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Emily Levesque Public Lecture: The Weirdest Stars in the Universe

  • Emily Levesque Public Lecture: The Weirdest Stars in the Universe

    1:8:47

    In her March 7 public lecture at Perimeter Institute, Emily Levesque discusses the history of stellar astronomy, present-day observing techniques and exciting new discoveries, and explores some of the most puzzling and bizarre objects being studied by astronomers today.

  • The Weirdest Stars in the Universe | Public Lecture

    1:20:15

    How big can a star get? Why would a star only PRETEND to explode? Can you hide one star inside another? During this talk Dr. Levesque will take you on a tour of some of the weirdest stars in the universe, from our nearest neighbors to stars more than 13 billion light years away. She will discuss the history of stellar astronomy, delve into about some present-day observing techniques and exciting new discoveries, and explore some of the most puzzling and exotic objects being studied by astronomers today.

    Presented by: Emily Levesque (University of Colorado)
    Hosted by Dr. Frank Summers
    Recorded live on June 2, 2015 at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, MD, USA

    Source:

    Credits: NASA and STScI

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  • The Last Stargazers | Emily Levesque | TEDxBerkeley

    15:21

    Emily Levesque is an astronomer, professor, and author whose research is focused on understanding how the most massive stars in the universe evolve and die. In 2014 she led a research group in discovering a completely new type of star known as a Thorne-Zytkow object, a luminous star supported by a dead stellar core that had been predicted by stellar theory nearly forty years earlier but never observed. In 2014 Emily was awarded the Annie Jump Cannon Prize by the American Astronomical Society. She is also a 2015 Scialog Fellow, a 2017 Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow in Physics, a 2018 Kavli Fellow, and was chosen as one of twenty-four Cottrell Scholars nation-wide in 2019. She received her bachelors degree in physics from MIT and her PhD in astronomy from the University of Hawaii. She is currently an Assistant Professor of Astronomy at the University of Washington. Emily's upcoming popular science book, The Last Stargazers shares some of the many incredible stories behind what it’s like to work at a telescope and will be published by Sourcebooks in August of 2020. Emily Levesque is an astronomer, professor, and author whose research is focused on understanding how the most massive stars in the universe evolve and die. In 2014 she led a research group in discovering a completely new type of star known as a Thorne-Zytkow object, a luminous star supported by a dead stellar core that had been predicted by stellar theory nearly forty years earlier but never observed. In 2014 Emily was awarded the Annie Jump Cannon Prize by the American Astronomical Society. She is also a 2015 Scialog Fellow, a 2017 Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow in Physics, a 2018 Kavli Fellow, and was chosen as one of twenty-four Cottrell Scholars nation-wide in 2019. She received her bachelors degree in physics from MIT and her PhD in astronomy from the University of Hawaii. She is currently an Assistant Professor of Astronomy at the University of Washington. Emily's upcoming popular science book, The Last Stargazers shares some of the many incredible stories behind what it’s like to work at a telescope and will be published by Sourcebooks in August of 2020. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at

  • Weirdest Stars in the Universe, including Thorne-Żytkow Objects: Emily Levesque, CU Boulder

    1:35:09

    The Denver Astronomical Society (DAS) promotes the enjoyment and understanding of astronomical phenomena, history and lore by providing educational and observing opportunities for our members, education to the general public, and outreach activities at the University of Denver's Historic Chamberlin Observatory, schools, and nature centers.

    We've upgraded our recording equipment and we're learning how to better record our speakers in Olin Hall. This is the first video with the newly upgraded equipment, and we hope the video and audio quality has been improved.

    Presented by
    Dr. Emily Levesque, CU Boulder
    for The Denver Astronomical Society

    Learn more about enormous red supergiants, core-collapse supernovae (and their impostors), neutron stars, and of course, Thorne-Żytkow objects, along with a comparison of Hollywood vs. actual astronomy!

    Dr. Levesque has lectured at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI), in Baltimore, and is a Hubble Fellow and a former Einstein Fellow. Her long-term research focuses on massive stellar astrophysics, and she's working toward improving our overall understanding of massive stars, both locally and in the early universe, so that we can effectively use them as cosmological tools. In 2014, Dr. Levesque received the Annie Jump Cannon Award from the American Astronomical Society for her work with gamma-ray bursts in exploring the fundamentals of stellar astrophysics and cosmology.

    (Bio information from Dr. Levesque's and the AAS's website.)

    Dr. Levesque's presentation began after a short business meeting at 7:30 pm. After the presentation, all attendees were invited to a reception at DU's Historic Chamberlin Observatory with coffee and refreshments and maybe some peeks through the historic 20-inch telescope.

  • Red Supergiants: New Perspectives on Dying Stars - Emily Levesque

    57:14

    More videos on

  • Hi. ASTRONOMY with Dr. Emily Levesque

    1:2:11

    Guest today was.... Dr. Emily Levesque

    Astronomer/Assistant Professor
    Website: [ | About: [
    Twitter: twitter.com/emsque
    Books: [
    The Weirdest Stars in the Universe: Emily Levesque Public Lecture:


    Brief Timeline of EVERYTHING:

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  • The Weirdest Stars in the Sky

    19:30

    Astronomer Emily Levesque studies stars - but not the normal type of stars. She looks at ,weird stars., Levesque visits The Agenda to discuss what those types of stars can illuminate about how the universe works.

  • Weird stars and the misc. w/ Dr. Emily Levesque

    1:17:31

    Our wonderful guest!:

    The Weirdest Stars in the Universe:


    The life and death of a massive star:


    Gamma Ray Bursts are the Deadliest Things in the Universe:


    Docu - Inside the Milky Way - Full Documentary, 720p:


    The Universe 310 - Strangest Things:


    TZO image:


    List of big stars-from our Sun to UY-Scuti:


    Black hole WARNING: Huge void 100,000 bigger than sun discovered in centre of Milky Way:


    Stellar cannibalism:


    Antares - REAL IMAGE:


    The Sun compared to Antares:


    Massive stars and their fusion:


    Milky Way and Andromeda Galaxies Collision Simulated | Video:


    Gamma Ray Bursts:


    Large Synoptic Survey Telescope:


    -- Watch live at

  • The Weirdest Stars in the Universe

    1:20:15

    How big can a star get? Why would a star only pretend to explode? Can you hide one star inside another? During this talk Dr. Emily Levesque of University of Colorado will take you on a tour of some of the weirdest stars in the universe, from our nearest neighbors to stars more than 13 billion light years away. She will discuss the history of stellar astronomy, delve into about some present-day observing techniques and exciting new discoveries, and explore some of the most puzzling and exotic objects being studied by astronomers today.

    Credits: HubbleSpaceTelescope (2015)

    Space and AI

  • The Weirdest Stars in the Universe: Public Lecture Trailer

    55

    On March 7, 2018, join Emily Levesque on a guided tour of some of the strangest stellar phenomena in the universe. From the biggest, brightest, and most volatile stars to the explosive fireworks of core-collapse supernovae and the fascinating physics of gravitational waves, “weird” stars serve as a common thread for exploring our universe’s history, evolution, and extremes. Watch the talk here:


    Animation credit:
    Director - Jenn Halweil
    Animator - Brett Mogavero

  • The most mysterious star in the universe | Tabetha Boyajian

    13:47

    Something massive, with roughly 1,000 times the area of Earth, is blocking the light coming from a distant star known as KIC 8462852, and nobody is quite sure what it is. As astronomer Tabetha Boyajian investigated this perplexing celestial object, a colleague suggested something unusual: Could it be an alien-built megastructure? Such an extraordinary idea would require extraordinary evidence. In this talk, Boyajian gives us a look at how scientists search for and test hypotheses when faced with the unknown.

    TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more.
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  • A Star Within a Star, Thorne Zytkow Objects w/ Dr. Emily Levesque

    14:52

    There's an error that created a star within a star BUT in real life these actually do exist! Join us and Dr. Emily Levesque, the discoverer of the first observational evidence of a Thorne-Żytkow Object, as we explore Stars within Stars!

    Dr. Emily Levesque

    The Last Stargazers, Book


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  • Reports of Betelgeuse’s Death Are Greatly Exaggerated, with Emily Levesque

    24:33

    Listen to the full episode at

    Feature Guest: Emily Levesque

    In December 2019, amateur and professional astronomers held their breath as the red supergiant Betelgeuse started dimming beyond anything on record, a sign the behemoth might be preparing to go supernova. But over the ensuing few months, things seemed to be returning to normal for this fascinating star. To solve the mystery, a team set out to investigate this bizarre behaviour and to shed light on the fate of Betelgeuse. Today we’re joined here at the Star Spot by Emily Levesque to discuss their findings. 

    Emily Levesque is Assistant Professor of Astronomy at the University of Washington. Previously she worked as a Post Doc at the University of Colorado, during which she held Einstein and Hubble Fellowships. She is a recipient of the Sloan Fellowship and the Annie Jump Cannon Award. Her work focuses on massive stars and galaxy formation.

    The Star Spot is also broadcast on The Scope at Ryerson. The show airs every Sunday at 8:00PM and Tuesday at 6:00PM Eastern Time. Listen live here.

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    Support The Star Spot

    The Star Spot is a nonprofit, volunteer-run organization. We operate with lots of love and a passion for astronomy, but that doesn’t quite cover all of our needs all of the time. Costs from web hosting, recording space, speaker fees, conference coverage and printing flyers, posters, business cards and the like do add up. Patreon is a simple way that fans of the show can contribute to the podcast every month and get some great rewards in return. If you’d like to see us continue to grow and continue to put out great content please consider helping us out. Our annual expenses total at about $10,000, and every little bit helps.

  • The Weirdest Stars in the Universe

    1:30:40

    In her March 7 public lecture at Perimeter Institute, Emily Levesque discusses the history of stellar astronomy, present-day observing techniques and exciting new discoveries, and explores.

    If you like this video - put Thumb Up button (please) and Subscribe to my channel! - ▻For all questions - RidddleMedia@gmail.com In this video, we used some footage.

    The Weirdest Stars in the Universe Emily Levesque, University of Colorado How big can a star get? Why would a star only PRETEND to explode? Can you hide one star inside another? During this.

  • The Strangest Star In The Universe

    11:01

    If you like this video - put Thumb Up button (please) and
    Subscribe to my channel! -

    The Strangest Star In The Universe.
    How do these stars appear in our galaxy.

    ►For all questions - RidddleMedia@gmail.com


    In this video, we used some footage from the game Space Engine (

  • Kaufmanis Lecture: The Newest Extragalactic Mystery

    1:25:28

    Learn about the new mysterious cosmic phenomenon—Fast Radio Bursts—and the revolutionary new radio telescope that will soon enable astronomers worldwide to make major progress in understanding them. This lecture was presented by the Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics.

  • Neutron Star Mergers and the Origin of the Elements - Eliot Quataert - 3/1/2019

    1:49:32

    In 2017, astronomers witnessed two neutron stars merging for the first time in history. Learn how events like this produce most of the gold in our jewelry and uranium powering the interior of the Earth. Presentation: 04:10; Presenter Q&A: 38:31; Panel Q&A: 52:06

    Date: March 1, 2019
    Lecturer: Dr. Eliot Quataert
    Title: Cosmic Gold: Neutron Star Mergers, Gravitational Waves, and the Origin of the Elements
    Abstract: Scientists have recently developed a new way to `see’ the universe, using the gravitational waves predicted by Einstein nearly a century ago. These waves can teach us about some of the most exotic objects known, including star “corpses known as black holes and neutron stars. Remarkably, they have also helped solve a longstanding puzzle about where in the Universe some of the elements we know and love here on Earth are produced, including gold, platinum, uranium, and even Californium!

    Event Photos:
    Echo360 Two-Pane Video Stream:
    Thumbnail Image Credit: University of Warwick/Mark Garlick

  • Warp Drive and Aliens: Bryan Gaensler Public Lecture

    1:21:13

    In his live public lecture at Perimeter Institute on February 5, 2020, astronomer Bryan Gaensler (Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto) explored the latest thinking on interstellar travel and on the search for alien life – including why he believes the frontiers of current research may be more exciting and visionary than any fictional stories we can imagine.

    Perimeter Institute (charitable registration number 88981 4323 RR0001) is the world’s largest independent research hub devoted to theoretical physics, created to foster breakthroughs in the fundamental understanding of our universe, from the smallest particles to the entire cosmos. The Perimeter Institute Public Lecture Series is made possible in part by the support of donors like you. Be part of the equation:

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  • Carl Sagans 1994 Lost Lecture: The Age of Exploration

    1:36:01

  • The Strangest Star In The Universe!

    12:48

    From what it is, to why it's so bizarre, join as we explore Mira, the strangest star in the universe.

    Subscribe for more videos:

    In the universe above, there are many, MANY kinds of stars. there are ones that shine brighter than any other out there, and there are some that are so dim that you won't be able to see them unless you're very close to them. Some stars become black holes, and some become Neutron Stars that are arguably SCARIER than black holes. Regardless though, there's no doubt that stars make up a large part of our universe, which is why when it comes to the star known as Mira, it's a strange one.
    Why is it so strange compared to all the other stars in the sky and the universe beyond? Because it is technically a falling star. Which I'm sure gives you all sorts of imagery, but it's not exactly what you think, and yet, it is kind of what you would expect.
    Let's start with the basics, shall we? Mira as it is known is a star that is 700 times larger than the diameter of our own sun. Which makes it quite sizeable when you consider that our sun is 865,370 miles in diameter. That's not a small star, which makes Mira very massive in comparison.
    As for when we found this very unusual star, that would be 134 BC via the astronomer known as Hipparchus. This was backed up by various other Chinese astronomers in their own journals, and obviously today we can confirm that it is a star that is in our sky. But that's only the beginning of the story. Because when it comes to its weirdness, a very random encounter led to that bit of information being discovered.
    David Fabricius was the one who made this unique discovery. But he wasn't looking for the star, rather, he was looking at Mercury.
    Anyway, getting back to Mira, the reason that Fabricius was so fascinated by it was that it appeared to be a rather interesting bright star with a magnitude of 3. But, as he kept watching it, by the end of August (a mere two weeks or so after first discovery), he noticed that the intensity of the star had actually grown to magnitude 2. Which made it not just a very bright star, but one that was the brightest in the constellation it was in. Which shouldn't have been possible based on what we know on stars and their movements and abilities. Right?
    And it only got weirder as the months went on, because in September, it didn't get bigger and brighter, instead, it shrank and got dimmer. Then, by October, the entire star had vanished from the sky.
    Perplexed, Fabricius decided to not try and find the star as he felt it wasn't worth the effort for what was clearly not a new star. But then, 13 years later, on February 5th, 1609...the star came back, and Fabricius was there to see it once again. And he wasn't the only one to notice, because a few years prior, Jonathan Bayer had noticed the star in the sky and put it in his famous Star Atlas. But because he wasn't with Fabricius in the decade prior, he didn't understand the importance of the star or what it could mean for astronomy as a whole.

    Mainly in that there isn't just one star called Mira, there is a satellite star called Mira B that circles that main star, and unlike Mira, it's a White Dwarf star.
    Why does this matter? Because this particular White Dwarf star is FEEDING off of Mira, and that means it's having a direct affect on the star. But, there's a twist in the tale here. You see, you'd think that this feeding would be noticed, or that the star would've been caught a lot earlier by Fabricius or Bayer or someone else, right? Except, it wasn't, and for good reason. The reason it hadn't be discovered until 1919 was because Mira B only orbits its parent star once every 400 years.
    So that means that since Fabricius found the star all the way back in 1596, that it hasn't had a full rotation around Mira. What's more, the distance between Mira and Mira B is much greater than the distance between Earth and our Sun.

    And would you believe it? There is STILL more to talk about with this star. In 2003, a very special satellite known as the Galex was set to observe Mira, and when it did, it noticed something very unexpected. Mainly, there is a trail of mass being left behind by the star. Which because of its orbit and movement throughout the galaxy it's in, makes it appear like a comets tail. To be clear, this is NOT the mass that is being absorbed by Mira B. It's something else entirely.
    Would you like to know the length of that tail? That would be 13 light years. If you need a little context as to how long that is, I'll help you out. If you were to draw a line from our sun to the closest star that is next to it, you'd reach Alpha Centauri in about 4.2 light years.

    #InsaneCuriosity#RecentSpaceDiscoveries #strangeststarintheuniverse

  • Einstein, Black Holes and Cosmic Chirps - A Lecture by Barry Barish

    1:29:02

    Albert Einstein’s theory of general relativity, developed 100 years ago, predicts the existence of gravitational waves. In February 2016, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) became the first experiment to observe gravitational waves, created by two black holes spiraling into each other. The discovery became known as the chirp heard around the world. Four month later, a few hours before this public lecture, LIGO announced the discovery of a second signal. This lecture, given by Dr. Barry Barish, LIGO director from 1997 to 2006, explains the physics of gravitational waves, the detection technique used by LIGO, the observations made and the implications these discoveries have on our understanding of the cosmos.

  • Extremes of the Universe by Andy Fabian

    1:9:32

    Professor Andy Fabian, University of Cambridg
    The Universe has many extreme events, from the Big Bang onward. In this talk I shall concentrate on extremes of power observed in the Universe, from Solar flares to exploding stars, magnetars, quasars, and the emission of gravitational waves from the merger of black holes. Extremes test our understanding of physics. The most extreme events briefly exceed the power of all the stars in all the galaxies of the observable Universe.

    Biography

    Professor Andrew Fabian OBE FRS is the Acting Director of the Institute of Astronomy at the University of Cambridge. He also leads the X-Ray research group within the Institute. The group’s research focuses on active galaxies, clusters of galaxies, elliptical galaxies, galactic black holes, neutron stars and the X-ray background. He is one of two UK members on ESA ’s Athena Science Study Team.

    Before becoming its Director, Professor Fabian was a Royal Society Research Professor in the Institute of Astronomy. Between 2008 and 2010 he was President of the Royal Astronomical Society, and from 1997 to 2012 he was Vice-Master of Darwin College, Cambridge.

    He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1996, and a Foreign Associate of the US National Academy of Sciences in 2016. He was awarded the American Astronomical Society’s (AAS) Bruno Rossi Prize in 2001, the Dannie Heineman Prize for Astrophysics of the AAS and APS in 2008, the Catherine Wolfe Bruce Gold Medal of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific in 2016 and he was appointed an OBE in 2006. Asteroid 25157 Fabian was named for him in 2016.

    This talk is part of the Darwin College Lecture Series series.

  • Nima Arkani-Hamed Public Lecture: Quantum Mechanics and Spacetime in the 21st Century

    1:26:51

    Dr. Nima Arkani-Hamed (Perimeter Institute and Institute for Advanced Study) delivers the second lecture of the 2014/15 Perimeter Institute Public Lecture Series, in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. Held at Perimeter Institute and webcast live worldwide on Nov. 6, 2014, Arkani-Hamed's lecture explores the exciting concepts of quantum mechanics and spacetime, and how our evolving understanding of their importance in fundamental physics will shape the field in the 21st Century.

    Perimeter Institute Public Lectures are held in the first week of each month. More information on Perimeter Public Lectures:

    Join the conversation:
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    #piLIVE

  • ► Brian Cox | Star Lecture | FULL TALK

    1:15:46

    Subscribe now to Atheism is Awesome!

    Original presentation given June 8, 2011, at The University of Manchester.

    Professor Cox begins his lecture around 8:45 (if you want to skip the introductions).

    *from 10:42 to 11:15, the video has been edited to simply use a still frame of a picture of the galaxy. This is to prevent an incorrect claim by BBC Worldwide from blocking the content in 244 countries. Thanks for your understanding!

    Professor Brian Cox is an English physicist, and Advanced Fellow of particle physics in the School of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Manchester. He is best known to the public as the presenter of science programmes, especially the Wonders of... series and for popular science books, such as Why Does E=mc²? and The Quantum Universe. He has been the author or co-author of over 950 scientific publications.

    Cox has been described as the natural successor for BBC's scientific programming by both David Attenborough and the late Patrick Moore.

    This talk was based around two key areas – the importance of studying science and his passion for it. It also centered around key topics the children study as part of their GCSEs.

    Playlist of FULL TALKS & DISCUSSIONS:

    ✔ Don't forget to rate, comment, and subscribe! :)

  • THE MOST BIZARRE STAR IN THE UNIVERSE - MY CAMELOPARDALIS

    10:37

    ➥ Subscribe -

    Here is MY Camelopardalis – one of the brightest stars located within our cluster. We used to consider it a single object for quite a while.
    However, Spanish scientists have recently found out that it is in fact two huge stars in the process of merging.

    ➥ Patreon -

    #MYCAM #UNIVERSE #Kosmo

  • Public Lecture | Brown Dwarfs: Failed Stars or Overachieving Planets?

    1:12:55

    Description:
    Giant planets can be up to 13 times the mass of Jupiter, while the least massive stars are about 80 times the mass of Jupiter. In between are objects called brown dwarfs – too massive to be called planets, but not massive enough to burn hydrogen and shine like stars. Since 1994, a few thousand brown dwarfs have been observed close to us in the galaxy. But, what are they? Are they more like half-pint cousins of stars, or more like overgrown planets? This lecture explains how we observe and study brown dwarfs and what we have learned about them. It describes clues to their nature from their composition and their evolution over time, and the insights they give us into how stars and planets are born.

    About the Speaker:

    Eric Nielsen is a research scientist in the Kavli Institute of Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology at Stanford University. He obtained his PhD in astronomy at the University of Arizona, and was a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Hawaii at Manoa and the SETI Institute. His research interests include searches for exoplanets, brown dwarfs, and the demographics of giant planets. He has collaborated in a number of planet-hunting surveys, trying to directly image giant planets around young nearby stars, including the ongoing Gemini Planet Imager Exoplanet Survey (GPIES) using the Gemini-South Telescope in Chile. This work includes the discovery of 51 Eridani b, a planet two-and-a-half times more massive than Jupiter. Nielsen is working to apply lessons learned from these ground-based surveys to future space-based missions that will image planets similar to Jupiter and Earth found orbiting distant stars.

  • 3 Weird Stars You Can See with the Naked Eye

    6:51

    These three stars can easily be seen with the naked eye, but it took some fancy telescopes for us to realize how weird they really are!

    Hosted by: Reid Reimers

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  • ITC Colloquium - Emily Levesque , Part 1

    11:54

    Red Supergiants: New Perspectives on Dying Stars

    ABSTRACT: Red supergiants (RSGs) are the helium-fusing descendants of moderately massive (10-25Mo) stars. As the coldest and largest (in physical size) members of the massive star population, these evolved stars serve as ideal magnifying glasses for scrutinizing our current understanding of massive stars and their role as supernova progenitors. RSGs are the observationally-confirmed progenitors of Type II-P, an intermediate evolutionary phase in the lifetimes of some stripped-envelope SN progenitors, and a crucial step in the formation and population statistics of massive interacting binaries (including those that will ultimately produce compact object binaries and gravitational waves). This talk will provide an overview of our field's current knowledge of RSGs, identify some of the most pressing open questions about these stars and their role as supernova progenitors, and consider the importance of RSGs in the coming decade as the next generation of observatories comes online.

  • Neil Turok Public Lecture: The Astonishing Simplicity of Everything

    1:39:14

    On Oct. 7, 2015, Perimeter Institute Director Neil Turok opened the 2015/16 season of the PI Public Lecture Series with a talk about the remarkable simplicity that underlies nature. Turok discussed how this simplicity at the largest and tiniest scales of the universe is pointing toward new avenues of physics research and could lead to revolutionary advances in technology.

    More on Perimeter Institute Public Lectures:



  • Lee Smolin Public Lecture: Time Reborn

    1:15:03

    What is time? Is our perception of time passing an illusion which hides a deeper, timeless reality? Or is it real, indeed, the most real aspect of our experience of the world? Perimeter Institute Faculty member Lee Smolin examines these and other timely questions from his book Time Reborn during his April, 2013 Perimeter Institute Public Lecture.

    Smolin's new book, co-authored with Roberto Mangabeira Unger, is The Singular Universe and the Reality of Time. Find it here:



  • Neutron Stars - Victoria Kaspi

    1:7:17

    General Relativity at 100: Institute for Advanced Study and Princeton University Celebrate the Enduring Reach, Power and Mysteries of Einstein’s Theory

    Victoria Kaspi - November 5, 2015



    Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity, a pillar of modern physics formulated 100 years ago, will be celebrated by the Institute for Advanced Study and Princeton University in a two-day conference, General Relativity at 100. The conference, which will feature ten colloquium-style talks by international experts on diverse aspects of general relativity and its fascinating history—from cosmology to quantum gravity, from black holes to neutron stars—will take place in Wolfensohn Hall on the Institute’s campus on November 5–6. The conference will also celebrate the seminal role of Princeton physicists, particularly John Wheeler and Bob Dicke and their students, in advancing an examination of general relativity.

    “The general theory of relativity is based on profound and elegant principles that connect the physics of motion and mass to the geometry of space and time,” stated Robbert Dijkgraaf, Director of the Institute and Leon Levy Professor. “With Einstein’s equations, even the universe itself became an object of study. Only now, after a century of calculations and observations, the full power of this theory has become visible, from black holes and gravitational lenses to the practical use of GPS devices.”

    Einstein was one of the Institute’s first Faculty members, serving from 1933 until his death in 1955, and played a significant part in its early development. Einstein came to the United States to take up his appointment at the invitation of Abraham Flexner, the Institute’s Founding Director. Today, theorists at the Institute continue to interpret and test Einstein’s theory of general relativity, about which questions persist: What is the physics of black holes? Do space and time emerge from a more fundamental description? Why is the universe accelerating? How can general relativity be reconciled with quantum mechanics? What are the origins and the long-term fate of the universe?

    The celebration will open on November 4 with a special performance of Light Falls: Space, Time, and an Obsession of Einstein, a dramatic portrayal of Einstein’s discovery of the general theory of relativity, at Princeton University’s Richardson Auditorium. Light Falls, written by Brian Greene, Member (1992-93) in the Institute’s School of Natural Sciences and Professor of Theoretical Physics at Columbia University, composed by Jeff Beal (“House of Cards”), designed by 59 Productions (“An American in Paris”) and directed by Scott Faris (“Walking with Dinosaurs”), is an original work weaving together dramatic portrayals, state-of-the-art animation and innovative projection techniques to trace Einstein’s electrifying journey toward one of the most beautiful ideas ever conceived.

    The conference will close on November 6 with a recital for the Institute campus community by world-acclaimed violinist Joshua Bell and a screening of the new documentary Einstein’s Light by Nickolas Barris, Director’s Visitor (2013) at the Institute and founder of Imaginary Films. Einstein’s Light explores how scientific imagination and innovation advance knowledge, with Einstein and Dutch Nobel Laureate Hendrik Lorentz as models. The film examines Einstein’s discoveries as well as modern examples of scientific imagination and innovation, highlighting institutions such as the Institute and others around the world. Bruce Adolphe’s score reflects the power of music as a catalyst for Einstein’s scientific creativity and his deep connection to the music of Mozart and Bach. Joshua Bell’s performance at the Institute will mark the world premiere of the score set to the final visualization from the film.

    Major support for the General Relativity at 100 conference and related events has been provided by Eric and Wendy Schmidt.

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  • A Journey to the Centre of the Sun - with Lucie Green

    54:50

    Lucie Green takes us on a journey from the centre of the sun to planet earth in a run-down of the latest solar physics research.
    Watch the Q&A here:

    Lucie's book 15 Million Degrees: A Journey to the Centre of the Sun is available to buy now -

    110 times wider than Earth; 15 million degrees at its core; an atmosphere so huge that Earth is actually within it: come and meet the star of our solar system.

    Light takes eight minutes to reach Earth from the surface of the Sun. But its journey within the Sun takes hundreds of thousands of years. What is going on in there? What are light and heat? How does the Sun produce them and how on earth did scientists discover this? Since the Royal Institution was founded in 1799 our knowledge of the Sun has changed dramatically and much of the work was carried out at the Ri.

    Join Lucie Green for an enlightening talk, taking you from inside the Sun to its surface and to Earth, to discover how the Sun works, how a solar storm can threaten the modern technology that society relies on and more of the latest research in solar physics.

    Lucie Green is a Professor of Physics based at the Mullard Space Science Laboratory, UCL’s Department of Space and Climate Physics. She studies activity in the atmosphere of our nearest star, the Sun. In particular, she looks at immense magnetic fields in the Sun’s atmosphere which sporadically erupt into the Solar System.

    Lucie is very active in public engagement with science, regularly giving public talks and appearing on TV shows like Sky at Night.

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  • Shaking Up the Dark Universe: The Dark Horses of Dark Matter

    1:17:01

    Forget what you think you know about dark matter. After a 30-year search for a single, as yet unidentified, species of dark matter particle that would make up some 25% of the mass of the universe, physicists are starting to consider novel explanations. Some envision invisible matter hiding within the folds of extra spatial dimensions. Others suggest not one kind of dark matter particle, but numerous species inhabiting a shadow universe. Others still conjecture that dark matter doesn’t exist, and instead propose that the laws of gravity need modification. We’ll bring together leading thinkers on dark matter—the revolutionary and conventional alike—for a distinctly unconventional discussion on the dark universe.

    This program is part of the Big Ideas Series, made possible with support from the John Templeton Foundation.

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    Original Program Date: June 2, 2016
    MODERATOR: John Hockenberry
    PARTICIPANTS: Katherine Freese, Justin Khoury, Stacy McGaugh, Neal Weiner, Lisa Randall

    The discovery of Dark Matter 00:05

    John Hockenberry introduction 3:50

    Participant Introductions 8:10

    What is dark matter? 9:59

    Lets talk about WIMPs 15:15

    How do we detect dark matter? 17:45

    The standard model looks incomplete 28:46

    So you want to take apart Newton and Einstein? 37:49

    What role did dark matter play in the early universe? 48:00

    Can dark matter be a super fluid? 55:15

    Will we understand dark matter better if we know about its origins? 1:02:28

    What is the headline for the next big dark matter discovery? 1:07:46

  • The story of Oumuamua, the first visitor from another star system | Karen J. Meech

    13:25

    In October 2017, astrobiologist Karen J. Meech got the call every astronomer waits for: NASA had spotted the very first visitor from another star system. The interstellar comet -- a half-mile-long object eventually named `Oumuamua, from the Hawaiian for scout or messenger -- raised intriguing questions: Was it a chunk of rocky debris from a new star system, shredded material from a supernova explosion, evidence of alien technology or something else altogether? In this riveting talk, Meech tells the story of how her team raced against the clock to find answers about this unexpected gift from afar.

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    The TED Talks channel features the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and more.

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  • Pulsars, Supernova Remnants and Radio Galaxies by Professor G Srinivasan

    2:8:39

    Summer course 2018 - A Random walk in astro-physics

    Lecture - 05 : Pulsars, Supernova Remnants and Radio Galaxies
    by Professor G Srinivasan, Raman Research Institute (Retired)

    10.00 to 12.00 Friday, 18 May 2018
    Madhava Lecture Hall, ICTS Bangalore

    The range of densities, temperatures, magnetic fields, etc. that obtain in the Universe are staggering: from 10-27 g cm-3 to 1015 g cm-3, from 3K to 1010 K, from 10-6 G to 1015 G. Not surprisingly, the variety of physical phenomena one encounters during the study of celestial objects is truly impressive. This set of lectures is intended to illustrate the richness of Astrophysics. It will be a random walk in basic physics, with numerous illustrations from astronomy. The topics in physics that will be reviewed have been chosen on the basis of their importance in contemporary astronomy.

    Topics:

    Absorption and emission of radiation
    Radiation from relativistic electrons
    Compton scattering of radiation
    Spontaneous and stimulated emission
    Hyperfine splitting of energy levels
    Molecular spectra
    Astrophysical plasma.
    Quantum tunnelling.
    Nuclear matter
    Neutrino Oscillation
    Phase transitions and the early Universe
    During this random walk in physics, one will encounter a range of astronomical objects and phenomena, such as, Solar wind, gaseous nebulae, interstellar hydrogen clouds, giant molecular clouds, neutron stars and pulsars, supernova remnants, radio galaxies and quasars, active galactic nuclei, the cosmic microwave background, etc.

  • The Next Big Questions in Astronomy - Professor Carolin Crawford

    59:48

    In her final Gresham Lecture, Professor Crawford talks about where the next big breakthrough will come from:

    For each exciting advance or discovery that takes place in Astronomy, other just as important questions either arise or remain unanswered. In my last Gresham lecture I shall review what the near future might bring – the exciting space missions, satellites and telescopes – and the fundamental scientific challenges they are designed to tackle.

    The transcript and downloadable versions of the lecture are available from the Gresham College website:

    Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website. There are currently over 1,800 lectures free to access or download from the website.
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  • Neutron Stars and Black Holes by G Srinivasan

    1:55:39

    SUMMER COURSES

    NEUTRON STARS AND BLACK HOLES

    SPEAKER: G Srinivasan (​Raman Research Institute - Retired)

    DATE: 15 May 2019 to 28 June 2019

    VENUE: Emmy Noether Seminar Room, ICTS Bangalore


    The theme of the course will be neutron stars and black holes, with emphasis on neutron stars in binaries (their formation and rotational history); their mergers; gamma ray bursts; formation of intermediate mass and super massive black holes.

    Lectures:

    1) Diffuse Stars
    2) Life History of the stars
    3) Quantum Stars
    4) Neutron Stars and Supernovae
    5) Interior of neutron stars
    6) Superfluidity and superconductivity inside neutron stars.
    7) Neutron Stars as Pulsars
    8) Gravitation - From Newton to Einstein
    9) Maximum mass of neutron stars
    10) Evolution of neutron stars in close binaries
    11) Recycled pulsars
    12) Tests General Relativity using Double Neutron Stars
    13) Gravitational radiation from neutron star mergers
    14) Black Holes of General Relativity
    15) Super massive Black Holes
    16) Universe versus Multiverse


    Schedule:

    May – 15, 17, 22, 24, 29 and 31
    June – 5, 7, 12, 14, 19, 21, 24, 26 and 28
    Time: 10:00 AM


  • How Were The Stars Formed? - Professor Joseph Silk

    55:02

    The Milky Way galaxy was once ablaze with bright young stars. Today, star formation has calmed down, but we glimpse intense pockets of gas that are forming massive stars, testifying to the brilliant past. Stars form in clouds of interstellar gas that orbit their host galaxy. The clouds acquire more mass as gas accumulates, and the gaseous nebulae are soon massive enough to become unstable, due to the pull of their own gravity. As the clouds collapse, their central regions fragment into dense clumps of cold gas that eventually form stars.

    Dust particles are the key ingredients that eventually coalesce to form a disk-like structure with rocky cores that orbit the forming sun and agglomerate into planets. The entire solar system was formed out of interstellar grit.

    The transcript and downloadable versions of the lecture are available from the Gresham College website:

    Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website. There are currently over 2,000 lectures free to access or download from the website.

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  • Elementary Particles and Their Interactions - Professor Joseph Silk FRS

    55:42

    Matter consists of a mêlée of elementary particles. There are protons and neutrons, made up of quarks, and many other short-lived massive particles. All atoms consist of protons, neutrons and an accompanying cloud of electrons - then there are electrons, muons and neutrinos, as well as the massless particles - photons.

    The very early universe is a unique laboratory for studying the rarest of particles. We see the faded brilliance of the fiery past, and can assemble clues that enable us to trace out the particle content of the beginning of the universe. One hope is to discover particles of dark matter, but this has so far eluded our best efforts.

    The transcript and downloadable versions of the lecture are available from the Gresham College website:

    Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website. There are currently over 2,000 lectures free to access or download from the website.

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  • Cosmology for Feynman: What We Know & What We Don’t Know - Michael Turner - 5/12/2018

    43:29

  • Cameron Smith Public Lecture: Interstellar Voyaging -- An Evolutionary Transition

    1:24:06

    Dr. Cameron Smith (Portland State University) delivers the third lecture of the 2014/15 Perimeter Institute Public Lecture Series, in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. Held at Perimeter Institute and webcast live worldwide on Dec 3., 2014, Smith's lecture explores the biological and cultural challenges associated with multigenerational interstellar space travel.

    Perimeter Institute Public Lectures are held in the first week of each month. More information on Perimeter Public Lectures:

    Join the conversation:
    @Perimeter
    #piLIVE

  • The Darwin Day Lecture 2019, with Richard Dawkins

    48:26

    Richard Dawkins is one of the best known scientists in the world. He is author of 'The Selfish Gene', which upturned our understanding of natural selection, and in 2017 was named the most influential science book of all time. He is also author of 'The God Delusion', which caused a global sensation upon publication in 2006. He has chaired almost every event in the Darwin Day Lecture series since its launch in 2003.

    Humanists UK president Professor Alice Roberts takes over the chair of the lecture at this event, and introduces Richard Dawkins as he delivers the Darwin Day Lecture for the first time.

  • Victoria Kaspi Public Lecture: The Cosmic Gift of Neutron Stars

    1:9:05

    In her Feb. 3 talk, Dr. Victoria Kaspi of McGill University, explored neutron stars -- mysterious celestial objects can shed light on some of the most vexing questions in the universe.

    More info on Perimeter Public Lectures:

  • Emily Levesque - Astronomy Adventures and the Scientific Power of Storytelling

    1:3:42

    A raven that mimicked gravitational waves. An astronomer that discovered microwave ovens. A telescope that got shot. Observational astronomy is rife with true stories and tall tales of the misadventures that accompany our exploration of the universe. However, these stories can do much more than serve as entertainment during conference dinners and colloquium coffee; oftentimes, telling them also means sharing the science behind our work and putting a human face on what can seem to many people, like a farfetched and remote field of study. By sharing our experiences as astronomers we can also preserve the unusual quirks of our rare and strange jobs and map the rapid technological expansion of our field, the new possibilities offered by tomorrow's telescopes, and the evolving role of humans as observers and scientists. In this colloquium I'll share some of astronomy's best observing stories and explore their utility as tools for science communication and supporting our field.


    This is a registration of a colloquium (via videoconferencing) for the Anton Pannekoek Institute for Astronomy in Amsterdam.

  • The Life Cycle of a Star: Victoria Kaspi at Perimeter Institute

    1:01

    Victoria Kaspi (McGill University) explains ___ during her 2016 public lectures at Perimeter Institute, The Cosmic Gift of Neutron Stars. Watch the full talk:
    Watch more Perimeter public lectures:

  • Katherine Freese Public Lecture: The Dark Side of the Universe

    1:3:17

    Dr. Katherine Freese explains the hunt for dark matter, the abundant-but-elusive matter believed to make up the majority of stuff in our universe, during her Perimeter Institute Public Lecture on March 2, 2016.

    Check out future Perimeter Public Lectures:


  • Astronomys New Messengers

    1:33:45

    Marcia Bartusiak joins Kip Thorne, Laura Danly and Rainer Weiss to demonstrate how two observatories on opposite sides of the country, called LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory), may open a new window on observing the cosmos—one based not in light but in gravity. Scientists have embarked on this joint experiment, seeking whispers of far-away violence—like the collision between distant black holes—rippling through the cosmos. It’s taken nearly a century, but technology has finally caught up to Einstein’s brilliance. His 1916 General Theory of Relativity predicted the existence of gravitational waves—undulations in the very fabric of space and time—and LIGO researchers are now poised to detect them.

    The World Science Festival gathers great minds in science and the arts to produce live and digital content that allows a broad general audience to engage with scientific discoveries. Our mission is to cultivate a general public informed by science, inspired by its wonder, convinced of its value, and prepared to engage with its implications for the future.

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    Original Program Date: June 4, 2010
    MODERATOR: Marcia Bartusiak
    PARTICIPANTS: Andrea Lommen, Kip S. Thorne, Laura Danly, Rai Weiss

    The Sound of the future 00:14

    Marcia Bartusiak's Introduction 00:40

    The history of gravity. 05:55

    Participant Introductions. 08:02

    How did we get here from the past? 12:11

    The universal rate of acceleration. 18:43

    What drew Einstein to rethink Newton's ideas. 24:30

    What Einstein predicted. 29:28

    What happens when two black holes collide? 35:35

    Stumbling on to a binary pulsar 40:30

    Why do you study something that doesn't exist? 46:10

    Measuring the strain of the universe. 53:35

    LIGOS the gravitational tape measure. 59:35

    When do you hear the gravity wave? 01:09:30

    What are the new surprises to look forward to? 01:16:00

    What would you expect space time to look like when black holes collide? 01:22:25

  • Gravitational Waves from Neutron Stars: Victoria Kaspi at Perimeter Institute

    1:11

    Victoria Kaspi (McGill University) explains the effort to detect gravitational waves from neutron stars during her 2016 public lectures at Perimeter Institute, The Cosmic Gift of Neutron Stars. Watch the full talk:
    Watch more Perimeter public lectures:

  • Neutron Star Facts: Victoria Kaspi at Perimeter Institute

    2:32

    Victoria Kaspi (McGill University) explains ___ during her 2016 public lectures at Perimeter Institute, The Cosmic Gift of Neutron Stars. Watch the full talk:
    Watch more Perimeter public lectures:

  • Vilhelm Bohr Public Lecture: Niels Bohr - Life Behind the Physics

    1:14:52

    Dr. Vilhelm Bohr, grandson of quantum science pioneer Niels Bohr, delivers a talk as part of Perimeter's Institute's 2014/15 Public Lecture Series. More on PI Public Lectures:

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