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Germany after the flooding | DW Documentary

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  • Germany after the flooding | DW Documentary

    12:27

    Germany is in shock. Days of heavy rain caused several rivers to burst their banks, flooding entire towns and villages. More than 160 people lost their lives. Now survivors are battling to clean up in the wake of the disaster.

    Several European countries have been hit by extreme weather, and many lives have been lost. Regions in western Germany have been most severely affected: in Rhineland-Palatinate, the south of North Rhine-Westphalia, and parts of Bavaria. The floodwaters destroyed highways, houses and whole communities. The floods have receded, leaving behind thick mud and tons of rubble. Chancellor Angela Merkel and other political leaders visited the disaster zones, offering encouragement and promising swift financial help for victims of the flooding. But many of those affected have criticized the emergency response as chaotic. In contrast, communities came together in solidarity – many people travelled long distances to offer their help. DW reporter Miodrag Soric visited the badly hit localities of Schuld and Walporzheim in Rhineland-Palatinate. He reports on how residents and volunteer helpers are dealing with the aftermath of the flooding.

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  • Disastrous floods in western Germany - The Eifel disaster | DW Documentary

    28:27

    It's the morning after the deadly flood in the small village of Schuld on the river Ahr. The extent of the natural disaster is gradually becoming clear.

    Schuld has a 1000-year history and has survived several wars. But now, it has been stricken by destructive weather. On the night into July 15, following heavy downpours, the river swelled and nearly swept the village away, wreaking havoc on everything that stood in its path. Normally, the Ahr is barely a meter deep as it passes through Schuld. It swelled to a monstrous depth of almost eight meters. Residents barely had time to react.

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  • Europe after the rain | DW Documentary

    42:27

    TV crews were quick to visit the areas in western Europe devastated by flooding in July. As they talked to victims and helpers, the shocking scale of the tragedy became clear to viewers. At least 170 people lost their lives.

    The deluge swept away entire communities in Germany. Now, residents are gradually returning to their homes - or what is left of them. After parts of Rhineland-Palatinate and North Rhine-Westphalia were inundated, subsequent rainfall also left a trail of destruction in Bavaria. Locals have been joined in the clear-up effort by experts and personnel from the police, fire brigade and other emergency services and even the German army - again called in to help out as it has been with the coronavirus pandemic. Meanwhile, the Nürburgring motor-racing circuit has been turned into a makeshift aid center. The floods were the worst in living memory. Picturesque villages have been reduced to mud and rubble. Many residents have lost not just their homes and possessions but also friends and family. The cleanup operation has only just begun and is likely to take years to complete. This disaster of record proportions is one that requires state intervention - and the nation as a whole to also reflect on what mistakes have been made, and what preparations can be taken to deal with future catastrophes of this nature.

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  • Germany before the election | DW Documentary

    28:27

    Germany is just days away from a major political transition. No matter who wins the federal election later this month, change is on the way. What are the major problems that Germany must deal with? Where does the country go from here? For this documentary, we interviewed a number of average Germans, and they told us about the issues that are important to them.

    Germany is now dealing with the effects of climate change. The recent floods in western Germany have put this situation front and center in the election campaign. Our reporters went to areas that were hit hard by flooding, and talked to two people who have directly experienced the consequences of climate change: Verena Bachus and Raphael Rill were forced to leave their homes, and now live in emergency accommodations. Their experience with the flood and its aftermath will shape how they vote.

    In Bavaria, CSU MP Thomas Erndl says above all, climate protection must be affordable. Erndl is locked in a tough re-election campaign in his consituency in Deggendorf. the In the 2017 federal election, the town had the state's highest percentage of voters for the right-wing nationalist AfD party. Erndl is trying to win back these voters. To do that, he has to walk a political tightrope.

    Fridays for Future” activist Pierre Zissel says There's no lobby for young people. Those aged 18 to 30 make up only ten-percent of the electorate -- so it is older voters who determine the fate of young people. Zissel is a university student, and lives in the central German city of Erfurt. He's committed to climate protection, but doesn't want to get involved in politics. He says it's too complicated, tedious and difficult, and sees the change the young can bring as something that takes too long.

    Hibba Kauser is a 21-year-old SPD politician in the city of Offenbach, near Frankfurt. Kauser is of Pakistani heritage, and was born in a refugee center in the state of Brandenburg and knows how hard social exclusion can be. She says that many Germans have a real problem with people who look different. She adds that it's hard for such people to get ahead because they are not represented in the political system, and instead they experience discrimination. Kauser wants to change all that.

    People who live in rural areas also believe that they've been left behind. Lots of young people have simply packed up and moved to cities. It's also difficult for many companies to set up new businesses in the countryside.

    Throughout Germany, the gap between rich and poor is growing. Many of difficult means no longer bother to vote. Have elections become merely an elitist exercise for the wealthy, the white, and the old?

    #documentary #GermanElection #Germany #DWDocumentary
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  • Germans at the end of Merkels grand coalition | DW Documentary

    42:27

    After 16 years of Angela Merkel's leadership, the country feels tired. Many believe the grand coalition dragged its feet on reforms and failed to resolve social conflicts. Fears of a schism in society are growing.

    Climate strikes by schoolchildren, large farmers' demonstrations, miners in fear of losing their jobs, and numerous protests against anti-Corona measures suggest growing dissatisfaction with the government and politics.

    Is this impression correct? Maybe it just feels that way, but isn't borne out by the statistics?

    The statistical data paints a surprisingly different picture: German life expectancy has gone up by nearly two years since 2005, the year Angela Merkel replaced Gerhard Schröder as Chancellor. Unemployment fell from 13 percent to less than 7 percent. Average living space per person has grown from 42 to 47 square meters, and the school dropout rate has fallen from 8.2 percent to 6.3 percent. There are one million fewer registered crimes. Not only that: Surveys on life satisfaction show that it has risen steadily since 2005, and was back at 1990 levels shortly before the outbreak of the Corona pandemic. The dissatisfied? No: The satisfied!

    So, all is well after all? No, it isn't. Those statistical averages conceal enormous disparities: In Bremen, for example, life expectancy in wealthy neighborhoods is seven years higher than in poor ones. The average household income in Gelsenkirchen is not even half of what it in Heilbronn. The school dropout rate has been on the rise again for several years - especially in the poorer German states, primarily in eastern Germany. In terms of biodiversity and climate balance, Germany lags far behind its own goals. Who has benefited from the positive developments, and who has lost? Why are farmers so angry? Why are miners and climate activists so irreconcilably opposed?

    The Dissatisfied? is a critical, nuanced, in parts unsparing and yet surprisingly positive assessment of the Merkel era as it draws to a close!

    #documentary #Merkel #Germany #GermanElection #DWDocumentary

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  • German reunification – a short history | DW Documentary

    43:05

    The fall of the Berlin Wall changed the course of history overnight. But German Reunification was never a guarantee. The situation could have spiraled out of control at any moment. Find out more in 2 + 4 + X: A SHORT HISTORY OF GERMAN REUNIFICATION.

    West German Chancellor Helmut Kohl took advantage of the chaos during this turbulent time. His 10-point plan paved the way for the reunification of a divided Germany - but this was done behind the backs of the Allied Forces. Those who witnessed the events tell the story of the “2+4” negotiations and rocky road the world took to reunite the GDR with the West.

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  • Nach den tödlichen Fluten in Deutschland | DW Reporter

    12:34

    Deutschland steht unter Schock. Tagelanger Starkregen hat mehrere Flüsse über die Ufer treten lassen. Ganze Städte und Dörfer sind überschwemmt. Mehr als 160 Personen verloren ihr Leben. Es wird lange dauern, die Folgen zu beseitigen.

    Es sind mehrere Länder in Mitteleuropa, die unter dem extremen Wetter leiden, etliche Menschen überleben die Flut nicht. Vor allem jedoch ist Westdeutschland betroffen: Rheinland-Pfalz, aber auch der Süden Nordrhein-Westfalens und Teile Bayerns. Das Wasser zerstört Autobahnen, Häuser und ganze Existenzen. Wo die Pegel zurückgehen, bleiben zäher Schlamm zurück und tonnenweise Trümmer. Bundeskanzlerin Merkel und andere Spitzenpolitiker zeigen vor Ort Flagge und versprechen rasche Hilfe für die Opfer des Hochwassers. Doch viele Betroffene kritisieren, die staatliche Hilfe verlaufe chaotisch. Auf der anderen Seite sind Solidarität und Hilfsbereitschaft in der Bevölkerung groß, nicht nur unter Nachbarn. DW-Reporter Miodrag Soric hat sich in den besonders stark betroffenen Ortschaften Schuld und Walporzheim in Rheinland-Pfalz umgesehen und berichtet, wie sich Anwohner und Helfer gegen die Auswirkungen des Hochwassers stemmen.

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  • Inundaciones arrasan el oeste de Alemania | DW Documental

    28:27

    A medida que amanece en el pequeño pueblo de Schuld an der Ahr, comienza a vislumbrarse la magnitud de las catastróficas inundaciones.

    Schuld, con más de mil años de historia a sus espaldas, había sobrevivido a crisis y guerras, pero no pudo resistir el embate de la meteorología. En la noche del 14 al 15 de julio, las aguas estuvieron a punto de arrancar el pueblo de cuajo. El Ahr lo arrasó todo a su paso. Un río cuyo cauce apenas llega al metro, multiplicó por ocho su profundidad. Los habitantes no tuvieron tiempo para reaccionar.

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  • Germany: The discreet lives of the super rich | DW Documentary

    42:31

    The rich in Germany been never been as well-off as they are today and assets have never been so unevenly distributed. But who are they? How do they live? And what do they think of their country? A journey into the discreet world of the super-rich.

    One percent of Germans own over a quarter of the country's assets, whilst half of the country’s citizens have no assets at all. But while the German media report on the growing poverty in the country on a daily basis, little is known about the super-rich. They keep a very low profile and can walk the streets unrecognized. Manager Magazin” says there were around 200 billionaires living in Germany in 2018, and their numbers are increasing. The documentary Top of the World asks why rich Germans are so unwilling to talk about their wealth. Its author immerses himself in the discreet world of big money and meets financial advisors with 800 years of family tradition behind them and billionaires such as drugstore king Dirk Rossmann and mail-order company heir Michael Otto - as well as a self-made businessmen such as Rainer Schaller. They talk about their notions of money and justice, the origins of their wealth and their fear of social envy.


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  • Die verunsicherte Republik - Deutschland vor der Wahl | DW Doku

    28:27

    Der Klimawandel ist in Deutschland angekommen. Die jüngsten Überschwemmungen im Westen des Landes haben das Thema ins Zentrum des Wahlkampfes gespült. Wir waren im Hochwassergebiet und haben mit zwei Flutopfern gesprochen, die die Folgen des Klimawandels hautnah miterlebt haben - Verena Bachus und Raphael Rill leben nun im Wohnwagen und im Zelt. Diese Erfahrung wird ihre Wahlentscheidung prägen.

    Auch in Bayern ist das Thema präsent. Der CSU-Bundestagsabgeordnete Thomas Erndl kämpft um seinen Wiedereinzug ins Parlament. Für Erndl muss Klimaschutz vor allem bezahlbar bleiben. Sein Wahlkreis Deggendorf hatte in Bayern bei der Bundestagswahl 2017 die höchsten Stimmenanteile für die AfD. Nun möchte der Bundestagsabgeordnete diese Stimmen zurückgewinnen. Dafür muss er einen Spagat machen, um alle mitzunehmen.

    Junge Menschen haben keine Lobby, sagt der Fridays for Future-Aktivist Piere Zissel. Die 18- bis 30-Jährigen machen nur 10% der Stimmen aus, eine alte Generation urteilt über das Schicksal der jungen. Der Student aus Erfurt engagiert sich für Klimaschutz, doch politisch aktiv werden möchte er nicht. Der Weg sei steinig, langwierig und schwer. Es dauere zu lange bis junge Menschen was ändern können.

    Die 21-jährige Kommunalpolitikerin Hibba Kauser aus Offenbach schafft sich ihre eigene Lobby. Geboren in einem Flüchtlingsheim in Brandenburg mit pakistanischen Wurzeln, weiß die SPD-Politikerin was Ausgrenzung bedeutet. Deutschland habe ein Problem mit Menschen die anders aussehen. Sie werden nicht repräsentiert, sondern diskriminiert und abgehängt. Das möchte sie ändern.

    Und auch auf dem Land haben die Menschen häufig den Eindruck, dass sie abgehängt werden. Wo es kein Netz gibt, wandern die Jungen ab, Unternehmen können sich nur schlecht ansiedeln.

    Die Schere zwischen Arm und Reich wächst. Viele Menschen in prekären Verhältnissen wählen gar nicht mehr.

    Wird die Wahl immer mehr ein Eliteprojekt der Vermögenden, der Weißen und Alten?

    #DWDoku #BTW2021 #Bundestagswahl #Dokumentation
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  • Alemania al final de la gran coalición de Merkel | DW Documental

    42:27

    Alemania cierra 16 años de Gobierno Merkel. Muchos opinan que la gran coalición se va sin haber abordado reformas urgentes, incapaz de resolver conflictos sociales. El temor a la polarización de la sociedad aumenta.

    Las huelgas escolares en demanda de una mayor protección climática, las grandes manifestaciones de agricultores, los temores de los mineros a perder sus empleos y también las protestas contra las medidas de contención durante la pandemia del coronavirus sugieren un aumento del descontento de la población con el Gobierno y la clase política alemanes. ¿Es ésta una impresión real o sólo una percepción subjetiva sin base estadística?

    De hecho, las cifras ofrecen un panorama bien diferente. La esperanza de vida de los alemanes, por ejemplo, subió dos años desde que Angela Merkel asumiera el gobierno en 2005, el desempleo se ha reducido del 13% a menos de un 7% y la superficie habitacional per cápita pasó de 42 m² a 47 m². Además, el fracaso escolar se redujo del 8,2% al 6,3% y hubo un millón de delitos denunciados menos. Y ahí no queda todo: la satisfacción con la propia vida subió constantemente desde 2005, recuperando el nivel de 1990 junto antes del comienzo de la pandemia. ¿Alemania, un país de descontentos? Al contrario.

    Sin embargo, no todo son bondades en el país teutón. Detrás de las cifras promedio se esconden disparidades clamorosas. En Bremen, por ejemplo, la esperanza de vida en los barrios ricos supera en siete años la de los distritos humildes. El ingreso medio de un hogar en la obrera Gelsenkirchen no llega ni a la mitad de lo que ganan en la próspera Heilbronn. El fracaso escolar repunta desde hace años, sobre todo en las regiones más pobres, es decir, especialmente en el este del país. Y en materia ambiental, Alemania va muy por detrás de sus objetivos en protección de la biodiversidad y descarbonización. Entonces, ¿quién se ha beneficiado de los avances y quiénes son los perdedores de la era Merkel? ¿A qué se debe el enojo del sector agrícola? ¿Por qué ecologistas y mineros adoptan posturas irreconciliables?

    Balance de una era ofrece una mirada crítica, analítica, sin compromisos, pero a la vez sorprendentemente positiva, del ciclo Merkel que ahora llega a su fin.

    #EleccionesAlemania #documental #DWDocumental

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  • The Stasi and the Berlin Wall | DW Documentary

    42:27

    For one group, at least, the erection of the Berlin Wall on August 13, 1961 was a stroke of luck. Over the following decades, the Wall would be the lifeblood of the East German secret police, known as the Stasi. By the time the Wall fell, in 1989, thousands of Stasi agents were employed with a single goal: to make the Wall insurmountable.

    The film tells the story of this existentially symbiotic relationship from the perspective of the Stasi under its notorious leader Erich Mielke. It’s the first time this most sensitive chapter of East Germany's history has been told in such an exemplary and coherent way: including the deaths that took place at the Wall, and the cover-up and concealment of many of those murders.

    We learn about the arrests and imprisonment of tens of thousands of refugees, as well as the Stasi’s elaborate construction of tunnels and underground listening stations to track down tunnel diggers. From the billion-dollar business of selling GDR prisoners to West Germany, to the filtering of Western traffic at border crossings to recruit unofficial collaborators, Mielke's specialists were everywhere.

    We see how Mielke's power grew, as the Wall and the border system were perfected, and how the walling-in of the population created more and more work for the Stasi. The Wall became the Stasi’s main field of activity, and its daily bread.

    The fall of the Wall brought an abrupt end to both East Germany and its security apparatus. An irony of history is that, on November 9, 1989, it was a Stasi man who opened the first barrier on Bornholmer Strasse and thus initiated the fall of the Berlin Wall.

    #dwdocumentary #berlinwall #documentary

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  • Dozens still missing in Germany two weeks after floods | DW News

    7:42

    Two weeks after the devastating floods in western Germany, the disaster is far from over. People are only slowly working their way through dealing with what the flood has left behind: bulks of mud and piles of rubbish. Dozens of people are still missing.

    DW visited a young Syrian from Ahrweiler, who lost everything - for the second time in his life: during the civil war in Syria, and now in Germany.

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    #Germany #flood #ExtremeWeather

  • Racism in Germany | DW Documentary

    12:32

    Not only in the U.S.A., but in Germany, too, people encounter discrimination based on their skin color. What are the lives of Afro-German youngsters and women like? Where do they run into racism, and how can their rights be better protected?

    Ana, Besong and Kalsoumy tell us about their everyday lives. Twelve-year-old Besong is at the top of her class, but often, she still feels ignored by her teachers. Kalsoumy will soon be starting at university. She says, when applying for apartments or internships, she can never be quite sure that prejudice wasn't a factor when she's turned down. Ana tells about her everyday experiences with racism, whether glances on the subway or fears of violence when she walks home through the park in the evening. All three are very familiar with the question, Where do you originally come from?” It seems to question their very identities as Germans. How can real change finally be achieved? A report by Mariel Müller.

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  • Germany’s poor pensioners | DW Documentary

    12:01

    Poverty threatens more German seniors than ever. How to make ends meet, when pension isn’t enough?

    Herbert worked nearly his entire life, as a welder and as a sailor. But he never put much thought into his pension. Now at 65, he barely receives enough to make ends meet. He can hardly afford daily expenses, not to mention hobbies or a vacation. The number of people in Germany struck with the same fate as Herbert is on the rise. At 15%, the rate of pensioners living at poverty level has leapt higher than any other segment in society. Herbert relies on food donations and collects bottles left behind by party-revelers for extra cash. It’s not easy for him, but he has no other choice. Just like so many other pensioners, even in Germany’s wealthiest regions. A report by Axel Rowohlt.
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  • Berlin: homeless capital of Germany | DW Documentary

    12:02

    Berlin: homeless capital of Germany; high taxes prompt Turks to brew own beer; Ugandan traders uncertain about ban on used clothes; the typewriter's last bid for survival in India.
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  • The German car industrys political muscle | DW Documentary

    42:26

    The German automotive industry has long played a key role in the country's prosperity. It employs hundreds of thousands and enjoys cozy relationships with politicians. But the COVID-19 crisis threw a wrench in the works. What’s next?

    The prosperous German auto industry has long been lagging when it comes to innovating new automotive technologies. Then came the COVID-19 pandemic. Now, the industry is turning to decision-makers for help.

    But just how far will policymakers go to help the car companies? Arguing that the COVID-19 pandemic has hit them hard, the auto industry is demanding the postponement of stricter CO2 limits and a purchase premium for new vehicles. They maintain that nothing less than the prosperity of the whole country is at stake. But is Germany's success really dependent on the auto industry? And how much blame does industrial policy bear for the failures of the automotive companies?

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  • Syrian refugees after 5 years in Germany | DW Documentary

    12:32

    In 2015, the Suleimans fled to Germany from war-torn Syria. How are they faring? Have they managed to build a new life?

    While the four Suleiman children have become German citizens - and speak fluent German and have made lots of friends - their parents have had a tougher time fitting in. For four years, the family had to keep moving, until they found a permanent home in Berlin. The children’s father worries about the rest of the family that’s still in Syria. The war there continues to haunt him, so he’s sought psychological help. Their mother is learning German. She hopes that, when her children are a bit older, she can work in Germany as a nurse. The Suleimans are happy to be in Germany, even if it’s taken longer for them to settle in than they’d hoped. A report by Viktoria Kleber.

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  • Germanys volunteer exchange | DW Documentary

    12:32

    Moises is from a poor region in Mexico, and has come to volunteer in Germany. He works in an addiction support center in Bielefeld. The German government’s volunteer exchange program weltwärts” made it possible.

    Until recently, Germany’s exchange program weltwärts was aimed at sending young German volunteers abroad. But the program is no longer just a one-way street. It’s now also for young people from other countries. The intention is to invite promising young community figures to come and learn new concepts in the German social environment which they can then apply back home. Moises lives in an indigenous community in rural Mexico. He works in a kindergarten, and is one of just a handful of people who has studied social work there. How useful is the program to him? A report by Anna Marie Goretzki.

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  • A nurse moves to Germany | DW Documentary

    12:32

    Nursing staff are in short supply in Germany, because not enough Germans want to perform this demanding, yet not very well-paid job. So more and more nurses are being recruited from abroad. Iyaloo from Namibia is one of them.

    In her homeland of Namibia, Iyaloo Akuunda studied nursing, but couldn’t find work. So, when she heard that Germany was looking for nurses, she decided to learn German and try her luck abroad. After a lot of hard work and help from a recruitment agency, she was offered a job at Düsseldorf University Hospital. Iyaloo was initially thrilled, even though it was hard to say goodbye to her family. But not everything in Germany is as she’d envisioned it would be. A report by Ruth Krause and Adrian Kriesch.

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  • #Germany Decides - German election road trip | DW Documentary

    42:32

    Two Deutsche Welle journalists crossed Germany to chart the mood ahead of the general election. What really concerns the German voter?

    September 24, 2017 sees elections to the 19th German Bundestag. Current incumbent Chancellor Angela Merkel is running for a fourth time, this year against the Social Democrats' candidate Martin Schulz. Many observers feel German society is becoming increasing polarized. Merkel's refugee policy has drawn sustained attack from the right. One party, the Alternative for Germany (AfD), has gained significant traction out of its anti-islamist stance.

    Narrowly missing entry into the Bundestag in 2013, will it make it this time? DW journalists Sumi Somaskanda and Nina Haase-Trobridge set off on a journey across the republic. They go to Dresden, city of anti-immigrant rallies, to gauge the strength of right-wing populism. They move on through the Czech Republic to Wegscheid on the German-Austrian border, where thousands of refugees poured into Germany every day in the autumn of 2015. What’s it like in the small border community now? The DW team meets Mayor Josef Lamperstorfer, who expressed his scorn for Germany’s politicians in scathing a letter about the humanitarian disaster. How welcome are refugees now? How fairly are they treated in Germany? How stable will the German economy be in the future? Nina Haase-Trobridge and Sumi Somaskanda want to find out how the people of this Republic are getting on. They meet young right-wingers, managers, politicians as well as the politically disillusioned. They travel across Germany from Saxony to Bavaria, Baden-Wurttemberg and North Rhine-Westphalia and then back to Berlin via Bremen. Who is going to be running Germany later this year?
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  • One German pub owner is still serving at 87 | DW Documentary

    12:01

    At age 87, landlady Hildegard Schweinsberg is still behind the bar every day. Her pub Zur Börse is the heart and soul of the small village of Neuhaus. People meet here to drink, relax and catch up. What will happen if this tradition dies out?

    A church, a cemetery and a pub surrounded by fields and forests - the scene of a typical, idyllic German village. But it's becoming increasingly rare. Many people are moving to the cities, and in the villages there are fewer places to meet and catch up. The pub has always been an integral part of country life, and for one lucky village of 1500 people, it's still a thriving tradition. In Neuhaus on the river Elbe, Hildegard Schweinsberg has been running Zur Börse for nearly 60 years. And at age 87, she still can't imagine ever giving up, despite often needing a walker to serve her customers. And there's no one to take over anyway. A report by Linda Vierecke.
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  • Inequality – how wealth becomes power | DW Documentary

    41:56

    Germany is one of the world’s richest countries, but inequality is on the rise. The wealthy are pulling ahead, while the poor are falling behind.

    For the middle classes, work is no longer a means of advancement. Instead, they are struggling to maintain their position and status. Young people today have less disposable income than previous generations. This documentary explores the question of inequality in Germany, providing both background analysis and statistics. The filmmakers interview leading researchers and experts on the topic. And they accompany Christoph Gröner, one of Germany’s biggest real estate developers, as he goes about his work. If you have great wealth, you can’t fritter it away through consumption. If you throw money out the window, it comes back in through the front door,” Gröner says. The real estate developer builds multi-family residential units in cities across Germany, sells condominium apartments, and is involved in planning projects that span entire districts. Entrepreneurs are more powerful than politicians, because we’re more independent,” Gröner concludes. Leading researchers and experts on the topic of inequality also weigh in, including Nobel-prize winning economist Joseph Stiglitz, economist Thomas Piketty, and Brooke Harrington, who carried out extensive field research among investors from the ranks of the international financial elite. Branko Milanović, a former lead economist at the World Bank, says that globalization is playing a role in rising inequality. The losers of globalization are the lower-middle class of affluent countries like Germany. These people are earning the same today as 20 years ago, Milanović notes. Just like a century ago, humankind is standing at a crossroads. Will affluent countries allow rising equality to tear apart the fabric of society? Or will they resist this trend?”

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  • The consequences of injustice | DW Documentary

    42:26

    Structural injustice creates division and threatens peace. But how do we know whether our social order is just? Challenging such notions is the key to social mobility.

    The idea of social justice is central to our sense of morality. Experiments show that even two-year-olds display high levels of social cooperation, while five-year-olds react indignantly when they feel discriminated against. So are we born with a sense of justice? According to Dr. Hanna Beissert, of Germany’s Leibniz Institute for Research and Information in Education, justice is both learned and innate.

    Meanwhile, nearly two-thirds of Germans feel that social justice has declined in recent years. Social mobility from the working-class to the rich and influential elite is extremely rare. And the more a society is characterized by structural inequality, the more likely it is to become further unbalanced. The distribution of opportunities and resources is becoming less equal around the world, leading to increased social division.

    The International Justice Index attempts to objectively measure social justice. Norway, Sweden and Denmark top the list, with Austria in fifth place and Switzerland in sixth, followed by the Netherlands and Germany, which share seventh place. The United States is in 24th place, ahead of Italy, Greece, Romania and Turkey. According to sociologist Michael Hartmann, Germany's future looks bleak: The social division that Germany is going through right now is similar to what the UK and US saw about 20 years ago. Simply put, you can say we're always about 20 years behind those countries in our development, and we’re now moving toward their level of division.

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  • German election: Rejuvenating politics | DW Documentary

    12:27

    Less than two percent of German lawmakers are under 30 years of age. We meet two young candidates for the Bundestag who want to change that. Kassem Taher Saleh is running for the Greens in Dresden; Wiebke Winter is a CDU candidate in Bremen.

    In many ways they embody the hopes and dreams of their parties. Kassem's family fled from Iraq and he grew up in eastern Germany. A civil engineer by profession, he is campaigning for climate-friendly building policies. Immigrants like Kassem frequently encounter prejudice in Germany, especially in the former communist east of the country. Wiebke Winter is the youngest member of the CDU's national executive. She is currently doing a doctorate in medical law and she co-founded an organization designed to push for climate issues in her party. As a young woman she has faced hurdles within the party and her constituency. What is it like for young people who go into politics? A report by Leonie von Hammerstein.

    #GermanElection #politics #Bundestag #DWDocumentary

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  • Fact check: Germanys floods - whats real and whats fake | DW News

    4:26

    After Germany's devastating floods, the country was confronted with another storm: Fakes and disinformation about the flooding made the rounds and caused panic. DW's fact-checking team got to the bottom of the reports.

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  • Rethinking capitalism | DW Documentary

    25:57

    More and more entrepreneurs are thinking beyond their own personal wealth. In what is known as the Purpose Movement, company bosses aim to put profits to good use, while rethinking the idea of corporate ownership.

    This film explores how the movement is rethinking capitalism. The founders and CEOs involved in the global Purpose Movement believe in transforming society: Their ownership model ensures that a company’s shareholders cannot withdraw profits, the company cannot be sold and its purpose cannot be changed. Christian Kroll founded search engine Ecosia in 2009. The profits are used to plant trees to combat climate change. Advertising revenue has so far financed the planting of more than a hundred million trees. Kroll could have sold Ecosia for many millions of euros long ago, but the founder wanted to protect his company from speculators. The trees were more important to him than his bank balance. That's why he used a foundation model to transfer ownership of Ecosia in 2018, effectively cutting himself out. The model makes it impossible to sell Ecosia for profit, to withdraw company capital, or to change the company's purpose, which is planting trees. Armin Steuernagel advises entrepreneurs who also want to give away their companies. His Purpose Foundation advises start-ups wanting to establish themselves as purpose companies,” like Hamburg’s Wildplastic, which produces garbage bags from recycled material. Steuernagel wants us to rethink capitalism. As a political lobbyist, he is working to create a legal framework to help facilitate the shift to purpose companies. Michael Hetzer ran the German family-owned company Elobau, which manufactures sensors and other parts for agricultural machinery. Instead of deciding to leave the business to one of his sons, he transferred the company to a foundation model. He wanted to take the burden off his sons' shoulders. And for him, the purpose of his company is important.

    #documentary #capitalism #business

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  • Germany devastated after flooding, as scientists predict more extreme weather

    4:51

    ABC News’ Maggie Rulli reports on how climate change has impacted the deadly floods in Germany that wrecked infrastructure and livelihoods in some of the worst damage Germany has faced since WWII.

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    #ABCNLPrime #Germany #Flooding

  • Floods in Germany: Could loss of life have been prevented? | DW News

    9:23

    Four days after torrential rains triggered deadly floods in western Germany, survivors have now turned their focus toward the daunting task of rebuilding. But with emergency services still busy looking for bodies and securing vital infrastructure, many residents are left to seek help from volunteers – or go it alone. And many are wondering if authorities could have done more to warn communities about the coming deluge.


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  • German floods: More heavy rain expected as people return home | DW News

    6:12

    In western Germany, people are returning to towns and villages wrecked by devastating floods - which left more than 200 people dead across several western European countries. Now, weather forecasters have announced there's more rain to come, causing new worries for people still busy digging through the mud, and trying to come to terms with their losses.
    With cleanup efforts underway, the extent of the damage for businesses is becoming clear. Anger is swelling up about why multiple systems designed to warn people of the impending disaster all failed. With more heavy rains expected in the coming days, locals fear that this may not be the last of their sorrows, and that the waters may rise again.


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  • Germanys hidden cracks: A nation at a crossroads | DW Analysis

    16:00

    Germany may be known as Europe's powerhouse, as a tolerant society that has learned from its dark past. But beneath the surface, Germany also faces significant challenges related to inequality, racism and democracy. DW looks at these problems that cut through German society, one month before the country goes to the polls for a landmark vote.
    00:00 Introduction: How we have come to think of Germany
    00:49 Inequality: Germany's opportunity gap
    05:11 Diversity: Racism and identity in Germany
    10:24 Democracy: Germany's east-west divide


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  • The story of a German conman | DW Documentary

    25:56

    It was one of the biggest white-collar scams in German history. In the 1990s, Manfred Schmider and his company FlowTex took investors for more than two billion euros. Today, the conman himself can’t believe how easy it was to get away with a major fraud.

    For years, banks and leasing companies paid entrepreneur Manfred Schmider money for machines that didn’t even exist. The more than 3,000 tunnel-drilling machines that were allegedly in use on construction sites around the world existed for the most part only on paper. There were no limits to the imagination of Schmider's criminal mind. And everyone was blinded. Dubbed the Sheik of Karlsruhe, Schmider lived in the lap of luxury, showering his wife with 50-carat diamonds, collecting holiday villas and flying the ten kilometers to his workplace by helicopter.

    Could authorities have stopped his scheme earlier if they’d investigated accounts of his fraudulent practices when they were first reported? Manfred Schmider was convicted in 2000 and spent years behind bars. Today he lives on Mallorca.

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  • Flooding in Europe kills at least 150 with hundreds still missing | DW News

    11:03

    Record-breaking floods have killed at least 150 people in western Europe. Most of the deaths are in Germany's west - where the disaster area stretches between the towns of Heinsberg, Erftstadt and Ahrweiler, near the border with the Netherlands and Belgium. More than 130 people have been confirmed dead and more than a thousand are still missing. President Frank-Walter Steinmeier has promised support for victims' families, and to the damaged towns.
    In Belgium, at least 20 people have died in the flooding. The government has declared Tuesday a national day of mourning.
    The towns of Liège in Belgium and Venlo in the Netherlands have been hit hard. In Venlo 10,000 people were told to evacuate, as well as 200 patients from a hospital. In Liege, the swollen Meuse river has burst.


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  • German floods leave fears of public-health catastrophe in their wake | DW News

    9:22

    Authorities in western Germany are rushing to clear mountains of debris and restore vital services after devastating floods last week. Many areas were left without access to drinking water after the floodwaters damaged waste water treatment plants. And concerns are now mounting over an environmental and public health catastrophe as sewage flows into rivers. More rain is forecast, complicating the clean-up.
    Meanwhile, social media has played a key role in connecting people affected by the flooding with volunteers who want to offer support. DW reporter Tessa Walther visited one town where a group of Syrian refugees answered the call for help.


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  • Rich and poor – the inequality gap | DW Documentary

    42:31

    Christoph Gröner is one of the richest people in Germany. The son of two teachers, he has worked his way to the top. He believes that many children in Germany grow up without a fair chance and wants to step in. But can this really ease inequality?

    Christoph Gröner does everything he can to drum up donations and convince the wealthy auction guests to raise their bids. The more the luxury watch for sale fetches, the more money there will be to pay for a new football field, or some extra tutoring, at a children's home. Christoph Gröner is one of the richest people in Germany - his company is now worth one billion euros, he tells us. For seven months, he let our cameras follow him - into board meetings, onto construction sites, through his daily life, and in his charity work. He knows that someone like him is an absolute exception in Germany. His parents were both teachers, and he still worked his way to the top. He believes that many children in Germany grow up without a fair chance. What we see here is total failure across the board,” he says. It starts with parents who just don’t get it and can’t do anything right. And then there’s an education policy that has opened the gates wide to the chaos we are experiencing today. Chistoph Gröner wants to step in where state institutions have failed. But can that really ease inequality?

    In Germany, getting ahead depends more on where you come from than in most other industrialized countries, and social mobility is normally quite restricted. Those on top stay on top. The same goes for those at the bottom. A new study shows that Germany’s rich and poor both increasingly stay amongst themselves, without ever intermingling with other social strata. Even the middle class is buckling under the mounting pressure of an unsecure future. Land of Inequality searches for answers as to why. We talk to families, an underpaid nurse, as well as leading researchers and analysts such as economic Nobel Prize laureate Joseph Stiglitz, sociologist Jutta Allmendinger or the economist Raj Chetty, who conducted a Stanford investigation into how the middle class is now arming itself to improve their children’s outlooks.

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  • The Berlin Wall - how it worked | DW Documentary

    10:27

    The Berlin Wall stood from 1961 to 1989, dividing the city of Berlin. 30 years later, a trip back in time exploring the division of East and West Germany when Berlin was walled in.
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  • Does Germanys aging population impede real political change? | DW Analysis

    21:30

    Almost 60% of voters in the upcoming elections are older than 50 years.
    A quarter even over 60. Getting the so-called 'baby boomer' generation on board is essential to succeed Angela Merkel as German chancellor. Even the Greens know that. Young voters on the other hand are a minority in this election - even though the outcome of this vote will affect them the most. During the coronavirus pandemic the young showed solidarity with the old - staying at home, sacrificing education and many other parts of their social life. The big question is how far this solidarity will go in the other direction in this vital election especially when it comes to topics such as climate change.

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  • Corruption in South Africa | DW Documentary

    42:27

    A country falls into the hands of kleptocrats, a state is taken over. This happens again and again, all over the world. Including in South Africa, of all places, where the fight for democracy against a brutal apartheid regime was so hard-won.

    For years, a small group of investigative journalists in South Africa had been on the trail of a gigantic corruption scandal. When they discovered signs of far-reaching corruption involving Jacob Zuma, then president of South Africa, a pernicious disinformation campaign was mounted against the integrity of the journalists.

    Then one day in early 2017, the journalists unexpectedly received a hard drive containing thousands of photos, emails and videos - evidence that laid bare the way the South African state had been taken over by private individuals, with the help of politicians.

    The so-called Gupta Leaks not only proved that the journalists had been right in their suspicions, but showed that the situation was much worse than they thought. Since taking office as president, Jacob Zuma had systematically awarded lucrative government contracts to three brothers from India, the Guptas.

    Thanks to their good friend Zuma, members of the Gupta family were able to use the proceeds of an entire nation for their own gain, acquiring holdings in coal mines, media and IT companies, and even government positions.

    The plundering of the state had been shamelessly supported by a group of elite international advisors. As criticism from the media grew louder, the British PR firm Bell Pottinger was hired. The journalists were defamed as agents of white monopoly capital, and the Guptas stylized as victims of a racist press. But after the publication of the Gupta Leaks, the graft stopped. The Zuma clan and the Guptas lost their power.

    When a Judicial Commission of Inquiry is finally ordered, Zuma himself testifies. His defense: it's all lies and fake news. In interviews, investigative journalists express their concerns about the global drift toward an ever-increasing entanglement between business and government, and the polarization it causes. Presidents and multinationals live unassailably in their own bubble. As a journalist, all you can do is make life in the bubble a little less comfortable. Is there still room for justice in South Africa's hard-won fledgling democracy? What lessons can be learned for the rest of the world?

    #documentary #SouthAfrica #corruption #dwdocumentary
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  • Jewish in Europe | DW Documentary

    42:25

    What is life like for Jews in Europe today? What are their stories? How do they combine traditional and modern life? And how do they deal with marginalization and threats?

    There is an everyday Jewish life in Europe that rarely gets shown. Debates about politics, the Middle East and anti-Semitism overshadow the diversity of Jewish life. That's why it was important for us to be able to capture it, just by spontaneously going there and seeing what was happening. This was the mission statement that led Swiss writer Yves Kugelmann and German film producer Alice Brauner, both Jewish, on a journey across Europe.

    The first part of this two-part documentary takes Brauner and Kugelmann to Marseille, Strasbourg, Frankfurt and Berlin. They talk about life in the Jewish quarter with Harold Weill, Chief Rabbi of Strasbourg, and ask whether he and his community feel threatened. Alon Meyer, chairman of intercultural soccer club Makkabi Frankfurt and president of the Jewish sports organization Makkabi Germany, describes the hostility his team faces away from the field. In Berlin, Brauner and Kugelmann meet the writer and dramatist Sasha Marianna Salzmann.

    #documentary #Jewish #Europe

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  • German electoral polls see high fluctuation | DW News

    5:40

    On September 26, Germany holds a general election, which will also determine who takes over from Chancellor Angela Merkel, who is not standing for reelection after 16 years in office. Just months ago, almost everything pointed to a clear election victory for Merkel's Christian Democratic Union (CDU) and its Bavarian sister party the Christian Social Union (CSU) — which has been the case for the most past seven decades. Back then, in mathematical terms, things looked good for a coalition government of the conservatives with the Green Party for months. Together they were predicted to receive an impressive 57%. Then support for the CDU/CSU fell well below 30%, and they were temporarily overtaken by the Green Party in May's Deutschlandtrend poll by the Infratest dimap institute. Still, it seemed clear that either CDU chairman and candidate for the chancellorship, Armin Laschet, would succeed Merkel, or it would be the Green Party's candidate, Annalena Baerbock.

    Three months later, the winds have shifted considerably: in the latest Deutschlandtrend poll, the CDU/CSU and the Green party are only at a combined 46%. The Social Democrats (SPD), who have been the junior coalition partner of the CDU/CSU for many years, have long been predicted to get significantly less support than the 20% they earned at the previous general election in 2017. But now figures show that SPD chancellor candidate Olaf Scholz may hope to lead a government composed of his party, the Green Party, and the pro-free market Free Democrats (FDP). Only one percentage point separates his party from the Greens. If the SPD and Greens work together with the FDP, the trio could form a so-called traffic light coalition — named for the colors of the three parties: red, green, and yellow. If the SPD can sustain its support and the CDU/CSU does not lose any more ground, the two parties could also renew their previous coalition. Whether the two parties would still be able to find political common ground is an entirely different issue.

    If Germans could vote directly for their chancellor, Olaf Scholz would be in the lead. With 35%, the SPD candidate is far ahead of Armin Laschet (29%) following his recent blunders and Annalena Baerbock (16%), whose campaign has taken several blows. The lead is even clearer when it comes to the question of how satisfied voters are with the work of the trio: Scholz is the clear leader with 48%, Baerbock comes in at 27%, and Laschet lagging behind at 24%. The undisputed leader in this category remains Angela Merkel with 66% even at the end of her fourth term in office. The chancellor of 16 years still enjoys a high level of approval: 75% think the Christian Democrat leader has been a good chancellor. With the exception of the far-right populist Alternative for Germany (AfD), she maintains this high level of approval from supporters of all parties. Well over two-thirds of respondents find Angela Merkel to be competent, a strong leader, trustworthy and likable.

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  • Walled in: The inner German border | DW English

    10:40

    For 28 years, a nearly insurmountable barrier kept people from fleeing East Germany. But then, the dramatic night of November 9, 1989, saw the fall of the Wall that divided Germany. Today, it is difficult to imagine what was bitter reality just a few decades ago.

    For the first time, a realistic computer animation reveals the vast security system of Germany's inner border and the Berlin Wall, both of which were recreated virtually in the greatest detail.

    The animation is part of the DVD Walled in! What the Cold War frontier in divided Germany was really like which can be purchased at DW's online store

  • Visiting Gaza Strip as a Palestinian | DW Documentary

    26:01

    German-Palestinian Nidal wants to return from Berlin to his family in the Gaza Strip. But will Israel allow a Palestinian to pass through the country? And will the Palestinian Hamas government let him enter?

    This documentary follows Nidal Bulbul, a naturalized German citizen born in Gaza, on an exciting and emotional journey. He has not seen his parents or his ten siblings for over four years. A former reporter, he set up a successful café in the German capital. He’s made new friends, built a new life. But he always worries about his family back in his old home - a feeling that many who have found shelter from war or persecution in Europe know all to well. When everything points to a new escalation between Israel and Gaza, Nidal drops everything from one day to the next. He sells his café, gives his dog to friends and leaves for Gaza. But there are only two ways to get there: through Egypt or through Israel. Nidal wants to try the Israeli route, but it is unclear whether the Israeli authorities will accept his German passport and let him though the country to Gaza. And even if they do, will the radical Islamist Hamas government allow him in?

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  • When love knows no bounds | DW Documentary

    12:01

    Samah is a Syrian refugee, Klaus is a German pensioner. The two got married three years ago. But not everyone accepts their unusual relationship.

    Samah Al-Jundi says she felt like a teenager when she met Klaus Werner Pfaff. They looked each other in the eyes and fell in love. Divorced in their 50s, they were both ready for a new start. Klaus’ family had no objections to the relationship, but Samah’s Muslim family was outraged by the fact that she was marrying a Christian. She refused to give in. Today, she misses her family and country and does not feel completely at home in Germany. But Klaus is doing everything he can to help her adapt. What both say is most important is that they’ve found each other.

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  • Bosnia and Herzegovina: an ethnically divided country | DW Documentary

    26:04

    Ethnic divides still exist in some neighborhoods in Bosnia and Herzegovina. In a school in Travnik, a fence separates Muslim and Croat pupils.
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    Amela is a Muslim. She went to school in Travnik and grew up with this ethnic segregation. Bosnia’s constitutional court declared the two schools under one roof policy unconstitutional in 2012. But this policy is still practiced in everyday life, even though nobody calls it that anymore. It’s not just in schools that the distance between the ethnic groups is visible. The parents also foster ethnic segregation from their neighbors. It’s always been this way - Amela will of course marry a Muslim.

    The country is home to Bosnian Muslims, Bosnian Croats and Bosnian Serbs. They say they live together but on closer inspection they just live side by side. Very few would accept a spouse from a different ethnic group.
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  • A train ride to the Czech Republic | DW Documentary

    25:56

    A train journey through the Elbe Sandstone Mountains between Germany and the Czech Republic. Peculiar rock formations and the river Elbe shape this beautiful region. Since the mid 19th century, a railway line has been meandering through its valleys.

    In 2014, a new rail connection was completed: the National Park line connects the Czech Republic to Germany. It runs from Děčín to Rumburk via Bad-Schandau, Sebnitz, and Dolní Poustevna. The train conductors are all bilingual and happy to answer passengers’ questions about the area and its people. This film takes viewers from Dresden to Dìèín. It makes a detour on the National Park line through the rocky landscapes of Bohemian Switzerland. See the enchanted valleys that inspired romantic-era painters, and discover Edmundsklamm gorge on the German-Czech border, and its protected wildlife. The documentary also digs deep into the history of brown coal, which once brought the region industry and prosperity.
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  • The limits of learning – kids in crisis | DW Documentary

    12:27

    Surveys show that the majority of German students feel hopeless, listless and even depressed as a result of the long lockdown. Homeschooling is overwhelming for many of them, and some families are struggling to cope. We visited students at home.

    Every morning, 14-year-old Catharina sits down at the dining table and tries to study Latin, Math, or English. Her 10-year-old brother, Philipp, sits next to her. He also has to study — and likes using Catharina as a teaching assistant. How are either one supposed to concentrate? Their single mother can’t help, because she is a doctor and has to go to work. Anna has it a little bit easier. She is 16 years old and considers the time she has spent in lockdown to be the most productive of her life so far. She can finally concentrate, and work in peace. Leandro is 14 and can't understand this. He feels completely overwhelmed by the massive heap of tasks. What should he tackle first and how should he do it? He can't provide the structure and guidance he used to get every day in the classroom for himself, and often has trouble getting out of bed in the morning —an indication of early-onset depression. Axel Rowohlt visited Catharina, Philipp, Anna and Leandro, and also spoke to Felix, their student representative. He conducted a survey among students in Berlin — with alarming results.


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  • Can nature itself save us from the effects of climate change? | DW Documentary

    28:27

    Extreme weather is on the rise worldwide: heavy and severe rains, flash floods and landslides have also occurred in Germany. One study warns that seven times as many people will be threatened by flooding in the next 25 years.

    The wrong strategies have also led to dangerous floods. For years, cities and municipalities relied on ever higher and more stable dams. The consequences were dramatic, as the water would find a way. But now, Europe is rethinking its strategy. Let the water in is the new approach, pioneered by engineers in the Netherlands. In Dordrecht, rather than using increasingly massive dams in the event of flooding, the city makes space for water. Playgrounds, sports facilities and whole residential areas are built in a way that absorbs rising water levels, without the houses getting their feet wet. We have a system where nature helps and protects us from the consequences of climate change and rising sea levels, says Marcel Stive, professor of hydraulic engineering.

    The cathedral city of Cologne has also learned from previous floods. Along the Rhine River, alluvial meadows absorb water, while special pump systems and mobile flood barriers help protect the city.

    The floodplain valley near Lenzen in Brandenburg is also a success story. The old dike was cut through, restoring 420 hectares of floodplains. Nature is thriving there. Rare species such as the white-tailed eagle and the whooper swan have found a new home, says floodplain researcher Meike Kleinwächter, and that attracts tourists.

    The French town of Nevers realized years ago that a river should not be constricted. Fallow land, floodplain forests and marshlands have been established at the confluence of the Loire and Allier rivers. These measures render the river more predictable and less dangerous during floods.

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  • A German Christmas market in Dresden | DW Documentary

    12:01

    Conjuring up the perfect Christmas spirit is hard work for those working at Dresden's Striezelmarkt Christmas market. Then there are all the concerns about security.

    Fairy tale houses, bakeries, handicrafts, mulled wine and the Dresden fruitcake now known as Stollen, once called Striezel, from which the market gets its name - with more than 230 booths, it's easy to get into the Yuletide spirit. And that's what visitors do, despite tightened security since the terrorist attack in Berlin two years ago. Concrete bollards, barriers and large water containers are meant to provide security. There are more police patrolling the streets than in the past. It's a new normality, and many people still have to get used to it. A Report by Thomas Gill.
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  • German food banks under pressure | DW Documentary

    12:02

    The food bank in northwestern Essen has temporarily stopped taking on any new non-German customers. Those in need must increasingly rely on donations.

    The decision sparked outrage across the country: The food bank in northwestern Essen – also the German word for “food” - has temporarily stopped taking on new customers who aren't German. Many politicians, including Chancellor Merkel, have voiced criticism. The case reveals the enormous strain on food banks to spread dwindling contributions among the rising number of those in need. Our report follows helpers in Cologne who are determined not to be like their colleagues in Essen.
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  • Germanys refugee safe haven - transit camp Friedland | DW Documentary

    42:36

    Since 1945, Friedland refugee camp has marked the start of a new life for millions. The people who live there have abandoned their homes and risked everything to get to Europe. Find out more in TRANSIT CAMP FRIEDLAND.

    The future is uncertain for most refugees but daily life in Friedland gives them a sense of normality. Language courses, advice centers, day trips and schools offer the refugees everything they need to start over again. Muslims from around the world live alongside Jewish and Christian families - stories of friendship and love blossom.

    The refugee camp has a long history. It opened in 1945 to home German refugees and soldiers returning from war. How are the stories of escape, the feelings and experiences of those living there different half a century later?

    Watch Part 2 here:


    Learn more about the families who call Friedland home in our web special:

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