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Making superconductors

  • SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC LEVITATION

    5:40

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    **CREDITS**

    Patreon Executive Producers: Arsalan Noorafkan, Ian Chi, Peter Beukering, Jim, Andrew Klein, Star Melody

    Directed/Produced/Hosted/Edited by Jake Roper

    Cinematography by Eric Langlay


    Research by Scott Frank

  • Superconducting Quantum Levitation on a 3π Möbius Strip

    2:50

    From the Low Temperature Physics Lab:
    Quantum levitation on a 3π Möbius strip track! Watch the superconductor levitate above the track and suspend below the track, without having to go across the edge.

    Our track is not an ordinary Möbius strip with just one twist, but rather a Möbius strip with three twists -- 540 degrees, or 3π radians, thus, a 3π Möbius strip track.

    You can also check out the video we made that documents the building of the track, if you want to make your own:

    If you have more questions about the physics or how we made the track, leave a comment below!

  • Making an Acid Etched Superconductor Ring with Obsidian Facets

    12:17

    In this video, Patrick Adair is making a new style of superconductor ring. This ring is made by starting with superconductor blank and then sanding an obsidian facet onto it before acid etching the ring to create a beautiful new style.

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  • Superconductivity - the challenge of no resistance at room temperature

    8:27

    Max Planck researchers on their way to superconductivity. Mikhail Eremts and his team are looking for materials and conditions to transport electricity with no resistance at room temperature.

  • Quantum Locking Will Blow Your Mind—How Does it Work?

    17:24

    In this video I use a type II superconductor to perform a quantum locking demonstration using YCBO (Yttrium barium copper oxide). I then explain in depth how superconductors and quantum locking (Flux pinning) works.

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    Superhydrophobic Knife Slices Water Drops in Half


    Real-Life Invisibility Cloak Can Hide Anything! How Does It Work?


    What's Inside the Worlds' Fastest Heat Conductor?


    Can You Use Umbrellas Instead of a Parachute?


    Opening a Bottle of Liquid Nitrogen Under Water!


    Warning: DO NOT TRY—Seeing How Close I Can Get To a Drop of Neutrons


    *Any experiment you try is at YOUR OWN RISK. The Action Lab assumes no responsibility for any injury if you attempt anything you see in this video or on my channel.

  • Giant Neodymium Monster Magnet vs Superconductor—Quantum Locking Part 2

    5:27

    In this video I show you what happens when you expose a type 2 superconductor to a very strong magnetic field from a giant neodymium magnet. In a previous video I explain more about quantum locking or flux pinning. See this video here:
    Quantum Locking Will Blow Your Mind—How Does it Work?


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    Superhydrophobic Knife Slices Water Drops in Half


    Real-Life Invisibility Cloak Can Hide Anything! How Does It Work?


    What's Inside the Worlds' Fastest Heat Conductor?


    Can You Use Umbrellas Instead of a Parachute?


    Opening a Bottle of Liquid Nitrogen Under Water!


    Warning: DO NOT TRY—Seeing How Close I Can Get To a Drop of Neutrons


    *Any experiment you try is at YOUR OWN RISK. The Action Lab assumes no responsibility for any injury if you attempt anything you see in this video or on my channel.

  • Making the Superconductor 2.0 Ring | Acid Etched Superconductor with Obsidian Facets Part 2

    7:59

    In this video, Patrick Adair Designs a successor to his most popular YouTube video ever. This ring is an acid etched superconductor ring 2.0 with obsidia facets. This was one of my most popular videos, and I thought it would be amazing to make a 2.0 video. This superconductor has much more titanium-niobium in it with the rods being much smaller. This means it has a very different pattern that is one of my favorites.

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  • Levitating Superconductor on a Möbius strip

    7:30

    Andy takes a closer look at one of his favourite demos from the 2012 Christmas Lectures, bringing together a levitating superconductor and a bewildering Möbius strip made from over 2,000 magnets.

    We'd love it if you helped us translate this video:

    As his super-conducting boat whizzes along the track, Andy demonstrates the remarkable properties of the superconducting material (Yttrium barium copper oxide) which allows it to seemingly float both above and below the track.

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  • Riding the Lexus hoverboard in Spain

    5:37

    Lexus invited us to Spain to ride the hoverboard it created for a commercial. Our resident skateboarder Sam Sheffer found the board to be very difficult to ride — but it does hover! Read the full story here:

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  • Behind the New World-Record Superconducting Magnet

    1:18

    National MagLab engineer Huub Weijers talks about the new world-record 32-tesla superconducting magnet, which reached full field Dec. 8, 2017.

  • Building a quantum computer with superconducting qubits

    10:46

    In this episode of QuantumCasts, Daniel Sank discusses the difference between classical and quantum information at the physical level, and how quantum information is harnessed in superconducting devices. You’ll learn what makes a superconducting qubit a quantum mechanical device, as well as some of the challenges researchers face in preserving quantum information. Stay tuned for future episodes, and subscribe to our channel, by clicking here →

    QuantumCasts playlist →

    Learn more about the Google AI Quantum team →

  • How to Make a Quantum Tunnel In Real Life

    10:02

    In this experiment I show you to perform quantum tunneling. I first explain what quantum tunneling actually is, then I show you how to make it happen. I talk about total internal reflection and how light can bounce off boundary layers and then how light can actually tunnel through it.

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    What's Inside the Worlds' Fastest Heat Conductor?


    Can You Use Umbrellas Instead of a Parachute?


    Opening a Bottle of Liquid Nitrogen Under Water!


    Warning: DO NOT TRY—Seeing How Close I Can Get To a Drop of Neutrons


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    *Any experiment you try is at YOUR OWN RISK. The Action Lab assumes no responsibility for any injury if you attempt anything you see in this video or on my channel.

  • Magnetically levitating trains

    2:21

    The physics department at the Université de Sherbrooke presents its superconducting, magnetically levitating trains. This feat is accomplished using cuprates, a family of materials that superconduct at ambient pressure and at temperatures above that of liquid nitrogen (approximately -180 ºC).

  • Making a GLOWING Acid Etched Superconductor Ring with Obsidian Facets

    10:51

    In this video, Patrick Adair Designs a Glowing Acid Etched and Obsidian Faceted Superconductor ring. Patrick adds technoglow's amazing glow powder making this ring glow beautifully at night. This is a follow up to the hugely popular obsidian superconductor ring part 1!
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  • Making A REAL Hoverboard | Factomania | Brit Lab

    3:59

    Sure, you can buy something called a hoverboard, but if you want a REAL hoverboard that hovers, you're going to have to look to science!

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  • How Supercapacitors Could Make Batteries a Thing of the Past

    3:53

    An accidental breakthrough in supercapacitor technology could finally make them more efficient than batteries! Here’s how it could lead to a brighter energy future.

    These Squishy Batteries Are Made Out of Water, Here’s How They Work -

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    Energy storage leap could slash electric car charging times

    “Researchers have claimed a breakthrough in energy storage technology that could enable electric cars to be driven as far as petrol and diesel vehicles, and recharge in minutes rather than hours.”

    A fluke breakthrough could be the missing link for an electric car age

    “By 2016, the pair were trying to make their polymer matrix more electrically conductive with an eye on biomedical applications - potentially as an interface between the nervous system and prosthetic limbs. But when they tested the new polymer – a thin, light blue square the size of a postage stamp – something strange happened.”

    Next Stop: Ultracapacitor Buses

    “Unlike a conventional trolley bus that has to continually touch an overhead power line, Sinautec’s ultracapacitor buses take big sips of electricity every two or three miles at designated charging stations, which double as bus stops. When at these stations, a collector on the top of the bus rises a few feet and touches an overhead charging line. Within a couple of minutes, the ultracapacitor banks stored under the bus seats are fully charged.”

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    Seeker explains every aspect of our world through a lens of science, inspiring a new generation of curious minds who want to know how today’s discoveries in science, math, engineering and technology are impacting our lives, and shaping our future. Our stories parse meaning from the noise in a world of rapidly changing information.

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  • Making my Best Ring Ever out of Superconductor and 18k Rose Gold

    11:32

    Today I make a ring of two special materials. I start with superconductor that has smaller micro-filaments giving it a more premium look, then I add a solid 18k rose gold liner to the ring. The rose gold will never tarnish, will protect my finger from discoloring due to the copper oxidizing, and gives the ring a really nice weight. The creation process of this ring was fairly straight-forward. I didn't even use my drill press, I did all the drilling with my lathe.
    I'm fairly new to gold jewelry, so this was a super fun project to do (even though the thought of ruining a $500 piece of gold is really scary haha). Superconductor is famous for its ability to levitate or 'maglev' when super-cooled, but it also looks incredible so I use it in my rings!

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  • Making a Superconductor Ring on a Lathe

    6:44

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  • Riding the New Hendo Hoverboard 2.0 | OOO with Brent Rose

    5:50

    In 2014, startup Arx Pax made headlines with the Hendo Hoverboard. With some helpful input from Tony Hawk and others, now we have the Hendo Hoverboard 2.0, and Brent Rose just scored the first ride on it.

    Full article at Wired.com:

    Tech writer Brent Rose is on a quest. With a surplus of emerging technologies and scientific discoveries popping up how do we separate facts from hype? Brent takes the goods out of the box—and out of the office—to find out how the new wave of cultural phenomena really holds up.

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    Riding the New Hendo Hoverboard 2.0 | OOO with Brent Rose

  • The Secrets of ‘Magic’ Angle Graphene Are Now Fully Revealed

    4:51

    Ever since its discovery, “magic-angle” graphene has taken the scientific community by storm. Now, researchers have mapped the material’s entire structure to find out what makes it so magical.
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    First discovered in 2018, magic-angle graphene involves taking graphene—a single sheet of carbon atoms—and stacking two of those sheets on top of one another. The twist comes from the fact that the sheets are ever so slightly offset from one another, and this magic angle is what gives the graphene its really cool properties.

    And the discovery of this twisted graphene started an entirely new field of study called twistronics, which explores how the structure of 2D materials influences their electronic behavior.

    And now, the same researchers who twisted that magic angle into a graphene bilayer in the first place have mapped the entire structure of magic angle graphene for the first time using a technique called “scanning nano-SQUID.”

    SQUID stands for Superconducting Quantum Interference Device.

    Find out more about the research teams work and what the future of twistronics might look like in this Elements.

    #twistronics #graphene #science #seeker #elements

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    Elements is more than just a science show. It’s your science-loving best friend, tasked with keeping you updated and interested on all the compelling, innovative and groundbreaking science happening all around us. Join our passionate hosts as they help break down and present fascinating science, from quarks to quantum theory and beyond.

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  • How Does This Hoverboard Work?

    4:02

    Lexus recently came out with a video showing off their new hoverboard but how does it all work?

    Hyperloop vs. High Speed Rail ►►►►

    Read More:
    Here's How the Lexus Hoverboard Actually Works

    Lexus has a history of facing the competition, such as German engineering, head-on. So it might strike some as a surprise that Toyota Motor's luxury car brand turned to the land of BMW and Mercedes when it wanted to create a hoverboard.

    Frozen Puck Hovers Over Track Using Quantum Levitation

    Researchers at the school of physics and astronomy at Tel Aviv University have created a track around which a superconductor can float, thanks to the phenomenon of 'quantum levitation'.

    Superconductivity

    The fascinating phenomenon of superconductivity and its potential applications have.
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  • Public Lecture | Making Waves in a Superconductor

    1:5:13

    Description:
    Superconductors are materials in which electric current flows freely, without resistance. They are used to create the powerful magnetic fields needed to operate MRI machines and levitate high-speed trains, and have even served as building blocks for quantum computers. While most metals can become superconducting at temperatures close to absolute zero, more complex materials can superconduct at higher temperatures. Can we discover what makes these materials so special? This lecture will describe experiments at SLAC that use optical and X-ray lasers to create waves in high-temperature superconductors and observe how the materials “breathe” at the atomic level. We hope to find a path to materials that are superconducting at room temperature, making this exotic phenomenon available for everyday applications.

    About the Speaker:

    Giacomo Coslovich has spent his career studying complex materials using ultrafast lasers. He did his graduate research at the University of Trieste, Italy, receiving his PhD in 2011. He then took a postdoctoral position at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. In 2015, he became a staff scientist at SLAC, where he studies high-temperature superconductors using SLAC’s LCLS X-ray laser.

  • Quantum Vortices and Superconductivity + Challenge Answers | Space Time | PBS Digital Studios

    9:03

    Scientists studying quantum vortices and their impact on superconductivity just won the Nobel Prize.

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    The Galactic Civilization Challenge Question


    Previous Episode - The Many World of the Multiverse


    Did you correctly answer the Galactic Civilization Challenge Question? If you did Matt will take you with him when he sets out to colonize the greater galaxy. And in addition, a few randomly selected winners are getting t-shirts! If you’re listed below please send us your address, American t-shirt size (S,M,L) and your t-shirt preference.

    Challenge Winners:

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    Written and hosted by Matt O’Dowd
    Produced by Rusty Ward
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  • Making an Off-Axis Superconductor Ring

    6:26

    Use code super50 for 50% off all superconductor rings on my site for the next two weeks!
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    This week Patrick Adair Designs a new style of superconductor ring for the store. This ring is made from the same titanium-niobium alloy superconductor but is made using a different technique to produce a different pattern after etching!

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  • The Amazing Eddy Current

    12:18

    Eddy Current is awesome and awful at the same time! Cherish it!
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  • Making a Ring out of Timascus, Superconductor, and Carbon Fiber

    14:14

    In this video, Patrick Adair is making a ring combining three of his favorite materials. This ring combines a Timascus and superconductor shell with a carbon fiber liner making this one of his most complex rings yet.
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  • See-Thru Science: How MRI Machines Work

    4:44

    Watch how radio waves and strong magnets combine to create pictures of the inside of our bodies.

  • Levitating Barbecue! Electromagnetic Induction

    3:46

    At the Palais de la Decouverte in Paris, they showed me this experiment where a 1kg aluminium plate is levitated above a large coil of wire that is being supplied with 800A of alternating current at 900Hz. This is by far the best demonstration of electromagnetic induction I have ever seen.

    Back in London, I visited the magnetic lab of Michael Faraday in the basement of the Royal Institution. It was here that he did his groundbreaking work on induction. People had previously observed that current in a wire causes a compass needle to deflect, but more exciting was the prospect of using a magnetic field to generate current. Faraday created his famous induction ring by winding two coils of insulated wire onto an iron ring. When he connected a battery to one coil, a small pulse of current was induced in the other. When the battery was disconnected, current was induced in the other direction. This led Faraday to the conclusion that current was induced in the second coil only when the magnetic field through it was changing.

    And if they hadn't been wrapped on the same ring, Faraday may have noticed that the two coils repel each other when the current is induced due to the interaction of their magnetic fields. This is the same thing that is happening with the aluminium plate, except we're using alternating current to create a continually changing magnetic field. This induces an alternating current in the plate, producing an opposing magnetic field which levitates the disk.

  • Making Etched Superconductor Ring 2018

    5:35

    Welcome To The Top Things.

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    Its not a Promotional Video we are doing here. Just some cool Amazing Thing that makes our life better

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  • Making a Wedding Ring from a Wheelchair?! - Titanium & Gold!

    11:30

    YOU GUYS ARE AWESOME! Over $24,000 donated to the school in Kenya! Every penny counts! You can donate through YouTube on this video: or if you live outside the US and want to donate, here is the website: say 'Zack and Cambry' in the form when donating.

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    Cambry and I have done a LOT of projects together. From the off road wheelchair: Updating that off road wheelchair: to building legos: to adding an elevator to our house: Cambry has been a great teammate. And we are excited for our future adventures together. If you want to learn more about what happened to Cambry you can watch this video: which explains more about her accident, and how she moved forward.

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  • Beyond Update How to Find Manufacturing Facilities and Get Blueprints | No Mans Sky 2019

    8:33

    If you are looking for how to find manufacturing facilities in No Man's Sky after the Beyond update then check this out. The rules have changed for finding manufacturing facilities, and for finding those blueprints! Now you can choose what blueprint you want to learn which is so awesome!!

    Like the video and Subscribe!!

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    More About No Man's Sky:

    Inspired by the adventure and imagination that we love from classic science-fiction, No Man's Sky presents you with a galaxy to explore, filled with unique planets and lifeforms, and constant danger and action.

    In No Man's Sky, every star is the light of a distant sun, each orbited by planets filled with life, and you can go to any of them you choose. Fly smoothly from deep space to planetary surfaces, with no loading screens, and no limits. In this infinite procedurally generated universe, you'll discover places and creatures that no other players have seen before - and perhaps never will again.

    Play with all 7 major updates since launch: Foundation, Pathfinder, Atlas Rises, NEXT, The Abyss, Visions and the 2.0 BEYOND update.

    An epic voyage to the center of a shared universe awaits, allowing you to explore, trade, fight and survive alone or with friends.

    At the center of the galaxy lies a irresistible pulse which draws you on a journey towards it to learn the true nature of the cosmos. But, facing hostile creatures and fierce pirates, you'll know that death comes at a cost, and survival will be down to the choices you make over how you upgrade your ship, your weapon and suit.

    Your voyage through No Man's Sky is up to you. Will you be a fighter, preying on the weak and taking their riches, or taking out pirates for their bounties? Power is yours if you upgrade your ship for speed and weaponry.

    Or a trader? Find rich resources on forgotten worlds and exploit them for the highest prices. Invest in more cargo space and you'll reap huge rewards.

    Or perhaps an explorer? Go beyond the known frontier and discover places and things that no one has ever seen before. Upgrade your engines to jump ever farther, and strengthen your suit for survival in toxic environments that would kill the unwary.

    The galaxy is a living, breathing place. Trade convoys travel between stars, factions vie for territory, pirates hunt the unwary, and the police are ever watching. Every other player lives in the same galaxy, and you can choose to share your discoveries with them on a map that spans known space. Perhaps you will see the results of their actions as well as your own...

    #NoMansSky2019 #NoMansSkyBeyond

  • Japans maglev train breaks world speed record

    2:29

    On a test track west of Tokyo, Japan's Superconducting Maglev train hits 603km/h an hour, breaking the world train speed record. The test is part of an ambitious plan to build a $47bn high-speed line between Tokyo and Nagoya. If completed as planned in 2027 the 280km between the two could be travelled in around 40 minutes. Al Jazeera's Tarek Bazley reports.

  • The Strange, Frictionless World of Superfluids

    7:11

    Imagine a cup of tea that doesn't obey the laws of physics, it pours out of the bottom of your cup while crawling up the sides to the top, and you'll have a pretty good picture of the ultracold phenomena of superfluids.

    SciShow is supported by Brilliant.org. Go to to get 20% off of an annual Premium subscription.

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  • Making an Acid Etched Superconductor Ring with Obsidian Facets

    4:02

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  • Breakthrough in Nuclear Fusion? - Prof. Dennis Whyte

    1:38:49

    Nuclear fusion is the holy grail of energy generation because by fusing two hydrogen atoms together into a single helium atom it releases enormous amounts of energy, yet represents a clean, safe, sustainable and secure form of power.

    The most tried and true approach for generating nuclear fusion energy has been a tokamak fusion reactor, which uses very high density magnetic fields to compress and contain a plasma to 100 million degrees. But none has been able to generate more electricity than it consumes. Until now.

    Director Whyte will describe the ARC nuclear fusion reactor (shown above right), based on a new superconducting material, for achieving very high density magnetic fields. It will be used as a research center, but could ultimately become a prototype for an inexpensive 200MW power plant, vaulting nuclear fusion from scientific curiosity to potential commercialization.

    The ARC reactor is being designed to produce at least 3 times the power required to run it, which has never been done before and is the result of several new technologies which dramatically reduce the size and cost.

    The biggest breakthrough is a new superconducting material which produces a much higher magnetic field density, yielding a ten-fold increase in fusion power per volume. Molten salt will be used as a liquid cooling blanket for fast heat transfer and easy maintenance. And 3D printing techniques will allow the fabrication of reactor components in shapes that cannot be made by milling machines. The result is a much smaller, lower cost and highly efficient modular power plant with zero emissions and abundant fuel.

    Dennis Whyte, recently promoted to run MIT’s Nuclear Science and Engineering Department and Director of MIT’s Plasma Science & Fusion Center, works in magnetic fusion and specializes in the interface between the plasma and materials.

    Dennis received his PhD from the Universite du Quebec in 1993. A Fellow of the American Physical Society, Dennis was awarded the Department of Energy’s Plasma Physics Junior Faculty Award in 2003 and won the International Atomic Energy Agency’s Nuclear Fusion Prize in 2013. He is a two-time winner of the MIT Joel and Ruth Spira Award for teaching excellence. Among his many lectures on fusion energy research, Dennis was an invited speaker at CERAWeek and the National Science Foundation’s Engineering Distinguished Lecturer in 2015.

  • Can we make quantum technology work? | Leo Kouwenhoven | TEDxAmsterdam

    18:20

    Leo Kouwenhoven is a professor of physics at TU Delft. His team at the QU Tech Lab designs experiments to place electrons in superpositions. Why? Because we need computers that can process information as quickly and efficiently as nature does, using quantum mechanics.

    So, what is a superposition? Quantum theory says that electrons can circle different atoms at the same time. That's the glue that keeps atoms together into molecules and stops our bodies from falling apart. It's how a green plant leaf can process light into oxygen in the fastest and most efficient way possible. If a plant can think that way, why can't a computer do that, too?

    Leo Kouwenhoven is a professor of physics at TU Delft. His team at the QU Tech Lab designs experiments to place electrons in superpositions. Why? Because we need computers that can process information as quickly and efficiently as nature does, using quantum mechanics.

    So, what is a superposition? Quantum theory says that electrons can circle different atoms at the same time. That's the glue that keeps atoms together into molecules and stops our bodies from falling apart. It's how a green plant leaf can process light into oxygen in the fastest and most efficient way possible. If a plant can think that way, why can't a computer do that, too?

    This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at

  • Making superconductors

    45:39

    Go to and find out how you can get 3 months free.

    -------------------------------------------

    A few years ago, I saw a video about superconductors and it looked like anti-gravity magic. So, I decided to try and make some superconductors myself and to see if I could re-create the effect myself.

    In particular, I'll be making a YBCO superconductor, which is one of the few practical high-temperature superconductors.

    Procedures:
    1) One with potential problem:
    2) One I followed:

    Nile talks about lab safety:

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  • Making YBCO superconductor

    19:37

    How to make and test your own pieces of YBCO superconductor.

    Best how-to resources for YBCO:




    -- I couldn't get this to work.

    All chemical purchased on eBay.

    The kiln that I used:

    Colored ferrofluid:

    Pax temperature logger:

    Keithly SMU:



    Applied Science on Patreon:

  • These Strange Metals Could Make Electronics Perfectly Efficient

    5:03

    Scientists are hunting for the high-temperature superconductor that could revolutionize electronics, and new research takes us one step closer.

    How Supercapacitors Could Make Batteries a Thing of the Past -

    Read More:

    Physicists Discover Tantalising New Properties of Uranium Compounds, Including Superconductivity

    “Scientists have experimentally confirmed the existence of strange new uranium compounds - and they predict some could even achieve superconductivity close to room temperature.”

    Superconductors to Wire a Smarter Grid

    “A proposed hub for connecting the three independent electricity grids that span the continental United States could make it easier to ramp up production of renewable electricity.”

    Explainer: What Is A Superconductor?

    “On a microscopic level the electrons in a superconductor behave very differently from those in a normal metal. Superconducting electrons pair together, allowing them to travel with ease from one end of a material to another. The effect is a bit like a priority commuter lane on a busy motorway.”
    ____________________

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    Seeker explains every aspect of our world through a lens of science, inspiring a new generation of curious minds who want to know how today’s discoveries in science, math, engineering and technology are impacting our lives, and shaping our future. Our stories parse meaning from the noise in a world of rapidly changing information.

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  • The Lexus Hoverboard: The Story

    5:07

    Discover the story behind the Lexus Hoverboard, from day 1 to day 403.

    The Lexus Hoverboard represents true innovation and imagination, together pushing the boundaries of technology even further to make the impossible possible. The Hoverboard was brought to life through Lexus’ passion for creating enjoyment out of motion and showcases the brand’s creativity to realize amazing experiences.

    Learn more at:
    Subscribe to Lexus International:
    Go to our website:
    Follow us on Instagram:

    Check out these other videos to learn more about the Lexus Hoverboard:








    Experience Amazing.

    #Lexus #LexusHoverboard #LexusHover #Hoverboard #Hoverpark #Skate #Skating #Skateboarding #Skatepark #Science #Future #Technology #Innovation #Design #Engineering #ExperienceAmazing

  • Steve Spangler Makes Ellen Float

    7:29

    He always has some exciting experiments to show Ellen's audience! Take a look at what Steve brought with him, including a hovercraft for Ellen!

  • Liquid Nitrogen Experiments: The Superconductor

    3:10

    What happens when a magnet is placed on a superconductor? [Closed Captioned]

  • Superconductors

    3:20

    In this video, we explore the world of superconductors!

    ~~~
    Support me on Patreon!
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    Superconductors:
    When an electric current is passed through a conductor, some of the energy is lost in the form of heat or light. The amount of energy lost varies depending on the individual material’s electrical resistance. Some materials, like copper or gold, are great conductors of electricity and have very low resistance.
    Scientists discovered that the colder these materials are, the more conductive they become. But no matter how cold you make copper or gold, it will always show some electrical resistance.
    Mercury, however, is different. In 1911, when scientists cooled a sample of Mercury all the way down to 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, its resistance abruptly disappeared: the first “superconductor” was discovered.
    Gradually, more and more superconductive materials have been found that show zero electrical resistance below a certain “critical temperature”.
    When resistance is zero, electricity is conducted perfectly, without any loss, and a current can theoretically flow in a closed loop forever. This has been demonstrated by scientists who have sustained electrical currents in superconductive rings for years without any measurable deprecation of energy.
    And it doesn’t end there; not only do superconductors have absolutely zero electrical resistance, they also don’t like to let magnetic fields to pass through. Instead, the field remains at the superconductor’s surface. This expulsion of magnetic fields is known as the Meissner Effect.
    You’ve probably seen the Meissner Effect in action with science experiments that look like this: a magnet is sat on top of a superconductive material. And at room temperature, nothing special happens, but when the material is cooled down to its critical temperature, the Meissner Effect kicks in, causing the magnet to levitate, as if by magic.
    But superconductors can be used for much more than science tricks. These materials are used today in MRI machines, super-fast floating trains, and even particle accelerators. But we can’t forget that superconductors have to be kept at temperatures near absolute zero in order to function properly. This is main factor limiting the practicality of superconductors.
    Fortunately, scientists have been busy finding and creating materials that become superconductive at higher and higher temperatures. For example, some ceramic materials undergo a superconducting transition at high enough temperatures that they can be cooled down using relatively warm liquid nitrogen.
    These materials are known as High-temperature Superconductors, and they have revolutionized how and where we are able to use this technology. But still, always having to have liquid nitrogen at hand is extremely limiting. The goal for scientists is to create a material that is superconductive at room temperature.
    If we had room-temperature superconductive wires for electronics, we’d be able to power devices using much less power; none of the energy would be lost as heat; changing the way that electronics are designed and built. This technology would allow for smaller and much more efficient devices.
    In 2015, researchers observed a material that, when placed under extreme pressure, became superconductive at around -70 degrees. This set the record for the highest temperature superconductor; but as of now, a room-temperature superconductor hasn’t been found.

  • The Institute of Making - Network Rail engineering education

    9:29

    Zoe Laughlin from Kings College London's Institute of Making introduces a film on the amazing world of materials -- she listens to crystals in metals, demonstrates the incredible properties of super conductors at low temperatures -- and explains how material science will transform how we heal bones.

  • Scientist Ernesto Bosque on making magnets with a special superconductor

    5:19

    Got 2 minutes? Find out how Boque helps design and build powerful magnets using a material called bismuth-2212 in this episode of Take 2.

  • Superconductivity - A Level Physics

    12:50

    A description of superconductivity - in a little more detail than you need at A Level - to explain the basic concepts of a quantum mechnical phenomenon.

  • What Is A Semiconductor?

    4:46

    Semiconductors are in everything from your cell phone to rockets. But what exactly are they, and what makes them so special? Find out from Jamie, a Ph.D. student in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT.

    More information on semiconductors from MIT:
    Go behind-the-scenes of this episode:
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    made with love at MIT
    Creative Commons: CC BY-NC-SA, MIT

    Hosted & Written by: Jamie Teherani (
    Additional Scripting by: Elizabeth Choe & George Zaidan

    Executive Producer & Doodles: Elizabeth Choe
    Director: George Zaidan
    Camera: Adam Morrell
    Editor & Motion Graphics: Per Hoel

    Theme song: Anthony Thomas & Neil Aggarwal

    Music:
    Brittle Rille Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0


    Special thanks to the following for their sponsorship:
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  • Lexus Hoverboard: Its here!

    2:13

    We've made the impossible, possible. The Lexus Hoverboard is here. See the world's first hoverpark in action, as Lexus demonstrates the desire to create enjoyment out of motion.

    The Lexus Hoverboard represents true innovation and imagination, together pushing the boundaries of technology even further.

    #LexusHover

    The Lexus Hoverboard has taken flight, a feat captured in Slide, a new film recording the success of the latest project in Lexus’s Amazing in Motion campaign.

    The official reveal of the Lexus Hoverboard in action marks the culmination of 18 months of design and technology planning and weeks of testing at a specially constructed “hoverpark” near Barcelona.

    The task of putting the machine through its paces fell to international pro-skateboard star Ross McGouran, who said: “I’ve spent 20 years skateboarding, but without friction it feels like I’ve had to learn a whole new skill, particularly in the stance and balance you need to ride the hoverboard.”

    Lexus worked with a team of scientists from IFW Dresden and evico GmbH who specialise in magnetic levitation technology. Following extensive testing with McGouran in Germany, the team were determined to push the hoverboard to its limits, conducting further tests in a dynamic environment.

    The hoverpark was constructed using around 200 metres of magnetic track set beneath the surface of an area similar to a conventional skate park. This gave Lexus and McGouran the opportunity to demonstrate tricks that no skateboard could ever perform, including travelling across water. The results are captured in Slide, a film helmed by award-winning director Henry-Alex Rubin.

    The Lexus Hoverboard features two cryostats, reservoirs which contain superconducting material, kept at -197°C through immersion in liquid nitrogen. The board is placed above a track fitted with permanent magnets to achieve magnetic levitation.

    Dr Oliver de Hass, CEO of evico, said: “The magnetic field from the track is effectively ‘frozen’ into the superconductors in the board, maintaining the distance between the board and track – essentially keeping the board in a hover. The force is strong enough that the rider can stand and even jump on the board.”

    Mark Templin, Executive Vice President Lexus International, said: “We set out to push the boundaries of technology, design and innovation to make the impossible possible, collaborating with partners who share our passion for creating enjoyment out of motion.

    “As we combined our technology and expertise, we discovered that making a hoverboard isn’t an easy process. We’ve experienced highs and lows and have overcome a few challenges, but through mutual determination we have created a demonstration of our philosophy in design and technology to create Amazing in Motion.”

    The Lexus Hoverboard film Slide features the new hoverboard together with the new GS F saloon, the forthcoming addition to Lexus’s F-designated range of high-performance models.

  • The high-stakes race to make quantum computers work - Chiara Decaroli

    5:16

    Get to know the unique properties of quantum computers and the obstacles that have prevented this theoretical technology from becoming a reality.

    --

    Quantum computers could eventually outstrip the computational limits of classical computers. They rely on the behavior of atomic and subatomic particles, whose quantum states are incredibly fragile and easily destroyed— which is why this technology remains largely theoretical. How would quantum computers work, and are they really possible? Chiara Decaroli investigates.

    Lesson by Chiara Decaroli, directed by Artrake Studio.

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  • Superconductors -- Powering Our Future

    3:41

    (Inside Science) -- A maglev train hovers above its track. A doctor uses an MRI scanner to detect disease. Fast digital circuits send superfast, clear signals from one source to another. These technologies are possible thanks to superconductors.

    Superconductors are materials where electrons can move without any resistance. But today's superconductors don’t work unless they are cooled to well below room temperature. Now researchers are using quantum physics on a quest to find superconductors that will work at room temperature to make them easier to use.

    There’s been a problem in physics that researchers are trying to solve for years: Can we find something that can superconduct at room temperature? If we find it, it will revolutionize how we transport and use energy.

    “If you had a room temperature superconductor in your pocket, you then hope there would be some very interesting applications that would come out of this,” said Richard Greene, physics professor at the University of Maryland.

    When lead, mercury and certain compounds are cooled to extremely cold temperatures, they become superconductors. They stop showing any electrical resistance and they expel their magnetic fields, which makes them ideal for conducting electricity. But you need to use liquid helium if you’re trying to get down to absolute zero (-459 degrees Fahrenheit). That’s why physicists want to find a high temperature superconductor that will work at room temperature -- it’s just down right easier to work with.

    Researchers discovered superconductivity in 1911. By the ’60s, they thought they had solved all of its mysteries. But in 1986 two scientists in Zurich discovered superconductors that work at higher temperatures than researchers thought were ever possible.

    “So this set off a gold rush of activity, because we were really surprised that this could happen. It occurred also in oxide materials, which was totally unexpected, and these were materials that were not very conducting at all,” said Greene.

    These materials work as high temperature superconductors up to -225 degrees Fahrenheit. Now that we have materials that can superconduct above the boiling point of nitrogen, we can finally use them in certain applications. Neither MRI machines or the particle accelerator at CERN would have been possible without the use of liquid helium-cooled superconducting electromagnets.

    “Superconductivity is what I would call an emergent property of materials. It’s not something you can predict by knowing how a few atoms work or a few electrons work. You really need to understand how many atoms and electrons together produce properties, and this of course requires knowing quantum mechanics, which was only invented in the 1920s,” said Greene.

    Researchers still do not understand how to predict which material will be a high temperature superconductors or what causes their superconductivity.

    “These new superconductors have many strange properties that are not understood even today. They do not go, they just don’t follow the normal paradigm that we are used to for conventional metals,” said Greene.

    Greene is studying copper oxide and iron-based superconductors for clues on why the electrons inside them act in such an unconventional way. Solving the problems that come with higher temperature superconductors -- Greene believes researchers will discover a room temperature super conductor in the next 30 years. If that happens, it could solve one of the greatest mysteries of physics -- at the tiniest level.

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