Lula, a former president of Brazil, could run again in 2022:

    Why Latin America’s economy has been so badly hurt by covid-19:

    How will Latin America’s covid-19 bill be paid?

    Why Latin America needs a new social contract:

  • Covid-19: When will a vaccine be ready? | The Economist

    11:17

    Around $10bn is being spent on finding a vaccine for coronavirus—it’s not nearly enough. And even when a covid-19 vaccine is found how should it be distributed fairly? Our experts answer your questions.

    00:00 Covid-19: When will a vaccine be ready?
    00:50 Will there ever be a “silver-bullet” vaccine?
    01:41 How long would it take for the whole world to be vaccinated?
    02:25 Who benefits financially from the vaccine?
    03:54 How much will each vaccine cost?
    05:10 What percentage of Americans do you estimate will choose not to get vaccinated, and how much of an issue will this be?
    06:44 In an ideal world, how should a vaccine be optimally distributed?
    07:21 Will new versions of the vaccine be required periodically?
    07:54 Will developing countries receive equal access to the vaccine, or will they be left behind?
    08:50 Should richer countries pay for vaccines in the developing world?
    10:01 How should we respond to crises like this one in the future?

    Further reading:

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    Covid-19 testing labs are being overwhelmed:

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  • Economist on the global economy and COVID-19s impact

    5:37

    Anders Aslund, Economist and a Senior Fellow at the Atlantic Council, talked about the state of the US and global economies in the age of COVID-19

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  • Public Debt: how much is too much? | The Economist

    9:01

    The covid-19 pandemic is set to increase public debt to levels last seen after the second world war. But is rising public debt a cause for concern? New economic thinking suggests perhaps not, at least for now.

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  • Protectionism will gain popularity due to the virus outbreak, says economist | Squawk Box Europe

    4:59

    Jean Tirole, honorary chairman of JJ Laffont-Toulouse School of Economics and Nobel Prize laureate, says protectionism will gain popularity as a result of the coronavirus pandemic.

  • Schools, education, and COVID-19

    1:44

    In the first half of 2020, 188 countries temporarily closed their schools to slow down the spread of Covid-19, with more than 1.5 billion young people on their own or following classes online. Many school re-openings since then have continued to be disrupted by the virus. What are the trade-offs between getting kids back to school and keeping communities healthy? How can schools adapt to the coronavirus? And will this virus radically and permanently change the way we learn and teach?

  • Economist details the difference between the COVID-19 financial crisis and the 2008 Financial Crisis

    9:37

    States are pushing to reopen businesses as the coronavirus continues to spread across the country. Deutsche Bank Securities Chief Economist Torsten Slok joins Yahoo Finance’s On The Move to share his thoughts on a potential timeline that will allow the U.S. economy to reopen.
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  • Goldman Sachs economist Jan Hatzius on Covid-19s economic impact

    6:07

    Jan Hatzius, Goldman Sachs chief economist, joins Squawk on the Street to discuss his outlook for the U.S. economy even as coronavirus cases surge across the United States. For access to live and exclusive video from CNBC subscribe to CNBC PRO:

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    The News with Shepard Smith is CNBC’s daily news podcast providing deep, non-partisan coverage and perspective on the day’s most important stories. Available to listen by 8:30pm ET / 5:30pm PT daily beginning September 30:

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  • When and How Will COVID-19 End? / Episode 15 - The Medical Futurist

    9:48

    Now that the coronavirus has taken over our lives, I want to answer the one question that’s on everyone’s mind. When will this nightmare finally end?

    We have been doing and looking at forecasts about the possible scenarios - here we analyze the most popular three.

    Also read our article on the topic:

    Follow us on Patreon for exclusive videos, podcast, personal analyses - along with many others:

    #DigitalHealth #COVID19 #Coronavirus

  • Does a vaccine spell the end of the coronavirus pandemic? | DW Documentary

    28:23

    A vaccine against COVID-19 is considered the only realistic hope of overcoming the virus. Several vaccines have now been approved. But does that mean an end to the pandemic and a return to normal life are in sight?

    A heated debate has broken out over whether we have enough vaccine and who will get it first: those who need it most urgently - or those who pay most? Many countries have long since reached lucrative deals with pharmaceutical companies to secure exclusive rights to millions of vaccine doses. Poorer states that cannot compete in the bidding are at risk of going empty-handed. If this is not prevented, global health apartheid will become more entrenched, driving inequality to new heights. And the pandemic will still be with us, warns Indian economist Jayati Ghosh.

    The documentary takes us to some of the most important locations and centers of vaccine development and distribution – in Germany, the United States, Britain and India. Pharmaceutical developers worldwide have allowed the film team exclusive access to their research laboratories, where operations are normally kept strictly secret.

    As we look at the countdown to vaccine development, we find a huge project at a crossroads: Will it prove possible not only to develop an effective vaccine against the new coronavirus but also to distribute it to the entire global population? Or will national egoisms ultimately torpedo the collective global effort?


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  • Covid-19: what will it take to vaccinate the world? | The Economist

    9:51

    The race to immunise the global population against covid-19 is under way. With the distribution of safe and effective vaccines posing an unprecedented challenge, what are the key obstacles to overcome?

    Keep up to date with The Economist’s coverage of the coronavirus:

    Track covid-19 vaccine rollouts around the world:

    Sign up to The Economist’s daily newsletter to to read stories about covid-19 and its consequences:

    Read why China’s jabs may have an important role in the fight against covid-19:

    How fast can vaccination against covid-19 make a difference?

    How can America meet its covid-19 vaccination targets?

    The EU should stop ignoring the vaccine race and try and win it:

    How will the new variants of covid-19 affect the vaccines?

    Covid-19 vaccination is a marathon not a sprint. Governments need to think about what comes next:

    Read about how politics is interfering with vaccination drives in Asia:

    Why vaccine campaigns are so hard—but crucial to get right:

    Why Bahrain and the UAE are relying on a Chinese-made vaccine:

  • How to treat covid-19 | The Economist

    7:03

    A vaccine for covid-19 is a long way off. In the meantime, could existing drugs be used to treat the novel coronavirus? Read more here:

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    Read about antibody tests for covid-19:

    See our briefing on the tough ethical decisions doctors face:

    Read about how science and industry are coming together to make more ventilators:

  • The future of work: is your job safe? | The Economist

    19:03

    The world of work will be radically different in the future. From hyper-surveillance of staff to digital nomadism to robots taking jobs—how, where and why we work is changing beyond all recognition. Film supported by Mishcon de Reya

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    This is the workforce of the future. Technology is transforming the world of work beyond all recognition creating groundbreaking opportunities. But it's also eroding the rights of workers. Some even fear a dystopian jobless future. But are these anxieties overblown? How we react to this brave new world of work today will shape societies for generations to come.

    What are the forces shaping how people live and work and how power is wielded in the modern age? NOW AND NEXT reveals the pressures, the plans and the likely tipping points for enduring global change. Understand what is really transforming the world today – and discover what may lie in store tomorrow.

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  • How Africa could one day rival China | The Economist

    15:37

    Africa is changing so fast, it is becoming hard to ignore. In the short term the continent faces many problems, including covid-19, but in the long term it could rival China's economic might. Read more here: doc

    See the UN's World Population Prospects 2019 here:
    Read about covid-19 in African countries:

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  • This is how we prevent the next pandemic

    1:51

    The unfortunate reality is that COVID-19 might not be the last pandemic. The threat of the next pandemic will always be hanging over our heads—unless the world takes steps to prevent it. You can learn more about this topic in our 2021 Annual Letter at

  • Why The Coronavirus Recession Is Unlike Any Other

    10:03

    The coronavirus pandemic is putting an end to the longest economic expansion in U.S. history. Policymakers and economists warn this recession will be unlike any other downturn.

    After expanding for a record 126 months as of December 2019, economists now predict GDP growth will plummet in the first and second quarters of the year as businesses shutter and hundreds of millions of Americans are locked down.

    This is a huge, unprecedented, devastating hit, former Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen told CNBC on Monday, adding she expects GDP to tumble 30% year on year in the second quarter.

    Dire unemployment and growth forecasts have led some to compare the coronavirus downturn to the Great Recession from 2007 to 2009 or the Great Depression in the 1930s. However, policymakers say this recession is unlike any other in U.S. history because it was spawned by a health crisis, not by an unhealthy economy.

    I would point to the difference between this and a normal recession: There is nothing fundamentally wrong with our economy, Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell told NBC's TODAY last month.

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    Why The Coronavirus Recession Is Unlike Any Other

  • How Coronavirus Decimated The Restaurant Industry Overnight

    10:54

    Restaurants in the U.S. are reeling from city and state-wide initiatives that shut down many restaurant dining rooms essentially overnight. As Americans stay inside and refrain from going out to eat, small and independently owned restaurants are facing massive uncertainty, and they are doing their best to accommodate accordingly. In the interim, the National Restaurant Association estimates that 3 million industry employees have already lost their jobs, and restaurants nationwide will take a $225 billion sales hit through May 2020. Even with some help from the $2 trillion federal stimulus package, restaurant owners may not be able to keep their staff employed, or even keep the doors open throughout the COVID-19 crisis.

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    How Coronavirus Decimated The Restaurant Industry Overnight

  • New Schools of Thought by The Economist Intelligence Unit

    58:14

    This report, sponsored by Qatar Foundation, assess how institutions are fighting to adapt in today's changing world.
    Download the full report here:
    #FutureHigherEd

  • Long way to go before EU issues corona bonds, economist says | Squawk Box Europe

    5:04

    Ken Wattret, chief European economist at IHS Markit, outlines the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on the euro zone economy.

  • Coronavirus is not a long-term economic event, economist says

    5:15

    Derek Scissors, resident scholar at AEI and chief economist at China Beige Book, and Bill Bishop, China watcher and author of the newsletter Sinocism, join Squawk Box to discuss the economic impact of the coronavirus outbreak.

  • Economist talks how COVID-19 will a cause a slowdown in housing and a recession

    5:31

    LendingTree Chief Economist Tendayi Kapfidze joins Yahoo Finance’s On The Move to discuss how COVID-19 is leaving a drastic impact on the housing industry.
    #recession #COVID-19 #coronavirus
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  • Economist Mohamed A. El-Erian on how COVID-19 affects developing countries

    2:05

    Allianz chief economic adviser and former PIMCO CEO Mohamed A. El-Erian explains how the coronavirus crisis is unleashing a “deglobalization” shock that means trouble for developing countries.

  • IMFs chief economist on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic

    8:12

    The COVID-19 pandemic dominated the discussions by world leaders at the G20 summit this weekend. Gita Gopinath, chief economist at the International Monetary Fund, breaks down the economic impact the pandemic, the IMF's forecast for the global economy, and the leaders' work on climate change.

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