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Hot Fire Engine Test for the Artemis Moon Rocket

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  • Hot Fire Engine Test for the Artemis Moon Rocket

    2:20:46

    One step closer to Artemis missions to the Moon ????  We are targeting a two-hour test window that opens at 4 p.m. EST on Sat., Jan. 16 for the hot fire test of the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket core stage at our Stennis Space Center. The hot fire is the eighth and final test of the Green Run series, to ensure the core stage of the SLS is ready to launch #Artemis missions to the Moon. This will be the first time that all four RS-25 engines will be fired at once in order to simulate a launch, generating 1.6 million pounds of thrust. 

    Live coverage begins at 3:20 p.m. EST. Use the hashtag #AskNASA and your questions might be answered on air ????

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  • Hot-fire! NASA SLS megarocket engines ignited, shut down prematurely

    2:49

    NASA's Space Launch System rocket core stage engines were test-fired for a litt;e over a minute on Jan. 16, 2021. The test was expected to run 8 minutes. -- Full Story:

    Credit: NASA

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  • Major component failure ends SLS rocket core stage test-fire prematurely, NASA explains

    5:53

    NASA SLS program manager John Honeycutt talks about the NASA SLS rocket core stage hot-fire test that occurred on Jan. 16, 2020. A major component failure put an end to the test after about a minute. -- Full Story:


    Credit: NASA

  • NASA’s Most Powerful Rocket May Be One Step Closer to Launch

    4:20

    NASA decided to kick off the year by performing a test on the Space Launch System that's destined to put the first woman on the moon. But things didn’t go quite as expected.
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    Learn more about NASA’s 2024 Artemis Moon Landing Mission »

    NASA has been prepping its new SLS rocket, and working with partners to build a new crew capsule known as Orion. In addition to the capsule, SLS can also carry astronauts and cargo to the Moon in a single mission. But the rocket wasn’t just designed to get humans back to the Moon.

    In fact it’s the first deep space rocket developed for crewed missions by NASA since the famous Saturn V rocket, used for the Apollo Program. NASA defines the design of SLS as flexible and evolvable, which will allow for longer scientific robotics missions deeper into space.

    This is possible because of the multiple configurations of SLS that can achieve not only various payload capacities, but also maximum thrust. Making it adaptable for crewed and cargo missions to the Moon as well as other planets.

    #nasa #space #astronauts #moon #seeker #science #elements

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    NASA likely to redo hot-fire test of its Space Launch System core stage

    The agency found that the test, conducted at the Stennis Space Center in Mississippi, was automatically shut down by an out-of-limits reading of hydraulic pressure in the thrust vector control mechanism used to gimbal, or steer, the engines.

    NASA SLS computer development branching to support first flight, future upgrades

    The first SLS vehicle will be assembled at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida later this year, and a critical set of checkouts of the new rocket with its Orion spacecraft payload will be performed to verify that Artemis 1 is ready to launch.

    NASA decides to launch Europa Clipper on commercial rocket in 2024

    NASA has decided to launch the multibillion-dollar Europa Clipper mission on a commercial heavy-lift rocket in October 2024, and not on the government-owned Space Launch System, officials said Wednesday.

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  • NASA Artemis Moon Hot Fire Rocket Test!

    2:36

    Watch this hot fire test of NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket core at the agency’s Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Mississippi. An anomaly was discovered roughly T+1 minute into ignition of the four RS-25s resulting in a test abort, but NASA says valuable data was still obtained.

  • Engine Test for NASA Artemis Moon Rocket

    18:46

    Watch an RS-25 engine that will help power our Space Launch System rocket on future missions to the Moon and Mars come alive at NASA's Stennis Space Center.



    Today’s test fire will provide data to help enhance production of new, upgraded engines for flights under our Artemis Program.

    Be sure to follow @NASAArtemis on Twitter for regular mission updates:

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  • WATCH: NASA Artemis Moon Hot Fire Rocket Test - Livestream

    2:27:35

    Tune in at 1:20pm PT / 4:20pm ET on Sat. Jan. 16 for NASA's hot fire test of its Space Launch System (SLS) rocket core at the agency’s Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Mississippi.

  • FSB-1 Test Fire for SLS Artemis Moon Rocket

    11:26

    FULL STORY -

    The FSB-1 test—the last firing of an SRB before Artemis-1 flies late next year—served to evaluate motor performance and the manufacturing quality of new booster materials and processes.

    Credit: NASA

  • Jan. 16: Artemis I Hot Fire Test

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    NASA is targeting the final test in the Green Run series, the hot fire, for Sat., Jan.16. The hot fire is the culmination of the Green Run test series, an eight-part test campaign that gradually brings the core stage of the Space Launch System (SLS) — the deep space rocket that will power the Artemis program's human missions to the Moon — to life for the first time. All four of the stage’s RS-25 engines will be fired simultaneously for up to eight minutes to simulate the core stage’s performance during launch.

    The next time this core stage will be fired is during the launch of Artemis I, the first integrated flight of SLS and Orion, and the first mission of the agency’s Artemis program.

    For more information about the Artemis program, please visit

    Producer/Editor: Lacey Young
    Music: Universal Production Music

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  • Hot fire engine test of NASAs Artemis Moon rocket SLS

    3:48

    #SLS #NASA #SpaceLaunchSystem #Artemismission #Rocket

    NASA successfully completed hot fire engine test of its Artemis moon rocket SLS (Space Launch System).
    The Space Launch System (SLS) is an American Space Shuttle-derived super heavy-lift expendable launch vehicle, which has been under development by NASA in the United States since its announcement in 2011. It will be the primary launch vehicle of NASA's deep space exploration plans, including the planned crewed lunar flights of the Artemis program and a possible follow-on human mission to Mars.

    Video Source : @NASA

  • Hot Fire Engine Test for the Artemis Moon Rocket

    1:46:55

    NASA will attempt to fire the engines on its Space Launch System (SLS) megarocket for the first time today and you can watch the fiery action live online.

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  • NASA Tests Space Launch System Rocket Booster for Artemis Missions

    1:23

    NASA completed a full-scale booster test for NASA’s Space Launch System rocket in Promontory, Utah, on Sept. 2.

    The full-scale booster firing was conducted with new materials and processes that may be used for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket boosters. NASA and Northrop Grumman, the SLS boosters lead contractor, will use data from the test to evaluate the motor’s performance using potential new materials and processes for Artemis missions beyond the initial Moon landing in 2024.

    The SLS boosters are the largest, most powerful boosters ever built for flight. The two boosters on the rocket provide more than 75% of the thrust needed to launch NASA’s future deep space missions through NASA’s Artemis lunar program. Northrop Grumman is the lead contractor for the SLS boosters.

    For a little over two minutes — the same amount of time that the boosters power the SLS rocket during liftoff and flight for each Artemis mission — the five-segment flight support booster fired in the Utah desert, producing more than 3 million pounds of thrust.

    NASA and Northrop Grumman have previously completed three development motor tests and two qualification motor tests. Today’s test, called Flight Support Booster-1 (FSB-1), builds on prior tests with the introduction of propellant ingredients from new suppliers for boosters on SLS rockets to support flights after Artemis III.

    For more on NASA’s SLS, visit:

    Producer Credit: Sonnet Apple
    Music: Universal Production Music

  • WATCH NASA Hot Fire Test 4 MASSIVE RS-25 Rockets for Core Stage of Artemis Moon Missions

    2:32:13

    NASA is targeting a two-hour test window that opens at 4 p.m. EST Saturday, Jan. 16, for the hot fire test of NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket core stage at the agency’s Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Mississippi. Live coverage will begin at 3:20 p.m. on NASA Television and the agency’s website, followed by a post-test briefing approximately two hours after the test concludes.

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    Timestamps:
    Start - 00:00:00
    Static Fire Begins- 02:18:00

  • SLS Core Stage Hot Fire Test

    4:28

    NASA performed a hot fire test of the core stage of the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket at NASA’s Stennis Space Center, Mississippi, on 16 January 2021, at 22:27 UTC (16:27 CST, 17:27 EST). During the test, the last of the Green Run test series, the four Aerojet Rocketdyne RS-25 engines were fired to simulate the stage’s operation during launch, generating 1.6 million pounds of thrust.
    Credit: NASA/MSFC/Kevin Obrien/Aerojet Rocketdyne/Jude Guidry/Tyler Martin
    Music: Symphony No. 5 by Beethoven courtesy of YouTube Audio Library

  • Hot Fire Engine Test for the Artemis Moon Rocket || NASA || USA || TechIQ

    2:19:54

    Hot Fire Engine Test for the Artemis Moon Rocket || NASA || USA || TechIQ

    #1-ON-TRENDING

    One step closer to Artemis missions to the Moon ???? We are targeting a two-hour test window that opens at 4 p.m. EST on Sat., Jan. 16 for the hot fire test of the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket core stage at our Stennis Space Center. The hot fire is the eighth and final test of the Green Run series, to ensure the core stage of the SLS is ready to launch #Artemis missions to the Moon. This will be the first time that all four RS-25 engines will be fired at once in order to simulate a launch, generating 1.6 million pounds of thrust.

    Live coverage begins at 3:20 p.m. EST. Use the hashtag #AskNASA and your questions might be answered on air ????

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    #hotfireengine # nasa #test #NASA #1-ON-TRENDING #NASA #SPACE #ISS #TechIQ #WatchLive #NASAsSpaceX #earth #prelaunch #news #USA #unitedstates

  • NASA Artemis Moon Rocket Engine Test!

    18:46

    Check out the RS-25 engine that will help power our SLS rocket on missions to the Moon and Mars come alive at NASA's Stennis Space Center.

  • Hot Fire Engine Test for the Artemis Moon Rocket

    2:25:35

    One step closer to Artemis missions to the Moon ???? We are targeting a two-hour test window that opens at 5 p.m. EST on Sat., Jan. 16 for the hot fire test of the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket core stage at our Stennis Space Center. The hot fire is the eighth and final test of the Green Run series, to ensure the core stage of the SLS is ready to launch #Artemis​ missions to the Moon. This will be the first time that all four RS-25 engines will be fired at once in order to simulate a launch, generating 1.6 million pounds of thrust.

    Live coverage begins at 4:20 p.m. EST.
    Use the hashtag #AskNASA​ and your questions might be answered on air ????

  • Hot Fire Engine Test for the Artemis Moon Rocket

    2:20:46

    One step closer to Artemis missions to the Moon ???? We are targeting a two-hour test window that opens at 4 p.m. EST on Sat., Jan. 16 for the hot fire test of the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket core stage at our Stennis Space Center. The hot fire is the eighth and final test of the Green Run series, to ensure the core stage of the SLS is ready to launch #Artemis missions to the Moon. This will be the first time that all four RS-25 engines will be fired at once in order to simulate a launch, generating 1.6 million pounds of thrust.

    Credit: NASA

    #Artemis #SLS #NASA

  • Smoke and Fire! NASAs Space Launch System Rocket Booster Test

    27:26

    On Wed., Sept. 2., at 2:45 p.m. EDT, we will test the solid rocket boosters for our Space Launch System, the most powerful rocket ever built. This full-scale booster test will take place at the Northrop Grumman facilities in Promontory, Utah, and help engineers evaluate improvements and new materials in the boosters for deep space missions beyond #Artemis III.

  • SLS Core Stage Hot Fire Test Explained

    4:44

    NASA will perform a hot fire test of the core stage of the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket on 16 January 2021, at NASA’s Stennis Space Center, Mississippi. During the test, the four RS-25 engines will fire to simulate the stage’s operation during launch. Jeff Zotti, RS-25 program director at Aerojet Rocketdyne, explains the hot fire test, the last of the Green Run test series.
    Credit: NASA

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  • Fire 1:56:47NASAs SLS Rocket Static fire test | Hot fire engine test for the Artemis moon mission

    2:24:33

    Watch NASA and Boeing conduct a static fire or a hot fire test of the SLS (Space Launch System) Rocket that will eventually take humans to the moons with NASA's Artemis mission.

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    One step closer to Artemis missions to the Moon ???? We are targeting a two-hour test window that opens at 5 p.m. EST on Sat., Jan. 16 for the hot fire test of the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket core stage at our Stennis Space Center. The hot fire is the eighth and final test of the Green Run series, to ensure the core stage of the SLS is ready to launch #Artemis missions to the Moon. This will be the first time that all four RS-25 engines will be fired at once in order to simulate a launch, generating 1.6 million pounds of thrust.

    Live coverage begins at 4:20 p.m. EST.

    NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) program and Core Stage prime contractor Boeing are finally ready for the big moment of the rocket’s Green Run campaign and the biggest moment in the 10-year old program, a static firing of the stage. After a year of test cases at the Stennis Space Center in Mississippi, visits from hurricanes, and waves of the COVID-19 pandemic, an eight-minute long, flight-duration Hot-Fire test planned for January 16 hopes to demonstrate the readiness of the new rocket stage for its first launch.

    Four veteran Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME), now equipped with upgraded computers and adapted to meet SLS performance requirements, are supporting actors in this crucial test of the rookie stage. The Hot-Fire test is planned as a full flight duty cycle to demonstrate the real-world performance of the large, complicated rocket; the renamed Aerojet Rocketdyne RS-25 engines will be put through a set of circular and sinusoidal gimbaling experiments that will help demonstrate operating margins predicted by analytical models.

    The Space Launch System (SLS) is an American Space Shuttle-derived super heavy-lift expendable launch vehicle, which has been under development by NASA in the United States since its announcement in 2011. It will be the primary launch vehicle of NASA's deep space exploration plans including the planned crewed lunar flights of the Artemis program and a possible follow-on human mission to Mars.

    The SLS is a Space Shuttle-derived launch vehicle, with the first stage of the rocket being powered by one central core stage and two outboard boosters. The upper stage is being developed from the Block 1 variant to a Block 2 variant, the Exploration Upper Stage.

    Core stage
    The Space Launch System's core stage contains the Main Propulsion System (MPS) of the rocket. It is 65 metres (212 ft) long by 8.4 metres (27.6 ft) in diameter and fuels the four RS-25 rocket engines at its base. The core stage is structurally and visually similar to the Space Shuttle external tank,] containing the liquid hydrogen fuel and liquid oxygen oxidizer. Initial flights are planned to use modified RS-25D engines left over from the Space Shuttle program. However, Space Shuttle main engines are reusable, so later flights are planned to switch to a different version of the engine not designed for reuse, as it will be cheaper.

    Blocks 1 and 1B of the SLS are planned to use two five-segment Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBs). These new SRBs are derived from the four-segment Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Boosters, with the addition of a center booster segment, new avionics, and lighter insulation. The five-segment SRBs provide approximately 25% more total impulse than the Shuttle SRB, but will no longer be recovered after use.

    The Interim Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (ICPS) is planned to fly on Artemis 1. It is a stretched and human rated Delta IV 5 metres (16 ft) Delta Cryogenic Second Stage (DCSS) powered by a single RL10B-2. Block 1 is intended to be capable of lifting 95 tonnes to LEO in this configuration if the ICPS is considered part of the payload. Artemis 1 is to be launched into an initial 1,800 by −93 kilometres (1,118 by −58 mi) suborbital trajectory to ensure safe disposal of the core stage. ICPS will then perform an orbital insertion burn at apogee and a subsequent translunar injection burn to send Orion towards the moon. The ICPS for Artemis 1 was delivered by ULA to NASA about July 2017,and was housed at Kennedy Space Centre as of November 2018. As of February 2020, ICPS (not EUS) is planned for Artemis 1, 2, and 3. ICPS will now be human-rated for the crewed Artemis-2 flight.

    The Exploration Upper Stage (EUS) is planned to fly on Artemis 4. Similar to the S-IVB, the EUS will complete the SLS ascent phase and then re-ignite to send its payload to destinations beyond low-Earth orbit. It is expected to be used by Block 1B and Block 2, share the core stage diameter of 8.4 meters, and be powered by four RL10 engines.
    #NASA #SLS #Artemis

  • Hot Fire Engine Test for the NASA Artemis Moon Rocket

    3:10

    One step closer to #Artemis missions to the Moon ????
    Hot fire test of the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket core stage at #NASA 's #Stennis Space Center. The hot fire is the eighth and final test of the Green Run series, to ensure the core stage of the SLS is ready to launch #Artemis missions to the #Moon. This is the first time that all four RS-25 (Aerojet Rocketdyne) engines fired at once in order to simulate a launch, generating 1.6 million pounds of thrust.

  • Closing in On a Hot Fire Test for Artemis I on This Week @NASA – August 14, 2020

    2:07

    Closing in on a hot fire test for Artemis I, a tiny hitchhiker headed for a near-Earth destination, and a final rehearsal for OSIRIS-REx … a few of the stories to tell you about – This Week at NASA!

  • WATCH: NASA Artemis Booster Test - Livestream

    27:01

    Skip to 11:14

    NASA will broadcast a Space Launch System (SLS) rocket full-scale booster test at 11:30 PT / 2:30 p.m. ET on Wednesday, Sept. 2.

    #nasa #artemis

  • An Update on the Green Run Hot Fire Test for Artemis I on This Week @NASA – January 8, 2021

    3:53

    An update on the Green Run hot fire test for Artemis I, a commercial cargo spacecraft leaves the space station, and innovative ideas for exploring unexplored areas of the Moon … a few of the stories to tell you about – This Week at NASA!

    Download Link:

    Producer: Andre Valentine
    Editor: Sonnet Apple
    Music: Universal Production Music

  • NASA Runs Hot Fire Test

    3:31

    NASA launches its green run hot fire test for its Artemis moon rocket from the John C. Stennis Space Center in Mississippi.

  • Engine Test for NASA Artemis Moon Rocket

    18:46



    Watch an RS-25 engine that will help power our Space Launch System rocket on future missions to the Moon and Mars come alive at NASA's Stennis Space Center.

    January 28's test fire will provide data to help enhance production of new, upgraded engines for flights under our Artemis Program.

    Credit: NASA

  • Ready Hot Fire Engine Test SLS NASA rocket

    1:34

    Hot Fire Engine Test for the Artemis Moon Rocket SLS
    NASA will attempt to fire the engines on its Space Launch System (SLS) megarocket for the first time today.
    The upcoming hot-fire engine test, is the final step in the testing process. This will mark the first time that four RS-25 engines will fire at the same time.
    The SLS is NASA's next-generation heavy-lift rocket that will ferry astronauts to the moon as part of the agency’s Artemis lunar program.

  • SLS Green Run Hot Fire Test Aborted Early

    2:36:24

    NASA is set to hot fire the core stage of the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket from the Stennis Space Center in Mississippi. The test will be the first time that four RS-25 engines are ignited at once.

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  • NASA Stages Manager Discusses Space Launch System Green Run Hot Fire Testing

    2:56

    What does it take to test the largest rocket stage NASA has ever produced? As teams prepare for the upcoming hot fire test, Julie Bassler, manager of the Space Launch System Stages Office at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, discusses Green Run testing. In this video, Bassler speaks with NASA communications specialist Kristen Hill inside the Systems Integration Lab at Marshall about the software and avionics testing and other tests conducted at Marshall that made the Green Run test possible. Each of the eight tests in the SLS Green Run test series is designed to gradually bring the SLS core stage to life for the first time. The test campaign cumulates with a hot fire test with all four RS-25 engines firing simultaneously. The 212-foot-tall core stage was installed into the B-2 Test Stand at NASA’s Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, for Green Run testing on Jan. 22, 2020. Green Run testing is a combined effort for NASA and its industry partners, Boeing, the prime contractor for the core stage, and Aerojet Rocketdyne, the lead contractor for the RS-25 engines. Prior tests in the Green Run test series evaluated the stage’s avionics, propulsion, and hydraulic systems.

    Together with the four RS-25 engines and its twin solid rocket boosters, the SLS rocket produces 8.8 million pounds of thrust to send NASA’s Orion spacecraft, astronauts, and supplies beyond Earth’s orbit to the Moon. Offering more payload mass, volume capacity, and energy to speed missions through space, the SLS rocket -- along with NASA’s Gateway in lunar orbit, the human landing system, and Orion -- is part of NASA’s architecture for deep space exploration through the agency’s Artemis program. No other rocket is capable of carrying astronauts in Orion around the Moon in a single mission. For more information about SLS, visit

  • NASA hot fire test of moon rocket system ends abruptly

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    For more:


    NASA ignited the engines of its Space Launch System (SLS) rocket in a hot fire test on January 16. The move was the final step in the Green Run test series for the core stage of the rocket that will launch the agency's Artemis I mission. The rocket engines test ended abruptly after just over a minute, the U.S. space agency said on January 17.

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  • Hot Fire Engine Test for the Artemis Moon Rocket | International News Station

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  • Don’t Miss the Green Run Hot Fire of NASA’s Moon Rocket

    41

    The date is set. NASA and its partners, Boeing and Aerojet Rocketdyne, will conduct a “hot fire” of the core stage for NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket on Jan. 16 at the agency’s Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Mississippi. The hot fire test is the eighth and final test of the SLS Green Run test series. Together with the previously completed structural test campaign and RS-25 test series, Green Run testing verifies the core stage and the engines are ready for NASA’s Artemis missions to the Moon. NASA will broadcast the Green Run Hot Fire test live on NASA TV and the agency’s website. For more information about SLS and Green Run, visit

  • NASAs SLS Moon Rocket Fails Crucial Hot-fire Test!

    7:22

    The SLS rocket has been undergoing testing and development for a decade now, and a successful hot-fire would've meant that the road would've been paved for an Artemis moon landing in 2021, now there are questions being asked about NASA's ability to compete with companies like SpaceX, who offer much cheaper launch services. We also say goodbye to Jim Bridenstine as NASA administrator.

  • Hot Fire Engine Test for the Artemis Moon Rocket 2021 01 16 23 27 36 by NASA

    3:35

  • NASA to test fire SLS rocket core stage - Take an animated look

    2:49

    The Space Launch System rocket is scheduled to have a green run hot fire test on July 16, 2021. Take a look at the how the test works in this animated look.

    Credit: NASA

  • Livestream Replay - NASA - Hot Fire Test SLS Core Stage - Stennis Space Center - January 16, 2021

    1:40:31

    The hot fire is the eighth and final test of the Green Run series to ensure the SLS rocket's core stage is ready to launch Artemis missions to the Moon, beginning with Artemis I. The core stage includes the liquid hydrogen tank and liquid oxygen tank, four RS-25 engines, computers, electronics, and avionics that serve as the “brains” of the rocket. During the test, engineers will power up all the core stage systems, load more than 700,000 gallons of cryogenic, or supercold, propellant into the tanks, and fire all four engines at the same time to simulate the stage’s operation during launch, generating 1.6 million pounds of thrust.

    In a series of increasingly complex missions, Artemis I will test the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft as an integrated system ahead of crewed flights to the Moon. Under the Artemis program, NASA is working on landing the first woman and the next man on the Moon in 2024.

    For more information about the Green Run test series, visit:

  • #NASA LIVE - Hot Fire Engine Test for the Artemis Moon Rocket

    1:43:31

    #NASA

  • NASA Test Fires First SLS Moon Rocket

    11:17

    FULL STORY -

    The first Hot Test fire of the Artemis Core Stage was carried out on Test Stand B-2 at Stennis Space Center. This is part of the validation process for the Artemis Program returning humans to the moon and beyond.

    Credit: NASA

    #SLS #NASA #ARTEMIS

  • Hot Fire Engine Test for the Artemis Moon Rocket | International News Station

    1:18

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  • Hot Fire Engine Test for the Artemis Moon Rocket | International News Station

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  • How NASA Will Test Its SLS Rocket’s Core Stage

    2:49

    Before NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket launches NASA’s Artemis missions to the Moon, its massive core stage must pass Green Run testing at NASA’s Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Mississippi. This video explains how the core stage is brought to life to complete the test. The SLS rocket’s core stage is the world’s largest rocket stage, stretching 212 feet from end to end with two huge propellant tanks, four RS-25 engines, and miles of cabling and avionics systems. The SLS core stage Green Run test series is designed to verify the core stage is ready for the first and future Artemis missions. Each of the eight tests brings the stage to life for the first time, cumulating in an exciting “hot fire” as all four RS-25 engines fire simultaneously and all those systems operate together for the first time. NASA is targeting the SLS Green Run hot fire for Jan. 16 and will broadcast the test live on NASA TV. Testing the SLS rocket’s core stage is a combined effort for NASA and its industry partners, Boeing, the core stage lead contractor, and Aerojet Rocketdyne, the RS-25 engines lead contractor. For more information about SLS and Green Run, visit

  • Space Launch System Green Run Presentation

    1:2:43

    NASA is resuming work on a series of tests to bring the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket core stage to life for the first time, allowing engineers to evaluate the new complex stage that will launch the Artemis I lunar mission. Learn more about this exciting moment in space exploration history from Boeing SLS Engineer Tony Castilleja in this Oct. 2 presentation.

    About the speaker
    Tony Castilleja received his Bachelors of Science and Master’s in Mechanical Engineering and has worked at Boeing for more than a decade starting on the Space Shuttle Program in the Mission Evaluation Room at Mission Control, built Astronaut Trainers for the Boeing Starliner to International Space Station, and works on the Space Launch System, the NASA Rocket to the Moon and Mars.

    What is a Green Run?
    This Green Run is the step-by-step testing and analysis of the new SLS rocket core stage that will send astronauts to the Moon.

    In January, engineers began activating the stage’s components one by one over several months through a series of initial tests and functional checks designed to identify any issues. Those tests and checks collectively called Green Run will culminate in a test fire replicating the stage’s first flight.

    Green Run tests minimize risk to the core stage and ensure the stage satisfies design objectives and validates design models.

    How many tests are there?
    Modal Test: The first test in the Green Run series, a modal test was conducted in January. This test used shakers to impart dynamic forces on the suspended stage to identify primary bending modes of the stage. Information from the modal test will help engineers verify vehicle models needed for the operation of the rocket’s guidance, navigation and control systems.
    Avionics: The rocket’s avionics, which are distributed throughout the stage, will be turned on and checkout out. This includes not only flight computers and electronics that control the rocket but also those that collect flight data and monitor the overall health of the core stage.
    Fail-Safes: Engineers will check out all the safety systems that shut down operations during testing. To do this, they will simulate potential issues.
    Propulsion: This will be the first test of each of the main propulsion system components that connect to the engines. Command and control operations will be verified, and the core stage will be checked for leaks in fluid or gas.
    Thrust Vector Controls: Engineers will ensure that the thrust vector control system can move the four engines and check all the related hydraulic systems.
    Countdown: This test simulates the launch countdown, including step-by-step fueling procedures. Core stage avionics are powered on, and propellant loading and pressurization are simulated. The test team will exercise and validate the countdown timeline and sequence of events.
    “Wet” Dress Rehearsal: Engineers will demonstrate loading, controlling and draining more than 700,000 gallons of cryogenic propellants into the two test stand run tanks and then returning the stage to a safe condition.
    Hot Fire: The core stage's four RS-25 engines will operated for up to eight minutes, generating 1.6 million pounds of thrust, the amount of thrust the engines produce at sea level on the launch pad at liftoff.

    What happens after the tests?
    After the hot fire test, engineers will refurbish the core stage and configure it for its journey to Kennedy for launch preparations. The next time the RS-25 engines fire, the SLS will launch in an epic debut of Artemis I  ̶̶ the first in a series of increasingly complex missions that will enable human exploration to the Moon and Mars.

    Note: This event is included in general admission.

  • Hot Fire Engine Test for the Artemis Moon Rocket | International News Station

    1:49

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  • SLS RS-25 Engine Test, 28 January 2021

    9:38

    An Aerojet Rocketdyne RS-25 rocket engine was tested on the A-1 Test Stand at the John C. Stennis Space Center in Mississippi, on 28 January 2021, at 22:53 UTC (16:53 CDT, 17:53 EDT). The test was conducted using the RS-25 developmental engine No. 0528 and had a duration of 500 seconds (full-duration test). This RS-25 hot-fire test is part of the Retrofit-2 test series, aiming to evaluate new engine components and reduce risk in engine operation. NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) will be powered by four RS-25 engines firing simultaneously.
    Credit: NASA/Aerojet Rocketdyne
    #RS25

  • NASA performs hot fire test of SLS rocket core stage

    2:01

    (16 Jan 2021) NASA on Saturday ignited the engines of its Space Launch System (SLS) rocket in a hot fire test.
    The fiery show was the final step in the Green Run test series for the core stage of the rocket that will launch the agency's Artemis I mission.
    All four engines of the booster stage were ignited to simulate what would occur during the actual launch.
    Under the Artemis program, NASA is working to land the first woman and the next man on the Moon in 2024.

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  • Update on NASA’s SLS Green Run Test

    7:28

    John Honeycutt, SLS program manager from NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, provided an update regarding the hot fire test of the core stage of the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket performed at NASA’s Stennis Space Center, Mississippi, on 16 January 2021, at 22:27 UTC (16:27 CST, 17:27 EST).
    Credit: NASA

  • Watch NASA fire up SLS for the first time!

    3:8:00

    NASA will be putting their super heavy lift rocket, the SLS [Space Launch System], through the ultimate test. They will fill the tanks with LOx and LH2 and then light the four RS25 engines for a 8 minute full duration burn. It will not leave the pad, which means we will get 8 full minutes of awesome engine sounds.

    Want to learn more? We've got you covered:

    SLS vs Starship: Why does SLS Still Exist? -

    Will Starship and Commercial Landers Make Artemis Better Than Apollo? -

    00:00 - Intro
    03:00 - What to expect
    09:20 - Listening to the NASA stream
    13:30 - Q&A
    21:30 - Listening to NASA / Update
    27:00 - Q&A
    34:00 - Listening to NASA
    44:45 - Q&A
    01:25:00 - Listening to NASA
    01:29:15 - Q&A
    01:36:15 - Listening to NASA
    01:47:00 - T minus 10
    01:47:10 - IGNITION!!!
    01:48:14 - Shut down
    02:00:00 - Q&A

    --------------------------

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  • 3, 2, 1... Lift-Off of the Artemis 1 Mission to the Moon

    2:56

    Hear the countdown and see how NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS), the world’s most powerful rocket, will send the Orion spacecraft to the Moon on the Artemis 1 Mission. This video takes you through the pre-launch sequence at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida and through all the flight operations as SLS launches Orion and sends it on to lunar orbit.
    For more information:

  • NASA SLS Booster Test

    6:31

    NASA will broadcast a Space Launch System (SLS) rocket full-scale booster test at 2:45 p.m. EDT Wednesday, Sept. 2, on NASA Television and the agency’s website, followed by a media teleconference.

    The Flight Support Booster-1 test builds on three full-scale development test firings and two qualification test firings NASA and Northrop Grumman successfully completed with the five-segment solid rocket motor in preparation for the first three Artemis missions.

    The Sept. 2 test at Northrop Grumman facilities in Promontory, Utah, will help teams evaluate potential new materials, processes, and improvements for the boosters that will power deep space missions beyond Artemis III. The test also will provide another opportunity to evaluate motor manufacturing and performance.

    About an hour and 30 minutes after the test, media will have the opportunity to participate in a teleconference with:

    Bruce Tiller, manager of the SLS boosters office at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama
    Charlie Precourt, vice president of propulsion systems at Northrop Grumman, in Promontory
    To participate, media must contact Kathryn Hambleton at 202-358-1100 or kathryn.hambleton@nasa.gov no later than noon Tuesday, Sept. 1.

    During the broadcast, anyone can submit questions on Twitter using the hashtag #AskNASA. Updates on the test will be posted on the Artemis blog.

    Powered by four RS-25 engines and two boosters, the SLS rocket produces more than 8 million pounds of thrust to power missions to the Moon and, ultimately, Mars. The twin five-segment solid rocket boosters produce more than 75% of the rocket’s thrust during the first two minutes of ascent.

    This latest booster test will take place as teams at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida begin assembling the boosters for Artemis I, the first launch of SLS and NASA’s Orion spacecraft.

    The SLS rocket, Orion spacecraft, Gateway, and human landing system are part of NASA’s backbone for deep space exploration. The Artemis program is the next step in human space exploration and is part of America’s broader Moon to Mars exploration approach, in which astronauts will explore the Moon. Experience gained there will enable humanity’s next giant leap: sending humans to Mars.


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