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Journey to a Black Hole - Uncovering a Mystery | SPACETIME - SCIENCE SHOW

  • Journey to a Black Hole - Uncovering a Mystery | SPACETIME - SCIENCE SHOW

    47:29

    We are surrounded by an intangible infinity: a universe in which the Earth is merely a grain of sand on the shore of an ocean. But we are unravelling more and more of the secrets of the universe which surrounds us. And that includes black holes, bottomless pits like the jaws of hell which devour all material that comes too close to them. Even light has no chance of escaping from them. But how does a Black Hole form? Are there any near us? And can they pose a threat to us? A look at the universe presents us with pictures of fascinating and confusing beauty: landscapes of light and gas and stardust, formed by cosmic wind and radiation. Our telescopes are discovering more and more wonders of the universe. They are looking far out into space and thus far back into the past. The centre of our galaxy is marked by a super-heavy Black Hole: an astronomical object with an inconceivable gravitational pull. Nothing can escape from it. The black hole at the centre of our galaxy is known as Sagittarius A-star. Of enormous size, it devours everything while remaining totally invisible.

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    #BlackHole #Universe #Spacetime

  • THE UNIVERSE - Out of Nothing: Infinity | SPACETIME - SCIENCE SHOW

    48:20

    SPACETIME - SCIENCE SHOW: The beginning of everything was the Big Bang. The creation of our universe was set in motion. But what came before the big bang? And what happened right after the big bang? We are fascinated by the infinite vastness of the universe. A vastness inconceivable to anything we can imagine. But how do we know that the universe is infinite? These are the questions humanity has been preoccupied with since we looked up at the stars: where do we come from? Where are we going? And where is our place in the infinity of the cosmos?

    The Big Bang is the absolute starting point of our universe. The birth of space and time. But was there really nothing before that? A nothing beyond our imagination, or was there something before the big bang? What cosmologists and astrophysicists can say with certainty: Our universe came into existence exactly 13.8 billion years ago. And everything started from a single speck. A tiny speck where our three-dimensional universe, space, was buried. But where was this speck, this dot? There is no answer comprehensible for average human imagination. Only mathematics helps here. And it states: this three-dimensional, strongly curved speck was just there.

    After the big bang, our universe ballooned. And continues to expand today, maybe for all eternity. Nevertheless, astronomers define the universe as manageable: it is as big as the eye can see. It consists of what we can observe in principle. In order to discover and observe galaxies and stars, we need to light. The light of our central star, our sun, takes 8 minutes to reach us. The light of the nearest stars a few years. Tens of thousands of years from the next galaxies. The Hubble Space Telescope photographs galaxies several billion light-years away, and satellites measure the microwave radiation produced only 400,000 years after the Big Bang. With this data, cosmologists measure our universe in space and time.

    Let there be light! In this episode of Spacetime, Professor Ulrich Walter explains how out of nowhere our universe emerged. How it expanded, and what happened and continues to happen today. We focus on the question whether our Universe will last forever, or whether it is finite. What would happen at the end? We examine the phenomena that our cosmos holds: What are dark energy and dark matter? Why black holes exist and how do wormholes work? Are there really parallel universes? And what does the detection of gravitational waves mean for science? We look at the theories, methods and instruments that cosmologists use to track down the origin and function of our universe.
    The view into space gives us images of a fascinating and bewildering beauty. Landscapes of light and gas and stardust, shaped by cosmic wind and radiation. We are surrounded by an intangible infinity. A universe in which the earth is just a grain of sand on the beach of an ocean. But we are deciphering more and more secrets of the universe around us.

    About the documentary series SPACETIME
    Take a look at the Earth from space: Prof. Dr. med. Ulrich Walter has fulfilled the dream of mankind. In 1993 he traveled to Earth orbit. For the science format Spacetime, the astronaut once again sets off for the universe. In this reportage series, the physicist and professor of space technology presents current space travel trends and pioneering discoveries in space research.
    The challenges of the dream call Astronaut, the new race of the space nations to the moon or the discovery of further Earth-like exoplanets: In this documentary series, Ulrich Walter proves how lifelike science can be and what answers space travel offers to some of the fundamental questions of human existence.
    In Spacetime, the viewer learns about the visions that space research is currently pursuing and what insights will change our future forever.

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    #Universe #bigbang #Spacetime

  • THE SUN - Giver Of Life & Death Star | SPACETIME - SCIENCE SHOW

    49:40

    SPACETIME - SCIENCE SHOW: It is the source of all life on Earth. The sun determines time and climate. A huge nuclear reactor full of seemingly infinite energy. A star whose presence all can feel firsthand. And yet only one star among billions in our galaxy. But the lifespan of the sun is finite. Its death will mean our death. The end of all life forms. But before its demise, our sun will demonstrate all its mighty power.

    The sun is at the end of its life cycle. Its diameter will expand and its luminosity will increase. The sun will swell into a red giant, swallowing the closest planet Mercury, and probably Venus and Earth as well. The Exodus of our solar system, as we know it. However, before that happens - life - as we know it, will be long gone. With the first initial expansion of the sun, the temperature on the surface of the earth will rise steadily. Our home planet will first turn into a desert planet. All higher life on earth scorched. In the end, the warming will be so great that the surface of the former Blue Planet will only consist of lava. But not only the high temperatures, even the changed UV spectrum of the sun will destroy every form of life on earth.

    In the end, the sun will have used up all of its hydrogen. What remains is a huge shell of helium. Shockwaves go through the star and after several explosions the sun throws off its outer shell. What's left is a glowing core of oxygen, carbon and helium no bigger than Earth. The red giant has become a white dwarf, which will cool down more and more. In the end, all that remains is a black, cold ball of slag and a planetary nebula from the remnants of the star's shell.

    When will it happen? In five to seven billion years. But the end of humanity will take place much earlier. In about 900 million years, the average temperature of our earth will have risen from the current 15°C to 30°C degrees. This will mean the end of life as we know it.
    The observation and research of the sun largely determines astrophysics. It forms the basis for understanding the structure of stars and the formation of planetary systems. Generations of people venerated or feared the sun. When the sun hid its face, it meant plague, death, and the end of the world.
    Only after the astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus had placed the sun at the center of our solar system did scientific exploration of the central star begin. Astronomy experienced a boom.
    In this episode Spacetime, Professor Ulrich Walter explains how stars and planetary systems are formed from ancient matter and supernova dust. How our sun came into being and how it works. Its construction and development over the billions of years of its lifetime. We study solar winds, eruptions and the black spots on our sun and what effects these phenomena have on our planet and life on Earth. We look at binary star systems and learn how light emerges. And Professor Walter shows us the end of the world: What happens when our sun dies?

    About the documentary series SPACETIME
    Take a look at the Earth from space: Prof. Dr. med. Ulrich Walter has fulfilled the dream of mankind. In 1993 he traveled to Earth orbit. For the science format Spacetime, the astronaut once again sets off for the universe. In this reportage series, the physicist and professor of space technology presents current space travel trends and pioneering discoveries in space research.
    The challenges of the dream call Astronaut, the new race of the space nations to the moon or the discovery of further Earth-like exoplanets: In this documentary series, Ulrich Walter proves how lifelike science can be and what answers space travel offers to some of the fundamental questions of human existence.
    In Spacetime, the viewer learns about the visions that space research is currently pursuing and what insights will change our future forever.

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    #Sun #Universe #Spacetime

  • Departure to Mars - Conquest of a Planet | SPACETIME - SCIENCE SHOW

    50:16

    SPACETIME - SCIENCE SHOW: August the 2nd, 2048. A space craft has just reached Mars. The crew has landed on the Red Planet: One giant leap for mankind. Seventy-nine years after the first moon landing man has set foot on another planet. This is a fictional scenario. But men on Mars will become a reality. We have known ever since the 1960s what it looks like on Mars. Dozens of probes have visited the Red Planet and sent back photographs and data. There have been reports of storms and barren deserts. In the end we are left with more questions than answers - especially the burning question of life, past or present, on our neighbour planet.
    Only a manned mission to Mars will solve the riddle once and for all, when scientists and engineers research the Red Planet on the spot.

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  • Back To The Moon - The Race Is On | SPACETIME - SCIENCE SHOW

    50:29

    In 1969, Neil Armstrong took the first steps on the lunar surface. Until 1972, only eleven other men followed in his footsteps. Then it was quiet around the Earth’s satellite and Mars was the new frontier. After the millennium, a comeback: China, Japan, India, Russia, Europe and the United States - the space nations want to go back to the moon. Cars, villages, vacation resorts? What is possible, what is fiction? Astronaut Prof. Dr. Ulrich Walter explains the hurdles in the new race to the moon in Spacetime.

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    #Moon #Space #SpaceTime

  • BACK TO THE MOON | SPACETIME - SCIENCE SHOW

    48:27

    SPACETIME - SCIENCE SHOW: On July 20, 1969, Neil Armstrong took that famous ‘one giant leap for mankind’ on the moon’s surface. By 1972, eleven other men followed in those lunar footsteps. All were US citizens. After that, interest waned. The super powers lost interest in its closest neighbor. As with many trends, the moon is experiencing a comeback: China, Japan, India, Russia, Europe and the USA - all known space nations - want a piece of it and are planning a return to the moon. A 2.0 run on the moon is in full swing.

    It was the first time that humanity was able to see their home from above, their blue planet. Us earthlings followed the journeys of Bill Anders, Frank Borman, and Jim Lovell, who were the first humans to leave Earth’s orbit on December 21, 1968, and enter the moon’s orbit, circling it. It was astronaut Bill Anders who used his camera to film the rising of the earth above the moon - a role reversal of the celestial bodies, and it was broadcast live on Christmas of that same year. The image of the earth as a lonely, beautiful and - from the perspective of outer space - tiny planet, moved millions of people to tears. This first flight to the moon was the real beginning of the conquest of the moon, our constant companion. Just over half a year later, Neil Armstrong and then Buzz Aldrin landed on the moon. Their landing on the Mare Tranquillitatis, the sea of tranquility, was the beginning of a new era in space travel.

    A total of six manned NASA missions landed on the moon. Twelve astronauts collected rock samples, carried out scientific experiments and proved with their landings that humans are able to travel to other celestial bodies. In 1972, NASA prematurely ended its lunar program. The scientific benefit did not justify the costs. But the real goal was achieved: with the moon landings, the United States was the uncontested leading space nation. It quieted down though and interest was lost in the Earth’s satellite. Russian and US astronauts limited exploration to space stations orbiting Earth. After the end of the Cold War, this led to the joint construction of the International Space Station ISS, which is occupied by an international team of six astronauts.

    But manned spaceflight is in the midst of change. The International Space Station is slowly but surely flying towards the twilight of its existence and space agencies are looking for new destinations with the moon, albeit for different reasons, becoming once again the focus of attention. While the race to the moon in the 1960s was still a part of the Cold War power struggle effort, the rekindled interest is of a purely scientific nature. The moon is being explored, measured and mapped. A permanent research station would be a new outpost of humanity in space. And for investors, the earth's moon is a tempting target, be it for future space tourism or for the promotion of raw materials. Measured in cosmic distances, the moon is relatively easy to reach. Flights there and back take a week. And so the moon would be an ideal location to test new technologies, do scientific research, or use it as a springboard for missions deeper into our solar system.

    In this episode of Spacetime, astronaut and scientist Ulrich Walter explains why the moon is suddenly so interesting to mankind. We explore if water exists on the moon and why its discovery would be of such consequence. Professor Walter reveals plans of the privately funded space agencies and how and why a permanent settlement on the moon is a viable possibility. He tells us about the pioneers of the Apollo missions and the first conquest. Professor Walter shows us how the moon could become a stepping stone into deeper space exploration. Many scientists and astronauts see our terrestrial satellite as a starting point to tackle the next great adventure of mankind: Manned journeys to Mars.

    About the documentary series SPACETIME
    Take a look at the Earth from space: Prof. Dr. med. Ulrich Walter has fulfilled the dream of mankind. In 1993 he traveled to Earth orbit. For the science format Spacetime, the astronaut once again sets off for the universe. In this reportage series, the physicist and professor of space technology presents current space travel trends and pioneering discoveries in space research.
    The challenges of the dream call Astronaut, the new race of the space nations to the moon or the discovery of further Earth-like exoplanets: In this documentary series, Ulrich Walter proves how lifelike science can be and what answers space travel offers to some of the fundamental questions of human existence.


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    #Moon #Science #Spacetime

  • TIMELAPSE OF THE FUTURE: A Journey to the End of Time

    29:21

    Support my work on Patreon: | Get the soundtrack: | How's it all gonna end? This experience takes us on a journey to the end of time, trillions of years into the future, to discover what the fate of our planet and our universe may ultimately be.

    We start in 2019 and travel exponentially through time, witnessing the future of Earth, the death of the sun, the end of all stars, proton decay, zombie galaxies, possible future civilizations, exploding black holes, the effects of dark energy, alternate universes, the final fate of the cosmos - to name a few.

    This is a picture of the future as painted by modern science - a picture that will surely evolve over time as we dig for more clues to how our story will unfold. Much of the science is very recent - and new puzzle pieces are still waiting to be found.

    To me, this overhead view of time gives a profound perspective - that we are living inside the hot flash of the Big Bang, the perfect moment to soak in the sights and sounds of a universe in its glory days, before it all fades away. Although the end will eventually come, we have a practical infinity of time to play with if we play our cards right. The future may look bleak, but we have enormous potential as a species.

    Featuring the voices of David Attenborough, Craig Childs, Brian Cox, Neil deGrasse Tyson, Michelle Thaller, Lawrence Krauss, Michio Kaku, Mike Rowe, Phil Plait, Janna Levin, Stephen Hawking, Sean Carroll, Alex Filippenko, and Martin Rees.

    Big thanks to Protocol Labs for their support of this creation:

    And to my Patreon supporters: Juan Benet, Kalexan, Laine Boswell, Holly, Dave & Debbie Boswell, Abraxas, Alina Sigaeva, Aksel Tjønn, Daniel Saltzman, Crystal, Eico Neumann, geekiskhan, Giulia Carrozzino, Hannah Murphy, Jeremy Kerwin, JousterL, Lars Støttrup Nielsen, Leonard van Vliet, Mitchel Mattera, Nathan Paskett, Patrick Cullen, Randall Bollig, Roman Shishkin, Silas Rech, Stefan Stettner, The Cleaner, Timothy E Plum, Virtual_271, Westin Johnson, Yannic, and Anna & Tyson.

    Soundtrack now available: and coming soon to iTunes/Spotify/Etc

    Peace and love,

    melodysheep
    @musicalscience
    melodysheep.com

    Concept, music, writing, edit, and visual effects by melodysheep, with additional visual material sourced from:

    NASA Goddard
    Google
    SpaceX
    2012
    Geostorm
    Into the Universe with Stephen Hawking
    BMW X1
    Journey to the Edge of the Universe
    Noah
    How the Universe Works
    Deep Impact
    Wonders of the Universe
    Moon raker vfx reel
    Voyage of Time

    Voice sample sources:

    Attenborough Davos Speech
    Craig Childs - Long Now Talk
    Brian Cox - Wonders of the Universe Episode 1
    Neil deGrasse Tyson interview with Bill Moyers
    How the Universe Works - Season 3 Episode 2
    Will The Universe Ever End with Lawrence Krauss
    Janna Levin TED Talk
    A Brief History of Time (1991)
    What Happens in the Far Far Future
    Sean Carroll TEDxCaltech
    Alex Filippenko - TEDxSF
    To Infinity and Beyond: The Accelerating Universe
    Martin Rees interview

    Help us caption & translate this video!

  • Scientist Solves the Mystery of the Bermuda Triangle

    10:54

    The Bermuda Triangle has puzzled scientists for years, with dozens of planes and ships going missing in the triangle for decades, now a scientist has finally solved the strange mystery of the Bermuda Triangle, and it's not what you expect. Watch today's amazing video to learn about the truth of the Bermuda Triangle!

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  • Why Mysterious Cosmic Clouds Form Near Black Holes

    4:57

    Once you leave the majestic skies of Earth, the word “cloud” no longer means a white fluffy-looking structure that produces rain. Instead, clouds in the greater universe are clumpy areas of greater density than their surroundings.

    Space telescopes have observed these cosmic clouds in the vicinity of supermassive black holes, those mysterious dense objects from which no light can escape, with masses equivalent to more than 100,000 Suns. There is a supermassive black hole in the center of nearly every galaxy, and it is called an “active galactic nucleus” (AGN) if it is gobbling up a lot of gas and dust from its surroundings. The brightest kind of AGN is called a “quasar.” While the black hole itself cannot be seen, its vicinity shines extremely bright as matter gets torn apart close to its event horizon, its point of no return.

  • NASA Science Live: Black Hole 101

    28:41

    How do we study black holes if we can’t even see them? Could a black hole “eat” an entire galaxy? What would happen if you fell into a black hole? Join experts on #NASAScience Live as we take a journey to explore these mysterious objects that can be found all over the universe.

  • Minecraft is DOOMED! How the Nether Portal PROVES Minecrafts End! | The SCIENCE of... Minecraft

    16:35

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    One of the most fascinating things in Minecraft is the Nether. It is a place you can only get to with the right materials and then you are transported through a PORTAL to a whole other world! That is such a crazy mechanic for this game to include. So much so, in fact, that Austin decided to figure out just how the Nether and the Minecraft overworld co-exist the way they do. Theorists, things do NOT look good for our favorite mining planet.

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    #Minecraft #Nether #NetherPortal #Blackhole #Relativity #TheScience #GameTheory #GameTheorists

  • Cosmic Monsters and Black Holes - HD Documentary

    47:35

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  • Black Holes 101 | National Geographic

    3:11

    At the center of our galaxy, a supermassive black hole churns. Learn about the types of black holes, how they form, and how scientists discovered these invisible, yet extraordinary objects in our universe.
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    National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible.

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  • How to Survive Time Travel

    5:21

    The mystery of time travel has been solved. Humankind has built a machine that can move through time. You can go back in the past and witness any event in history. Or you can uncover the mysteries of the future. But only one person can make the journey, and you're going to be the first person to travel through time. Get ready for a trip like never before, because where we're going, we don't need roads.

    Transcript and sources:

    Produced by the makers of What If. Check out our What If channel:

    Whether it’s an earthquake, mudslide or shark attack, survive whatever awaits you. How To Survive shows how to endure life-threatening moments with science and survivor stories.

    Note: This video is not intended to be a substitute for professional advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or another qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have seen on this channel. If you think you may have an emergency, call your doctor, the ambulance or the police immediately. Underknown does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, physicians, products, procedures, opinions, or other information that may be mentioned in this video. Reliance on any information provided by Underknown is solely at your own risk.

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  • First Image of a Black Hole!

    5:29

    The Event Horizon Telescope Collaboration observed the supermassive black hole at the center of M87, finding the dark central shadow in accordance with General Relativity, further demonstrating the power of this 100 year-old theory.

    To understand more about why the shadows look the way they do, check out:

    I will continue updating this description with more links.

    Event Horizon Telescope collaboration:

    Animations and simulations with English text:
    L. R. Weih & L. Rezzolla (Goethe University Frankfurt)


    Video of observation of M87 courtesy of:
    C. M. Fromm, Y. Mizuno & L. Rezzolla (Goethe University Frankfurt)


    Video of observation of SgrA* courtesy of
    C. M. Fromm, Y. Mizuno & L. Rezzolla (Goethe University Frankfurt)
    Z. Younsi (University College London)


    Video of telescopes in the array 2017:
    C. M. Fromm & L. Rezzolla (Goethe University Frankfurt)


    Animations and simulations (no text):
    L. R. Weih & L. Rezzolla (Goethe University Frankfurt)


    Special thanks to Patreon supporters:
    Donal Botkin, Michael Krugman, Ron Neal, Stan Presolski, Terrance Shepherd, Penward Rhyme

    Scale animation by Maria Raykova

  • A journey to the center of a monster black hole

    45:57

    A black hole is defined as a region of spacetime from which gravity prevents anything, including light, from escaping. The theory of general relativity predicts that a sufficiently compact mass will deform spacetime to form a black hole. Around a black hole, there is a mathematically defined surface called an event horizon that marks the point of no return. The hole is called black because it absorbs all the light that hits the horizon, reflecting nothing, just like a perfect black body in thermodynamics. Quantum field theory in curved spacetime predicts that event horizons emit radiation like a black body with a finite temperature. This temperature is inversely proportional to the mass of the black hole, making it difficult to observe this radiation for black holes of stellar mass or greater.

    Objects whose gravity fields are too strong for light to escape were first considered in the 18th century by John Michell and Pierre-Simon Laplace. The first modern solution of general relativity that would characterize a black hole was found by Karl Schwarzschild in 1916, although its interpretation as a region of space from which nothing can escape was first published by David Finkelstein in 1958. Long considered a mathematical curiosity, it was during the 1960s that theoretical work showed black holes were a generic prediction of general relativity. The discovery of neutron stars sparked interest in gravitationally collapsed compact objects as a possible astrophysical reality.

    Black holes of stellar mass are expected to form when very massive stars collapse at the end of their life cycle. After a black hole has formed it can continue to grow by absorbing mass from its surroundings. By absorbing other stars and merging with other black holes, supermassive black holes of millions of solar masses may form. There is general consensus that supermassive black holes exist in the centers of most galaxies.

    Despite its invisible interior, the presence of a black hole can be inferred through its interaction with other matter and with electromagnetic radiation such as light. Matter falling onto a black hole can form an accretion disk heated by friction, forming some of the brightest objects in the universe. If there are other stars orbiting a black hole, their orbit can be used to determine its mass and location. Such observations can be used to exclude possible alternatives (such as neutron stars). In this way, astronomers have identified numerous stellar black hole candidates in binary systems, and established that the core of the Milky Way contains a supermassive black hole of about 4.3 million solar masses.

  • What Did Scientists Really See In The Mariana Trench?

    5:15

    So what really lives at the bottom of the Mariana trench? Scientists have finally revealed the Mariana Trench mystery. Take a look at the deepest creature ever caught there!

    For copyright matters, please contact infotrendcentral@gmail.com

    #Mariana #Trench #Discovery

    What Did Scientists Really See In The Mariana Trench?

  • Star Trek: Black Hole - SFDebris

    18

    Courtesy of SFDebris.

    A black hole is an outdated term, until it isn't.

  • This Black Hole Is So Close You Can “See” It, Here’s How

    3:42

    A team of astronomers discovered a black hole lying just 1,000 light-years from Earth — and its presence may hint at the existence of many more.
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    Astronomers have just found the closest black hole to us yet, a discovery which suggests there could be even more black holes lurking out there in the universe.

    The astronomers were originally looking for a double star system called HR 6819 — a pair of stars close enough that it can be seen from the Southern Hemisphere without any optical aids on a dark and clear night. But while observing the stars, the astronomers realized that what they were really seeing was a three body system: The inner star was orbiting around something (hint, hint: a black hole) once every 40 days, while the outer star orbited the pair from much farther away.

    So how did researchers know that the star was orbiting a black hole? And what does this discovery mean for the future of space observation and our understanding of large stars and three body systems? Find out in this Elements.

    #blackhole #stars #space #seeker #science #elements

    Read More:
    10 Questions You Might Have About Black Holes

    While black holes are mysterious and exotic, they are also a key consequence of how gravity works: When a lot of mass gets compressed into a small enough space, the resulting object rips the very fabric of space and time, becoming what is called a singularity.

    Closest black hole to Earth found 'hiding in plain sight'

    The astronomers studying HR 6819 weren’t looking for black holes at all. Instead, they wanted to learn more about a pair of odd stars orbiting each other.

    How Supermassive Black Holes Were Discovered

    Given that the centers of galaxies might harbor supermassive black holes, it was natural to check the center of our Milky Way galaxy for such a monster. In 1974, a very compact radio source, smaller than 1 second of arc (1/3600 of a degree) was discovered there.

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  • Inside the black hole image that made history | Sheperd Doeleman

    11:30

    At the center of a galaxy more than 55 million light-years away, there's a supermassive black hole with the mass of several billion suns. And now, for the first time ever, we can see it. Astrophysicist Sheperd Doeleman, head of the Event Horizon Telescope collaboration, speaks with TED's Chris Anderson about the iconic, first-ever image of a black hole -- and the epic, worldwide effort involved in capturing it.

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  • A mysterious hole has reappeared in the middle of Antarctica

    2:05

    A mysterious 'hole' larger than Maryland has reappeared in the middle of Antarctica after 42 years. Scientists aren't sure how it got there. But this isn't the first time it's appeared. The hole is a type of polynya. Polynyas are a region of open water surrounded by sea ice. But the Weddell polynya is unlike any other. While most polynyas form near the shore, this polynya is located hundreds of kilometers from the coast. Scientists first saw it in 1974. Back then, the opening was as large as Oregon. But in 1976, the opening closed up seemingly for good. Then, in 2016, a NASA satellite spotted a small opening. It was the first sighting of the polynya in over 40 years. Since then, the opening has grown considerably larger. Now, it's large enough to fit Maryland. It's still 5X smaller than it was in the '70s. But this polynya's reappearance is a mystery to scientists. One expert said it was like someone had punched a hole in the ice.

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  • Scientists Finally Crack Stonehenge Mystery

    8:01

    After decades of speculation and mystery, scientist have finally uncovered who built Stonehenge. In today's video we are looking into the strange set of rocks, are they alien or something stranger?

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  • Seeing a Black Hole with a Planet-Sized Telescope | STELLAR

    7:29

    Thank you to Draper and its Hack the Moon initiative for supporting PBS Digital Studios | Learn more at


    It took about a century for black holes to go from impossible, to theoretical, to real. And it was just this year, in 2019, when we finally saw the first picture of a black hole! But how to you take a photo of something so massively dense that not even light can escape its gravitational pull? You use a telescope the size of the Earth!

    This video is a bit different from most It's Okay To Be Smart videos. It's part of a new PBS miniseries called STELLAR, done in collaboration with Matt O’Dowd from PBS Space Time and Dianna Cowern from Physics Girl. Over six episodes we travel to telescopes, go inside space research centers, and chat with amazing scientists to bring you the most exciting stories about space. Next up is Matt's episode where he tells you how we discovered galaxies outside of our own. And if you missed it, check out:

    **Matt O’Dowd exploring the oldest quasar ever seen at the Gemini Telescope:

    **Physics Girl visits LIGO to learn about gravitational waves:

    You'll be able to see future episodes on the Physics Girl, Space Time and It’s Okay to be Smart YouTube channels, as well as the PBS Digital Studios Facebook page.

    Stellar is a part of the PBS Summer of Space. They'll be lots of awesome space related content all summer long on PBS. See what's happening at

    #SummerOfSpacePBS #astrophysics #space

    Hosted by Joe Hanson
    Written by: Sophia Chen, Joe Hanson, Andrew Kornhaber, Eric Brown
    Directed by: Eric Brown and Andrew Kornhaber
    Producer: Randa Eid
    Director of Photography: Eric Brouse
    Sound: Tobi Nova
    Production Assistant: Anna Bosketti
    Editing: Pavel Ezrohi
    Graphics: Murilo Lopes
    Assistant Editing: Daniel Sircar
    Produced By: Kornhaber Brown

  • This Incredible Animation Shows How Deep The Ocean Really Is

    3:30

    Just how deep does the ocean go? Way further than you think. This animation puts the actual distance into perspective, showing a vast distance between the waves we see and the mysterious point we call Challenger Deep.

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    This Incredible Animation Shows How Deep The Ocean Really Is

  • Black holes and the beginnings | Star dust |

    33:36

    hi guys in this video i'll try to explain the concept of black hole from theoretical prespective and the astrophysical prespective.. and i try to combine the work from aristotle, newton, huygens,michael faraday, maxwell, maxplank,albert einstien, laplace, john michell, and stephen hawking..
    through gravity, escape velocity, properties of light and geodesics..

  • How To Time Travel | National Geographic

    4:09

    Late for school? A meeting? Just take a wormhole -- you'll be there before you know it.
    ➡ Subscribe:

    #NationalGeographic #TimeTravel #Wormholes

    About National Geographic:
    National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible.

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    How To Time Travel | National Geographic


    National Geographic

  • The mysterious rays shooting at us from space

    5:13

    Cosmic rays are hitting us all the time. What are they?

    Become a Video Lab member!

    You may think the greatest mysteries of the universe exist way out there, at the edge of a black hole. But they actually surround us all the time — and even sail right through our bodies.

    One such mystery is cosmic rays, radiation from space made of tiny bits of atoms. They’re not harmful to humans, but they’re perplexing physicists, who don’t know where they’re coming from. They’re super powerful — many are much too powerful to have originated from our sun or an exploding star. And because they don’t often travel in a straight line, it’s hard to pinpoint their true origin.

    This video is based on Vox science reporter Brian Resnick’s in-depth article about cosmic rays:

    For more on how cosmic rays can affect computers, check out Radiolab’s podcast “Bit Flip”

    If you want to watch more videos like this, check out our friends at Verge Science. They do a ton of hands-on experiments and explorations into the future of science:

    Note: The headline for this video has been updated since publishing.
    Previous headline: We caught a cosmic ray, one of science’s biggest mysteries

    Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out

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  • The Hindu Interpretation of Creation | The Story of God

    2:03

    In India, Morgan Freeman learns about the Hindu's story of creation at a shrine to Ganga.
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    About The Story of God:
    Today, for better or worse, the power of religion touches all of our lives, no matter what our faith. This is Morgan Freeman's journey to discover how our beliefs connect us all. This is the quest of our generation. This is the Story of God.

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    The Hindu Interpretation of Creation | The Story of God


    National Geographic

  • New CGI of How Titanic Sank | Titanic 100

    2:42

    Titanic: The Final Word With James Cameron: James Cameron and his team pull together a new CGI of how they believe the TItanic sank and reached the ocean floor.
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    New CGI of How Titanic Sank | Titanic 100


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  • The Hidden World Beneath the Antarctic Ice Sheet | John Priscu | TEDxBozeman

    11:19

    Following more than a decade of international and national planning and an intense week of on-ice weather delays, Priscu led the field team successfully drilled through the overlying ice sheet and sampled directly the waters and sediments of a lake hidden beneath the Antarctic ice sheet. The groundbreaking exploration of Antarctica's subglacial environment marks the beginning of a new era in polar science, opening the window for future interdisciplinary scientific investigations of one of Earth's last unexplored frontiers.

  • Why Alien Life Would be our Doom - The Great Filter

    9:36

    The first 688 people to use this link will get 20% off their annual membership:

    Thanks a lot to Brilliant for supporting this channel.

    Finding alien life on a distant planet would be amazing news - or would it? If we are not the only intelligent life in the universe, this probably means our days are numbered and doom is certain.


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    Why Alien Life Would be our Doom - The Great Filter

  • Alien Life: Will We Know It When We See It?

    1:33:30

    What are scientists looking for when searching for alien life? A lot, it turns out: the search for extraterrestrials requires the help from astronomers, planetary scientists, chemists, computer scientists, and geneticists, just to name a few. But are we barking up the wrong carbon-based tree? Could alien life develop in ways we haven't dreamed of here on Earth? Hear Paul Davies, Sara Seager, Jack Szostak, and other experts give updates on the search for life outside our planet in Alien Life: Will We Know It When We See It? part of the Big Ideas series at the 2014 World Science Festival.

    This program is part of the Big Ideas Series, made possible with support from the John Templeton Foundation.

    Subscribe to our YouTube Channel for all the latest from WSF.
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    Original Program Date: May 31, 2014
    Host: John Hockenberry
    Participants: Jack W. Szostak, Paul Davies, Sara Seager, Dimitar Sasselov

    Carl Sagan and the future of finding alien life. 00:04

    John Hockenberry's Introduction. 2:23

    Participant Introductions. 5:45

    How close are we to finding aliens? 6:48

    How can you detect exoplanets that far away? 10:03

    Kepler 186 system. 14:49

    What are the tools you use to find Exoplanets? 18:00

    Detecting beer drinkers at a football game. 24:18

    What are we looking for on the microbial level? 30:05

    What starts life on any planet? 36:04

    Who will we call when aliens land on earth? 41:28

    Processing in analog and digital with a two denominational cellular optometer. 49:30

    The awakening of extraterrestrial life from the Vatican. 54:00

    How we may have cheated to form life from other planets? 56:50

    If we look for life where water is located are we ignoring life everywhere else? 1:04:54

    Can you elaborate on the possibility life on ancient mars? 1:08:39

    What are the new tools coming online today? 1:11:20

    What is the direct imaging technique? 1:14:50

    Testing the pedals on a space telescope. 1:21:00

    The conditions on earth that we need for life elsewhere. 1:24:32

    Communication basics from extremophiles. 1:28:05

  • Studying the beginning of the universe from the bottom of the world

    1:7:26

    For over 30 years, scientists have been going to the bottom of the Earth--the geographic South Pole--to make observations of the relic heat from the Big Bang, also called the cosmic microwave background (CMB). In this 60-minute public lecture, held on February 28, 2020, Dr. Brad Benson gives a brief history of these measurements and talks about the challenges associated with building CMB experiments and instruments at one of the coldest, most remote places on Earth. He explains how these measurements are revolutionizing our understanding of the origins, content, and evolution of the universe, including the surprising discovery that nearly 95% of the universe is comprised of two mysterious components: dark matter and dark energy. Dr. Benson discusses new measurements designed to understand the physics within the first fraction of a second after the Big Bang and how these instruments have recently been used to take the first direct image of the black hole at the center of the Milky Way galaxy, as part of the Event Horizon Telescope project.

    Dr. Benson is an experimental cosmologist who studies the cosmic microwave background, the relic radiation from the very early universe that was emitted 380,000 years after the Big Bang. His research frequently takes him to the South Pole, where he and his colleagues work on the South Pole Telescope to study the cosmic microwave background: They are building instruments designed to answer some of the biggest questions in cosmology: What physics was responsible for the Big Bang? What is the universe made of? What is dark energy? Dr. Benson is an associate scientist at Fermilab, a senior member of the Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics and an assistant professor in the Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics at the University of Chicago,

    For information about other public lectures and events at Fermilab, visit

    For more information about research at Fermilab, check out

  • The Galactic Center: Uncovering the Pulse of Our Galaxy

    58:34

    Speaker: Dr. Andrea Ghez
    Lurking at the center of our galaxy is its most massive object—a supermassive black hole. More than a quarter century ago, astronomers first imagined that galaxies such as our own Milky Way might harbor massive, though possibly dormant, central black holes. Definitive proof lay in assessing the distribution and motion of matter at the center of the galaxy. Based on 15 years of high- resolution imaging, Dr. Ghez's team has moved the case for a supermassive black hole at the galactic center from a possibility to a certainty. Although the stars orbiting close to the black hole appear to be massive and young, their origins are difficult to explain. Understanding them may provide key insights into the black hole's evolution.

  • Ultimate Science: Mysterious Meteorite Impacts | space and astronomy

    1:39:23

    Cameras track a fireball streaking to Earth from space, triggering a frantic race to recover the extraterrestrial rock and discover the secrets of our solar system deep it may hold.

    The astonishing evidence that a deadly meteorite impact may have played a part in the adoption of Christianity by the Roman Empire, and so changed the world.

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  • Deciphering The Vast Scale of the Universe | STELLAR

    10:12

    Thank you to Draper and its Hack the Moon initiative for supporting PBS Digital Studios | Learn more at

    One of the fundamental questions humanity has always asked is how big is our Universe? For much of human history, people believed that Planet Earth was the very center of the entire universe. And Earth is pretty big. But compared the rest of the universe, we are infinitesimally small.

    The animation in this video the Digital Universe data collection curated by the American Museum of Natural History. The software is used to visualize these datasets is OpenSpace, which is developed through a collaboration between AMNH, Linköping University in Sweden, New York University, and the University of Utah. The software and datasets are open source and are free to download and explore.

    Credit: From the ESO Supernova to the end of the Universe at 00:52

    Credit: ESO/L. Calçada/M. Kornmesser/spaceengine.org

    Credit: Cepheid Variable 4:06

    NASA, ESA, M. Kornmesser

    I know, this video is a bit different from most Space Time videos. It's part of a PBS miniseries called Stellar, done in collaboration with Diana Cowern from @physicsgirl and Joe Hanson from @It'sOkayToBeSmart. Over six episodes we travel to telescopes, go inside space research centers, and chat with amazing scientists. Next up is Joe's episode where he explores where life might be outside our solar system.

    Check out Joe’s episode here:


    Check out the other episodes in this series:

    The Quasar from The Beginning of Time | STELLAR


    Seeing a Black Hole with a Planet-Sized Telescope | STELLAR


    I Visited the First Gravitational Wave Detector! LIGO | STELLAR


    How We’ll Find the Aliens in Our Solar System! | STELLAR


    Stellar is a part of the PBS Summer of Space. There'll be lots of awesome space related content all summer long on PBS. See what's happening at

    #SummerOfSpacePBS #astrophysics #space

    Hosted by Matt O’Dowd
    Written by: Sophia Chen, Matt O’Dowd, Andrew Kornhaber, Eric Brown
    Directed by: Andrew Kornhaber & Eric Brown
    Producer: Randa Eid
    Director of Photography: Eric Brouse
    Sound: Justin Pope & Brett Van Duesen
    Production Assistant: Marifisia Bel
    Editing: Pavel Ezrohi, Tom Levin, Rebbecca Senn
    Graphics: Murilo Lopes
    Assistant Editing: Daniel Sircar
    Produced By: Kornhaber Brown

    Check out the new Space Time Merch Store!


    Support Space Time on Patreon

  • Exploring King Tutankhamuns Tomb | Blowing Up History

    7:53

    Archaeologists want to discover why King Tut's tomb is so different to all the others in the Valley of the Kings.

    Subscribe to Discovery UK for more great clips:


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  • Secrets of the Stone Age | DW Documentary

    42:26

    During the Stone Age, humans shifted from the nomadic lifestyle to the more settled life of farmers. A documentary on an important period of human history. Watch Part 2 here:

    Around 12,000 years ago, humans underwent a transition from nomads to settlers. That epoch, the Stone Age, produced monumental building works. Part 1 of this two-part documentary illuminates the cultural background of these structures and shows the difficulties Stone Age humans had to contend with. Until around 10,000 BC, humans lived as hunters and gatherers. Then an irreversible change began. Settlements formed. For millions of years humans lived as foragers and suddenly their lives changed radically. This was far more radical than the start of the digital age or industrialization, says prehistorian Hermann Parzinger, president of the Prussian Cultural Heritage Foundation. For a long time, scholars believed that a sedentary lifestyle was a prerequisite for constructing large buildings. Then archaeologist Klaus Schmidt discovered Göbekli Tepe in southern Turkey, a 12,000-year-old complex of stone blocks weighing up to 20 tons. Its builders were still hunter- gatherers. They decorated the stone columns with ornate animal reliefs. How these structures were used and who was allowed access to them remains a mystery. But we now know that the site was abandoned and covered over once settlements took root. Human development continued its course. The discovery of agriculture and animal husbandry led to larger settlements, a changed diet and ultimately to dependence on material goods. This social upheaval in the late Neolithic period has influenced our lives up to the present day. But experts agree that the monuments of the Stone Age prove that humans have gigantomanic tendencies and a need to immortalize themselves.
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  • Saturn 101 | National Geographic

    4:07

    How did the rings around Saturn form? How many moons does the planet have? See stunning NASA images of the gas giant studied by Christian Huygens and Giovanni Cassini.
    ➡ Subscribe:

    About National Geographic:
    National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible.

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    Read more in Saturn


    Saturn 101 | National Geographic


    National Geographic

  • Black Holes and the Structure of Spacetime by Juan Maldacena

    1:29:32

    PUBLIC LECTURES

    Black Holes and the Structure of Spacetime by Juan Maldacena

    DATE: 25 May 2018, 16:00 to 18:00
    VENUE: Chandrasekhar Auditorium, ICTS, Bangalore


    Black holes are fascinating objects predicted by Einstein's theory of general relativity. Though they were initially viewed as pathological and unphysical solutions, they were later understood to be a solid and generic outcome of the theory. They are objects where the distortion of space and time is so extreme that it defies imagination. Black holes give rise to paradoxes whose resolution requires us to modify our conception of spacetime. We will review how black holes went from being an apparently unphysical solutions to a central tool for discovering new perspectives on the nature of spacetime.

  • Sean Carroll - The Particle at the End of the Universe

    58:07

    It was the universe's most elusive particle, the linchpin for everything scientists dreamed up to explain how stuff works. It had to be found. But projects as big as CERN's Large Hadron Collider don't happen without dealing and conniving, incredible risks and occasional skullduggery.

    Buy Sean's book The Particle at the End of the Universe -

    Award-winning physicist and science popularizer Sean Carroll reveals the history-making forces of insight, rivalry, and wonder that fuelled the Higgs search and how its discovery opens a door into the mind-boggling domain of dark matter and other phenomena we never predicted.

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  • What is a Black Hole? - Stephen Hawkings final theory

    7:53

    ~ The black hole information paradox and Soft Hair ~
    You can check out Google's Science Journal app at

    What does Stephen Hawking's last paper on black holes with soft hair say about the black hole information paradox?

    If you liked this video check out these:
    The Most MYSTERIOUS Object in the Universe
    Why is the universe flat?






    creator: dianna cowern
    editing: dianna and eric birkemeier, and jabril ashe
    animations: keegan larwin, kyle norby and dianna
    research: sophia chen
    writing: dianna cowern, sophia and dan walsh
    script editing: dan abromowitz

    Thanks to Andrew Strominger, Derek Muller and Kyle Kitzmiller!

    Thanks to Matt Parker for the footage of the flaming parabola of fire” - from Festival of the Spoken Nerd show Just For Graphs” - fotsn.com/j4g -

    Paper source:

  • The Story Of Information With Professor Jim Al-Khalili | Order and Disorder | Spark

    58:46

    We think humans have created huge amounts of information. But in fact, it's a tiny amount compared to the information needed to describe the universe. Using beautiful slow-motion footage of a water droplet, presenter Jim Al-Khalili gives us a sense of just how much of what goes on in the physical world is hidden from us.

    Subscribe to Spark for more amazing science, tech and engineering videos -

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    Content licensed from TVF International to Little Dot Studios.

    Any queries, please contact us at: owned-enquiries@littledotstudios.com

    #JimAlKhalili #spark #sparkdocumentary #sciencedocumentary

  • 2011 Isaac Asimov Memorial Debate: The Theory of Everything

    1:47:01

    Can the entire universe be explained with a single, unifying theory? This is perhaps the most fundamental question in all of science, and it may also be the most controversial.

    Albert Einstein was among the first to envision a unified theory that could account for the behavior of all matter and energy in the cosmos, but a definitive solution has eluded physicists to this day. As the 21st century progresses, string theory remains the leading candidate to be the theory of everything—although some have come to question whether string theorists are on the right track. Still others doubt that a theory of everything exists at all—and consider the search for such a theory an outdated philosophy of our search for cosmic truths.

    Join Director of the Hayden Planetarium Neil deGrasse Tyson as he hosts and moderates six of the world's leading voices in this great scientific debate.

    #stringtheory #universe #universes #debates

    Panelists:

    Dr. Katherine Freese, professor of physics at the University of Michigan

    Dr. Jim Gates, professor of physics at the University of Maryland-College Park

    Dr. Janna Levin, professor of physics and astronomy at Barnard College

    Dr. Marcello Gleiser, professor of physics and astronomy at Dartmouth College

    Dr. Brian Greene, professor of physics and mathematics at Columbia University

    Dr. Lee Smolin, theoretical physicist at Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics

    The talk was recorded at the American Museum of Natural History on March 7, 2011.

    2017 Isaac Asimov Memorial Debate: De-Extinction


    2016 Isaac Asimov Memorial Debate: Is the Universe a Simulation?


    2015 Isaac Asimov Memorial Debate: Water, Water


    2014 Isaac Asimov Memorial Debate: Selling Space


    2013 Isaac Asimov Memorial Debate: The Existence of Nothing


    2012 Isaac Asimov Memorial Debate: Faster Than the Speed of Light


    2011 Isaac Asimov Memorial Debate: The Theory of Everything


    Rose Center Anniversary Isaac Asimov Debate: Is Earth Unique?


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    This video and all media incorporated herein (including text, images, and audio) are the property of the American Museum of Natural History or its licensors, all rights reserved. The Museum has made this video available for your personal, educational use. You may not use this video, or any part of it, for commercial purposes, nor may you reproduce, distribute, publish, prepare derivative works from, or publicly display it without the prior written consent of the Museum.

    © American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY

  • Revealing the Nature of Dark Matter

    1:5:02

    Dr. Dan Hooper, a Theoretical Astrophysicist at Fermilab, explores the current status of the dark matter search and some new thoughts on the nature of this mystery.

    A signal of gamma rays has been observed from the center of the Milky Way, and it may be the breakthrough that we have long been waiting for. If these gamma-rays are in fact being produced by the interactions of dark matter particles, they promise to reveal much about this elusive substance, and may be a major step toward identifying of the underlying nature of our universe's dark matter.

  • The Science of Fireworks - with Chris Bishop

    1:8:53

    Professor Chris Bishop, presenter of the 2008 Royal Institution Christmas Lectures, gives a family lecture on the history of the modern firework.

    Through demonstrations of pyrotechnic chemistry hear how Chinese incendiaries made from honey led to the development of gunpowder; discover how the loud bangs of fireworks are routed in the origins of photography; and find out how an accident in a nineteenth-century kitchen sparked a new chemistry for firework making.

    Recorded at the University of Cambridge on the 4 November 2011.

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  • Uncovering the Mysteries of the Narwhal | QUEEN ANNE SCIENCE CAFE

    58:38



    What have scientists learned about the mysterious narwhal, or unicorn whale? Dr. Kristin Laidre, Research Scientest at the University of Washington Polar Science Center discusses narwhal biology, migrations, diving, feeding, how narwhals are studied and what mysteries remain.

  • Upgrading the Particle Physics Toolkit: The Future Circular Collider - Harry Cliff, John Womersley

    59:51

    When the LHC reaches the limits of its discovery potential in 2035, what happens next? John Womersley and Harry Cliff discuss the next mega-collider - the future circular collider.
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    The 'Future Circular Collider' (FCC) is a plan for a 100km ring-shaped particle accelerator buried underground near Geneva, which would dwarf the Large Hadron Collider in power, reaching collision energies of up to 100 TeV. This formidable machine would allow physicists to seek answers to some of the deepest questions about our universe including the nature of dark matter, the imbalance between matter and antimatter in the universe, and whether a deeper theory lies beneath the current Standard Model of particle physics.

    Watch the Q&A:

    Dr Harry Cliff is a particle physicist based at the University of Cambridge who works on the LHCb experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. Harry’s research is focused on searching for signs of new particles and forces beyond the Standard Model of particle physics by studying the decays of particles known as bottom quarks. For the past seven years he has held a joint fellowship with the Science Museum, where he curated exhibitions on physics and astronomy including a major exhibition about the Large Hadron Collider.

    Professor John Womersley is one of the world’s foremost particle physicists and has taken leading roles on projects both in Europe and the United States. John worked at Fermilab near Chicago before becoming a scientific advisor to the Department of Energy in the US. He returned to the UK in 2005 to become Director of the Particle Physics Department at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory at a time when it was building and delivering vital components to CERN's Large Hadron Collider. In time John took on a broader role as Director of the Science Programmes Office and was then appointed Chief Executive of the Science and Technology Facilities Council in 2011. He is now the Director General of Europe’s next major science project, the European Spallation Source.

    These talks and Q&A were recorded and live streamed in the Ri on 7 March 2019.

    You can watch the unedited live stream version here:

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  • Andrea Ghez: The hunt for a supermassive black hole

    16:57

    With new data from the Keck telescopes, Andrea Ghez shows how state-of-the-art adaptive optics are helping astronomers understand our universe's most mysterious objects: black holes. She shares evidence that a supermassive black hole may be lurking at the center of the Milky Way.

    TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes. Featured speakers have included Al Gore on climate change, Philippe Starck on design, Jill Bolte Taylor on observing her own stroke, Nicholas Negroponte on One Laptop per Child, Jane Goodall on chimpanzees, Bill Gates on malaria and mosquitoes, Pattie Maes on the Sixth Sense wearable tech, and Lost producer JJ Abrams on the allure of mystery. TED stands for Technology, Entertainment, Design, and TEDTalks cover these topics as well as science, business, development and the arts. Closed captions and translated subtitles in a variety of languages are now available on TED.com, at Watch a highlight reel of the Top 10 TEDTalks at

  • Supermassive Black Hole In The Milky Way - Full HD Documentary

    49:31

    The mysteries that lie within the center of the Milky Way serves as the basis for enticing documentary. This breathtaking swirl composed of gas, dust, and billions of stars has remained largely elusive throughout history, but its secrets may hold the key to understanding much of what remains unknown about our universe.

    The film opens by tracing the historical discoveries which have led to our present-day understanding of the Milky Way. That history began in the 1930s when American physicist Karl Jansky identified the Milky Way as a source of radio static for Bell Telephone Industries. More than three decades later, acclaimed astronomer Eric Becklin helped to construct infrared technology which allowed his team to peer through the clouds of dust particles to uncover the center of the Milky Way.

    In the 1990s, aided by highly advanced telescopic technologies, two groups of astronomers formed observational stations in different parts of the globe in order to further understand the contents and activities that lay at the center of the galaxy. Becklin was stationed in Hawaii, while astronomer Reinhart Jensen studied from the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Germany. The speed with which objects swarmed and circled around this galactic center led to the possibility of a supermassive black hole, a theory further supported by the awe-inspiring imagery captured by the Hubble telescope.

    Featuring insightful footage of these renowned scientists at work and a wealth of gorgeous space photography and animations, this film follows the continuing journey for knowledge that was set in motion by Jansky all those years ago. Their quest is occasionally thwarted by the limitations of current technology, a challenge they overcome with impressive cooperation and ingenuity. For them, many mysteries remain. What accounts for the formation of this black hole, and for the immense power which permits it to illuminate our galaxy? With little doubt, Supermassive Black Hole at the Center of the Galaxy affirms that their continued efforts will provide an even greater understanding of these mysteries in the not so distant future.

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