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How does coronavirus attack your body? | COVID-19 Special

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  • How Coronavirus Attacks the Body | NYT News

    5:28

    It doesn’t take long for mild coronavirus symptoms to turn serious. These virtual reality images show how the virus can invade the lungs and kill.

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  • COVID-19 Animation: What Happens If You Get Coronavirus?

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  • HOW DOES COVID-19 AFFECT THE BODY?

    5:15

    Coronaviruses (CoV) are a family of viruses that cause sicknesses like the common cold, as well as more severe diseases, such as Middle East Respiratory Syndrome and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome. A novel coronavirus (nCoV) is a new strain – one that hasn’t previously been recognized in humans.
    Coronaviruses cause diseases in mammals and birds. A zoonotic virus is one that is transmitted between animals and people. When a virus circulating in animal populations infects people, this is termed a “spillover event”.
    How does CoVID-19 affect the body? The virus is fitted with protein spikes sticking out of the envelope that forms the surface and houses a core of genetic material. Any virus that enters your body looks for cells with compatible receptors – ones that allow it to invade the cell. Once they find the right cell, they enter and use the cell’s replication machinery to create copies of themselves. It is likely that COVID-19 uses the same receptor as SARS – found in both lungs and small intestines.
    It is thought that CoVID-19 shares many similarities with SARS, which has three phases of attack: viral replication, hyper-reactivity of the immune system, and finally pulmonary destruction. Early on in infection, the coronavirus invades two types of cells in the lungs – mucus and cilia cells. Mucus keeps your lungs from drying out and protects them from pathogens. Cilia beat the mucus towards the exterior of your body, clearing debris – including viruses! – out of your lungs. Cilia cells were the preferred hosts of SARS-CoV, and are likely the preferred hosts of the new coronavirus. When these cells die, they slough off into your airways, filling them with debris and fluid. Symptoms include a fever, cough, and breathing difficulties. Many of those infected get pneumonia in both their lungs.
    Enter the immune system. Immune cells recognize the virus and flood into the lungs. The lung tissue becomes inflamed. During normal immune function, the inflammatory process is highly regulated and is confined to infected areas. However, sometimes the immune system overreacts, and this results in damage to healthy tissue. More cells die and slough off into the lungs, further clogging them and worsening the pneumonia.
    As damage to the lungs increases, stage three begins, potentially resulting in respiratory failure. Patients that reach this stage of infection can incur permanent lung damage or even die. We see the same lesions in the lungs of those infected by the novel coronavirus as those with SARS. SARS creates holes in the lungs, so they look honeycomb-like. This is probably due to the aforementioned over-reactive immune response, which affects tissue both infected and healthy and creates scars that stiffen the lungs. As such, some patients may require ventilators to aid breathing.
    The inflammation also results in more permeable alveoli. This is the location of the thin interface of gas exchange, where your lungs replace carbon dioxide in your blood with fresh oxygen you just inhaled. Increased permeability causes fluid to leak into the lungs. This decreases the lungs’ ability to oxygenate blood, and in severe cases, floods them so that you become unable to breathe. Sometimes, this can be fatal.
    The immune system’s over-reaction can also cause another kind of damage. Proteins called cytokines are the immune system’s alarm system, recruiting immune cells to the infection site. Over-production of cytokines can result in a cytokine storm, where there is large-scale inflammation in the body. Blood vessels become more permeable and fluid seeps out. This makes it difficult for blood and oxygen to reach the rest of the body and can result in multi-organ failure. This has happened in the most severe cases of CoVid-19. Although there are no specific treatments for coronaviruses, symptoms can be treated through supportive care. Also, vaccines are currently in development.
    What can you do to protect yourself from CoVid-19? Basic protocol comes down to regular hand washing, avoiding close contact with anyone coughing or sneezing, avoiding unnecessary contact with animals, washing hands after contact with animals, thoroughly cooking meat and eggs prior to consumption, and covering your mouth and nose while coughing or sneezing. Respiratory viruses are typically transmitted via droplets in sneezes or coughs of those infected, so preventing their travel stops the spread of disease.

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  • How COVID-19 Affects the Body

    4:03

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    #Coronavirus #COVID-19 #Virus

    COVID-19 is the short name for the disease known as novel coronavirus disease 2019. Coronaviruses are a large group of similar viruses. Some are known to infect humans, such as SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV. The one that causes COVID-19 is called SARS-CoV-2. All coronaviruses are named for the crown-like “spikes” that cover their surface, called spike, or “S,” proteins. Inside the virus, genetic material, called RNA, is made up of genes. Genes carry the information to make more copies of the virus. The virus can infect you if it enters your mouth, nose, or lungs. Inside your body, the S protein of the virus locks to a receptor on the surface of one of your cells. This can trigger the virus to enter the cell in a couple of ways. It may cause the virus to fuse with the cell surface, then release its genes into the cell. Or, the cell may pull the virus inside by enclosing it in a sac. Once inside, the virus can fuse to the sac and release its genes. Next, the genes use a structure in your cell, called a ribosome, to make new copies of the virus. The new viruses travel to the surface of the cell. There, they can leave to infect more cells. In the meantime, viral S proteins left on the surface of the infected cell can cause it to fuse with nearby healthy cells, forming a giant cell. This may be another way for the virus to spread between cells. People may be infected with COVID-19 for two to fourteen days before symptoms appear. The three main symptoms of COVID-19 are: a fever, cough, and shortness of breath. Other symptoms may include: tiredness, body aches, stuffy nose, sore throat, diarrhea and vomiting, loss of appetite, and loss of smell. Most people have a mild illness and can recover at home. Some people who have the virus may not get sick at all or may show no symptoms. But, if you have trouble breathing, or any other symptoms that are severe, call your doctor or the emergency room. They will tell you what to do. For most people who have the virus, the risk for serious illness is thought to be low. People sixty-five years and older may have a higher risk for serious illness. And, people of any age may be at high-risk if they have underlying conditions, such as: chronic lung disease or asthma; serious heart conditions; diabetes; severe obesity; chronic kidney disease, and liver disease. High-risk groups also include people with a weakened immune system, including: those on certain medications, such as corticosteroids; people in cancer treatment; and those with HIV or AIDS. Even if you aren’t in a high-risk group, it’s important to practice social distancing, which means keeping at least two meters, or six feet, between you and other people. This helps prevent infections and serious illness in others as well as yourself. For up-to-date information about COVID-19 and other ways to prevent its spread, visit the CDC website.

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  • Coronavirus Animation: High Impact Demonstrates How COVID-19 Impacts the Body

    1:56


    Coronavirus, which causes COVID-19, originated in the city of Wuhan, China, and has since spread across the globe at an alarming rate. We produced this 3D coronavirus animation to show how COVID-19 is believed to be transmitted while educating the public on the symptoms that may be caused by COVID-19.

    Follow the World Health Organization for updates about the international spread of Coronavirus and how to protect yourself from COVID-19:


    Follow the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to learn how the coronavirus outbreak is currently spreading across the United States, and recommendations for improving your safety and resilience.


    If you are currently leading government or private efforts to combat the coronavirus outbreak and you think our visualizations could help in your mission to educate the public or relevant stakeholders about this virus, we encourage you to visit our website, view some of our medical work, and reach out to learn how we can help.

  • Medical Animation explaining Coronavirus MOA - How Coronavirus attacks a human body

    1:13

    our latest video-
    our dedicated microsite-
    While the exact mechanism of action for the 2019 Novel Coronavirus is still unknown, the 3D structure has been published; This structure shows that the virus is very similar to other coronaviruses and so we show the mechanism of action of how coronavirus gains cell entry, coopts the human cell into producing copies of itself, and causes apoptosis or cell death.

    For more info on the biology, the spread and the response to 2019 nCoV see our microsite:


    The 3D ribbon structure was taken from Innophore who have created the structure based on the genome sequencing data published by Chinese researchers. You can find it here:

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  • The immune systems response to a coronavirus attack

    2:34

    COVID-19 is not different from how influenza viruses attack the body. Therefore, the immune system has a predictable response to it.
    A cascade of viral particles enters the body through the nose, eyes or mouth. Breathing carries some of these particles to the lower respiratory tract.
    Here the spike proteins of the coronavirus, acting like a key, lock into epithelial cells. SARS-CoV-2 is able to stay undetected longer than many flu or coronaviruses.
    Its spike proteins are able to gain entry by unlocking the ACE2 protein on the lung cells.In the case of SARS-CoV-2, the virus seems better at penetrating deeper.
    The inflammation triggers a fluid build-up in the lungs. Apart from producing mucus and a runny nose to trap viral particles and prevent their ingress.
    The fluids also contain the residue of a host of specialised cells — including T cells. These carpet bomb and damage many of the body’s own cells as well as the viral particles.
    It is in expelling this fluid that a dry cough, characteristic of the coronavirus infection, begins. As more airsacs are infected, the lungs find it harder to extract oxygen from the air. And eventually, this aggravates breathlessness.

  • How Corona Virus Affects Your Body? | COVID-19 | The Dr Binocs Show | Peekaboo Kidz

    9:09

    Pandemics Explained | How Pandemics Occur | Corona Virus Pandemic | Epidemics | Wuhan Coronavirus | What Is Pandemic | Influenza Pandemic | SARS | Small Pox | Corona Pandemics | World Health Organisation | WHO | Covid19 Pandamics | Flu | Spread Of Pandemics | Pandemics Information | Best Kids Show | Dr Binocs Show | Dr Binocs | Peekaboo Kidz

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  • This is what Coronavirus does to the human body | COVID-19

    1:55

    As COVID-19 advances, we implement more and more measures to battle the spread of the disease, from thoroughly washing our hands to self-isolation and national lockdowns. But, do we actually know how Coronavirus affects our bodies and how it transmits?

    Video posted March 26th, 2020.

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  • What does Covid-19 do to the body? - BBC World Service

    3:12

    Covid-19 can affect the lungs, mind, immune system and many other parts of the body.

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    Covid-19 affects people very differently. For some, a fever, cough and breathlessness are as bad as it gets but others can be hospitalised for weeks as the virus takes hold. Covid-19 can affect the lungs and the body’s immune system, and can even lead to strokes and psychosis. Breathing problems and post-viral fatigue last for months in some cases. We still don’t know how anyone will react to Covid-19 until they get it but it’s obvious the effects can be devastating and that all health guidance should be followed.

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  • How Coronavirus Invades the Lungs

    1:29

    To learn more about coronavirus, please visit

    The coronavirus rapidly hijacks healthy cells in the respiratory tract and lungs. This can lead to pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). See how coronavirus takes over the lungs in this informative video.

  • How does Coronavirus affect our lungs?

    1:45

    We spoke to Professor Debby Bogaert, Scottish Senior Clinical Fellow and Honorary Consultant in paediatric infectious diseases at the University of Edinburgh about the effect of COVID-19 on our respiratory system.

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    Transcript
    COVID-19 is a respiratory illness caused by a new type of coronavirus, but what is the respiratory system and how is it affected by COVID-19? We spoke to Professor Debby Bogaert, Scottish Senior Clinical Fellow and Honorary Consultant in paediatric infectious diseases at Edinburgh University.

    Our respiratory system is a series of organs responsible for taking in oxygen and expelling carbon dioxide, also known as gas exchange. Professor Bogaert told us that when we become infected with COVID-19, it can cause an infection of part of this respiratory system known as the respiratory tree, which is found in our lungs. The respiratory tree, also called the bronchial tree, is a name given to the branch-like structure in our lungs which includes the bronchi right down to the tiny air sacs called alveoli. Professor Bogaert goes on to say that when we contract COVID-19 the lining of the respiratory tree typically becomes damaged, irritating the nerves in the lining of the airway, and causing that dry cough we’ve heard about. However for a small number of people, the infection can cause more severe problems by affecting what’s known as ‘gas exchange’. Gas exchange happens around the alveoli, those tiny air sacs at the tips of the respiratory tree - oxygen passes into the blood and carbon dioxide passes from the blood into the alveoli and is then exhaled - Professor Bogaert says that if COVID-19 affects this process, our body becomes less able to take on oxygen and get rid of carbon dioxide over time, and some people will need a ventilator to help them breathe.

  • How The Coronavirus Attacks Your Lungs | Deep Look

    5:11

    The new coronavirus packs a devastating punch. It penetrates deep into your lungs, causing our immune cells to go haywire and damage tiny air sacs – the alveoli – where oxygen normally flows into our blood.

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    ---

    The coronavirus has had an enormous impact on our lives: how we work, communicate and congregate. At this point, we’re familiar with how to protect ourselves from the virus – and the disease it causes, COVID-19 – by washing our hands thoroughly, wearing masks and social distancing.

    Most people who get the virus are mildly sick and will recover at home. For others, the virus can be severe, even fatal.

    One significant way the virus attacks is deep in our lungs.

    ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science:



    --- What are the symptoms of the new coronavirus?
    The Center for Disease Control advises on its website that “symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure to the virus. People with these symptoms or combinations of symptoms may have COVID-19: Cough, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing. Or at least two of these symptoms: fever; chills; Repeated shaking with chills; muscle pain; headache; sore throat; new loss of taste or smell.”

    --- How can I protect myself from the coronavirus?
    The Center for Disease Control has a comprehensive list of guidelines at cdc.gov, but the main tips to remember are: wash your hands often; avoid close contact with other people; cover your mouth and nose with a cloth face cover (like a mask or bandanna) when around others; cover coughs and sneezes with a tissue or your elbow; regularly clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces in your home.

    --- If you’ve had the new coronavirus, are you now immune?
    The Center for Disease Control states on its website: “We do not know yet if having antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 can protect someone from getting infected with that virus again, or how long that protection might last. Scientists are doing studies to answer those questions.”

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    #covid19 #coronavirus #deeplook

  • How COVID-19 Affects Your Lungs

    2:20

    COVID-19 is a disease caused by a virus called SARS-CoV-2. The virus – and your immune system’s reaction to it, inflammation – can damage your lungs, causing them to scar and stiffen or fill with fluid.

    This video is by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

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  • Medical Animation explaining Coronavirus Mechanism of Action - How Coronavirus attacks a human body

    1:23

    our latest video-
    While the exact mechanism of action for the 2019 Novel Coronavirus is still unknown, the 3D structure has been published; This structure shows that the virus is very similar to other coronaviruses and so we show the mechanism of action of how coronavirus gains cell entry, coopts the human cell into producing copies of itself, and causes apoptosis or cell death.

    For more info on the biology, the spread and the response to 2019 nCoV see our microsite:


    The 3D ribbon structure was taken from Innophore who have created the structure based on the genome sequencing data published by Chinese researchers. You can find it here:

  • How covid-19 attacks the lungs

    4:55

    Ajeet Vinayak of Georgetown University Hospital breaks down how the covid-19 virus attacks the lungs of patients, leaving possible long lasting damage. Read more: Subscribe to The Washington Post on YouTube:

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  • How COVID-19 Turns Your Immune System Against You

    3:49

    Learn more about the Yale School of Medicine's response to COVID-19, visit:

    Dr. Akiko Iwasaki is an Investigator of the HHMI and Waldemar Von Zedtwitz Professor of Department of Immunobiology, and of Department of Molecular Cellular and Developmental Biology. Her laboratory is actively engaged in both surveillance and research efforts to understand viral prevalence and in studying the immune response that leads to protective versus pathologic consequences of COVID-19.

    Faculty across Yale, including at the School of Medicine, School of Nursing, School of Public Health, School of Engineering & Applied Science and Faculty of Arts and Sciences are actively engaged in research, innovation, and clinical efforts to combat COVID-19.

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  • How does COVID-19 attack the lungs? Penn State Health Coronavirus

    40

    How does COVID-19 attack the lungs?

    Dr. Chris DeFlitch, VP and Chief Medical Information Officer


    Penn State Health is committed to keeping the public informed and helping people find the most up-to-date, reliable information about Coronavirus disease 2019, also known as COVID-19.

    You can learn more about Penn State Health’s response to COVID-19 here:

    Dr. Chris DeFlitch, VP and Chief Medical Information Officer

  • Coronavirus: How COVID-19 is attacking our brains

    2:53

    COVID-19 patients have reported having strokes, delirium and a loss of senses, but how does the novel coronavirus affect people’s brains in these ways?

    Researchers say it’s an “ingenious” virus. They’re learning more every day about how COVID-19, once thought to be primarily respiratory, can impact our minds long term.

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  • Coronavirus explained: How it attacks the body and how scientists think we can beat it | ABC News

    3:29

    Take a look at COVID-19 at twelve million times its actual size. How does this tiny particle, that has turned the world upside down, actually work and what is the weakness that scientists think they can exploit to beat it?

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  • How the Novel Coronavirus Infects a Cell: Science, Simplified

    1:40

    An animated look at how the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19 enters the body and infects cells. Illustrated by a Scripps Research scientist, this installment of Science, Simplified gives an overview of the entire infection process.

    Science, Simplified is a new series from Scripps Research highlighting key scientific concepts in short, easy-to-understand videos.

    Video Script:

    Due to its unique features, the novel coronavirus is particularly good at infecting new cells, both in the upper respiratory tract, as well as deeper down in the lungs. Here’s a look at how the process takes place.
    1. The microscopic virus enters through the nose or mouth, where it begins its infection of our airways.
    2. The outer spike protein of the coronavirus latches onto specific receptors on the surface of cells in our respiratory tract. In the case of COVID-19, the virus latches on to the ACE2 receptor.
    3. This binding triggers the process by which the virus fuses into human cells. The viral envelope merges with the oily membrane of our own cells, allowing the virus to release its genetic material into the inside of the healthy cell.
    4. The genetic blueprint of the virus is RNA (instead of DNA), which acts as a molecular message, instructing our host cell machinery to read the template and translate it into proteins that make up new virus particles.
    5. The hijacking persists, as the human host cell continues to generate more copies of the virus, assemble these copies into viable particles and traffic them to the outer edges of the cell for release.
    6. Each infected cell may produce and release millions of copies of the virus, which can then go on to infect other neighboring cells, as well as neighboring people when they are expelled from the airways in droplets via coughing and sneezing.

  • How long does immunity against the coronavirus last? | COVID-19 Special

    11:56

    Immunity has been on everyone's lips since the pandemic began. Now, it's more pressing than ever, as infections rapidly rise in parts. Immunity depends on antibodies - proteins in the bloodstream that fight pathogens and viruses. Their production depends on the severity of an infection. But immunity from COVID may only last a short period. The elderly show a significantly faster reduction in antibodies than the young. There's also evidence that some people don’t develop immunity at all.

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  • How Coronavirus Kills: Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome & COVID 19 Treatment

    11:05

    How COVID-19 causes fatalities from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) by pulmonologist and critical care specialist Dr. Seheult of
    This video illustrates how viruses such as the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 can cause pneumonia or widespread lung inflammation resulting in ARDS.
    Includes evidenced-based ARDS treatment breakthrough strategies: Low tidal volume ventilation, paralysis, and prone positioning.

    Note: this video was recorded on January 28, 2020, with the best information available. Acute respiratory distress is, of course, not the ONLY way COVID 19 causes fatalities (other causes include heart failure, thrombosis (stroke), etc.)

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    #coronavirus #COVID19 #ARDS

  • COVID-19 Coronavirus Vaccine: How Does It Affect Your Body?

    5:42

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    This video is a collaboration between Nucleus Medical Media and our friends at the What If Channel. To watch interesting hypothetical scenarios on the human body, humanity, the planet and the cosmos, please visit the What If Channel at


    This video explains what happens in your body when you get the COVID-19 mRNA vaccine, including how the vaccine helps your immune system recognize and fight the COVID-19 virus, possible side effects from the vaccine, and how long before you are fully-vaccinated against the virus after receiving the vaccine.

    Hash tags: #CoronavirusVaccine #COVID19Vaccine #Coronavirus

  • The coronavirus does not only attack the lungs

    1:53

    Covid-19 overwhelmingly kills people by attacking their lungs, but here’s what else it does to your body.
    #covid-19 #coronavirus #NotJustCough

    Check out these playlists about Coronavirus

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  • Coronavirus: Under the microscope | ABC News

    3:28

    Take a look at COVID-19 at twelve million times its actual size. How does this tiny particle, that has turned the world upside down, actually work and what is the weakness that scientists think they can exploit to beat it?

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  • The Science Behind How the Coronavirus Affects the Brain | WSJ

    7:21

    New research could help explain why thousands of Covid-19 survivors are facing debilitating neurological symptoms months after initially getting sick. WSJ breaks down the science behind how the coronavirus affects the brain, and what this could mean for long-haul patients. Illustration: Nick Collingwood/WSJ

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    #WSJ #Coronavirus #Science

  • Coronavirus outbreak explained through 3D Medical Animation

    6:09

    This video is available in different language subtitles English, Korean (
    Our dedicated microsite-
    The 2019 nCoV Novel Coronavirus is fast threatening to become a pandemic. This 3D medical animation explains the story so far, covering what is a pandemic, current rates of infection and tips to protect against infections. It also delves into the biology and mechanism of action MoA that coronavirus uses to infect and destroy human cells. Though the exact MoA for this coronavirus is not known.

    Check back daily for more information as it develops. Alternatively, see our website: , or our dedicated microsite above. The PDF in the video is available for free download also. It is provided under a Wiki CC4.0 creative commons license.

    For those of you leading government or private institutions or in the medical community , and if you think our visualizations can help in any way, please feel free to reach out.

    Also, any voice over artists, translators, that can offer to support our effort, please contact us on info@scientificanimations.com .

    Link to the 3D structure mentioned in the video:

  • SARS-CoV-2 Infection Process

    2:21

    SARS-CoV-2 (Covid-19) Infection Process
    Video of scientific popularization. Animation.

    In this animation, a process in which a multitude of actors intervene (Enzymes, polysaccharides, cell organelles ...) is exposed, in a very simplified way.
    It is not a scientific video, but an outreach video that tries to explain, in the simplest possible way, a very complex process.
    I hope you like it.
    Guillermo Corrales Morales
    Music: Carlos Estella

  • The Science Behind How the Body Clears Coronavirus | WSJ

    8:22

    Understanding how the body clears the new coronavirus is becoming more important as the U.S. begins to reopen. WSJ’s Daniela Hernandez explains how the body fights infection and why feeling better doesn’t equal being virus-free. Photo illustration: Laura Kammermann

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    #WSJ #Science #Coronavirus

  • The Immune System, T-Cells, and Covid-19

    3:50

    So far we’ve been pretty focused on the antibody side of things during the pandemic, but recent work suggests that T Cells aren’t sitting this one out, and that could mean something significant in terms of immunity, even for people who haven’t been infected with the new coronavirus.

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    #healthcaretriage #covid-19 #covid

  • Which organs does COVID-19 affect the most?

    2:54

    Coronavirus spares no major organ in the body. For some patients, the virus spreads its lethal tentacles to multiple organs. If the virus is not detected in the initial stage, it invades the lower respiratory tract.

    The lungs are just the ground zero. Other organs that can be affected include the heart and blood vessels, kidneys, gut, and brain. The virus enters the cells by binding to receptors angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 or ACE2 which are found on it.

    These receptors act as the site of entry and are found in the cells of multiple organs, making it easy for the virus to enter.

  • How COVID-19 Affects Your Heart

    2:12

    COVID-19 is a disease caused by a virus called SARS-CoV-2. The virus most commonly affects the lungs but it can also lead to serious heart problems. COVID-19 can damage the lungs, preventing enough oxygen from reaching the heart muscle.

    This video is by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

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  • Origin, transmissibility, severity: What we know about the Omicron variant so far | COVID19 Special

    11:39

    The new coronavirus variant omicron has so far been found in 57 countries, the World Health Organization said, warning that the rate of hospitalization resulting from infection is likely to rise. The WHO said it needed more data to evaluate the severity of the disease caused by the new variant. Even if the severity is equal or potentially even lower than for delta variant, it is expected that hospitalizations will increase if more people become infected and that there will be a time lag between an increase in the incidence of cases and an increase in the incidence of deaths, it said.

    The newest COVID variant was first detected in South Africa, but that doesn't mean omicron originated there. It's a sign of the country's progress in gene sequencing.

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    #Omicron #Coronavirus #Covid19

  • Can the coronavirus cause permanent brain damage? | COVID-19 Special

    11:49

    A study shows the new coronavirus could seriously damage the brain and central nervous system, leading to psychosis, paralysis and strokes. Researchers are calling for more extensive studies to investigate the long-term risks for Covid-19 patients.
    And DW science correspondent Derrick Williams answers your questions about the state of coronavirus vaccine research.

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    #Coronavirus #Covid19 #Vaccine

  • How antibodies neutralize the novel coronavirus: Science, Simplified

    2:01

    An animated look at the immune response to the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19. Learn how scientists are studying the antibodies produced by people exposed to SARS-CoV-2. These antibodies could be used to create treatments or vaccines for the virus.

    Script:

    Antibodies are Y-shaped proteins produced by our immune system after we are exposed to a disease-causing invader, such as bacteria or a virus.

    These proteins help the body remember the threat and be better prepared for the next encounter.

    Antibodies to the novel coronavirus recognize the virus’s outer spike protein enabling them to bind to the surface of the virus, preventing the virus particles from attaching to the host cell.

    Even if the virus successfully attaches, antibodies can prevent it from penetrating our cell membranes.

    If the virus still manages to enter the cell, antibodies can still prevent the virus from releasing its genome into the host cell for replication.

    Antibodies bound to the virus can also signal to other components of our immune system, targeting the virus for destruction.

    Scientists are trying to use antibodies both as a way to treat COVID-19 and prevent the disease from taking hold.

    Some researchers are studying antibodies taken from recovered COVID-19 patients.

    These antibodies could act as a medicine for the newly infected.

    Other scientists are focused on how the antibody interacts with coronavirus spike proteins, which may enable them to design a successful vaccine that instructs our bodies to generate effective antibodies against the virus.

    The long-term hope is that we might also be able to identify “broadly neutralizing antibodies,” a type of antibody that could defuse not just this specific viral strain, but also offshoots that occur because of natural mutations in the virus over time.

  • Understanding the extent of damage COVID-19 does to the body

    10:16

    As the number of coronavirus cases continues to surge worldwide, health experts are learning more about the extent of the damage COVID-19 can do. The lungs have been considered ground zero, but now doctors are finding its reach extends to other organs. Dr. Qanta Ahmed, a New York pulmonologist and intensive care specialist, joined CBSN to break it all down.

  • Everything About Coronavirus | Covid-19 Explained | The Dr Binocs Show | Peekaboo Kidz

    31:55

    Everything About Corona Virus | Covid-19 Explained | Covid 19 Symptoms | Coronavirus Outbreak | History Of Covid-19 | Coronavirus In India | World Health Organisation | Wuhan Virus | Safety Measures For Covid-19 | Video For Kids | Science Videos | Best Kids Show | Dr Binocs Show | Peekaboo Kidz

    Hey kids, in this video, Dr Binocs will explain Everything About Coronavirus | The Dr Binocs Show | Peekaboo Kidz

    Make sure you watch the whole video to know all the answers to your curious questions!

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  • The Immune System

    4:44

    This video describes the Immune System and explains how it detects and attacks any foreign organism that enters the body.

    We learn how the team in the MRC Centre for Transplantation at King’s College London have developed a way to harness the power of the Immune System after a transplant, whilst maintaining the body’s capacity to resist infectious diseases.

    Produced by Figment Productions.

    Learn more about the immune system and how it fights back against #COVID19:

    You can find more on the science behind COVID-19 in this playlist:

  • Coronavirus Pandemic Update 55: How COVID-19 Infection Attacks The Immune System & Differs From HIV

    11:09

    COVID-19 Update 55 with Roger Seheult, MD of

    Dr. Seheult illustrates new findings from Nature (a peer-reviewed journal) about how the SARS-CoV-2 virus may infect T-cells and render them ineffective during COVID 19 infection. A comparison is also made to how HIV infects T-cells with a key difference being that HIV actually utilizes T-cells of the human immune system to replicate itself (and this has not been observed with SARS-CoV-2. Other topics include a medical review by the Mayo Clinic about potential benefits of sauna/hydrothermal therapy (brief core temperature elevation), and a new vent multiplexer that allows some individual adjustment when treating multiple patients with one ventilator.

    Links referenced in this video:

    Johns Hopkins Tracker -

    Worldometer -

    P&T Community -

    Business Insider -

    Mayo Clinic Review -

    Cellular & Molecular Immunology -

    Nature Medicine -


    Some previous videos from this series (visit MedCram.com for the full series):
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 54: COVID-19 Antibody vs. PCR Testing; When to Relax Social Distancing?:
    -Coronavirus Pandemic Update 53: Anticoagulation; Can Mechanical Ventilation Make COVID 19 Worse?:
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 52: Ivermectin Treatment; Does COVID-19 Attack Hemoglobin?:
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 51: State by State Projections; Ultrasound to Diagnose COVID19 Pneumonia:
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 50: Dip in Daily New Deaths; Research on Natural Killer Cells & COVID-19:
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 49: New Data on COVID-19 vs Other Viral Infections (Ventilator Outcomes):
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 48: Curve Flattening in California, PPE in the ICU, Medication Trials:
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 47: Searching for Immunity Boosters & Possible Lessons From Spanish Flu:
    -Coronavirus Pandemic Update 46: Can Hot/Cold Therapy Boost Immunity? More on Hydroxychloroquine
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 45: Sharing Ventilators, More on Sleep, Immunity, & COVID-19 Prevention
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 44: Loss of Smell & Conjunctivitis in COVID-19, Is Fever Helpful?
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 43: Shortages, Immunity, & Can a TB Vaccine (BCG) Help Prevent COVID-19?
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 42: Immunity to COVID-19 and is Reinfection Possible?
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 41: Shelter In Place, FDA Investigates Hydroxychloroquine for COVID-19:
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 40: Ibuprofen and COVID-19 (are NSAIDs safe?), trials of HIV medications:
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 39: Rapid COVID-19 Spread with Mild or No Symptoms, More on Treatment:
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 38: How Hospitals & Clinics Can Prepare for COVID-19, Global Cases Surge:
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 37: The ACE-2 Receptor - The Doorway to COVID-19 (ACE Inhibitors & ARBs):
    - How Coronavirus Kills: Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) & Treatment:

    Many other videos on COVID-19 (coronavirus outbreak, coronavirus symptoms, Spanish Flu pandemic, influenza, coronavirus epidemic, coronavirus vaccine, ultrasound to diagnose COVID-19) and other medical topics (ECG Interpretation, hypertension, anticoagulation, DKA, acute kidney injury, influenza, measles, mechanical ventilation, etc.) at MedCam.com

    Speaker: Roger Seheult, MD
    Board Certified in Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Disease, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine.

    MedCram provides videos to a variety of medical schools, education programs, and institutions (please contact us at customers@medcram.com if you are interested)

    Media Contact: emayer@medcram.com
    Media contact info:

    MedCram medical videos are for medical education and exam preparation, and NOT intended to replace recommendations from your doctor.
    #COVID19 #SARSCoV2 #Coronavirus

  • More long-term damage caused by COVID-19 than expected | COVID-19 Special

    11:44

    Thousands of people of all ages are staying sick for weeks -- even months. A study by Denmark's Aarhus University found a third of corona patients suffered long-term side effects. For some, the virus doesn't just come and go. It stays. The disease can damage the lungs, heart and brain, increasing the risk of long-term health problems.

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    #COVID19 #corona #LongTermEffects

  • Sensory impairment: How the coronavirus is getting on our nerves | COVID-19 Special

    12:42

    Many people who catch Covid-19 report a loss of taste and smell. For some it's one of a range of symptoms. For others, it's the only one. Scientists studying the phenomenon believe the sensory impairment could be caused by the virus attacking nerve cells in the nose. This leads to questions about the disease's effect on the brain.

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    #coronavirus #COVID-19 #brain

  • Immune Response to Viruses: How the Body Reacts

    9:23

    Whether it’s fighting the coronavirus or the common cold, the body’s immune system has several mechanisms to combat viral infection. The first response to a viral infection is the rapid-onset innate response. There are several mechanisms involved in innate immunity: interferons, natural killer cells, and antigen-presenting cells.

    Further information can be found under the following links:



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  • Flu Attack! How A Virus Invades Your Body | Krulwich Wonders | NPR

    3:39

    When you get the flu, viruses turn your cells into tiny factories that help spread the disease. In this animation, NPR's Robert Krulwich and medical animator David Bolinsky explain how a flu virus can trick a single cell into making a million more viruses.

    See and hear the rest of the story on NPR.org:

    Credit: Robert Krulwich, David Bolinsky, Jason Orfanon

    Copyright © 2009 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use for further information.


    For permission to reuse this video, visit our permissions pages at npr.org

  • Coronavirus Pandemic Update 52: Ivermectin Treatment; Does COVID-19 Attack Hemoglobin?

    20:23

    COVID-19 Update 52 with Roger Seheult, MD of

    Dr. Seheult illustrates the possible mechanism of the medication Ivermectin for a potential treatment for COVID-19 and discusses recent articles about the possible impact of coronavirus on hemoglobin. Interesting projections and data from the USA, Nordic Countries, and New Zealand is also discussed.

    This video was recorded on April 8, 2020.
    Links referenced in this video:

    Johns Hopkins Tracker -

    Worldometer -

    IMHE COVID-19 Projection Graphs -

    NYT -

    ChemRxiv -

    ScienceDirect -

    MSN -

    Some previous videos from this series (visit MedCram.com for the full series):
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 51: State by State Projections; Ultrasound to Diagnose COVID19 Pneumonia:
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 50: Dip in Daily New Deaths; Research on Natural Killer Cells & COVID-19:
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 49: New Data on COVID-19 vs Other Viral Infections (Ventilator Outcomes):
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 48: Curve Flattening in California, PPE in the ICU, Medication Trials:
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 47: Searching for Immunity Boosters & Possible Lessons From Spanish Flu:
    -Coronavirus Pandemic Update 46: Can Hot/Cold Therapy Boost Immunity? More on Hydroxychloroquine
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 45: Sharing Ventilators, More on Sleep, Immunity, & COVID-19 Prevention
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 44: Loss of Smell & Conjunctivitis in COVID-19, Is Fever Helpful?
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 43: Shortages, Immunity, & Can a TB Vaccine (BCG) Help Prevent COVID-19?
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 42: Immunity to COVID-19 and is Reinfection Possible?
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 41: Shelter In Place, FDA Investigates Hydroxychloroquine for COVID-19:
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 40: Ibuprofen and COVID-19 (are NSAIDs safe?), trials of HIV medications:
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 39: Rapid COVID-19 Spread with Mild or No Symptoms, More on Treatment:
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 38: How Hospitals & Clinics Can Prepare for COVID-19, Global Cases Surge:
    - Coronavirus Pandemic Update 37: The ACE-2 Receptor - The Doorway to COVID-19 (ACE Inhibitors & ARBs):
    - How Coronavirus Kills: Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) & Treatment:

    Many other videos on COVID-19 (coronavirus outbreak, coronavirus symptoms, Spanish Flu pandemic, influenza, coronavirus epidemic, ultrasound to diagnose COVID-19) and other medical topics (ECG Interpretation, hypertension, DKA, acute kidney injury, influenza, measles, mechanical ventilation, etc.) at MedCam.com

    Speaker: Roger Seheult, MD
    Board Certified in Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Disease, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine.

    MedCram provides videos to a variety of medical schools, education programs, and institutions (please contact us at customers@medcram.com if you are interested)

    Media Contact: Hayley@MedCram.com
    Media contact info:

    MedCram medical videos are for medical education and exam preparation, and NOT intended to replace recommendations from your doctor.
    #COVID19 #SARSCoV2 #Coronavirus

  • How does COVID-19 affect the heart?

    4:49

    The effects of COVID-19 on the lungs are well-known. As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, more information is becoming available about the role the virus, called SARS-CoV-2, has on the heart. Individuals with known cardiovascular disease are at an increased risk of more severe complications from respiratory viral illnesses, including the flu and COVID-19, says Dr. Leslie Cooper, chair of the Department of Cardiology at Mayo Clinic.

    We know that during severe SARS-CoV-2 infection, heart function may decrease. Sometimes this decrease is a consequence of the systemic inflammatory response to infection, and occasionally, in some people, because of direct viral infection in the heart.

    Read more:

    More health and medical news on the Mayo Clinic News Network.

    Journalists: Clean and nat sound versions of this pkg available for download at

    Register (free) at

  • Heres how coronavirus attacks the body | Just the FAQs: Deep Dive

    3:25

    How does coronavirus enter the body, and why does it become fatal for some compared to just a cough or fever for others?
    RELATED:

    U.S. exports of surgical masks, ventilators and other personal protective gear to China skyrocketed in January and February, when the coronavirus was wreaking havoc in the country where it began and as U.S. intelligence agencies warned it would soon spread.

    American companies sold more than $17.5 million worth of face masks, more than $13.6 million in surgical garments and more than $27.2 million in ventilators to China during the first two months of the year, far exceeding that of any other similar period in the past decade, according to the most recent foreign trade data available from the U.S. Census Bureau.

    » Subscribe to USA TODAY:
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    #coronavirus #covid19

  • How does coronavirus attack the body?

    3:01

    Sky's Rowland Manthorpe has been looking at how COVID-19 affects the body and what happens if you end up in hospital.

    Sky News videos are now available in Spanish here/Los video de Sky News están disponibles en español aquí

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  • UK Covid-19 lab: What is coronavirus and how does it attack the body? - BBC Newsnight

    5:06

    Newsnight has been behind the scenes at a Bristol University laboratory to understand how British scientists are getting to grips with coronavirus.
    Subscribe to our channel here:

    The government has published its action plan for dealing with the virus, which involves three phases - contain; delay; mitigate - alongside ongoing research.

    The emphasis is currently on the contain and research phases, officials say, but planning for the delay and mitigate stages is already in train.

    Deborah Cohen reports.

    Coronavirus Budget: How will the government respond?
    Inside the lab trying to understand Coronavirus -
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    Coronavirus and fake news – what to believe? -
    Coronavirus cases pass 50 as UK publishes its plan -
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    Coronavirus: How prepared is the NHS for an outbreak? -
    Coronavirus: How is it affecting the economy? -
    Coronavirus: How should China's handling of the crisis inform our response? -
    Coronavirus: Is the UK’s response to China virus proportionate? -
    Coronavirus: How could it be stopped? -
    Coronavirus: What is it and should we be worried? -

    #Coronavirus #Covid19 #CoronaOutbreak #2019nCov

    Newsnight is the BBC's flagship news and current affairs TV programme - with analysis, debate, exclusives, and robust interviews.

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  • WATCH: How does Coronavirus attack your body?

    12:34

    At the start of the pandemic, we knew very little about how the virus affects the human body and what happens to our organs when infected with the Coronavirus. We know much more about that now, than what we did at the start of the outbreak. However, even with all the knowledge we’ve obtained, the case numbers aren’t showing any signs of slowing down.

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