This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn more

How coronavirus is changing the world | DW Documentary

x
  • How coronavirus is changing the world | DW Documentary

    46:50

    How are democracies and authoritarian states reacting to the coronavirus pandemic? An investigative team is looking for clues worldwide and interviewing virologists, health experts and citizens. Where is the fight against COVID-19 working and where isn’t it?

    Nine months after the new coronavirus first appeared, the documentary The Pandemic Spreads finds some initial answers to these questions. The film takes the viewer on a journey around the world: We dive into seven different countries and analyze their ways of handling the virus. We return to the putative beginnings of the pandemic in Wuhan in China. We see how Taiwan reacted to the virus earlier and more decisively than almost any other country in the world, as Europe and North America were still lulling themselves into a false sense of security. In retrospect, it is clear that the Western democracies saw the coronavirus as a local Chinese problem for far too long. Yet research from France and other European countries suggest it was probably already among us here in Europe at the end of 2019. Our viral world tour also takes us to the outsiders of the pandemic: Sweden, for example. At first the Swedes' special approach was still seen as daring, but months later it seems to have gone disastrously wrong.The biggest health and economic crisis in recent history has underlined recent global political developments: as the world power USA sinks into corona chaos, its rival China seems to have hit its stride. Will Beijing’s authoritarian regime come out on top of the crisis through its aggressive and consistent approach to the virus? The Pandemic Spreads shows how COVID-19 is changing our world for good.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------

    DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

    Subscribe to:
    DW Documentary:
    DW Documental (Spanish):
    DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

    For more visit:

    Instagram:

    Facebook:


    DW netiquette policy:

  • x
  • Coronas consequences – how the pandemic is changing globalization | DW Documentary

    42:27

    Around the world, pandemic-related lockdowns have hit our globalized economy hard. Supply chains have been disrupted, industries crippled. The coronavirus has laid bare the risks of global interconnectedness. Is the crisis the beginning of the end of globalization?

    In early 2020, when much Asian production and manufacturing was shut down, the effects were quickly felt in supply chains. The flow of raw materials and other products that drives global trade dried up. Hamburg port operator HHLA reported losses of up to 40 percent, with supply shortfalls bringing production at German factories to a temporary halt. Coronavirus-related lockdowns in Europe led to garment workers in Bangladesh losing their livelihoods. This documentary shows how such global dependencies function during a pandemic. Is it time to bring back local production, to ensure populations are provided for even in times of crisis?

    This film shows that many are thinking hard about the issue. Companies are diversifying their supply chains, or stepping up digitalization efforts. In Germany, public funds are being used to encourage home-grown production of protective equipment in order to secure supplies in the future. But for the majority of German companies such measures would make production drastically more expensive. Globalization is in many ways the cause of exploitation and social injustice, yet if developing countries were to lose huge orders without compensation, the result would likely be dire. Many more people will die from hunger than from the pandemic, fears globalization expert Ian Goldin of Oxford University. But could the coronavirus crisis also bring positive changes, like a fairer division of labor, more conscientious consumption, less pollution, and more social responsibility?

    ـــــ
    DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch top documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

    Subscribe to:
    DW Documentary:
    DW Documental (Spanish):
    DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

    For more visit:

    Instagram:

    Facebook:


    We kindly ask viewers to read and stick to the DW netiquette policy on our channel:

  • x
  • Coronavirus complications | DW Documentary

    28:25

    A growing number of people who recover from COVID-19 are experiencing long-term health problems. This includes younger patients without pre-existing conditions who had only mild symptoms with the virus. How are doctors and patients responding?

    The COVID-19 disease is triggered by the SARS-CoV-2 virus, and can affect multiple organs. The symptoms of the initial illness are now well known. But what about the long-term effects of coronavirus? Not everyone who gets COVID-19 makes a full recovery afterwards. A growing number of people are experiencing reduced physical and abilities and cognitive symptoms. One such patient is 31-year old junior doctor Maria. Five months after falling sick, she is still unable to work normally.

    In October, Germany’s University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein launched the largest study to date on the long-term effects of coronavirus. Teams of doctors specialized in various fields of medicine are planning to examine several thousand former COVID-19 patients who have officially recovered from the virus. They’re looking in particular at the lungs, heart, kidneys and liver, as well as the nervous system and metabolism. Christopher Bley from Berlin would welcome the opportunity to be included in a study like that. The 35-year-old feels he isn’t getting the support he needs from doctors. Ever since the father of two contracted the virus, he has been battling shortness of breath. For a long time, he hoped he would heal naturally, but the problem persists.
    Writer Nina Marewski from Frankfurt feels similarly let down by doctors. She says they either ignore her or don’t take her seriously. She has been writing about her experience with coronavirus online, and is giving a voice to other post-COVID long haulers. This documentary accompanies three people who are struggling with the aftereffects of the virus. What do the health problems mean for them and how do they deal with the uncertainty about whether they will ever make a full recovery?

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch top documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

    Subscribe to:
    DW Documentary:

    DW Documental (Spanish):
    DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

    For more visit:

    Instagram:

    Facebook:


    We kindly ask viewers to read and stick to the DW netiquette policy on our channel:

  • Does a vaccine spell the end of the coronavirus pandemic? | DW Documentary

    28:23

    A vaccine against COVID-19 is considered the only realistic hope of overcoming the virus. Several vaccines have now been approved. But does that mean an end to the pandemic and a return to normal life are in sight?

    A heated debate has broken out over whether we have enough vaccine and who will get it first: those who need it most urgently - or those who pay most? Many countries have long since reached lucrative deals with pharmaceutical companies to secure exclusive rights to millions of vaccine doses. Poorer states that cannot compete in the bidding are at risk of going empty-handed. If this is not prevented, global health apartheid will become more entrenched, driving inequality to new heights. And the pandemic will still be with us, warns Indian economist Jayati Ghosh.

    The documentary takes us to some of the most important locations and centers of vaccine development and distribution – in Germany, the United States, Britain and India. Pharmaceutical developers worldwide have allowed the film team exclusive access to their research laboratories, where operations are normally kept strictly secret.

    As we look at the countdown to vaccine development, we find a huge project at a crossroads: Will it prove possible not only to develop an effective vaccine against the new coronavirus but also to distribute it to the entire global population? Or will national egoisms ultimately torpedo the collective global effort?


    ------------------------------------------------------------------

    DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch top documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

    Subscribe to:
    DW Documentary:
    DW Documental (Spanish):
    DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

    For more visit:

    Instagram:

    Facebook:


    We kindly ask viewers to read and stick to the DW netiquette policy on our channel:

  • x
  • Can viruses be beneficial? | DW Documentary

    42:26

    Viruses can be fatal, but some viruses can in fact be life-sustaining. The SARS-CoV-2 virus has killed large numbers of people during the current pandemic. But humans wouldn’t exist without viruses. How can they benefit us?

    Viruses aren’t living beings, yet they have had a great influence on evolution. Some viral elements have embedded themselves into the human genome and reproduce along with us - so-called endogenous retroviruses. One type of virus helps form the placenta, for example, while other viruses attack harmful bacteria.

    Viruses also maintain balance in marine ecosystems, curbing the growth of algae and attacking bacteria that are harmful to sea animals. Soon, viruses may even replace antibiotics in fish farming.

    Thousands of viruses have already been sequenced, including Ebola, Zika and bird flu. Ebola is one of the deadliest viruses in the world, with a mortality rate of up to 90%. But experts see greater danger in the less deadly diseases like Spanish flu and COVID-19: Because they spread much further, they kill more people overall.

    Viruses can also be used to create vaccines. In Rome, the shell of a virus found in gorilla feces has been used as a vector for the COVID-19 vaccine, turning a pathogen into a life-saving drug.
    __

    DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch top documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

    Subscribe to:
    DW Documentary:
    DW Documental (Spanish):
    DW Documentary (Arabic):

    For more visit:

    Instagram:

    Facebook:


    We kindly ask viewers to read and stick to the DW netiquette policy on our channel:

  • The pandemic and young people – their hopes, dreams and fears | DW Documentary

    28:27

    They are raring to go. At their age, they can’t wait to fulfill their goals - whether that’s finishing high school, attending university or pursuing an apprenticeship. Instead, many young people are facing frustration full on.

    Karl, for instance, had already packed his bags. The 17-year-old from northeastern Germany was looking forward to spending a year abroad at a high school in Canada. But just a few days before his departure, the trip was canceled due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Now instead of making new friends and going skiing in the Rocky Mountains, he’s doing his lessons from home. He’s trying to make the best out of a bad situation by studying hard to get good grades and motivating himself to exercise, all while hoping that both school and the soccer pitch reopen soon.

    Meanwhile in Leipzig, a medical student named Friederike is in her fourth semester. In her first year at university, she was able to explore the eastern German city, throw parties with her flatmates and study together with other students. Then came the pandemic. Now she is living by herself in a small apartment on the outskirts of the city and spends most of her time at the computer. The young woman always knew pursuing medicine would mean many long and hard hours studying. But she never could have imagined that her life would be an endless cycle of only studying, eating and sleeping for months on end. No trips to the cinema or bars or to visit her boyfriend in Bavaria. Her savior is her dog, Freya, whom she got from an animal shelter. Taking care of Freya means Friederike must go outside several times a day. It’s also how she first met and connected with some fellow dog owners.

    And then there is Alena. The 19-year-old and her fellow trainees work at Bokel-Mühle Hotel, a family business nearby Hamburg. She had long dreamed of doing such an apprenticeship in the hotel and catering industry, but the pandemic derailed all her plans. Suddenly, everything came to a standstill. No more guest bookings meant no more exciting work. Alena loves interacting with people, but now she is making beds that no one sleeps in and sets tables where no one eats.

    The film follows Alena, Karl and Friederike as they go about their daily lives. It tells of their hopes, dreams and fears - and shows what keeps them going despite the challenges.

    #documentary #youngpeople #pandemic

    ـــــ
    DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch top documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

    Subscribe to:
    DW Documentary:
    DW Documental (Spanish):
    DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

    For more visit:

    Instagram:

    Facebook:


    We kindly ask viewers to read and stick to the DW netiquette policy on our channel:

  • x
  • Cash or card – will COVID-19 kill cash? | DW Documentary

    28:27

    More and more people are paying with cards or apps these days. Could COVID-19 spell the end of cash? Many people have switched to contactless payment because of fears that the coronavirus might be transmitted by bills and coins. They even use debit cards for small sums at the bakery or newsagent’s. Electronic payment systems are on the rise.

    Germany is torn. Up to now, Germans have been known for their love of cash. The country has been famously reluctant to embrace payment by card or app. But since the beginning of the coronavirus crisis more and more people have switched to paying electronically. For many months, it was unclear whether the virus could spread on paper currency and coins. It’s now believed that the risk of COVID-19 transmission on money is low. But the pandemic has amped up the trend toward cash-free payments in Germany. According to a survey by the Association of German Banks, almost 60 percent of people in Germany now pay by debit or credit card, or with smartphone apps. Marion Labouré, a strategist at Deutsche Bank and Harvard lecturer, has carried out research in this field. She says South Korea and China have even put bank notes into quarantine and destroyed bills. ‘The US Central Bank is another example,’ she adds. ‘Cash is definitely being used by fewer and fewer people. Last December, one third of Germans paid with cards or apps, now it’s about 50 percent.’

    Credit card companies, which charge fees to retailers, are profiting from this development. But data protection advocates warn that information is gathered, stored and often passed on with each electronic transaction. Sarah Spiekermann, a professor at the University of Economics and Business in Vienna, has warned of the serious consequences of this kind of surveillance capitalism: ‘Ordinary people, people who are quite similar to one another, will find themselves paying different prices for flights and hotel bookings, for instance, or they might be refused insurance or be passed over for job offers.’

    ------------------------------------------------------------------

    DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

    Subscribe to:
    DW Documentary:

    DW Documental (Spanish):
    DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

    For more visit:

    Instagram:

    Facebook:


    DW netiquette policy:

  • Coronavirus in Spain | DW Documentary

    28:26

    Spain is one of the countries worst hit by the coronavirus. Catastrophic conditions in hospitals, eerily deserted inner cities and days with up to 1,000 COVID-19 deaths.

    In record time, the epidemic has swept away everything that the Spanish cherish so dearly: close contact with the extended family, greetings with kisses and hugs, the bustle of outdoor life - on the street, in parks, cafés and restaurants. Reporter Natalia Bachmayer has travelled through a shattered country, meeting people like David, who cannot get over the lonely death of his grandmother. Or Aura, a migrant who came to Spain full of dreams and now stands in line for food in one of the many hunger queues. The reporter has also seen how the crisis in one district of Madrid has turned neighbours into friends.

    Natalia visited Miguel, the mayor of a tiny Canary island. For years he sought to attract more attention and visitors but is now glad the island has stayed miraculously virus-free. Spain’s fight with the coronavirus depicts life in a country which is waking up from the nightmare, a land in a state of emergency.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

    Subscribe to:
    DW Documentary:
    DW Documental (Spanish):
    DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

    For more visit:

    Instagram:

    Facebook:


    DW netiquette policy:

  • Climate change – living on the water | DW Documentary

    42:27

    Sea levels are rising faster and faster, threatening 700 million people who live on the world’s coasts. Will water become the habitat of the future? Visionary projects for a life with the tides are forging ahead worldwide.

    Experts forecast that by 2100, sea levels will be two meters higher than they are today. This could force 40 percent of the world’s population out of their homes, for example, in Mumbai, Tokyo, Guangzhou or Bangladesh. The US won’t be spared either. Miami, New Orleans and New York would also have to be evacuated. Entire city districts would be under water. Climate change would drastically alter our metropolitan areas.

    That's why ideas that originated in science fiction have now becoming reality. Floating and underwater buildings could become places of refuge. What sounds like a utopia is soon to become reality. The first pioneers are already living in floating neighborhoods. Could the South Pacific paradise of Tahiti also be saved in this way?

    This is still all tantalizing luxury. Visionary hotel operators offer rooms with an underwater view. Or dinner during which fish and marine life are a feature in floating restaurants. Many of these futuristic plans involve water. Will we be farming on the sea? Will the SeaOrbiter” floating research station designed by Parisian architect Jacques Rougerie get underway soon? Or will we walk through seaports on floating boulevards?

    ------------------------------------------------------------------

    DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

    Also subscribe to:
    DW Documental (Spanish):
    DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

    For more visit:

    Instagram:

    Facebook:


    DW netiquette policy:

  • x
  • Corona diaries | DW Documentary

    42:32

    People from all over the world have been describing the drastic impact of the corona pandemic: The empty streets outside their homes, their fears and daily routines, the news, the regulations, the newly discovered sense of community as well as the small moments of hope.

    Google offers endless results if you enter a search for corona + diary. What else is there to do when everything is closed and normal life has ground to a halt: When the shops are shuttered, the office doors locked and whole regions have been placed under quarantine? What do you do to fend off the boredom and the uncertainty? But wait a minute, there is always your mobile phone. People everywhere have been using them to document this most unusual of times, recording their thoughts both for themselves and for others.

    In the form of video diaries the protagonists record their personal stories in these times of global pandemic providing personal and authentic insights on a truly global event; and one which has yet to play out, nobody knows today what tomorrow will bring.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

    Also subscribe to:
    DW Documental (Spanish):
    DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

    For more visit:

    Instagram:

    Facebook:


    DW netiquette policy:

  • Artificial intelligence and algorithms: pros and cons | DW Documentary

    42:32

    Developments in artificial intelligence (AI) are leading to fundamental changes in the way we live. Algorithms can already detect Parkinson's disease and cancer, and control both cars and aircraft. How will AI change our society in the future?

    This documentary journeys to the hot spots of AI research in Europe, the USA and China, and looks at the revolutionary developments which are currently taking place. The rapid growth of AI offers many opportunities, but also many dangers. AI can be used to create sound and video recordings which will make it more and more difficult to distinguish between fact and fiction. It will make the world of work more efficient and many professions superfluous. Algorithms can decide whether to grant loans, who is an insurance risk, and how good employees are. But there is a huge problem: humans can no longer comprehend how algorithms arrive at their decisions. And another big problem is AI’s capacity for widespread surveillance. The Chinese city of Rongcheng is already using an AI-supported 'social credit system' to monitor and assess its citizens. Does AI pose a danger to our personal freedoms or democracy? Which decisions can we leave to the algorithms - and which do we want to? And what are AI’s social implications?

    A documentary by Tilman Wolff und Ranga Yogeshwar

    --------------------------------------------------------------------

    DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

    Subscribe to DW Documentary:


    Our other YouTube channels:
    DW Documental (in spanish):
    DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (in arabic):

    For more documentaries visit also:

    Instagram

    Facebook:


    DW netiquette policy:

  • How artificial intelligence is changing our society | DW Documentary

    42:26

    Artificial intelligence (AI) is changing our lives. It touches on all aspects of society - private life, business, security -- including in the spread of fake news and the challenges posed by the advent of autonomous weapons.

    This documentary looks at the rapid change digitalization is causing as it unfolds. In particular, breakthroughs in artificial intelligence are opening completely new horizons. In their film about AI, Tilman Wolff and Ranga Yogeshwar examine the role AI plays in the spread of fake news. They also consider a future with robots and the risks and ethical questions posed by the development of autonomous weapons. To address these issues, they travel the globe to speak with leading experts. AI can generate perfectly forged sound and videos, making it effective for purveying fake news. Discerning the truth from fiction will become increasingly difficult. Technology will streamline work, making some jobs surplus to requirements. Software will pilot self-driving cars and aerial drones. AI is rapidly opening up new vistas, but turning blind corners at speed can be risky. How sensible is this type of progress, and at which point should society step in and set limits to its development?

    A documentary by Tilman Wolff und Ranga Yogeshwar

    Part 1:

    --------------------------------------------------------------------
    DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

    Subscribe to:
    DW Documentary:
    DW Documental (Spanish):
    DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

    For more visit:

    Instagram:

    Facebook:


    DW netiquette policy:

  • Vaccinating against COVID-19 in Alaska | DW Documentary

    12:27

    Fort Yukon in Alaska is one of the most remote villages in the world, and people here are also afraid of Coronavirus. But now that vaccinations are being carried out, scattered families are difficult to reach.

    Fort Yukon lies eight kilometers north of the Arctic Circle. Most of the 500 or so inhabitants are Indigenous members of the Gwich'in tribe. Debra McCarty runs the local hospital and, as a result, is also responsible for vaccinating the village’s inhabitants. Some of the families she is trying to reach are only accessible by plane and snowmobile. The people here have heard of the dangerous coronavirus, and that’s why they pretty much everyone wants to be vaccinated - no matter how remote they are. They say that catching the virus here in the wilderness is pretty much fatal. DW reporter Oliver Sallet traveled to Fort Yukon to report on how people living close to the Arctic Circle are handling the pandemic.

    ـــــ
    DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch top documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

    Subscribe to:
    DW Documentary:
    DW Documental (Spanish):
    DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

    For more visit:

    Instagram:

    Facebook:


    We kindly ask viewers to read and stick to the DW netiquette policy on our channel:

  • The Month Coronavirus Unraveled American Business | A WSJ Documentary

    44:19

    March 2020 began on a high note for American business and ended with the economy in tatters

    This WSJ documentary goes behind-the-scenes to reveal how the coronavirus pandemic ripped through American business during the month of March 2020 -- told through the firsthand accounts of 12 prominent executives.

    When the coronavirus tore through industry, commerce and society in March 2020, the U.S. economy came to a screeching halt. Top executives relive the tough decisions they made as they scrambled to weather the storm. Photo Illustration: Adele Morgan/The Wall Street Journal

    More from the Wall Street Journal:
    Visit WSJ.com:
    Visit the WSJ Video Center:

    On Facebook:
    On Twitter:
    On Snapchat:

    #WSJ #Documentary

  • Big Pharma - How much power do drug companies have? | DW Documentary

    42:27

    The pharmaceutical industry exerts a huge amount of influence on health policy. Some companies develop highly profitable drugs with public money, while others have been found to have covered up serious side effects.

    The fight against Covid-19 is further fueling the greed of pharmaceutical companies. Does the industry’s influence threaten public health systems?

    The industry has seen major changes in the last decade. Most of the world’s pharmaceuticals are produced by a handful of large corporations, so-called Big Pharma. They’re richer and more powerful than ever. In some cases, they can even call the shots on governmental health policies.

    This documentary is the result of more than a year of research, and brings together patients, whistleblowers, lawyers, doctors and politicians, as well as representatives of the industry. Large laboratories are accused of concealing or downplaying research results to maintain their monopolies. Take the manufacturer Sanofi, whose epilepsy drug Depakine triggered a scandal throughout Europe. In the US, Johnson & Johnson has had to stand trial for driving millions of people into opioid addiction. And Novartis is one of several companies now facing huge fines over improper practices in the treatment of macular degeneration, an eye disease.

    The pharmaceutical industry gets support from influential doctors. But only one-fifth of German doctors declare what they receive from drug companies. As the world battles the Coronavirus pandemic, this documentary also looks at the lobbying efforts of manufacturer Gilead, as it seeks approval for a promising drug developed largely with public money. Every company is vying to find the next miracle treatment that will help it succeed against the competition.

    #documentary #BigPharma #dwdocumentary

    ______

    DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch top documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

    Subscribe to:
    ⮞ DW Documentary (English):
    ⮞ DW Documental (Spanish):
    ⮞ DW Documentary (Arabic):
    ⮞ DW Doku (German):
    ⮞ DW Documentary (Hindi):

    For more visit:
    Follow DW Documentary on Instagram:
    Follow DW Documental on Facebook:

    We kindly ask viewers to read and stick to the DW netiquette policy on our channel:

  • Corona – heroes in crisis mode | DW Documentary

    15:42

    Many people are on the frontline fighting against corona. Italy has been in lockdown for weeks but paramedic Andrea is still on the road almost every day, doing up to 10 journeys in one shift. Nerea is an intensive care nurse from Barcelona. For six years she has worked nightshifts in the physically and emotionally challenging intensive care unit of her hospital. She is struggling above all with the lack of personal protective equipment in the hospital and with her duty as a nurse. In the AFMB laboratory in Marseille, Ashleigh and her team are carrying out research to help combat COVID-19. Follow the daily lives of these frontline heroes as they face the challenges of the coronavirus pandemic.

    #mycoronadiary is a co-production between Berlin Producers Media, RBB, DW and Arte.

    Part 1:
    Part 2:
    Part 3:
    Part 4:

    -------------------------------------------------------------------
    DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

    Subscribe to:
    DW Documentary:
    DW Documental (Spanish):
    DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

    For more visit:

    Instagram:

    Facebook:


    DW netiquette policy:

  • Will the next pandemic start in Brazil? | DW Documentary

    28:26

    ‘The next pandemic will come from the Amazon region’, says Dr. Alessandra Nava, a Manaus scientist conducting research on bats. She is hunting down viruses which lurk in the rain forest and may be dangerous to humans.

    She makes her way through the heart of the Amazon rainforest. At night, Alessandra Nava catches different species of bats in nets or traps. In her laboratory she has already detected new viruses in the bats’ blood or urine. At some point, these could be transmitted to humans. So-called zoonotic diseases like this are increasingly common. The more that humans encroach on the wilderness, the more likely it is that viruses will spread between the species.

    The destruction of the Amazon jungle therefore means a higher risk of pandemics. Wherever agricultural land borders on the rain forest, researchers are already registering increased cases of dengue fever, for example. It’s easy for the virus to spread there. Here on the bordering area there are only a few species left: cattle, pigs and cats - the virus soon adapts to its new host. Often, it’s only a matter of time until the virus adapts to the human organism and attacks it. ‘If we carry on this way, it’s only a question of time until we are confronted with the next pandemic’, Nava says. And it could spread from Brazil to the rest of the world.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

    Subscribe to:
    DW Documentary:
    DW Documental (Spanish):
    DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

    For more visit:

    Instagram:

    Facebook:


    We kindly ask viewers to read and stick to the DW netiquette policy on our channel:

  • Brazils President Bolsonaro and coronavirus | DW Documentary

    12:33

    Brazil's President Jair Bolsonaro continues to downplay COVID-19, despite having contracted the virus himself. Meanwhile, the numbers of those infected and the death toll keep rising. Bolsonaro's response to the pandemic has divided the country.

    Bolsonaro supporters march through the streets, trying to convince Brazilians that the coronavirus pandemic and social distancing measures are all just a bunch of hype. Meanwhile, a group of Bolsonaro opponents -- soccer fans from São Paulo - prepare and deliver food to Brazilians who’ve lost everything due to the crisis. Despite the pandemic, these soccer supporters are also taking to the streets to protest against the government and for democracy. A report by Matthias Ebert and Marie-Kristin Boese.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

    Subscribe to:
    DW Documentary:
    DW Documental (Spanish):
    DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

    For more visit:

    Instagram:

    Facebook:


    DW netiquette policy:

  • Oil promises – how oil changed a country | DW Documentary

    1:24:53

    When oil was discovered in Ghana in 2007, the country began to dream big. It dreamed that the ‘black gold’ would bring economic upswing and long-awaited prosperity to its nation. But what happens when dreams and globalization meet?

    The global economy continues to rely on oil — but the so-called ‘black gold’ is becoming scarce. If a country has oil, so we tend to believe, it has all it needs to become a wealthy country. When oil was discovered in Ghana in 2007, Ghanaians also believed that economic prosperity would soon sweep over their country. By 2010, drilling had started. Ghana was determined to do better than Nigeria, a country that exports oil, but has to import gasoline.

    This documentary, shot over a period of ten years, is a case study of globalization. Filmed in a coastal region where people lived off fishing and rubber cultivation for decades, it shows the impact the oil discovery has had on their lives. Would the promises come true? Would the ‘black gold’ bring modern life and progress, paved streets, electricity and jobs even to small villages? Filmmaker Elke Sasse and journalist Andrea Stäritz spent ten years documenting the developments on Ghana’s western coast. Nigerian animator Ebele Okoye adds her personal perspective through art, as a citizen of a nation hit by the oil curse.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high quality documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

    Subscribe to:
    DW Documentary:

    DW Documental (Spanish):
    DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

    For more visit:

    Instagram:

    Facebook:


    We kindly ask viewers to read and respect the DW netiquette policy on our channel:

  • Who were the Neanderthals? | DW Documentary

    42:26

    Long before Homo sapiens populated the earth, the Neanderthals lived in Eurasia.
    Now, paleoanthropologists in England and France are using new archeological methods to shed light on some previously unexplained Neanderthal mysteries.

    In an age clouded by the mists of time, the first early humans colonized the Eurasian continent. They settled on land that had only recently been covered by glaciers. This species, called Neanderthals, died out about 30,000 years ago -- but at one time, they formed the largest group in an area that stretched from northern France to the Belgian coast and from the Channel Islands to southern England.

    During the last Ice Age, the North Sea was frozen over -- and the English Channel was a small river that could easily be crossed on foot. The Neanderthals lived in close harmony with their perpetually changing environment. They had everything they needed to survive: the meat of prey animals, edible wild plants, water and wood for cooking and heating. How did these early humans develop over almost 300,000 years? What were their lives like before they became extinct?

    Our documentary is based on the latest research. We investigate various populations of Neanderthals, and visit archaeological sites in northern France, southern England, and on the island of Jersey.

    Renowned researchers such as the British paleoanthropologist Chris Stringer and his French colleague Ludovic Slimak describe how the Neanderthals lived, and discuss their cognitive abilities. Was this species capable of structured thinking? Did they have cultures, languages, and societies? How intelligent were they, and what sort of adaptive strategies kept them alive for 300,000 years? How similar were they to modern-day humans?

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch top documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

    Subscribe to:
    DW Documentary:
    DW Documental (Spanish):
    DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

    For more visit:

    Instagram:

    Facebook:


    We kindly ask viewers to read and stick to the DW netiquette policy on our channel:

  • x
  • Money, happiness and eternal life - Greed | DW Documentary

    42:31

    Can money and power ever make us happy? How much is enough? Our constant desire for more is part of our human nature.

    But is greed getting the better of us? Find out in GREED - A FATAL DESIRE.

    From Buddhists and bankers to Eskimos and psychologists, we explore the phenomenon of greed with people from all walks of life. How can it be defined? What makes us greedy? And what are the repercussions?

    People like to have a lot of stuff because it gives them the feeling of living forever, says American social psychologist Sheldon Solomon. He thinks we have to come to terms with our own mortality before we can break the cycle.

    Are there other ways to feel happy and content? Can we simply stop being greedy by changing the way we think?

    Watch Part 2 here:
    Watch the extended cut here:

    Check out our web special:

    _______

    Exciting, powerful and informative – DW Documentary is always close to current affairs and international events. Our eclectic mix of award-winning films and reports take you straight to the heart of the story. Dive into different cultures, journey across distant lands, and discover the inner workings of modern-day life. Subscribe and explore the world around you – every day, one DW Documentary at a time.

    Subscribe to DW Documentary:


    For more information visit:

    Instagram:

    Facebook:

  • Norway and CO2 emissions | DW Documentary

    25:57

    Oil nation Norway plans to help fight climate change by capturing and storing Europe’s carbon emissions. The ‘Northern Lights’ project will store captured CO2 emissions in the North Sea. But this procedure is not without risks.

    The world is facing a climate catastrophe, and despite rapid growth in renewable energy production, some industries continue to emit vast amounts of CO2 during production processes. Two of these industries are cement and steel, both crucial for the economy. A solution is needed, and Norway believes part of the answer for Europe is carbon capture and storage (CCS).

    The country has called its CCS project ‘Northern Lights.’ The plan is to capture CO2 emitted from industrial sites, liquefy it, and then transport the liquefied gas via pipelines to be stored in the North Sea, approximately 3000 meters below sea level.

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has said that the only way to limit the global rise in temperature to a maximum of two degrees is to capture and store many billions of tonnes of greenhouse gases. But in Germany people have protested against the use of carbon capture and storage.

    The technology has been fraught with problems in the past. And there are other, more natural alternatives. One option could be to restore moorlands and bogs. When wet, these store carbon that has been sucked from the air by plants. But many bogs have been drained for farming, and as drained moorlands dry, CO2 is produced, meaning they have become a source of pollution rather than carbon storage. Reversing this and returning them to their carbon storing potential could be relatively inexpensive, as well as being a more natural way of reducing greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.

    This documentary weighs up the pros and cons of CCS and investigates why the restoration of moorlands has hardly progressed in years.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

    Subscribe to:
    DW Documentary:


    DW Documental (Spanish):
    DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

    For more visit:

    Instagram:

    Facebook:


    DW netiquette policy:

  • Everyday life in Kenyas capital Nairobi | DW Documentary

    28:25

    The bridge crosses over a busy freeway in Kenya's capital, Nairobi. If you're looking for vegetables, a bowl of hot soup, a haircut, or even a new bed, you can find it here. But now, the bridge is to be torn down.

    The bridge provides a vital link between the slum district of Kangemi and more prosperous parts of the city. ARD's Nairobi bureau chief, Sabine Bohland, first reported in 2015 on the thriving commerce that takes place on the bridge. She interviewed three people: Mogaka, who makes and sells soup; Jacky, who sells vegetables; and Saidi, a student. All three talked about their dreams for the future. Five years later, Bohland returned to the bridge to find out how these people are coping with the coronavirus pandemic, and whether they've made their dreams come true.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------

    DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch top documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

    Subscribe to:
    DW Documentary:
    DW Documental (Spanish):
    DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

    For more visit:

    Instagram:

    Facebook:


    We kindly ask viewers to read and stick to the DW netiquette policy on our channel:

  • When food becomes scarce – high-tech farms of the future | DW Documentary

    25:57

    Agriculture will have to change drastically in the future if it is to meet global demand. Food production will become increasingly difficult in the face of growing challenges like rapid population growth, climate change and soil exhaustion.

    In Berlin, too, you can find lettuces growing in beds without soil and under artificial lighting next to restaurant kitchens or in some supermarkets. But in Japan and the US the practice of growing vegetables in huge factory buildings has been around longer. These are a world away from your normal greenhouses. The plants are grown in sterile conditions without the use of any pesticides. The fruit and vegetables produced can be eaten without being washed. And the yield is 100 times greater than in a same-sized area outdoors. The Japanese maker of such high-tech farms is successfully exporting them around the world - to customers in the Arab Emirates and in Asia’s megacities, for example.

    We will all have to wake up to the fact that food production methods will have to change if our food supplies are to be secure in the future. Increasingly, our cities will have to come up with ways of growing more for themselves and becoming less dependent on rural areas and global food supply chains. At the same time it is imperative to reform conventional farming to make it more weather resistant and less resource intensive.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------

    DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

    Subscribe to:
    DW Documentary:

    DW Documental (Spanish):
    DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

    For more visit:

    Instagram:

    Facebook:


    DW netiquette policy:

  • Can green investment change the world? | DW Documentary

    25:55

    A new generation of investors wants to force businesses to become environmentally-friendly. Even climate conservationists know that money talks, but can green investments really save the world?

    Green investment rewards companies that use sustainable production practices and protect the environment. At the same time, companies that pollute or contribute to global warming are deprived of funds. The strategy converts the once secondary issue of the environment into hard, cold cash.

    Antonis Schwarz is 30 years old -- and an investor, philanthropist, and activist. His slogan is cash against climate change. Schwarz, like many other wealthy millennials, sees climate change as the key variable when it comes to investing money. These people intentionally put their cash into companies and projects that protect the environment.

    Schwarz believes that those who are well-off have a special responsibility to follow this strategy. He says, When you are able to change something and you don't, you're complicit. We all have to become fully involved, so we can prevent a climate disaster.

    This philosophy can be summed up with the following question: What's the point of having loads of money if it becomes worthless because you're living on a planet that's becoming increasingly chaotic?

    Institutional investors have more money at their disposal than wealthy private individuals do. Their approach is also changing -- and not out of pure idealism. Extreme weather events caused by climate change, for example, are bad for business. They can force corporations to write off billions in damages.

    This documentary goes behind the scenes to take a closer look at the financial markets. How well does impact investing work? Can investors really move large, powerful corporations to change their strategies? Politicians have so far failed to do precisely that.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch top documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

    Subscribe to:
    DW Documentary:

    DW Documental (Spanish):
    DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

    For more visit:

    Instagram:

    Facebook:


    We kindly ask viewers to read and stick to the DW netiquette policy on our channel:

  • Italy tackles rural exodus | DW Documentary

    25:55

    More Italians are migrating to big cities, and every year around 200,000 leave to go abroad. Entire villages now stand empty. So small towns are providing incentives for incomers - like rent-free homes in Campania or one euro house prices in Sicily.

    The Italian countryside is full of hilly landscapes, breathtaking panoramas and picturesque hamlets. Yet small towns and villages are dying out. Lack of jobs and poor infrastructure are driving people to leave. In the coming years, some 2,500 places could become ghost towns, although the Coronavirus pandemic has slowed this development.

    During the strict lockdown, the Vittoria family from Naples decided to escape the confines of the big city. In the fall of 2020 they packed their belongings and moved to Teora in Campania. Here mayor Stefano Farina is trying to repopulate his small town by paying newcomers‘ rent for two years if they enroll their children in the local school. That’s also enticed the Greenwoods to move from Manchester, in the UK, to Teora with their four children. The town has acquired some thirty new residents from around the world and ensured the survival of its school.

    Seven hundred kilometers to the south, Mussomeli in Sicily is selling abandoned homes in its old town for just one euro. Here, too, more than half of the buildings stand empty. The initiative has proved so successful an agency had to be founded to deal with prospective foreign buyers. They must commit to renovating the house within the next three years, but are not obliged to reside in Italy. Mussomeli is most concerned with saving its dilapidated town center.

    #documentary #Italy #rurallife
    ـــــ
    DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch top documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

    Subscribe to:
    DW Documentary:
    DW Documental (Spanish):
    DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

    For more visit:

    Instagram:

    Facebook:


    We kindly ask viewers to read and stick to the DW netiquette policy on our channel:

  • The German car industrys political muscle | DW Documentary

    42:26

    The German automotive industry has long played a key role in the country's prosperity. It employs hundreds of thousands and enjoys cozy relationships with politicians. But the COVID-19 crisis threw a wrench in the works. What’s next?

    The prosperous German auto industry has long been lagging when it comes to innovating new automotive technologies. Then came the COVID-19 pandemic. Now, the industry is turning to decision-makers for help.

    But just how far will policymakers go to help the car companies? Arguing that the COVID-19 pandemic has hit them hard, the auto industry is demanding the postponement of stricter CO2 limits and a purchase premium for new vehicles. They maintain that nothing less than the prosperity of the whole country is at stake. But is Germany's success really dependent on the auto industry? And how much blame does industrial policy bear for the failures of the automotive companies?

    ـــــ
    DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch top documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

    Subscribe to:
    DW Documentary:
    DW Documental (Spanish):
    DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

    For more visit:

    Instagram:

    Facebook:


    We kindly ask viewers to read and stick to the DW netiquette policy on our channel:

  • The limits of learning – kids in crisis | DW Documentary

    12:27

    Surveys show that the majority of German students feel hopeless, listless and even depressed as a result of the long lockdown. Homeschooling is overwhelming for many of them, and some families are struggling to cope. We visited students at home.

    Every morning, 14-year-old Catharina sits down at the dining table and tries to study Latin, Math, or English. Her 10-year-old brother, Philipp, sits next to her. He also has to study — and likes using Catharina as a teaching assistant. How are either one supposed to concentrate? Their single mother can’t help, because she is a doctor and has to go to work. Anna has it a little bit easier. She is 16 years old and considers the time she has spent in lockdown to be the most productive of her life so far. She can finally concentrate, and work in peace. Leandro is 14 and can't understand this. He feels completely overwhelmed by the massive heap of tasks. What should he tackle first and how should he do it? He can't provide the structure and guidance he used to get every day in the classroom for himself, and often has trouble getting out of bed in the morning —an indication of early-onset depression. Axel Rowohlt visited Catharina, Philipp, Anna and Leandro, and also spoke to Felix, their student representative. He conducted a survey among students in Berlin — with alarming results.


    ـــــ
    DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch top documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

    Subscribe to:
    DW Documentary:
    DW Documental (Spanish):
    DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

    For more visit:

    Instagram:

    Facebook:


    We kindly ask viewers to read and stick to the DW netiquette policy on our channel:

  • Tour of the Arctic – from Svalbard to Siberia | DW Documentary

    42:26

    The Arctic is one of the most fascinating regions on our planet, and one of the most threatened. Two film crews explore its spectacular wilderness in a two-part documentary. Part one takes viewers from Norway’s Svalbard archipelago to Siberia.

    The region around the North Pole is one of the greatest and least-known wildernesses in the world, and it’s rapidly changing due to global warming. The retreat of Arctic sea ice can be observed everywhere along the Arctic Circle, presenting those who live there with dramatic changes. This documentary takes viewers on a journey through the Arctic circle and explores those changes.
    It begins in Norway’s Svalbard archipelago, a place to see one of nature’s most spectacular displays — the northern lights. With the ice retreating, cruise ships can now travel further north than was previously possible. This places a strain on the fragile ecosystem. But more visitors may also mean more awareness about the risks that face the region, and more motivation to protect the Arctic.
    But as if often the case, protecting nature in the Arctic is at odds with economic interests. Russia, in particular, is keen to sell Arctic fossil fuels to the rest of world. The film next takes viewers to the gas-rich Yamal Peninsula in northwestern Siberia, where the Russian company Novatek has built the northernmost industrial facility on the globe.

    Further East in Yakutia, two noises fill the air: the relentless buzzing of mosquitoes that infest the Siberian tundra in summer, and the steady dripping of the thawing permafrost on the banks of the Kolyma River. The film’s journey ends in Chukotka in the northeast of Russia, a region closer to Alaska than to the Russian capital Moscow.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch top documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

    Subscribe to:
    DW Documentary:

    DW Documental (Spanish):
    DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

    For more visit:

    Instagram:

    Facebook:


    We kindly ask viewers to read and stick to the DW netiquette policy on our channel:

  • The clothes we wear | DW Documentary

    28:31

    We live in an age of hyper-consumption, and nowhere is this more obvious than the fashion industry. ‘Fast fashion’ is the buzzword these days. Driven by glossy advertising campaigns, many consumers are constantly buying new clothes.

    New collections are arriving on the market at an ever increasing rate - many of them at rock-bottom prices. And if you believe the information campaigns run by some of the textile giants, consumers can now buy with a clear conscience. It’s become trendy for clothing labels to tout their green credentials, advertising eco-friendly labels allegedly made according to strict environmental standards.

    But is it all genuine? Two reporters go undercover to find out what’s really happening in the textile factories where many clothes destined for the European market are made. They discover the extent of the environmental devastation caused by the industry and how companies are making a profit from the fact that sustainability sells.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------
    DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

    Subscribe to:
    DW Documentary:
    DW Documental (Spanish):
    DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

    For more visit:

    Instagram:

    Facebook:


    DW netiquette policy:

  • From an African refugee camp to the US | DW Documentary

    42:26

    An American dream comes true for a Congolese family and their friend. After more than 20 years in an African refugee camp they start a new life in the United States. With courage and humor, they navigate the challenges of their new life.

    The first time in an airplane, the first time on an escalator ... these everyday situations are part of something much more for Jean-Pierre, his family, and his friend Isaiah. Their departure after 20 years living in a refugee camp is a moment of happiness, but also one of deep emotion. Because of the brutal civil war in the Democratic Republic of Congo, the group had long ago given up hope of a better life. But eventually, they made their way via Uganda to the United States, thanks to a special UN refugee program. As they begin their new life, they are assisted by social workers specializing in integration. Their experiences reveal a lot about American society, like when a social worker praises sugary soft drinks in a supermarket, prompting Jean-Pierre to comment on how unhealthy the American diet is. One Way Ticket is a heart-warming documentary by Gregoire Gosset depicting brave and charismatic immigrants as they begin a new life.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------

    DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch top documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

    Subscribe to:
    DW Documentary:
    DW Documental (Spanish):
    DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

    For more visit:

    Instagram:

    Facebook:


    We kindly ask viewers to read and stick to the DW netiquette policy on our channel:

  • Fentanyl: An epidemic of addiction made worse by the COVID-19 pandemic | DW News

    7:25

    Today we learned that more than 100,000 Americans died of drug overdoses in the last year. That is the highest overdose death toll ever recorded in a 12-month period.

    The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said 100,300 Americans died of overdoses between May 2020 and April 2021. That's a 28 percent increase on the previous year. Most of the death came from overdoses of the synthetic drug Fentanyl. An epidemic of addiction made worse by the COVID-19 pandemic. Lockdowns left drug users socially isolated and unable to get treatment. Drug overdoses now claim more lives than car accidents and gun violence combined.

    Subscribe:

    For more news go to:
    Follow DW on social media:
    ►Facebook:
    ►Twitter:
    ►Instagram:
    Für Videos in deutscher Sprache besuchen Sie:
    #Fentanyl #Overdose #DrugConsumption

  • Transylvanias Gábor – between tradition and modernity | DW Documentary

    42:27

    For 500 years, Transylvania’s Gábor people have held onto their values and rituals. This film explores the insular world of the Gábor Roma, and asks whether they can maintain their traditional lives in a globalized world.

    The Romanian village of Karácsonyfalva is the center of the Gábor Roma community. More than 1,000 Gábor live there. The men wear large black hats, the women long skirts. The men travel all over Europe as traders, while the women raise the children. Most Gábor belong to the Adventist denomination. Many only learned to read in order to study the Bible. Abstaining from pork and above all from alcohol and tobacco makes them targets of curiosity. Considered aristocratic among the Roma people, the Gábor have their own laws in all areas of life. Problems are solved within the community; in cases of conflict, even the police turn to the community leaders. Their biggest and most important celebration is the wedding, the foundation of their society. Gábor marry exclusively among themselves. For this reason, girls are removed from school at age 11 and married at 14. Boys move from organized education to the school of life at 14. This documentary follows the marriage of 14-year-old Mundra to 16-year-old Bobbi, while giving a portrait of their families and the wider community. For the first time, they share an insight into their exciting, colorful, contradictory and insular world, in which wealth and poverty collide. This is a tight-knit community, one caught between tradition and the pressures of modernity.

    ـــــ
    DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch top documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

    Subscribe to:
    DW Documentary:
    DW Documental (Spanish):
    DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

    For more visit:

    Instagram:

    Facebook:


    We kindly ask viewers to read and stick to the DW netiquette policy on our channel:

  • Tomatoes and greed – the exodus of Ghanas farmers | DW Documentary

    52:52

    What do tomatoes have to do with mass migration? Tomatoes are a poker chip in global trade policies. Subsidized products from the EU, China and elsewhere are sold at dumping prices, destroying markets and livelihoods in Africa in the process.

    Edward still harvests tomatoes. But he is no longer on his own fields in Ghana. He now works on plantations in southern Italy under precarious conditions. The tomatoes he harvests are processed, canned and shipped abroad - including to Ghana, where they compete with local products. The flood of cheap imports from China, the US and the EU has driven Ghana’s tomato industry to ruin. Desperate farmers find themselves having to seek work elsewhere, including in Europe. For many, the only route available is a dangerous journey through the desert and across the Mediterranean. Ghana is a nation at peace, a democracy with free elections and economic growth. Nonetheless, tomato farmer Benedicta is only able to make ends meet because her husband regularly sends her money from his earnings in Italy.

    A former tomato factory in Pwalugu, Ghana, illustrates the predicament. This factory once helped secure the livelihood of tomato farmers across the region. Today it lies empty, guarded by Vincent, a former employee who hopes to keep it from falling into ruin. In the surrounding region, the market for tomatoes has collapsed and most farmers are no longer growing what could easily be Ghana’s ‘red gold’. An agricultural advisor is trying to help local tomato farmers, but has little by way of hope to offer. Conditions like this are what drive local farmers to cut their losses and head for Europe. Once in Italy, migrants from Ghana and other African countries are forced to live in desperate conditions near the plantations. They work as day laborers for extremely low wages, helping to grow the very tomatoes that are costing people back home their work and livelihoods. These days, canned tomatoes from China, Italy and Spain are available for purchase on the market of Accra. Some may call this free trade. But economist Kwabena Otoo says free trade should open doors; not destroy people’s lives.

    Every two seconds, a person is forced to flee their home. Today, more than 70 million people have been displaced worldwide. The DW documentary series ‘Displaced’ sheds light on the causes of this crisis and traces how wealthy industrialized countries are contributing to the exodus from the Global South.

    Oil and ruin — exodus from Venezuela:
    Drought and floods — the climate exodus:

    --------------------------------------------------------------------
    DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

    Subscribe to:
    DW Documentary:
    DW Documental (Spanish):
    DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

    For more visit:

    Instagram:

    Facebook:


    DW netiquette policy:

  • Corona in Italy | DW Documentary

    28:12

    Venice, a city deserted. Filming while wearing protective masks, filming in a northern Italy that has been devastated by the coronavirus.

    Markus Frings and Marco Polo, both from South Tyrol, needed special permission to travel through northern Italy. They wore masks and gloves to protect themselves from the virus. They filmed checkpoints and nighttime disinfection crews cleaning the streets. They talked to virologists, local business people and of course the residents themselves.

    Cameraman Marco shows us how his family in Bolzano has come to terms with these exceptional times of closed schools and restricted movement. And we learn that many Italians appear to have adjusted to this most abnormal of new normalities.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------
    DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

    Subscribe to:
    DW Documentary:
    DW Documental (Spanish):
    DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

    For more visit:

    Instagram:

    Facebook:


    DW netiquette policy:

  • Colombia: An airlift against COVID-19 | DW Documentary

    12:27

    Plastic surgeon Camilo Prieto has a comfortable life in Bogotá. But since the global pandemic struck, he’s been on a mission. He flies to villages in Colombia’s hinterlands to combat the coronavirus.

    Deep in the rainforest, everything is scarce: masks, disinfectants, COVID tests, oxygen tanks. And awareness. The governments’ mandates on social distancing, hygiene measures, and exercising caution all seem so far away from reality here. Healthcare has always been poor in the rainforest villages, and now armed gangs are on the move, sometimes even attacking doctors. But none of that deters Camilo Prieto. He braves the odds and the long flight into the rainforest to help as best he can. Private volunteer pilots take helpers as far in as possible: then they press on by boat. As happy as he is to help, he knows his work can only offer a temporary solution. Sustainable change can only come about when the country tackles its systemic inequality.

    ـــــ
    DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch top documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

    Subscribe to:
    DW Documentary:
    DW Documental (Spanish):
    DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

    For more visit:

    Instagram:

    Facebook:


    We kindly ask viewers to read and stick to the DW netiquette policy on our channel:

  • A COVID-19 survivor versus corona skeptics | DW Documentary

    12:32

    Politician Karoline Preisler contracted a severe case of COVID-19 and had to be hospitalized. At a demonstration of corona skeptics, she aims to confront those who trivialize the virus, conspiracy theorists and the far right.

    While the vast majority of Germans are pleased with the measures their politicians have taken to tackle the pandemic thus far, that hasn’t stopped corona skeptics from taking to the streets. Now right-wing extremists are looking to attract new supporters by taking advantage of the skeptics’ inherent mistrust of politicians. To prevent this, Free Democrat Karoline Preisler is going to demonstrations and talking to the protesters. She wants them to know that coronavirus is both real and dangerous. Will they listen or will her message fall on deaf ears? A report by Viktoria Kleber.

    ----------------------------------------------------------------

    DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

    Subscribe to:
    DW Documentary:
    DW Documental (Spanish):
    DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

    For more visit:

    Instagram:

    Facebook:


    DW netiquette policy:

  • The Plague and COVID-19 | DW Documentary

    26:02

    The history of the Oberammergau Passion Play reaches back to the seventeenth century, when a plague known as the Black Death swept through Europe. In 1633 the residents of this Bavarian village vowed to present a play depicting the suffering and death of Jesus Christ every ten years if they were spared extinction. Oberammergau has kept its word for more than 400 years.

    But in 2020 the production had to be called off. Every ten years the village of Oberammergau in southern Germany enters a time loop. For six months more than 2,000 villagers don biblical garments. The men sport beards and the school kids grow their hair long. The reason is a five-hour presentation of Christ’s suffering and death to commemorate the village’s survival when a plague swept through Europe in the seventeenth century. This report on the Oberammergau Passion Play takes a look at their extensive preparations for this epic production, on which a new pandemic cast its shadow. Right up until the last moment, the cast hoped to be able to stage their production. But in the end, the village that the plague made famous had to bow to the corona pandemic. Bowed but not broken, the villagers are determined to fulfil their vow and stage the Oberammergau Passion Play in 2022.
    -------------------------------------------------------------------
    DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

    Subscribe to:
    DW Documentary:
    DW Documental (Spanish):
    DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

    For more visit:

    Instagram:

    Facebook:


    DW netiquette policy:

  • Being creative in times of the coronavirus pandemic | DW Documentary

    14:28

    The coronavirus pandemic is presenting everyone with challenges. But some people are coping with the current circumstances by staying positive. In Italy, Umberto De Martino converted his restaurant into a catering kitchen to cook for the Red Cross. Sonja Völker and her daughter Marie have started the production of face masks in Vienna. Street artist Mundano distributes wash kits to homeless people in Sao Paolo. Ines Subashka from Sofia, Bulgaria, does not let corona get her down, despite having had to close her gym. Tuba player and music producer Jonas is already underway in his van through Germany with a list of online projects.

    #mycoronadiary is a co-production between Berlin Producers Media, RBB, DW and Arte. Over the next four weeks, we plan to upload one episode every Friday.

    Part 1:
    Part 2:
    Part 3:
    Part 4:

    -------------------------------------------------------------------
    DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

    Subscribe to:
    DW Documentary:
    DW Documental (Spanish):
    DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

    For more visit:

    Instagram:

    Facebook:


    DW netiquette policy:

  • Funerals in times of Covid-19 | DW Documentary

    12:32

    Birgit Scheffler's work involves something that’s next to impossible during the coronavirus pandemic: comforting the bereaved while keeping her distance. And these days she deals with death on a daily basis. Scheffler is a funeral director.

    In the midst of the pandemic, Birgit Scheffler and a friend went into business for themselves. Scheffler gave up her job with a media outlet and opened a funeral home. Ever since her mother’s sudden death she’d been thinking about how to make the process of saying your final farewells to a loved one a less painful experience. She wants to offer her clients comfort and support in their time of grief, and to help them heal. Being a funeral director is Birgit Scheffler’s dream job. She’s witness to much suffering, but, as a mother of a young daughter, she’s careful not to take her work home with her. Still, she works irregular hours, because death waits for no one. COVID-19 has made undertakers‘ jobs even more challenging. Before a funeral, Birgit Scheffler can hardly sleep. She’s all too aware of her responsibility for ensuring the deceased is given a worthy sending off. A report by Marie Kamprath.

    ـــــ
    DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch top documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

    Subscribe to:
    DW Documentary:
    DW Documental (Spanish):
    DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

    For more visit:

    Instagram:

    Facebook:


    We kindly ask viewers to read and stick to the DW netiquette policy on our channel:

  • Coronavirus in closed worlds in Israel, Iran, Greece | DW Documentary

    13:51

    The coronavirus pandemic has affected every aspect of life for people around the world. This time we are in Greece, Iran and Israel and we meet Mahdi Jafari from Afghanistan or Moria Camp, Gershon Moshkovirts from Jerusalem and Majdi Arsanjani from Tehran.

    Gershon Moshkovirts is an orthodox Jew from Jerusalem. The lives of Gershon und his community are shaped by their religion. The communal prayers, communal living and Jewish traditions form everyday life. However, with the coronavirus outbreak, these have come to a standstill.

    Mahdie Jafari is 15 years old. Together with her family she fled Afghanistan and has lived in Moria refugee camp on the island of Lesbos for five months. Living conditions in the camp were catastrophic even before the outbreak of the coronavirus epidemic. There is a lack of water and soap, and the tents are tightly packed. Mahdie is unable to protect herself from the virus.

    In Iran, the current situation is difficult to assess because of the way the Iranian government is dealing with the crisis. Majdi Arsanjani is an unemployed lecturer in film directing in Tehran. Majdi has cancer and therefore belongs to the high-risk group. As a result, he lives in strict isolation. The documentary takes a look at how the coronavirus pandemic is affecting people of all cultures and backgrounds around the globe.

    #mycoronadiary is a co-production between Berlin Producers Media, RBB, DW and Arte.

    Part 1:
    Part 2:
    Part 3:
    Part 4:

    -------------------------------------------------------------------
    DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

    Subscribe to:
    DW Documentary:
    DW Documental (Spanish):
    DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

    For more visit:

    Instagram:

  • Rethinking capitalism | DW Documentary

    25:57

    More and more entrepreneurs are thinking beyond their own personal wealth. In what is known as the Purpose Movement, company bosses aim to put profits to good use, while rethinking the idea of corporate ownership.

    This film explores how the movement is rethinking capitalism. The founders and CEOs involved in the global Purpose Movement believe in transforming society: Their ownership model ensures that a company’s shareholders cannot withdraw profits, the company cannot be sold and its purpose cannot be changed. Christian Kroll founded search engine Ecosia in 2009. The profits are used to plant trees to combat climate change. Advertising revenue has so far financed the planting of more than a hundred million trees. Kroll could have sold Ecosia for many millions of euros long ago, but the founder wanted to protect his company from speculators. The trees were more important to him than his bank balance. That's why he used a foundation model to transfer ownership of Ecosia in 2018, effectively cutting himself out. The model makes it impossible to sell Ecosia for profit, to withdraw company capital, or to change the company's purpose, which is planting trees. Armin Steuernagel advises entrepreneurs who also want to give away their companies. His Purpose Foundation advises start-ups wanting to establish themselves as purpose companies,” like Hamburg’s Wildplastic, which produces garbage bags from recycled material. Steuernagel wants us to rethink capitalism. As a political lobbyist, he is working to create a legal framework to help facilitate the shift to purpose companies. Michael Hetzer ran the German family-owned company Elobau, which manufactures sensors and other parts for agricultural machinery. Instead of deciding to leave the business to one of his sons, he transferred the company to a foundation model. He wanted to take the burden off his sons' shoulders. And for him, the purpose of his company is important.

    #documentary #capitalism #business

    ـــــ
    DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch top documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

    Subscribe to:
    DW Documentary:
    DW Documental (Spanish):
    DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

    For more visit:

    Instagram:

    Facebook:


    We kindly ask viewers to read and stick to the DW netiquette policy on our channel:

  • Covid Changed My Job | RT Documentary

    13:28

    COVID-19 has dramatically changed the lives of many. A disinfection technician used to be the boss in his old job. But as the pandemic broke out, he wore a gas mask and armed up with a sanitiser spray. He never regretted it. Neither did an entertainment entrepreneur who wore a hazmat suit and went saving lives in the ‘red-zone’. Meanwhile, in Japan, the quarantine forced a Buddhist monk to take a VR camera to the cemetery. See the stories about those who managed to adjust quickly and saw the lockdown as a chance to evolve.

    0:00 - Intro
    01:36 A Buddhist monk in a Japanese cemetery
    2:13 Workout after coronavirus
    2:56 Dismissal due to pandemic
    3:47 The job is to kill the Coronavirus
    4:44 A monk takes care of graves
    6:05 A monk lives with his family
    7:04 Recovered from the coronavirus
    7:13 Became a doctor in 2 weeks
    9:04 Disinfection technicians
    12:13 The pandemic changed lives

    RT Documentary offers you in-depth documentary films on topics that will leave no one indifferent. It’s not just front-page stories and global events, but issues that extend beyond the headlines. Social and environmental issues, shocking traditions, intriguing personalities, history, sports and so much more – we have documentaries to suit every taste. RT Documentary’s film crews travel far and wide to bring you diverse and compelling stories. Discover the world with us!

    SUBSCRIBE TO RTD Channel to get documentaries firsthand!

    FOLLOW US
    RTD WEBSITE:
    RTD ON TWITTER:
    RTD ON FACEBOOK:
    RTD ON INSTAGRAM
    RTD LIVE

  • Climate refugees in Bangladesh | DW Documentary

    42:31

    Within the next 30 years, up to 20% of Bangladesh will disappear beneath the water as rivers and sea levels rise. This will put as many as 30 million people on the move.

    Climate researchers say it’s just the first manifestation of a process that will soon be happening all over the world. This film takes us on a journey to the Bangladesh of the future, a country that’s set to suffer terribly from climate change. The Meghna River has already turned into a torrent that’s nine kilometers wide in places, a mass of moving water that flows ten times faster than the Rhine. It demolished the house I moved into as a bride,” Momtaj Begum says. It’s where I gave birth to my four children. It breaks my heart.” She and her son are saving what they can before the river sweeps everything relentlessly into the sea. Her village looks like a battlefield. The Meghna has cut deep into the ground, and is literally ripping the soil away beneath the residents’ feet.

    Momtaj Begum and her family of eight have already been turned into climate refugees. Her village was swallowed by the river, along with many others. Around 2,000 displaced people like her arrive in the Bangladeshi capital Dhaka every day. With a population topping 20 million and a crumbling infrastructure, the city is on the verge of collapse. The climate refugees that arrive here are now forcibly moved on again, this time by the government. Shantytowns are destroyed by police raids and bulldozers. And what’s happening in Bangladesh is only the beginning. Before long, every country in the world will begin to notice the effects of rising sea levels.
    _______

    DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

    Subscribe to DW Documentary:

    Visit our Spanish channel:

    Visit our Arabic channel:

    For more documentaries visit:

    Instagram

    Facebook:


    DW netiquette policy:

  • Virologists on the coronavirus outbreak | VPRO Documentary

    42:07

    What do virologists know about the coronavirus? Was covid-19 a surprise, and could the coronavirus outbreak be prevented?

    In a globalized world, no one is untraceable for the next virus. What will tomorrow's virus look like, and how can we prepare for it? What will tomorrow's virus be? And how can we prepare for it? In this documentary, we talk to virologist Ron Fouchier and virologist Marion Koopmans to find answers to the questions above.

    For many doctors and scientists, the corona crisis comes as no surprise. Ron Fouchier, a virologist at Erasmus MC in Rotterdam, is an international key figure in virology. What new viruses await us in the future? How vulnerable are we? Infections develop quickly and smartly. Can people also become smarter and arm themselves?

    We could have known there was going to be a pandemic. It's not the first and certainly not the last time. And yet we weren't ready.

    You could call Ron Fouchier a virus hunter. He is Professor of Molecular Virology and deputy head of the Viroscience Department at Erasmus MC. The Rotterdam laboratory is highly regarded and is invariably asked for advice and assistance with research in new virus outbreaks such as Sars, Mers, Ebola, Zika, and Corona. And this will often happen because this crisis is not an isolated one.

    Director: Rob van Hattum
    Composition: Geert Rozinga
    Camera: Maarten Kramer, Martijn Cousijn
    Sound: Marc Witte
    Edit: Michiel Hazebroek, Jeroen van den Berk
    Research: Frédérique Merman
    Image Research: Paula Witkamp
    Production: Jeroen Beumer
    Commissioning Editors: Bregtje van der Haak, Doke Romeijn
    Archive: NWO

    On VPRO broadcast you will find nonfiction videos with English subtitles, French subtitles and Spanish subtitles, such as documentaries, short interviews and documentary series.

    This channel offers some of the best travel series from the Dutch broadcaster VPRO. Our series explore cultures from all over the world. VPRO storytellers have lived abroad for years with an open mind and endless curiosity, allowing them to become one with their new country. Thanks to these qualities, they are the perfect guides to let you experience a place and culture through the eyes of a local. Uncovering the soul of a country, through an intrinsic and honest connection, is what VPRO and its presenters do best.

    So subscribe to our channel, and we will be delighted to share our adventures with you!
    more information at

    Visit additional youtube channels bij VPRO broadcast:
    VPRO Broadcast:
    VPRO Metropolis:
    VPRO Documentary:
    VPRO World Stories:
    VPRO Extra:
    VPRO VG (world music):
    VPRO 3voor12 (alternative music):
    VPRO 3voor12 extra (music stories):

  • A nurse moves to Germany | DW Documentary

    12:32

    Nursing staff are in short supply in Germany, because not enough Germans want to perform this demanding, yet not very well-paid job. So more and more nurses are being recruited from abroad. Iyaloo from Namibia is one of them.

    In her homeland of Namibia, Iyaloo Akuunda studied nursing, but couldn’t find work. So, when she heard that Germany was looking for nurses, she decided to learn German and try her luck abroad. After a lot of hard work and help from a recruitment agency, she was offered a job at Düsseldorf University Hospital. Iyaloo was initially thrilled, even though it was hard to say goodbye to her family. But not everything in Germany is as she’d envisioned it would be. A report by Ruth Krause and Adrian Kriesch.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

    Subscribe to:
    DW Documentary:
    DW Documental (Spanish):
    DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

    For more visit:

    Instagram:

    Facebook:


    DW netiquette policy:

  • A gangster delivering groceries - Corona in South Africa | DW Documentary

    12:32

    Since late March, Cape Town, like all of South Africa, has been under lockdown to stop the spread of the coronavirus. Many residents depend on food deliveries to get by. In one part of Cape Town, the groceries come from a former organized crime boss.

    These days Poppie cooks meals for neighbors in need. But he says he will resume his career as a ganster once the lockdown is over. He has already spent 18 years in prison. Caroline Peters lives a few blocks away. She helps women suffering domestic abuse. The numbers, she says, are soaring. The government has gone so far as to ban the sale of alcohol during the pandemic to try to curb violence and crime. President Cyril Ramaphosa has been widely praised around the world for his strict lockdown measures. But women and the poor are paying a high price.
    A Report by Adrian Kriesch.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------
    DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

    Subscribe to:
    DW Documentary:
    DW Documental (Spanish):
    DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

    For more visit:

    Instagram:

    Facebook:


    DW netiquette policy:

  • Can Africas forests help save the world? | DW Documentary

    29:25

    Humans are destroying more and more natural habitats, which brings animals into closer contact with people -- and this can contribute to the outbreak of pandemics, like Covid-19. But several African countries are trying to protect forested areas. For example, most researchers believe that the Covid-19 virus originated in bats, and then crossed over to humans. The precise origins of Covid-19 are not yet clear. But there is no doubt that a number of new viruses have originated in the animal kingdom or are transmitted in the wild. The primary source of Covid-19 is widely believed to be bats; pangolins may have served as intermediate hosts. And the destruction of forests by humans has brought many animals closer to populated areas, which has increased the threat of new diseases.

    In Uganda and Kenya, virologists and zoologists are trying to determine whether there's a connection between human contact with wild animals and the spread of viruses. They're concerned that a deadly virus like Covid can spread from humans to certain species of animals. At the Bwindi National Park in Uganda, Dr. Gladys Kalema-Zikusoka, is working to protect mountain gorillas, an endangered species. She fears that the gorillas could fall victim to Covid-19, transmitted by humans. Her job has become more difficult, because a number of men who lost their jobs due to Covid restrictions have now turned to poaching gorillas.

    Kenyan scientist Augustine Baraza Obuyele is an expert on bats. He's been working at Mount Elgon on the Kenyan-Ugandan border, trying to discover new kinds of viruses among the bat population there -- viruses that could one day spread to humans, as Covid has. As humans continue to encroach on animal habitats, such as clear-cutting forests, there is an increased risk that infections could spread from animals to humans.

    The international community is concerned about these developments. For example, the U-N has declared a decade-long effort, set to begin next year, to protect and revive the world's ecosystems. The project, led by the UN's Environment Programme and its Food and Agriculture Organization, includes a number of re-forestation projects.

    Many African countries are cutting down forests to generate income, but others are committed to conservation efforts. For example, Kenya is trying to protect as much of the Mau Forest as possible. But to do this, the authorities have driven large numbers of indigenous people from their ancestral homeland. It will be difficult to find the right balance between protecting ecosystems and preserving the rights of people who live in those areas.

    (Reupload -- director's cut)

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch top documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

    Subscribe to:
    DW Documentary:

    DW Documental (Spanish):
    DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

    For more visit:

    Instagram:

    Facebook:


    We kindly ask viewers to read and stick to the DW netiquette policy on our channel:

  • Germany votes - The winners and the losers | DW Documentary

    28:26

    Germany is to get a new parliament - and a new chancellor. After 16 years, Angela Merkel is stepping down. Three candidates have spent months fighting to succeed her. Filmmaker Stephan Lamby followed their campaigns. Which one was most effective?

    Olaf Scholz, Annalena Baerbock and Armin Laschet found themselves locked in an increasingly tight race to win over voters for their parties and policies. We look at how the candidates and campaigns revamped their image and their manifestos in the ten months before the federal election. A hard-fought process that we get to watch close-up, against a backdrop of dramatic events that have shaped the past year.

    #documentary #Germany #GermanElection #DWDocumentary

    ______

    DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch top documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

    Subscribe to:
    ⮞ DW Documentary (English):
    ⮞ DW Documental (Spanish):
    ⮞ DW Documentary (Arabic):
    ⮞ DW Doku (German):
    ⮞ DW Documentary (Hindi):

    For more visit:
    Follow DW Documentary on Instagram:
    Follow DW Documental on Facebook:

    We kindly ask viewers to read and stick to the DW netiquette policy on our channel:

  • Syrian refugees after 5 years in Germany | DW Documentary

    12:32

    In 2015, the Suleimans fled to Germany from war-torn Syria. How are they faring? Have they managed to build a new life?

    While the four Suleiman children have become German citizens - and speak fluent German and have made lots of friends - their parents have had a tougher time fitting in. For four years, the family had to keep moving, until they found a permanent home in Berlin. The children’s father worries about the rest of the family that’s still in Syria. The war there continues to haunt him, so he’s sought psychological help. Their mother is learning German. She hopes that, when her children are a bit older, she can work in Germany as a nurse. The Suleimans are happy to be in Germany, even if it’s taken longer for them to settle in than they’d hoped. A report by Viktoria Kleber.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

    Subscribe to:
    DW Documentary:
    DW Documental (Spanish):
    DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

    For more visit:

    Instagram:

    Facebook:


    DW netiquette policy:

Shares

x

Check Also

Menu