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How Big Is The Universe?

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  • How the Universe is Way Bigger Than You Think

    10:28

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    The Universe is so enormous we can't really comprehend it all. I try my best to visualize it in this video. This video had without a doubt the most complicated math I've ever done in a video before. If I made errors or miscalculations please let me know in the comments or message me! I want to know. Sources are listed below...

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    Videos explaining things. Mostly over topics like history, geography, economics and science.

    We believe that the world is a wonderfully fascinating place, and you can find wonder anywhere you look. That is what our videos attempt to convey.

    Currently, we try our best to release one video every week. Bear with us :)

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  • Universe Size Comparison 3D

    5:08

    Planets in our Universe can get extremely large, but stars get even bigger. In this video we explore the sizes of moons, planets, stars, and even beyond, including black holes and even galaxies.
    Basically a comparison of the entire Universe.

    Support the channel on Patreon!


    All measurements represent diameter.

    Enjoy!

    Music:
    'Get Back Up' by Silent Partner

    Made with Blender 2.79

  • x
  • How Big Is The Universe?

    9:07

    Us humans are driven by the desire for knowledge. The ability to understand the workings and structure of our environment helped our species reach the highly developed point in our own history where we are today. Although humanity regularly produces new technological milestones, there are still almost countless realities that elude our knowledge almost entirely. While these mysteries of life on the one hand cause big question marks over the heads of experts, the fascination that emanates from these unsolved mysteries is equally undisputed. This topic becomes particularly exciting whenever we turn to a field that seems to exceed our tangible horizon. In the case of the universe, research is still in its infancy despite all the rockets sent into orbit and the successful moon landing in 1969. At present, we know only a tiny part of what is currently still hidden from our eyes in the infinite vastness of space. The question of how big the universe as a whole actually is is a mystery that mankind has been dealing with for countless centuries. With today's contribution we would like to present the current state of research on this topic. We will show you the current state of astronomical knowledge of our species and will also talk about why the answer to the question of the size of the universe is so difficult to come by.

    Subscribe for more! ►

    Credit: NASA, ESA, ESO, SpaceX, Wikipedia, Shutterstock, ...

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  • How Big is the Universe?

    4:17

    It has NO EDGE. And NO CENTER... or does it?

    The Scale of the Universe -

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    Minute Physics provides an energetic and entertaining view of old and new problems in physics -- all in a minute!

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    Thanks to Nima Doroud for contributions. Created by Henry Reich

  • x
  • How Large is the Universe?

    25:04

    For 4K space, and more great History and Science than you'll ever watch, check out our sister network...

    The universe has long captivated us with its immense scales of distance and time. How far does it stretch? Where does it end, and what lies beyond its star fields and streams of galaxies extending as far as telescopes can see?

    These questions are beginning to yield to a series of extraordinary new lines of investigation and technologies that are letting us to peer into the most distant realms of the cosmos. But also at the behavior of matter and energy on the smallest of scales. Remarkably, our growing understanding of this kingdom of the ultra-tiny, inside the nuclei of atoms, permits us to glimpse the largest vistas of space and time. In ancient times, most observers saw the stars as a sphere surrounding the earth, often the home of deities. The Greeks were the first to see celestial events as phenomena, subject to human investigation rather than the fickle whims of the Gods.

    One sky-watcher, for example, suggested that meteors are made of materials found on Earth... and might have even come from the Earth. Those early astronomers built the foundations of modern science. But they would be shocked to see the discoveries made by their counterparts today. The stars and planets that once harbored the gods are now seen as infinitesimal parts of a vast scaffolding of matter and energy extending far out into space.

    Just how far began to emerge in the 1920s. Working at the huge new 100-inch Hooker Telescope on California's Mt. Wilson, astronomer Edwin Hubble, along with his assistant named Milt Humason, analyzed the light of fuzzy patches of sky... known then as nebulae.

    They showed that these were actually distant galaxies far beyond our own. Hubble and Humason discovered that most of them are moving away from us. The farther out they looked, the faster they were receding. This fact, now known as Hubble's law, suggests that there must have been a time when the matter in all these galaxies was together in one place.

    That time, when our universe sprung forth, has come to be called the Big Bang. How large the cosmos has gotten since then depends on how long its been growing and its expansion rate. Recent precision measurements gathered by the Hubble space telescope and other instruments have brought a consensus...

    That the universe dates back 13.7 billion years. Its radius, then, is the distance a beam of light would have traveled in that time ... 13.7 billion light years. That works out to about 1.3 quadrillion kilometers. In fact, it's even bigger.... Much bigger. How it got so large, so fast, was until recently a deep mystery.

    That the universe could expand had been predicted back in 1917 by Albert Einstein, except that Einstein himself didn't believe it until he saw Hubble and Humason's evidence. Einstein's general theory of relativity suggested that galaxies could be moving apart because space itself is expanding.

    So when a photon gets blasted out from a distant star, it moves through a cosmic landscape that is getting larger and larger, increasing the distance it must travel to reach us. In 1995, the orbiting telescope named for Edwin Hubble began to take the measure of the universe... by looking for the most distant galaxies it could see.

    Taking the expansion of the universe into account, the space telescope found galaxies that are now almost 46 billion light years away from us in each direction... and almost 92 billion light years from each other. And that would be the whole universe... according to a straightforward model of the big bang. But remarkably, that might be a mere speck within the universe as a whole, according to a dramatic new theory that describes the origins of the cosmos.

    ABOUT US
    Here at SpaceRip, we value the exploration of the unknown. We surpass boundaries for the sake of uncovering the mysteries of the cosmos and what they may tell us about our origin and our future. With our videos, we hope to educate our viewers on how we fit into the universe, and more so how we can do our part to better it.

  • How Big Is the Universe?

    4:23

    We all know that the universe is mind-bogglingly gigantic, but how *exactly* mind-bogglingly gigantic is it? Let Hank fill you in on the details that scientists have worked out!

    Why Shouldn't You Look at the Sun?:

    Is the Universe Expanding?:


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  • How Big is the Universe?

    8:26

    It's very hard to imagine just how big the universe is. I tried to make comparisons and animations that can put things into perspective.



    This is my first video, but I will keep posting roughly every two weeks. If you like my content, let me know by subscribing!


    Credits:
    Images from NASA (spacetelescope.org) - each image is labelled with direct credits in video
    Wikipedia images, credited in video

  • How Big is the Universe? REMASTERED - AlwaysAsking.com

    37:10

    How big is the universe? While it is generally known that the universe is very big, the latest science reveals that its true size defies all comprehension.

    In this episode we tackle the question of how big the universe is, whether or not it is infinite, and what the consequence are for us all if it is.

    If the universe is big enough, it guarantees the existence of aliens, mirror Earths, and even copies of you living in the distant past and far future.

    Beginning: 00:00
    Episode start: 00:25
    Historic views: 00:50
    Copernican view: 2:24
    Other star systems: 3:13
    Many galaxies: 5:40
    The modern view: 7:35
    Ancient radiation: 8:48
    Where the bang happened: 10:18
    Size of the bang: 11:47
    Cosmic inflation: 14:32
    Eternal inflation: 19:01
    String theory landscape: 21:21
    Mathematical universe: 25:13
    How big reality is: 28:05
    Consequences of infinite space: 31:00
    We're not alone: 31:40
    You have doppelgängers: 32:43
    You've lived before: 34:33
    Does god exist? 35:24
    Credits: 36:12

    Other formats:
    Podcast:
    Article:
    eBook:

  • From Earth to Multiverse

    6:12

    Star Size Comparison - The Scale of the Universe And the Multiverse.

    The Multi-Universe Cosmos

    Source: Star Size Comparison 2 -
    Channel: morn1415 ©

    Credit: 1:05

    Music: Vangelis - Alpha


    Reupload

    * * *

    Star Size Comparison 3 ( Vortex V1 ):

    * * *

  • x
  • How Large is the Universe? Bigger than you can Imagine?

    19:12

    How big is the universe? Why even ask or attempt to answer that question? We’re all living our lives in our own little bubble, so why even think about something so abstract? I believe that we should explore and get a better understanding of the universe because it’s about self-discovery. Learning more about the universe tells us more about ourselves because in essence, it is us, we are the universe, we are not separate from it – we are literally it! As Alan Watts said, “we are an aperture through which the universe is exploring itself.”

    My intent with this video is to show you, visually, just how large the universe is… and to also touch on what we can learn from that. Stick with me, because however big you think the universe is… it’s bigger.. much, much bigger.

    Let's take a journey from the Earth and moon, to the solar system, to the Oort cloud, the Milky Way Galaxy, the Virgo Supercluster, Laniakea Supercluster, and finally the observable universe and beyond!

    Intro: (0:00)
    Earth: (1:04)
    Earth and Moon: (1:33)
    Planets and Solar System: (2:28)
    The Theoretical Oort Cloud: (5:13)
    Our Closest Neighboring Star - Proxima Centauri - 4.2 LY away: (6:53)
    Interstellar Neighborhood - 50 LY: (8:06)
    Radiosphere - 160 LY: (8:42)
    The Milky Way - 120,000 LY: (9:20)
    Our Nearest Galaxy - 2.5 Million LY: (13:18)
    Virgo Supercluster 110M LY ~ 20,000 Galaxies: (13:34)
    Laniakea Supercluster ~100,000 Galaxies: (13:44)
    Billions of Galaxies: (13:56)
    Quasars: (14:02)
    Cosmic Background Radiation and Entire Observable Universe - 93 Billion LY: (14:10)
    Beyond The Observable Universe: (14:33)

    Credit:

    ESO/L. Calçada/M.
    Music: The Golden Present by Jesse Gallagher

  • Universe Size Comparison 2020

    13:52

    From the smallest measurable distance to the potentially infinite Universe, in this video we take a look at the size of... pretty much everything. Enjoy!

    Thanks to Savfk for his incredible original score:
    Check out more of Savfk's music:

    Support the channel on Patreon!

    Join the community Discord!


    Thanks to Rowan Steyn 3D for his planet generators:


    Made in blender 2.82

  • How the Universe is WAY Bigger Than You Think Reaction

    12:06

    How the Universe is WAY Bigger Than You Think! Leave a Like if you enjoyed! Watch the ocean is way deeper than you think Subscribe to join the Squad and enable notifications

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  • VFX Artist Reveals the True Scale of the Universe

    6:35

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    Do the planets really fit between Earth and the Moon?

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  • How Big Is The Universe Really? ????

    8:37

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    ???? How Big Is The Universe Really? ????

    ???? Earth is 384,400 kilometers away from the Moon, which is the closest we can get from our world. If you were to connect with someone back home, it would take only two and a half seconds to fly between you and them. Voyager 1 Space Probe, the most distant man-made entity from Earth, is 138 times farther away from us than the Sun. 12 people have already set foot on Earth, marking the farthest distant that any person person has ever been from Earth. This is what the World would be like if you were out there with them.

    Voyager 1 is now flying at 17 kilometers per second, but even at that speed, it's not going to break out of the grasp of our solar system for another 30,000 years. Proxima Centauri star is 4.24 light-years away from us, and it would take 70,00 years to reach it if it were going in the right direction. Milky Way galaxy stretches more than 100,000 light years from the end to the end, but you've never seen the full glory of the galaxy at night.

    The visible world is only a tiny slice of what we can see from the entire universe right now. It's entirely possible that the rest of the world beyond is vastly bigger and more amazing than we would even imagine. Certain areas of space, far from Earth, are expanding further from us faster than the speed of light. This means that the light from these locations will never hit Earth after an endless period of time. There will always be an unknown number of places in the world that we will never know or see. We're all too incredibly little but you shouldn't worry, because all that means is that there's too much left for us to learn together.

    Thanks and Enjoy :)

  • How Big is The Universe?

    10:47

    How big is the universe? Yes, there are stars, galaxies, and planets that we can sometimes see from Earth but to truly grasp how big the universe truly is can be difficult. Thanks to the Hubble deep space telescope, we have been able to capture space images that give us a better understand of exactly how big the universe is!

    Thanks for watching Factnomenal!
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  • How big is the Universe?

    9:40

    How big is the universe?

  • The Observable Universe

    3:27

    -This video illustrates the scaled size of our universe from quarks to the entirety of the observable universe. Each circle used in the video represents a scale factor of 10; meaning each larger circle is zoomed out 10x more than its predecessor.

    ( i.e. after 1 circle you are now looking at 10x larger horizon, after 2 circles 100x, 3 would be 1000x, and so forth. This also applies to the speed, ignoring relativistic effects, at which the observer (you) would be traveling.)

    *EDIT: Please note that the zoom out from 2:26 - 2:34 is a simplistic model of the *hypothetical* mutliverse intended to aid conceptualization of the idea, but is currently not definitively known to science and is most certainly NOT part of the observable universe. I left some comments explaining why I kept it in the video for those who still aren't satisfied with this explanation. Thanks and enjoy!

    ***IMPORTANT INFORMATION UPDATE***:

    In October of 2016, NASA has conducted another deep field survey with Hubble and found that the already unfathomably large observable universe actually has.... about 10x more galaxies than we originally thought, putting the new estimated total at around 2 trillion. That means that there are more galaxies in our viewable universe than there are stars in our own galaxy, by a large margin. And remember, this is all just the parts of the universe we can see. Much of it is obscured behind a cosmic horizon where the light cannot reach us. Truly astounding.

    Source:

  • The Largest Star in the Universe – Size Comparison

    11:59

    We created our first app ‘Universe in a Nutshell’, together with Tim Urban of Wait but Why!
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  • How Big is the Universe? - AlwaysAsking.com

    36:38

    How big is the universe? While it is generally known that the universe is very big, the latest science reveals that its true size defies all comprehension.

    In this episode we tackle the question of how big the universe is, whether or not it is infinite, and what the consequence are for us all if it is.

    If the universe is big enough, it guarantees the existence of aliens, mirror Earths, and even copies of you living in the distant past and far future.

    Beginning: 00:00
    Episode start: 00:25
    Historic views: 00:50
    Copernican view: 2:24
    Other star systems: 3:13
    Many galaxies: 5:40
    The modern view: 7:35
    Ancient radiation: 8:48
    Where the bang happened: 10:18
    Size of the bang: 11:47
    Cosmic inflation: 14:32
    Eternal inflation: 19:01
    String theory landscape: 21:21
    Mathematical universe: 25:13
    How big reality is: 28:05
    Consequences of infinite space: 31:00
    We're not alone: 31:40
    You have doppelgängers: 32:43
    You've lived before: 34:33
    Does god exist? 35:24
    Credits: 36:12

    Other formats:
    Podcast:
    Article:
    eBook:

  • How Large is the Universe? 4k

    25:02

    The universe has long captivated us with its immense scales of distance and time. How far does it stretch? Where does it end, and what lies beyond its star fields and streams of galaxies extending as far as telescopes can see?

    These questions are beginning to yield to a series of extraordinary new lines of investigation and technologies that are letting us to peer into the most distant realms of the cosmos. But also at the behavior of matter and energy on the smallest of scales. Remarkably, our growing understanding of this kingdom of the ultra-tiny, inside the nuclei of atoms, permits us to glimpse the largest vistas of space and time. In ancient times, most observers saw the stars as a sphere surrounding the earth, often the home of deities. The Greeks were the first to see celestial events as phenomena, subject to human investigation rather than the fickle whims of the Gods.

    One sky-watcher, for example, suggested that meteors are made of materials found on Earth... and might have even come from the Earth. Those early astronomers built the foundations of modern science. But they would be shocked to see the discoveries made by their counterparts today. The stars and planets that once harbored the gods are now seen as infinitesimal parts of a vast scaffolding of matter and energy extending far out into space.

    Just how far began to emerge in the 1920s. Working at the huge new 100-inch Hooker Telescope on California's Mt. Wilson, astronomer Edwin Hubble, along with his assistant named Milt Humason, analyzed the light of fuzzy patches of sky... known then as nebulae.

    They showed that these were actually distant galaxies far beyond our own. Hubble and Humason discovered that most of them are moving away from us. The farther out they looked, the faster they were receding. This fact, now known as Hubble's law, suggests that there must have been a time when the matter in all these galaxies was together in one place.

    That time, when our universe sprung forth, has come to be called the Big Bang. How large the cosmos has gotten since then depends on how long its been growing and its expansion rate. Recent precision measurements gathered by the Hubble space telescope and other instruments have brought a consensus...

    That the universe dates back 13.7 billion years. Its radius, then, is the distance a beam of light would have traveled in that time ... 13.7 billion light years. That works out to about 1.3 quadrillion kilometers. In fact, it's even bigger.... Much bigger. How it got so large, so fast, was until recently a deep mystery.

    That the universe could expand had been predicted back in 1917 by Albert Einstein, except that Einstein himself didn't believe it until he saw Hubble and Humason's evidence. Einstein's general theory of relativity suggested that galaxies could be moving apart because space itself is expanding.

    So when a photon gets blasted out from a distant star, it moves through a cosmic landscape that is getting larger and larger, increasing the distance it must travel to reach us. In 1995, the orbiting telescope named for Edwin Hubble began to take the measure of the universe... by looking for the most distant galaxies it could see.

    Taking the expansion of the universe into account, the space telescope found galaxies that are now almost 46 billion light years away from us in each direction... and almost 92 billion light years from each other. And that would be the whole universe... according to a straightforward model of the big bang. But remarkably, that might be a mere speck within the universe as a whole, according to a dramatic new theory that describes the origins of the cosmos.

    ABOUT US
    Here at SpaceRip, we value the exploration of the unknown. We surpass boundaries for the sake of uncovering the mysteries of the cosmos and what they may tell us about our origin and our future. With our videos, we hope to educate our viewers on how we fit into the universe, and more so how we can do our part to better it.

  • x
  • How big is the universe ... compared with a grain of sand?

    6:44

    How big is the universe ... compared with a grain of sand? 'You'll never get your head around how big the universe is,' warns astronomer Pete Edwards of the University of Durham in this film about measuring astronomical distances. 'There are as many stars in the universe as there are grains of sand on the Earth.' So how far is a light year? And supposing our galaxy were the size of a grain of sand, how big would the universe be?

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  • Spaced Out: Crash Course Kids #25.1

    5:10

    So... how big is the Universe? It's big... really big... no, bigger than that... it's big. In this episode of Crash Course Kids, Sabrina gives us some perspective on this whole Universe thing and how we fit into it.

    Watch More Crash Course Kids:

    ///Standards Used in This Video///
    5-ESS2-1. Develop a model using an example to describe ways the geosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, and/or atmosphere interact. [Clarification Statement: Examples could include the influence of the ocean on ecosystems, landform shape, and climate; the influence of the atmosphere on landforms and ecosystems through weather and climate; and the influence of mountain ranges on winds and clouds in the atmosphere. The geosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere are each a system.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment is limited to the interactions of two systems at a time.]

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    Credits...
    Producer & Editor: Nicholas Jenkins
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  • Cosmic Eye

    3:00

    This is the original landscape-format version of the short movie Cosmic Eye, designed by astrophysicist Danail Obreschkow. The movie zooms through all well-known scales of the universe from minuscule elementary particles out to the gigantic cosmic web. In doing so, it shows the ultimate size comparison in our universe. The video drew inspiration from a progression of increasingly accurate graphical representations of the scales of the universe, including the classical essay Cosmic View by Kees Boeke (1957), the short movie Cosmic Zoom by Eva Szasz (1968), and the legendary movie Powers of Ten by Charles and Ray Eames (1977). Cosmic Eye takes these earlier representations to the state-of-the-art by displaying real photographs obtained with modern detectors, telescopes, and microscopes. Other views are renderings of modern computer models. Smart vector-based blending techniques are used to create a seamless zoom.

    This 2018-version of Cosmic Eye contains improved graphics and minor technical corrections compared to the 2011-version in portrait format.

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    Donations are vital to develop, update and translate Cosmic Eye. Thank you for any support.

    All rights were obtained for third-party images and image-data:
    + Millennium Dark Matter simulation (V. Springel & Virgo Consortium)
    + 3D galaxy and star positions in the local universe (from
    + Synthetic rendering of the Milky Way (adopted from N. Rising)
    + Galaxy M51 (HST, NASA)
    + Oort cloud rendering (adopted from a BBC illustration)
    + Planet images (from NASA Voyager 2)
    + Satellite images by 2012 Google Maps, Europa Technologies, MapLink/Tele Atlas
    + Retina photography (C. Allison)
    + Electron microscopy of a leukocyte (J. Ehrman)
    + Microscopy of red blood cells (internet photos.net)
    + Synthetic DNA model (adopted from

    Music:
    Enter the Maze by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (
    Source:
    Artist:

  • How Big Is The Universe?

    3:20

    We all know that the universe is big. It's very big...but just how large is it? Join Anthony as he discusses some pretty astounding new theories about the universe, and how we're extremely close to finding out almost exactly how big it is.

    Read More:
    A 1-percent measure of galaxies half the universe away

    Researchers from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) today announced that they have measured the distance to galaxies more than six billion light years away to an unprecedented accuracy of just one percent.

    Universe Measured to One-Percent Accuracy: Most Precise Calibration Yet of Cosmic 'Standard Ruler'

    The Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) Collaboration announced that BOSS has measured the scale of the universe to an accuracy of one percent.

    THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY QUASAR CATALOG. V. SEVENTH DATA RELEASE

    We present the fifth edition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Catalog, which is based upon the SDSS Seventh Data Release.

    The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Baryon Acoustic Oscillations in the Data Release 10 and 11 galaxy samples

    We present a one per cent measurement of the cosmic distance scale from the detections of the baryon acoustic oscillations in the clustering of galaxies from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), which is part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III).

    Scale of Universe Measured with 1-Percent Accuracy

    An ultraprecise new galaxy map is shedding light on the properties of dark energy, the mysterious force thought to be responsible for the universe's accelerating expansion.

    Flat universe

    In a flat universe, all of the local curvature and local geometry is flat.

    The Geometry of the Universe

    The most profound insight of General Relativity was the conclusion that the effect of gravitation could be reduced to a statement about the geometry of spacetime.

    The Universe: Now Measured To 1 Percent Accuracy

    One-percent accuracy in the scale of the universe is the most precise such measurement ever made, says BOSS's principal investigator, David Schlegel, a member of the Physics Division of the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab).

    Universe measured to 1% accuracy

    This staggeringly precise survey - across six billion light-years - is key to mapping the cosmos and determining the nature of dark energy.

    Clocking an Accelerating Universe: First Results from BOSS

    Some six billion light years distant, almost halfway from now back to the big bang, the universe was undergoing an elemental change.

    BOSS Quasars Unveil a New Era in the Expansion History of the Universe

    Berkeley Lab scientists and their Sloan Digital Sky Survey colleagues use quasars to probe dark energy over 10 billion years in the past.

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    Are Parallel Universes Real?

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  • If the universe is only 14 billion years old, how can it be 92 billion light years wide?

    9:46

    The size and age of the universe seem to not agree with one another. Astronomers have determined that the universe is nearly 14 billion years old and yet its diameter is 92 billion light years across. How can both of those numbers possibly be true? In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln tells you how.

    For further information, see

  • How Big is The Universe? Universe Size Comparison 2021

    13:29

    Often times we visualize space without actually stopping to think about how big it really is. If you've ever wondered, How big is the universe? The answer is probably much larger than you could have imagined. In this video I hope I can show you that we on Earth are incredibly small when you zoom out in the slightest. Join us as we explore the sheer size of The Cosmos!

    If you thought the video was interesting or you learned something new, please hit that like button! Likes on videos help so much in the YouTube algorithm for ranking, and I'd love to be able to reach more people with my videos. If you're interested in watching more videos like this, feel free to subscribe and help me grow my community! It's small now, but we plan on growing :)

    Audio - A huge thanks to savfk and SergePavkinMusic for their royalty free audio! Here are the links to the soundtracks I used:
    - The Travelling Symphony by Savfk
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    - Universe by SergePavkinMusic

    Please check these guys out! They've got tons of amazing, high quality music and I'd highly recommend them to anybody that needs royalty free audio or soundtracks!

    Disclaimer:

    I do NOT own the majority of the visuals used in this video. Any visuals not made directly from myself came from royalty free photo/video sites such as Pexels, Pixabay, and Videvo. If you believe one or more of the images may be yours and violates fair use policy, please email me at austindd01@gmail.com. Thank you.

  • your mind will collapse if you try to imagine this | UNIVERSE SIZE COMPARISON

    4:58

    special video to my 3000 subs, welcome to this travel for the universe and thanks for watch this video

    next awesome video COMPARISON OF THE DISTANCES IN THE UNIVERSE:



    DATA:

    1 LIGHT YEAR = 9 460 730 472 580.8 km

    NEBULA: A nebula is a giant cloud of dust and gas in space. Some nebulae (more than one nebula) come from the gas and dust thrown out by the explosion of a dying star, such as a supernova. Other nebulae are regions where new stars are beginning to form

    GALAXY: A galaxy is a huge collection of gas, dust, and billions of stars and their solar systems, all held together by gravity.

    UNIVERSE: he Universe is all of space and time and their contents, including planets, stars, galaxies, and all other forms of matter and energy.




    PLUTO: Pluto was discovered by Clyde Tombaugh in 1930 as the ninth planet from the Sun. After 1992, its status as a planet was questioned following the discovery of several objects of similar size in the Kuiper belt. In 2005, Eris, a dwarf planet in the scattered disc which is 27% more massive than Pluto, was discovered. This led the International Astronomical Union (IAU) to define the term planet formally in 2006, during their 26th General Assembly. That definition excluded Pluto and reclassified it as a dwarf planet.

    MOON:The Moon is an astronomical body that orbits Earth as its only natural satellite. It is the fifth-largest satellite in the Solar System, and the largest among planetary satellites relative to the size of the planet that it orbits (its primary). The Moon is, after Jupiter's satellite Io, the second-densest satellite in the Solar System among those whose densities are known.

    MERCURY: Mercury is the smallest and innermost planet in the Solar System. Its orbit around the Sun takes only 87.97 days, the shortest of all the planets in the Solar System. It is named after the Roman deity Mercury, the messenger of the gods.

    MARS: Mars is the fourth planet from the Sun and the second-smallest planet in the Solar System after Mercury. In English, Mars carries a name of the Roman god of war and is often referred to as the 'Red Planet'. The latter refers to the effect of the iron oxide prevalent on Mars' surface, which gives it a reddish appearance distinctive among the astronomical bodies visible to the naked eye. Mars is a terrestrial planet with a thin atmosphere, having surface features reminiscent both of the impact craters of the Moon and the valleys, deserts, and polar ice caps of Earth.

    VENUS: Venus is the second planet from the Sun. It is named after the Roman goddess of love and beauty. As the second-brightest natural object in the night sky after the Moon, Venus can cast shadows and, rarely, is visible to the naked eye in broad daylight. Venus lies within Earth's orbit, and so never appears to venture far from the Sun, setting in the west just after dusk and rising in the east a bit before dawn. Venus orbits the Sun every 224.7 Earth days. With a rotation period of 243 Earth days, it takes longer to rotate about its axis than any planet in the Solar System and rotates in the opposite direction to all but Uranus (meaning the Sun rises in the west and sets in the east). Venus does not have any natural satellites, a distinction it shares only with Mercury among planets in the Solar System.

    EARTH:
    Earth is the third planet from the Sun and the only astronomical object known to harbor life.

    KEPPLER 22 B: also known by its Kepler object of interest designation KOI-087.01, is an extrasolar planet orbiting within the habitable zone of the Sun-like star Kepler-22. It is located about 587 light-years (180 pc) from Earth in the constellation of Cygnus. It was discovered by NASA's Kepler Space Telescope in December 2011 and was the first known transiting planet to orbit within the habitable zone of a Sun-like star. Kepler-22 is too dim to be seen with the naked eye.

    NEPTUNE: Neptune is the eighth and farthest known planet from the Sun in the Solar System. In the Solar System, it is the fourth-largest planet by diameter, the third-most-massive planet, and the densest giant planet. Neptune is 17 times the mass of Earth, slightly more massive than its near-twin Uranus. Neptune is denser and physically smaller than Uranus because its greater mass causes more gravitational compression of its atmosphere. Neptune orbits the Sun once every 164.8 years at an average distance of 30.1 au (4.5 billion km; 2.8 billion mi). It is named after the Roman god of the sea and has the astronomical symbol ♆, a stylised version of the god Neptune's trident.




    I DO NOT HAVE SPACE FOR MORE DATA :(






    ¡Happy new year 2020!

  • The Universe is Big: Brian Schmidt at TEDxSydney

    16:16

    Nobel laureate Brian Schmidt takes us on a 15-minute tour of the Universe, explaining the thinking that led him and his colleagues to identify a hitherto unknown force: 'dark energy' that, incredibly, makes up some 70% of the Universe.

    TEDxSydney 2012 took place on Saturday 26 May 2012 at Carriageworks. Tens of thousands of people enjoyed the day: 800 in the theatre, over 1,000 via big screen simulcast in The Forum, many thousands online via YouTube and ABC Big Ideas ... and up to 80,000 tuning in to ABC Radio National.

    About TEDx, x = independently organised event

    In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organised events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organised events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organised TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organised.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations.)

  • NASA - How Big is Our Universe?| Space Science Documentary

    23:44

    The universe is a big, big place. But how big? And how do we know?
    Throughout history, humans have used a variety of techniques and methods to help them answer the questions 'How far?' and 'How big?' Generations of explorers have looked deeper and deeper into the vast expanse of the universe. And the journey continues today, as new methods are used, and new discoveries are made.

  • Big Universe. Bigger God.

    7:25

    Take a journey from Earth to the edge of the observable universe—in seven unforgettable minutes. Spectacular computer animation will transport you 45 billion light years to discover glimpses of God’s creative power and divine attributes as revealed through the wonders of the cosmos he once spoke into existence. See more at

  • How Big is the Universe?

    2:36

    How big is the universe? How big is space? No, it’s much bigger than that.

    The sun is a million times bigger than earth.

    Imagine for a minute that the Sun was the size of this basketball. Earth would be about the size of this nail head.

    And how far do you think it would be. This far?…maybe this far?

    Nope and nope. This nail head would be 100 feet away.

    Now…here’s the big question, how far away would the nearest star be?

    That answer is going to shock you!

    Do you think it would be a thousand feet away, a mile, 10 miles maybe?

    Nope, nope and nope.

    I am currently located near New York City in the United States. To see the nearest star to our basketball sun, I would need to travel to Russia.

    Let that sink in for a minute.

    Now, here is the really shocking part. There are 200 billion such starts in our own Milky Way Galaxy.

    …And each one of these stars are as far from each other as our sun is from its nearest star.

    And what’s in between. Pretty much just empty space.

    And here is something even more mind-boggling than that – the Milky Way galaxy is one of just 2 Trillion such galaxies in the Universe.

    Let that sink in for a second.

    The vastness of space, and its emptiness is mind boggling. But it’s the truth. Can you handle it?

  • Universe Size Comparison

    7:29

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    Lightening Fast Facts!

    Episode : 04

    Music ⓒ - Kevin MacLeod

    Theme Mix - Thusith Niroshana (Centigradz)


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    Editor
    Madhawa Vimukthi Gunasekara

  • The Cosmic Scale

    33:12

    How large is the universe? Where does it begin and end? And how does it expand? These are some of the biggest questions of astronomy. And while humanity is so small that we may never be able to fully understand the true scale of the universe, advancements in technology are helping us to look ever-deeper into the wilds of our existence- towards the edge of our observable universe, known as the Cosmic Horizon. Today, we will analyse the universe, its laws, and its awe-inspiring scale.

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    MUSIC:
    Special thanks to Lombus, who allowed me to use his song Doppler Shores in the title screen:
    - Source:
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    The following songs by Chris Zabriskie are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 licence.
    - The Theatrical Poster...:
    - Unfoldment, Revealment...
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    - Oxygen Garden:
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    Other songs are from the YouTube Audio Library:
    - Landing | Godmode
    - Tundras | Amulets
    - Dolphin-esque | Godmode
    - Space Chatter | Doug Maxwell
    - Traversing | Godmode
    - At The Precipice of a Dying Light | Dan Bodan

    FOOTAGE:
    The space scenes in this video were captured using SpaceEngine Pro, a virtual universe simulator:

    Get SpaceEngine on Steam:

    Stock footage provided by Videezy.com

    VIDEO CLIPS:
    - NASA Redshift Animations:
    - Dark Energy Expansion:
    - Zooming into the Ultra Deep Field:
    - Virtual Clips of Hubble Repair:
    - Final Servicing Mission:
    - Observable Universe Growing ESA:
    - ESO Type 1a supernova
    - Redshift Expansion [Creative Commons]:
    - Expanding Universe Animation [Hubble ESA]:

    IMAGES:
    - Observable Universe Logarithmic Illustration:
    - Hubble Images:
    - Observable Universe Graphic: By Andrew Z. Colvin - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0,
    - Accelerated Expansion Diagram: By Design Alex Mittelmann, Coldcreation, CC BY-SA 3.0,
    - Ursa Major:
    - Night Sky Image:

    SOURCES OF INFORMATION:
    - Number of Stars in the Universe:
    - Einstein and Achievements:
    - Edwin Hubble's 1929 Discovery:
    - The Hubble Deep Field Images:
    - How Much of the Unobservable Universe will we See Someday:
    - Some interesting notes on the sphere expanding model:
    - Type 1a Supernovae:
    - Frieman et al., Dark Energy & the Accelerating Universe:
    - Size of the Unobservable Universe [Oxford Physicists]:

    TIMESTAMPS:
    0:00 Introduction
    2:23 Defining the Universe
    6:51 The Big Bang
    9:12 The Observable Universe
    10:53 The Hubble Telescope
    11:46 The Hubble Deep Field
    16:49 Cosmic Expansion
    19:40 Redshift
    21:48 The Cosmic Horizon and the Unobservable Universe
    25:36 Accelerating Expansion
    28:29 Dark Energy
    30:14 The End of the Universe

  • Zoom out from earth

    5:13

    How big the universe is

  • The Real Size of the Universe

    12:01

    How to Learn More About the Universe. In case you want to take an amazing journey through the Universe from the smallest to the largest objects, this video is a perfect opportunity for you to find out more about the world in a fun and not boring way. You’ll discover the Universe from tiny little Neutrino to the end of its observable part. Let’s see where us humans fit in into this system and how large we are compared to other human beings and objects.

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  • How Big is the Universe Compared to a Human!!!

    5:35

    From the smallest thing (Well, not exactly a 'thing' but a scale) in Universe (Planck Length) to the observable universe this size comparison of the universe will show you just how big our universe is. This animation somewhat compares the size of a human to that of the universe.

    The observable universe is a spherical region of the Universe comprising all matter that may be observed from Earth at the present time because light and other signals from these objects have had time to reach Earth since the beginning of the cosmological expansion. There are at least two trillion galaxies in the observable universe, containing more stars than all the grains of sand on planet Earth. Assuming the universe is isotropic, the distance to the edge of the observable universe is roughly the same in every direction. That is, the observable universe is a spherical volume (a ball) centered on the observer. Every location in the Universe has its own observable universe, which may or may not overlap with the one centered on Earth.

    Sources:
    Hubble Reveals Observable Universe Contains 10 Times More Galaxies Than Previously Thought

  • How Large is the Universe Documentary - Space Science

    00

    If you've ever dreamed of time traveling, just look out at the night sky; the glimmers you see are really snapshots of the distant past. That's because those stars, planets and galaxies are so far away that the light from even the closest ones can take tens of thousands of years to reach Earth.

    The universe is undoubtedly a big place. But just how big is it?

    That may be something that we actually never know, Sarah Gallagher, an astrophysicist at Western University in Ontario, Canada, told Live Science. The size of the universe is one of the fundamental questions of astrophysics. It also might be impossible to answer. But that doesn't stop scientists from trying.

  • Physics Student REACTS : How the Universe Is Way Bigger Than You Think

    26:25

    Link to the original video:


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  • Zooming Out From Earth to the Edge of the Observable Universe

    11:28

    We all know that the universe is big. But how big it is? Much bigger than you think. Let's start out by looking at the Earth, and then zoom out to progressively larger and larger structures, so that we can see just how big it is. Then let's get into our spaceship and blast off to the edge of the observable universe, so that we can see for ourselves!

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  • The Terrifying Way Our Universe Will End — And When

    3:43

    Our universe is racing toward its destruction as we speak. The end is not going to be especially pleasant, but when that end will happen is still a point of contention amongst cosmologists.

    Tech Insider tells you all you need to know about tech: gadgets, how-to's, gaming, science, digital culture, and more.
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  • Whats At The End Of The Universe?

    3:39

    The Big Bang Theory says the universe is expanding. But, what's at the very end of our universe?
    Watch more: What Would A Parallel Universe Even Be Like? ►►

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    We are LIFE NOGGIN! An animated and educational web show designed to teach you all about your awesome life and the brain that makes you able to live it! We answer questions about everything from inside the human body to deep outer space. Stay tuned for more videos on every Monday and Thursday! Keep On Thinking.

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  • Michio Kaku: The Universe in a Nutshell | Big Think

    42:14

    Michio Kaku: The Universe in a Nutshell
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    OVERVIEW:

    In a profoundly informative and deeply optimistic discussion, Professor Michio Kaku delivers a glimpse of where science will take us in the next hundred years, as warp drives, teleportation, inter-dimensional wormholes, and even time travel converge with our scientific understanding of physical reality. While firing up our imaginations about the future, he also presents a succinct history of physics to the present.
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    MICHIO KAKU:

    Dr. Michio Kaku is the co-founder of string field theory, and is one of the most widely recognized scientists in the world today. He has written 4 New York Times Best Sellers, is the science correspondent for CBS This Morning and has hosted numerous science specials for BBC-TV, the Discovery/Science Channel. His radio show broadcasts to 100 radio stations every week. Dr. Kaku holds the Henry Semat Chair and Professorship in theoretical physics at the City College of New York (CUNY), where he has taught for over 25 years. He has also been a visiting professor at the Institute for Advanced Study as well as New York University (NYU).
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    TRANSCRIPT:

    My name is Professor Michio Kaku. I’m a professor of theoretical physics at the City University of New York and I specialize in something called string theory. I’m a physicist.
    Some people ask me the question, “What has physics done for me lately? I mean, do I get better color television, do I get better internet reception with physics?” And the answer is yes. You see, physics is at the very foundation of matter and energy. We physicists invented the laser beam, we invented the transistor. We helped to create the first computer. We helped to construct the internet. We wrote the World Wide Web. In addition, we also helped to invent television, radio, radar, microwaves, not to mention MRI scans, PET scans, x-rays. In other words, almost everything you see in your living room, almost everything you see in a modern hospital, at some point or other, can be traced to a physicist.

    Now, I got interested in physics when I was a child. When I was a child of eight, something happened to me that changed my life and I wanted to be part of this grand search for a theory of everything. When I was eight, a great scientist had just died. I still remember my elementary school teacher coming into the...

    To read the full transcript and for more info, please visit
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  • Size of the universe | Smallest to the Largest

    6:00

    A short video on the scale of the universe.

    From the Planck scale to the cosmic scale, the size comparison of the universe will show you just how large our universe is
    From cells to stars in this video we explore the size of the universe from right down at the subatomic level to the intergalactic scale. The universe is big, its vast and complicated, and ridiculous.

    The sheer scale of the cosmos is hard to imagine. Watch this video to be a part of the journey from smallest to the biggest in the universe, right from space-time fabric to multiverse!

    Astronomy and space-time question this video answers:
    How large is the universe?
    What is the smallest thing in the universe?
    Zoom out from smallest to the biggest.
    How big is the galaxy?
    How big is the Milky way?
    How Big is the Universe?

    Universe size - universe size comparison - 2020.
    Universe Size Comparison 3D Planets in our Universe can get extremely large, but stars get even bigger
    How the Universe is Way Bigger Than You Think.
    Universe size comparison Zoom out.
    Universe Size Comparison Zoom Out & zoom In on YouTube

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  • How The Universe Is Way Bigger Than You Think

    11:32

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  • The Universe Is Way Bigger Than You Think REACTION

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  • HOW BIG IS THE UNIVERSE - THE UNIVERSE DOCUMENTARY HD 1080P

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  • The True Size Of The Universe As We Know It

    3:31

    Every time you get upset about something small, just remember this.

    Check out more awesome BuzzFeedBlue videos!


    MUSIC
    Robotix
    Licensed via Warner Chappell Production Music Inc.

    STILLS
    Pleiades (Seven Sisters) in the Taurus Constellation
    ronniechua / Thinkstock.com

    Pleiades Star Cluster
    Astrobobo / Thinkstock.com

    Milky Way Bar
    Stocktrek Images / Thinkstock

    Andromeda Galaxy
    Astrobobo / Thinkstock.com

    Blue Moon
    somchaisom / Thinkstock.com

    ISS006-E-40544 / NASA.gov


    Moon / NASA.gov


    Neptune / NASA.gov


    Uranus / NASA.gov


    Saturn / NASA.gov


    Jupiter / NASA.gov


    Mars / NASA.gov


    Venus / NASA.gov


    Mercury Globe / NASA.gov


    Mercury as Never Seen Before / NASA.gov


    THE BLUE MARBLE / NASA.gov


    North America satellite orthographic / Wikimedia Commons


    Earthrise / NASA.gov


    TWINKLE, TWINKLE LITTLE EARTH / NASA.gov


    VIDEO
    NASA | Fiery Looping Rain on the Sun / NASA Goddard


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  • How Big is the Universe?

    6:23

    Explains how astronomers have learnt to measure the distance to the stars. How many stars are in the observable universe and is it possible to comprehend the size of it all?

    For more information and the full suite of resources, visit

  • How big is the Universe -⭐️- A Beautiful Mind HD

    2:40

    ⭐️8/10 - Love is the greatest power in the universe

    A Beautiful Mind (2001)


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  • How The Universe Is Way Bigger Than You Think

    14:40

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