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Monster BLACK HOLE | Full Documentary

  • Monster BLACK HOLE | Full Documentary

    50:01

    Monster Black Hole traces the life cycle of a black hole, from its violent beginnings in the early universe, to its growth to supermassive proportions at the center of a galaxy, and its death in deep time.

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  • Biggest Black Holes and Cosmic Monsters - Space Documentary 2015

    1:23:28

    Biggest Black Holes and Cosmic Monsters - Space Documentary 2015
    Astronomers have identified a mammoth black hole weighing as much as 12 billion suns.


    It's not the biggest black hole ever found, but it's astonishingly young. The giant appears to have swelled to its enormous size only 875 million years after the big bang, when the universe was just 6 percent of its current age. That's a surprise, astronomers report Wednesday in the journal Nature, because giant black holes are thought to grow relatively slowly by vacuuming up gas and even stars that venture too close.

    How do you build such a big black hole in such a short time? asks Xue-Bing Wu of China's Peking University, lead author of the study.

  • Monster Black Hole - How the Universe Works

    43:02

    How the Universe Works - Monster Black Hole (Season 4/Episode 3).
    Black holes are the least understood places in the universe, where the rules of physics collapse. We go inside the super-massive black hole in the center of the Milky Way.

    Archived for educational purposes only. No copyright infringement intended. All rights belong to Discovery.

    #HowTheUniverseWorks #MonsterBlackHole #Documentary #Discovery #BlackHole #Universe

  • Monster Black Holes - New NOVA Space Documentary 2015 HD

    1:6:24

    A black hole is a mathematically defined region of spacetime exhibiting such a strong gravitational pull that no particle or electromagnetic radiation can escape from it. The theory of
    general relativity predicts that a sufficiently compact mass can deform spacetime to form a black hole.[2][3] The boundary of the region from which no escape is possible is called the event
    horizon. Although crossing the event horizon has enormous effect on the fate of the object crossing it, it appears to have no locally detectable features. In many ways a black hole acts like
    an ideal black body, as it reflects no light. Moreover, quantum field theory in curved spacetime predicts that event horizons emit Hawking radiation, with the same spectrum as a black
    body of a temperature inversely proportional to its mass. This temperature is on the order of billionths of a kelvin for black holes of stellar mass, making it essentially impossible to observe.

    Objects whose gravitational fields are too strong for light to escape were first considered in the 18th century by John Michell and Pierre-Simon Laplace. The first modern solution of general
    relativity that would characterize a black hole was found by Karl Schwarzschild in 1916, although its interpretation as a region of space from which nothing can escape was first published by
    David Finkelstein in 1958. Long considered a mathematical curiosity, it was during the 1960s that theoretical work showed black holes were a generic prediction of general relativity. The discovery
    of neutron stars sparked interest in gravitationally collapsed compact objects as a possible astrophysical reality.

    Black holes of stellar mass are expected to form when very massive stars collapse at the end of their life cycle. After a black hole has formed, it can continue to grow by absorbing mass from its
    surroundings. By absorbing other stars and merging with other black holes, supermassive black holes of millions of solar masses (M☉) may form. There is general consensus that supermassive black
    holes exist in the centers of most galaxies.

    Despite its invisible interior, the presence of a black hole can be inferred through its interaction with other matter and with electromagnetic radiation such as visible light. Matter falling
    onto a black hole can form an accretion disk heated by friction, forming some of the brightest objects in the universe. If there are other stars orbiting a black hole, their orbit can be used
    to determine its mass and location. Such observations can be used to exclude possible alternatives (such as neutron stars). In this way, astronomers have identified numerous stellar black hole
    candidates in binary systems, and established that the radio source known as Sgr A*, at the core of our own Milky Way galaxy, contains a supermassive black hole of about 4.3 million M☉.


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  • Supermassive Black Holes: Most Powerful Objects in the Universe - Discovery Space Documentary

    00

    The most massive black hole ever observed has been discovered in a galaxy some 700 million light-years from Earth. ...
    The galaxy in question, called Holm 15A, is the brightest member of a cluster of galaxies called Abell 85 that sit in the constellation Cetus, visible from both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres.

  • Black Holes National Geographic Documentary HD

    50:33

    Black Holes National Geographic Documentary HD
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  • Journey to a Black Hole - Uncovering a Mystery | SPACETIME - SCIENCE SHOW

    47:29

    We are surrounded by an intangible infinity: a universe in which the Earth is merely a grain of sand on the shore of an ocean. But we are unravelling more and more of the secrets of the universe which surrounds us. And that includes black holes, bottomless pits like the jaws of hell which devour all material that comes too close to them. Even light has no chance of escaping from them. But how does a Black Hole form? Are there any near us? And can they pose a threat to us? A look at the universe presents us with pictures of fascinating and confusing beauty: landscapes of light and gas and stardust, formed by cosmic wind and radiation. Our telescopes are discovering more and more wonders of the universe. They are looking far out into space and thus far back into the past. The centre of our galaxy is marked by a super-heavy Black Hole: an astronomical object with an inconceivable gravitational pull. Nothing can escape from it. The black hole at the centre of our galaxy is known as Sagittarius A-star. Of enormous size, it devours everything while remaining totally invisible.

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  • Supermassive Black Hole at the Center of the Galaxy - Space Documentary

    31:33

    Supermassive Black Hole at the Center of the Galaxy - Space Documentary 2016
    A supermassive black hole (SMBH) is the largest type of black hole, on the order of hundreds of thousands to billions of solar masses (M☉), and is found in the center of almost all massive galaxies.[1][2] In the case of the Milky Way, the SMBH is believed to correspond with the location of Sagittarius A*.[3][4]

    Supermassive black holes have properties that distinguish them from lower-mass classifications. First, the average density of a supermassive black hole (defined as the mass of the black hole divided by the volume within its Schwarzschild radius) can be less than the density of water in the case of some supermassive black holes.[5] This is because the Schwarzschild radius is directly proportional to mass, while density is inversely proportional to the volume. Since the volume of a spherical object (such as the event horizon of a non-rotating black hole) is directly proportional to the cube of the radius, the density of a black hole is inversely proportional to the square of the mass, and thus higher mass black holes have lower average density. In addition, the tidal forces in the vicinity of the event horizon are significantly weaker for massive black holes. As with density, the tidal force on a body at the event horizon is inversely proportional to the square of the mass: a person on the surface of the Earth and one at the event horizon of a 10 million M☉ black hole experience about the same tidal force between their head and feet. Unlike with stellar mass black holes, one would not experience significant tidal force until very deep into the black hole.

  • Monster Black Hole With Mass of 40,000,000,000 Suns

    10:36

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  • Whats Inside A Black Hole? - Black Holes Explained - Origin of the Solar System

    1:9:25

    As Hawking says, the black holes would evaporate. During evaporation, the black hole emits energy in the form of the positive particles that escape. ... So, yes, black holes do die, and they do so when the theories of the extremely large come together with the theories of the very small.

  • Biggest Black Hole in the center of Galaxy HD documentary

    1:14:16

    Astronomers are closing in on the proof they've sought for years that one of the most destructive objects in the universe -- a super massive black hole -- lurks at the center of our own galaxy..

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    Astronomers are closing in on the proof they've sought for years that one of the most destructive objects in the universe -- a super massive black hole -- lurks at the center of our own galaxy...
    Our Milky Way may harbor millions of black holes... the ultra dense remnants of dead stars. But now, in the universe far beyond our galaxy, there's evidence of ...

    National Geographic Documentary | Black Holes & Monsters of Universe | Science Documentary Full HD Black holes of stellar ...

    A supermassive black hole (SMBH) is the largest type of black hole, on the order of hundreds of thousands to billions of solar masses (M☉), and is found in the ...

    Supermassive Black Hole at the Center of the Galaxy - Space Documentary 2016 A supermassive black hole (SMBH) is the largest type of black hole, on the ...

    Astronomers are closing in on the proof they've sought for years that one of the most destructive objects in the universe -- a super massive black hole -- lurks at ...

  • Black Holes

    50:33

    Subscribe to Naked Science -

    Every other Wednesday we present a new video, so join us to see the truth laid bare...

    Somewhere in our galaxy, at some time in the future, a spacecraft from Earth will encounter the most dangerous object in the Universe. A stunning visual journey into black holes, their structure and their creation.

    A black hole is a geometrically defined region of spacetime exhibiting such strong gravitational effects that nothing, including particles and electromagnetic radiation such as light, can escape from inside it. The theory of general relativity predicts that a sufficiently compact mass can deform spacetime to form a black hole.

  • Whats Inside A Black Hole? | Unveiled

    9:16

    What's Inside A Black Hole?
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    Black holes are mysterious and bizarre objects in the universe that really have no explanation. In fact, we hardly know anything about what lies inside of a black hole. We know and understand what we see on the outside of a black hole, but we have no way of going inside one to take a look at what is really happening. Even if we sent a probe inside a black hole, it would not survive the journey, and there would be no way that the probe could transmit a signal outside once it had been sucked inside. This is because a black hole is the product of mass being squeezed together so densely, and so tightly, that it creates a gravitational pull that is so strong, that not even light can escape its grasp.

    Supermassive black holes with masses millions to billions of times that of the sun are thought to lurk at the hearts of all galaxies in the universe. You may notice that when you see a photo of a spiral galaxy, such as the Milky Way, in the center of the galaxy is a giant mass of light, which many people would think looks like a massive sun.

    But this is not light coming from the black hole itself. Remember, that light cannot escape the heavy gravitational pull. Instead, the light we see comes from the magnetic fields near a spinning black hole that propel electrons outward in a jet along the rotation axis. The electrons produce bright radio waves. Quasars are believed to produce their energy from massive black holes in the center of the galaxies in which the quasars are located. Because quasars are so bright, they drown out the light from all the other stars in the same galaxy.

    You’re probably asking, ‘well, what’s a quasar?’ A Quasar is the short name for ‘quasi-stellar object’ and is a very highly energetic object surrounding an actively feeding Supermassive Black Hole. In more basic terms, the Supermassive Black Hole in the middle of a galaxy feeds intermittently. As it feeds, gas swirls around it at incredible speeds and forms an insanely bright hot orbiting disk. And if the black hole is swallowing a large amount of material, this feeding is accompanied by gigantic jets of gas. These are called Quasar. They are essentially fueled by the Black Holes they orbit.

  • Monster Black Holes - New BBC Documentary 2015 HD

    42:08

    A black hole is a mathematically defined region of spacetime exhibiting such a strong gravitational pull that no particle or electromagnetic radiation can escape from it. The theory of
    general relativity predicts that a sufficiently compact mass can deform spacetime to form a black hole.[2][3] The boundary of the region from which no escape is possible is called the event
    horizon. Although crossing the event horizon has enormous effect on the fate of the object crossing it, it appears to have no locally detectable features. In many ways a black hole acts like
    an ideal black body, as it reflects no light. Moreover, quantum field theory in curved spacetime predicts that event horizons emit Hawking radiation, with the same spectrum as a black
    body of a temperature inversely proportional to its mass. This temperature is on the order of billionths of a kelvin for black holes of stellar mass, making it essentially impossible to observe.

    Objects whose gravitational fields are too strong for light to escape were first considered in the 18th century by John Michell and Pierre-Simon Laplace. The first modern solution of general
    relativity that would characterize a black hole was found by Karl Schwarzschild in 1916, although its interpretation as a region of space from which nothing can escape was first published by
    David Finkelstein in 1958. Long considered a mathematical curiosity, it was during the 1960s that theoretical work showed black holes were a generic prediction of general relativity. The discovery
    of neutron stars sparked interest in gravitationally collapsed compact objects as a possible astrophysical reality.

    Black holes of stellar mass are expected to form when very massive stars collapse at the end of their life cycle. After a black hole has formed, it can continue to grow by absorbing mass from its
    surroundings. By absorbing other stars and merging with other black holes, supermassive black holes of millions of solar masses (M☉) may form. There is general consensus that supermassive black
    holes exist in the centers of most galaxies.

    Despite its invisible interior, the presence of a black hole can be inferred through its interaction with other matter and with electromagnetic radiation such as visible light. Matter falling
    onto a black hole can form an accretion disk heated by friction, forming some of the brightest objects in the universe. If there are other stars orbiting a black hole, their orbit can be used
    to determine its mass and location. Such observations can be used to exclude possible alternatives (such as neutron stars). In this way, astronomers have identified numerous stellar black hole
    candidates in binary systems, and established that the radio source known as Sgr A*, at the core of our own Milky Way galaxy, contains a supermassive black hole of about 4.3 million M☉.


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  • Black Holes 101 | National Geographic

    3:11

    At the center of our galaxy, a supermassive black hole churns. Learn about the types of black holes, how they form, and how scientists discovered these invisible, yet extraordinary objects in our universe.
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    National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible.

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  • Documentary 2015 - Black Holes and Cosmic Monsters Space FULL HD

    1:50:28

    Documentary Films 2015,Documentary 2015, Documentary National Geographic, national geographic documentary 2015,Documentary Channel,national geographic channel,Documentary Wild,Documentary in the World

  • Secret Monster Black Holes and Time - New BBC Documentary 2015 HD

    1:11:09

    A black hole is a mathematically defined region of spacetime exhibiting such a strong gravitational pull that no particle or electromagnetic radiation can escape from it. The theory of
    general relativity predicts that a sufficiently compact mass can deform spacetime to form a black hole.[2][3] The boundary of the region from which no escape is possible is called the event
    horizon. Although crossing the event horizon has enormous effect on the fate of the object crossing it, it appears to have no locally detectable features. In many ways a black hole acts like
    an ideal black body, as it reflects no light. Moreover, quantum field theory in curved spacetime predicts that event horizons emit Hawking radiation, with the same spectrum as a black
    body of a temperature inversely proportional to its mass. This temperature is on the order of billionths of a kelvin for black holes of stellar mass, making it essentially impossible to observe.

    Objects whose gravitational fields are too strong for light to escape were first considered in the 18th century by John Michell and Pierre-Simon Laplace. The first modern solution of general
    relativity that would characterize a black hole was found by Karl Schwarzschild in 1916, although its interpretation as a region of space from which nothing can escape was first published by
    David Finkelstein in 1958. Long considered a mathematical curiosity, it was during the 1960s that theoretical work showed black holes were a generic prediction of general relativity. The discovery
    of neutron stars sparked interest in gravitationally collapsed compact objects as a possible astrophysical reality.

    Black holes of stellar mass are expected to form when very massive stars collapse at the end of their life cycle. After a black hole has formed, it can continue to grow by absorbing mass from its
    surroundings. By absorbing other stars and merging with other black holes, supermassive black holes of millions of solar masses (M☉) may form. There is general consensus that supermassive black
    holes exist in the centers of most galaxies.

    Despite its invisible interior, the presence of a black hole can be inferred through its interaction with other matter and with electromagnetic radiation such as visible light. Matter falling
    onto a black hole can form an accretion disk heated by friction, forming some of the brightest objects in the universe. If there are other stars orbiting a black hole, their orbit can be used
    to determine its mass and location. Such observations can be used to exclude possible alternatives (such as neutron stars). In this way, astronomers have identified numerous stellar black hole
    candidates in binary systems, and established that the radio source known as Sgr A*, at the core of our own Milky Way galaxy, contains a supermassive black hole of about 4.3 million M☉.


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  • BLACK HOLES - Full Documentary - Penetrating the Mystery of Singularities

    51:18

    A black hole is a place in space where gravity pulls so much that even light can not get out. The gravity is so strong because matter has been squeezed into a tiny space. This can happen when a star is dying. Because no light can get out, people can't see black holes. They are invisible. Space telescopes with special tools can help find black holes. The special tools can see how stars that are very close to black holes act differently than other stars.

    How Big Are Black Holes?

    Black holes can be big or small. Scientists think the smallest black holes are as small as just one atom. These black holes are very tiny but have the mass of a large mountain. Mass is the amount of matter, or stuff, in an object.

    Another kind of black hole is called stellar. Its mass can be up to 20 times more than the mass of the sun. There may be many, many stellar mass black holes in Earth's galaxy. Earth's galaxy is called the Milky Way.

    The largest black holes are called supermassive. These black holes have masses that are more than 1 million suns together. Scientists have found proof that every large galaxy contains a supermassive black hole at its center. The supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way galaxy is called Sagittarius A. It has a mass equal to about 4 million suns and would fit inside a very large ball that could hold a few million Earths.


    How Do Black Holes Form?
    Scientists think the smallest black holes formed when the universe began.

    Stellar black holes are made when the center of a very big star falls in upon itself, or collapses. When this happens, it causes a supernova. A supernova is an exploding star that blasts part of the star into space.

    Scientists think supermassive black holes were made at the same time as the galaxy they are in.


    If Black Holes Are Black, How Do Scientists Know They Are There?
    A black hole can not be seen because strong gravity pulls all of the light into the middle of the black hole. But scientists can see how the strong gravity affects the stars and gas around the black hole. Scientists can study stars to find out if they are flying around, or orbiting, a black hole.

    When a black hole and a star are close together, high-energy light is made. This kind of light can not be seen with human eyes. Scientists use satellites and telescopes in space to see the high-energy light.


    Could a Black Hole Destroy Earth?
    Black holes do not go around in space eating stars, moons and planets. Earth will not fall into a black hole because no black hole is close enough to the solar system for Earth to do that.

    Even if a black hole the same mass as the sun were to take the place of the sun, Earth still would not fall in. The black hole would have the same gravity as the sun. Earth and the other planets would orbit the black hole as they orbit the sun now.

    The sun will never turn into a black hole. The sun is not a big enough star to make a black hole.


    How Is NASA Studying Black Holes?
    NASA is using satellites and telescopes that are traveling in space to learn more about black holes. These spacecraft help scientists answer questions about the universe.

  • The Most Dangerous Supermassive Giant Black Hole in the Universe Documentary HD 1080p

    2:23:13

    Subscribe to New Documentary: s://.com/channel/UCQyI . On our channel a lot of interesting documentaries on such themes: to destroy the Land, kill the Earth, .

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  • Magnetars, Black Holes, Quasars And Pulsars Documentary

    1:19:23

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    In this edition of My Universe Documentaries, we are going to take you through a journey where you can learn about the most dangerous places in the universe .

  • The Largest Black Holes in the Universe

    24:59

    For more 4K space, and more great History and Science than you'll ever watch, check out our sister network...

    Our Milky Way may harbor millions of black holes... the ultra dense remnants of dead stars. But now, in the universe far beyond our galaxy, there's evidence of something far more ominous. A breed of black holes that has reached incomprehensible size and destructive power. Just how large, and violent, and strange can they get?

    A new era in astronomy has revealed a universe long hidden to us. High-tech instruments sent into space have been tuned to sense high-energy forms of light -- x-rays and gamma rays -- that are invisible to our eyes and do not penetrate our atmosphere. On the ground, precision telescopes are equipped with technologies that allow them to cancel out the blurring effects of the atmosphere. They are peering into the far reaches of the universe, and into distant caldrons of light and energy. In some distant galaxies, astronomers are now finding evidence that space and time are being shattered by eruptions so vast they boggle the mind.

    We are just beginning to understand the impact these outbursts have had on the universe: On the shapes of galaxies, the spread of elements that make up stars and planets, and ultimately the very existence of Earth. The discovery of what causes these eruptions has led to a new understanding of cosmic history. Back in 1995, the Hubble space telescope was enlisted to begin filling in the details of that history. Astronomers selected tiny regions in the sky, between the stars. For days at a time, they focused Hubble's gaze on remote regions of the universe.

    These hubble Deep Field images offered incredibly clear views of the cosmos in its infancy. What drew astronomers' attention were the tiniest galaxies, covering only a few pixels on Hubble's detector. Most of them do not have the grand spiral or elliptical shapes of large galaxies we see close to us today.

    Instead, they are irregular, scrappy collections of stars. The Hubble Deep Field confirmed a long-standing idea that the universe must have evolved in a series of building blocks, with small galaxies gradually merging and assembling into larger ones.

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  • MONSTER BLACK HOLE WITH MASS OF 66,000,000,000 SUNS... TON 618

    10:55

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  • Supermassive black hole The Unknown Universe Documentary - Space Discovery Documentary

    35:03

    The star's outer layers spew out into space, but the inside implodes, becoming denser and denser, until there is too much matter in too little space. The core succumbs to its own gravitational pull and collapses into itself, in extreme cases forming a black hole

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  • The Monster Black Hole at the Center of the Milky Way

    1:11:38

    Jan. 25, 2017
    Dr. Andrea Ghez (University of California, Los Angeles)
    By measuring the rapid orbits of the stars near the center of our galaxy, Dr. Ghez and her colleagues have moved the case for a supermassive black hole at the heart of the Milky Way from a possibility to a certainty. She reports on her pioneering observations and discusses some of the surprising results this work has led to.

  • The Death of a Black Hole | space and astronomy

    10:04

    Monster Black Hole traces the life cycle of a black hole, from its violent beginnings in the early universe, to its growth to supermassive proportions at the center of a galaxy, and its death in deep time.

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  • First Image of a Black Hole!

    5:29

    The Event Horizon Telescope Collaboration observed the supermassive black hole at the center of M87, finding the dark central shadow in accordance with General Relativity, further demonstrating the power of this 100 year-old theory.

    To understand more about why the shadows look the way they do, check out:

    I will continue updating this description with more links.

    Event Horizon Telescope collaboration:

    Animations and simulations with English text:
    L. R. Weih & L. Rezzolla (Goethe University Frankfurt)


    Video of observation of M87 courtesy of:
    C. M. Fromm, Y. Mizuno & L. Rezzolla (Goethe University Frankfurt)


    Video of observation of SgrA* courtesy of
    C. M. Fromm, Y. Mizuno & L. Rezzolla (Goethe University Frankfurt)
    Z. Younsi (University College London)


    Video of telescopes in the array 2017:
    C. M. Fromm & L. Rezzolla (Goethe University Frankfurt)


    Animations and simulations (no text):
    L. R. Weih & L. Rezzolla (Goethe University Frankfurt)


    Special thanks to Patreon supporters:
    Donal Botkin, Michael Krugman, Ron Neal, Stan Presolski, Terrance Shepherd, Penward Rhyme

    Scale animation by Maria Raykova

  • Black Holes Explained – From Birth to Death

    5:56

    Black holes. Lets talk about them.

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  • TESS Catches its First Star-destroying Black Hole

    1:46

    For the first time, NASA’s planet-hunting Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) watched a black hole tear apart a star from start to finish, a cataclysmic phenomenon called a tidal disruption event.

    The blast, named ASASSN-19bt, was found on Jan. 29 by the All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae (ASAS-SN), a worldwide network of 20 robotic telescopes. Shortly after the discovery, ASAS-SN requested follow-up observations by NASA’s Swift satellite, ESA’s (European Space Agency’s) XMM-Newton and ground-based 1-meter telescopes in the global Las Cumbres Observatory network.

    The disruption occurred in TESS’s continuous viewing zone, which is always in sight of one of the satellite’s four cameras. This allowed astronomers to view the explosion from beginning to end.

    This video shows images of a tidal disruption event called ASASSN-19bt taken by NASA’s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) and Swift missions, along with an animation illustrating how it unfolded. Because ASASSN-19bt occurred in the TESS continuous viewing zone, the satellite observed the full duration of the event.

    This video is public domain and along with other supporting visualizations can be downloaded from the Scientific Visualization Studio at:

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  • What Happens When a White Hole and a Black Hole Collide?

    15:17

    In this video I show you the difference between a I white hole and a black hole, then I actually show you what a white hole and a black hole look like in real life. Then I actually show you what happens when I black hole and a white hole collide together!

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    My other video about white holes and worm holes more in depth

  • Astronomers Find Vortex Around A Black Hole Spinning At 70% the Speed of Light

    6:32

    Scientists discover a mysterious vortex spinning 70 percent the speed of light, but you have nothing to worry about, maybe. In today's scientific space video we are looking into black holes and letting you know what we see.

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  • Whats Inside A Black Hole? — ایک بلیک ہول کے اندر کیا ہے — Urdu Dubbed

    12:34

    Wormholes, time warps, alternate universes — we’ve all heard interesting theories about what happens inside a black hole. So what’s the real story?

    Special thanks to Unveiled Youtube Channel for giving permission to use this documentary for non-commercial, non-profit and education purpose by dubbing in Urdu language.

    Unveiled:
    -----

    A joint Urdu dubbing project of Mashal Books and the Eqbal Ahmad Centre for Public Education with generous support from Nasser Ahmad.

    Urdu Translation: Nayyar Afaq
    Voice Over: Maria Rubab
    Technical help: Media 6

    Please visit our websites and social media pages for more videos, articles, books and other useful material.







  • What If Two Black Holes Collided?

    5:08

    Black holes are the gravitational monsters of the Universe. They are so powerful that nothing, even light, can escape their grasp. One black hole is bad enough. But if you took two black holes and smashed them into each other, they'd be capable of changing the shape of space itself. How epic would that explosion be? And could it somehow reach the Earth?

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    What If is a mini-documentary web series that takes you on an epic journey through hypothetical worlds and possibilities. Join us on an imaginary adventure — grounded in scientific theory — through time, space and chance, as we ask what if some of the most fundamental aspects of our existence were different.

  • Black Hole in Telugu | Black Hole Explained

    7:06

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    Black Hole in Telugu

    video Source: Pixabay

    Disclaimer- Some contents are used for educational purpose under fair use. Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for fair use for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

    Music: Time Passing By by Audionautix is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution licence (
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    Disclaimer- Some contents are used for educational purpose under fair use. Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for fair use for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.
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  • This Massive Black Hole Is Blasting a Jet at 99% the Speed of Light

    4:50

    Jets of particles appear to be streaming from the center of the supermassive black hole M87* faster than the speed of light. But how could that be the case??!
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    For the first time ever, Chandra X-ray Observatory observations show that sections of a jet are moving at greater than 99 percent the speed of light. A jet is a cloud of high-speed, high energy particles spewed out from the center of a black hole. And in this case, the black hole in question is M87*.

    M87* exists in the center of the enormous elliptical galaxy Messier 87, and is roughly 55 million light-years away. Astronomers have been observing the supermassive black hole for some time now, watching M87*’s jet of material for years in different wavelengths including radio, optical and x-ray.

    And just last year, the Event Horizon Telescope captured the first-ever image of a black hole: an image of M87*, which helped contribute to the black holes fame.

    Astronomers have announced that M87* has now been observed shooting jets of physical material out into space at extreme speeds that might break the cosmic speed limit.

    So how fast is the material actually moving and what causes the jets in the first place?

    Find out the answers and more in this Elements.

    #blackholes #cosmic #speedoflight #space #seeker #science #elements

    Read More:
    Black Hole Spits Out High-Energy Jets at Near Light-Speed

    A stunning new image reveals two jets of high-energy material being spewed at nearly light-speed from the first-ever photographed black hole. The supermassive black hole, M87 — dubbed Pōwehi — lives 55 million light-years away from Earth in a galaxy called Messier 87. The new image of M87 was released by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

    A Powerful Energy Beam in Space Seems to Exceed the Speed of Light

    The Hubble Space Telescope monitored its development between 1995 and 1999 and, after four years of photos, they saw the plasma ripple outwards faster than what was being emitted from the black hole, meaning it must be moving faster than the speed of light. In 2013, after 13 years of images, it appeared to move in corkscrew-like spirals, making this strange occurrence even more mystifying.

    How are galaxies moving away faster than light?

    Light emitted by the galaxies is moving towards us, while the galaxy itself is traveling away from us, so the photons emitted by all the stars can still reach us. These wavelengths of light get all stretched out, and duckslide further into the red end of the spectrum, off to infrared, microwave, and even radio waves. Given time, the photons will be stretched so far that we won't be able to detect the galaxy at all.
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  • secrets of black hole sun - New NOVA Soace Documentary HD

    53:07

    A black hole is a mathematically defined region of spacetime exhibiting such a strong gravitational pull that no particle or electromagnetic radiation can escape from it. The theory of
    general relativity predicts that a sufficiently compact mass can deform spacetime to form a black hole.[2][3] The boundary of the region from which no escape is possible is called the event
    horizon. Although crossing the event horizon has enormous effect on the fate of the object crossing it, it appears to have no locally detectable features. In many ways a black hole acts like
    an ideal black body, as it reflects no light. Moreover, quantum field theory in curved spacetime predicts that event horizons emit Hawking radiation, with the same spectrum as a black
    body of a temperature inversely proportional to its mass. This temperature is on the order of billionths of a kelvin for black holes of stellar mass, making it essentially impossible to observe.

    Objects whose gravitational fields are too strong for light to escape were first considered in the 18th century by John Michell and Pierre-Simon Laplace. The first modern solution of general
    relativity that would characterize a black hole was found by Karl Schwarzschild in 1916, although its interpretation as a region of space from which nothing can escape was first published by
    David Finkelstein in 1958. Long considered a mathematical curiosity, it was during the 1960s that theoretical work showed black holes were a generic prediction of general relativity. The discovery
    of neutron stars sparked interest in gravitationally collapsed compact objects as a possible astrophysical reality.

    Black holes of stellar mass are expected to form when very massive stars collapse at the end of their life cycle. After a black hole has formed, it can continue to grow by absorbing mass from its
    surroundings. By absorbing other stars and merging with other black holes, supermassive black holes of millions of solar masses (M☉) may form. There is general consensus that supermassive black
    holes exist in the centers of most galaxies.

    Despite its invisible interior, the presence of a black hole can be inferred through its interaction with other matter and with electromagnetic radiation such as visible light. Matter falling
    onto a black hole can form an accretion disk heated by friction, forming some of the brightest objects in the universe. If there are other stars orbiting a black hole, their orbit can be used
    to determine its mass and location. Such observations can be used to exclude possible alternatives (such as neutron stars). In this way, astronomers have identified numerous stellar black hole
    candidates in binary systems, and established that the radio source known as Sgr A*, at the core of our own Milky Way galaxy, contains a supermassive black hole of about 4.3 million M☉.


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  • What If You Fell Into a Black Hole?

    4:55

    What would the outcome be if you took a leap of faith straight into a black hole? We looked to Einstein and Hawking to ponder the scenario.

    Say one day you were exploring space looking for a new planet for humans to inhabit, but came across a black hole and decided – why not check it out? Would you have any chance of survival? How would you get out if at all? Would you find a shortcut to another universe? Watch the video to learn about what would happen if you fell into a black hole.

    With your support we can make our show better! Join our Patreon community:

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    About What If: Produced by Underknown in Toronto, Canada, What If is a mini-documentary web series that takes you on an epic journey through hypothetical worlds and possibilities. Join us on an imaginary adventure — grounded in scientific theory — through time, space and chance, as we ask what if some of the most fundamental aspects of our existence were different.

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    Imagination will often carry us to worlds that never were. But without it, we go nowhere. — Carl Sagan

  • Black Hole Comparison

    4:10

    Hello world! Sorry about the long time without any uploads,
    but I had to spend some time dealing with life ;)
    But good news, I am back with a space themed video similar to my first upload,
    which became quite popular.
    I hope I was able to convey my fascination.
    Enjoy

    Music:

    Black Vortex Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
    Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

  • Soundgarden - Black Hole Sun

    5:21

    REMASTERED IN HD!

    Music video by Soundgarden performing Black Hole Sun. (C) 1994 A&M Records

    #Soundgarden #BlackHoleSun #Remastered #Vevo

  • Physicist Brian Cox Explains Black Holes in Plain English | Joe Rogan

    5:39

    Taken from Joe Rogan Experience #1233 w/Brian Cox:

  • BBC Space Documentary Monster Black Holes and Time Science Documentary 2014 HD

    45:58

    BBC Space Documentary Monster Black Holes and Time Science Documentary 2014 HD

  • Absolutely Gargantuan Black Hole The Mass of 40 Billion Suns Found

    3:30

    Black holes can get pretty big, but there's a special class that is the biggest of the big, absolute yawning monster black holes. And astronomers seem to have identified an absolute specimen, clocking in at 40 billion times the mass of the Sun.

  • How the Universe Works - Black holes - Space Discovery Documentary

    6:13:43

    The idea of an object in space so massive and dense that light could not escape it has been around for centuries. Most famously, black holes were predicted by Einstein's theory of general relativity, which showed that when a massive star dies, it leaves behind a small, dense remnant core. If the core's mass is more than about three times the mass of the Sun, the equations showed, the force of gravity overwhelms all other forces and produces a black hole.

    Scientists can't directly observe black holes with telescopes that detect x-rays, light, or other forms of electromagnetic radiation. We can, however, infer the presence of black holes and study them by detecting their effect on other matter nearby. If a black hole passes through a cloud of interstellar matter, for example, it will draw matter inward in a process known as accretion. A similar process can occur if a normal star passes close to a black hole. In this case, the black hole can tear the star apart as it pulls it toward itself. As the attracted matter accelerates and heats up, it emits x-rays that radiate into space. Recent discoveries offer some tantalizing evidence that black holes have a dramatic influence on the neighborhoods around them - emitting powerful gamma ray bursts, devouring nearby stars, and spurring the growth of new stars in some areas while stalling it in others.

  • BBC Documentary - How To See A Black Hole 1080i HDTV

    59:01

    A BBC documentary about one of the greatest discoveries of humans by a team of top scientific minds from different parts of the world known as the Event Horizon Telescope project team guided by Dr Sheperd Doeleman of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, on a mission to capture the first ever picture of a black hole with a mega virtual telescope the size of the earth, by combining radio observatories and telescope facilities from all over the world to make up this earth-size virtual telescope.

    All the videos, songs, images, and graphics used in the video belong to their respective owners and I or this channel does not claim any right over them.

    Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favour of fair use.
    #DeepWorldsDocs

  • Monster Black Hole -Hindi Urdu

    43:19

    A black hole is a region of spacetime exhibiting such strong gravitational effects that nothing—not even particles and electromagnetic radiation such as light—can escape from inside it. The theory of general relativity predicts that a sufficiently compact mass can deform spacetime to form a black hole. The boundary of the region from which no escape is possible is called the event horizon. Although the event horizon has an enormous effect on the fate and circumstances of an object crossing it, no locally detectable features appear to be observed. In many ways a black hole acts like an ideal black body, as it reflects no light. Moreover, quantum field theory in curved spacetime predicts that event horizons emit Hawking radiation, with the same spectrum as a black body of a temperature inversely proportional to its mass. This temperature is on the order of billionths of a kelvin for black holes of stellar mass, making it essentially impossible to observe.

  • Live: Astronomers to reveal first close up images of monster black hole | ITV News

    1:1:56

    Astronomers reveal first ever close up images of monster black hole from the Event Horizon Telescope.

    More here:

  • The First Image of a Black Hole with Dr. Feryal Ozel

    37:39

    This is the first photo of a the M87 black hole taken with eight telescopes all across earth, in a collaborative effort called the event horizon telescope. This effort was monumental, and Dr. Feryal Ozel was one of the team members who’s work lead to developing the image of M87’s black hole.

    Event Horizon Telescope team:


    This is the first photo of a black hole


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  • 4 Billion Solar Mass Black Hole in M87 - Event Horizon Telescope

    8:27

    55 million light years away
    20 billion kilometers in diameter.
    6 Billion solar masses
    The first image of this monster sets new technical standards.

    Visualized using
    Space Engine

    Universe Sandbox 2

  • NASAs Fermi Links Cosmic Neutrino to Monster Black Hole

    2:07

    For the first time ever, scientists using NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have found the source of a high-energy neutrino from outside our galaxy. This neutrino traveled 3.7 billion years at nearl-light speed before being detected on Earth -- farther than any other neutrino for which we know the origin.

    High-energy neutrinos are hard-to-catch particles that scientists think are created by the most powerful events in the cosmos, like galaxy mergers and material falling onto supermassive black holes. They travel a whisker shy of the speed of light and rarely interact with other matter, so they can travel unimpeded across billions of light-years.

    On Sept. 22, 2017, the IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South Pole detected signs of a neutrino striking the Antarctic ice with an energy of about 300 trillion electron volts -- more than 45 times the energy achievable in the most powerful particle accelerator on Earth. This high energy strongly suggested that the neutrino had to be from beyond our solar system. Backtracking the path through IceCube indicated where in the sky the neutrino came from, and automated alerts notified astronomers around the globe to search this region for flares or outbursts that could be associated with the event.

    Data from Fermi's Large Area Telescope revealed enhanced gamma-ray emission from a well-known active galaxy at the time the neutrino arrived. This active galaxy is a type called a blazar, where a supermassive black hole with millions to billions of times the Sun's mass blasts particle jets outward in opposite directions at nearly the speed of light. Blazars are especially bright and active because one of these jets happens to point almost directly toward Earth.

    Fermi showed that at the time of the neutrino detection, the blazar TXS 0506+056 was the most active it had been in a decade.

    The discovery is a giant leap forward in a growing field called multimessenger astronomy, where new cosmic signals like neutrinos and gravitational waves are definitively linked to sources that emit light.

    Music: Hidden Tides from Killer Tracks

    Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

    This video is public domain and along with other supporting visualizations can be downloaded from the Scientific Visualization Studio at:

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  • Monster of the Universe - Black Hole Documentary

    58:25

  • BLACK HOLE Madam Info Serye Part 1

    12:58

    Ang BLACK HOLE Madam Info SERYE ay 3-part series na tatalakay sa tinaguriang halimaw ng kalawakan dahil sa kakayahan nitong hilahin at lunukin ang kahit anong bagay na mapalapit dito.

    Dito sa PART 1 ay aalamin muna natin ang iba't ibang uri ng black hole at tatalakayin ang pinakabagong ideya na posibleng may primordial black hole dito mismo sa ating solar system.

    Link para sa Black Hole Part 2:

    Link para sa Black Hole Part 3:

    Kumusta! Ako po si Madam Info at salamat sa pagbisita sa ating channel. Boses ko po ang naririnig ninyo dito. Kung nagustuhan niyo po ang video na ito, please don't forget to like, share, comment & subscribe????❤????


    ----------------------------------------
    Attributions:

    NASA Goddard
    HubbleESA
    Chandra X-Ray Laboratory
    European Southern Observatory (ESO)
    Pixabay.com
    Event Horizon Telescope
    National Science Foundation
    NASASolarSystem
    SXSCollaboration
    NASA 360
    Hubble Space Telescope
    Fermilab
    Video Ball Reviews
    Caltech

    Planet Nine By Tomruen - Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0,

    The constellation Taurus as it can be seen by the naked eye By Till Credner - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0,

    uic.edu for James Unwin's photo
    dur.ac.uk for Jakub Scholtz' photo

    ogle.astrouw.edu.pl for OGLE telescope photo

    ----------------------------------------
    Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for fair use for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

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