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Mucky Secrets (full) - The Marine Creatures of the Lembeh Strait

  • Mucky Secrets - The Marine Creatures of the Lembeh Strait

    1:32:25

    Mucky Secrets is a documentary about the marine life of the Lembeh Strait at the heart of the Coral Triangle off north Sulawesi in Indonesia. The DVD is available at

    The Lembeh Strait is a popular scuba diving destination, famed for its excellent muck diving. A huge diversity of exotic marine creatures can be found on the mucky seabed, including everything from tropical fish to benthic sharks to nudibranchs. Critters compete for survival with an armoury including camouflage, mimicry, toxicity, and dazzling coloration.

    Mucky Secrets is an excellent resource for scuba divers, aquarists, and marine biology students. The documentary features underwater macro footage from many of Lembeh's famous dive sites including Critter Hunt, Police Pier, Tanjung Kusu-Kusu, Nudi Falls, Aer Perang, Jahir, Makawide, Nudi Retreat, Retak Larry, TK (Teluk Kembahu), Hairball and Aw Shucks.

    There are subtitles/CC tracks for the narration and for the scientific and common names of the marine species, and dive site names.

    Watch the 4-minute prologue video at

    Marine life featured:

    0:00:00 Introduction
    0:05:11 Corals
    0:05:57 Tunicates - sea squirts - ascidians
    0:06:37 Symbiosis - sea anemones - anemonefish (clownfish)

    CRUSTACEANS
    0:07:29 Commensal shrimps (partner shrimps)
    0:09:12 Emperor shrimp
    0:11:07 Mantis shrimps
    0:12:34 Squat lobsters
    0:13:27 Hermit crabs
    0:14:26 True crabs
    0:15:55 Sea Urchins

    ELASMOBRANCHS
    0:17:11 Blue spotted stingrays
    0:18:15 Brownbanded bamboo shark

    EELS
    0:18:59 Snake eels
    0:20:27 Moray eels
    0:21:34 Ribbon eels

    REEF FISHES
    0:22:33 Cardinalfishes
    0:24:43 Trumpetfish
    0:25:58 Seahorses
    0:27:06 Pygmy seahorse
    0:28:30 Pipefishes
    0:30:38 Ghost pipefishes
    0:33:22 Shrimpfishes - razorfishes
    0:33:58 Seamoths - short dragonfish
    0:35:03 Oriental flying gurnard
    0:35:58 Blennies
    0:36:49 Gobies
    0:37:46 Sea pen
    0:38:17 Dragonets
    0:40:49 Mandarinfish
    0:42:08 Frogfishes
    0:46:39 Juvenile fishes
    0:47:12 Spotted parrotfish
    0:48:20 Sweetlips
    0:49:05 Yellowblotch razorfish
    0:49:37 Filefishes
    0:50:24 Boxfishes - cowfishes
    0:50:57 Puffers (pufferfish)
    0:52:21 Sharpnose puffers (tobies)
    0:52:50 Porcupinefishes
    0:53:45 Panther grouper
    0:54:10 Whitemargin stargazer
    0:54:54 Leopard flounder
    0:55:25 Flatheads
    0:56:36 Scorpionfishes
    0:57:27 Ambon Scorpionfish
    0:58:04 Rhinopias
    0:59:50 Lionfishes
    1:02:29 Demon stinger (spiny devilfish, bearded ghoul)
    1:03:17 Fireworm
    1:03:45 Waspfishes

    MOLLUSCS
    CEPHALOPODS
    1:05:48 Cuttlefishes
    1:08:38 Octopuses
    1:11:34 Flame scallop
    GASTROPODS
    1:12:03 Sea snails
    1:14:37 Sea slugs - nudibranchs
    1:21:49 Sea slugs feeding
    1:23:57 Nudibranchs mating
    1:26:11 Sap-sucking slug
    1:26:59 Headshield slugs
    1:27:49 Sea hares
    1:30:21 Polyclad flatworm
    1:31:18 End credits

    I have more scuba diving videos and underwater footage on my website at:


    I post updates about my videos here:





    MUSIC CREDITS:
    Arrival of the Broken Kings by Klangachse (
    The Unknown by Jaycieh (

    All the following tracks are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license

    Covert Affair, Tenebrous Brothers Carnival - Snake Lady, Hitman, Sneak 'n Get Caught, Water Prelude, The Other Side of the Door, Sneaky Adventure, Umbrella Pants, Comfortable Mystery, Babylon, Mysterioso March, Sneaky Snitch, Hidden Agenda, Lightless Dawn, Tenebrous Brothers Carnival - Mermaid, Scheming Weasel (slower version), Brittle Rille, Perspectives by Kevin MacLeod (
    Mystery 2, Joy 2 by Tom Cusack (Leafy Lane Productions)(
    Divider, Air Hockey Saloon by Chris Zabriskie (
    Mountain Breeze (pad), Biosphere by Purple Planet (
    Second Thoughts by James Kirsch a.k.a. generalfuzz (
    Blade Walker by Lahniz (
    Untitled Ambient Tune by TekMerc (
    Melody of the Lost Ark by Ojini Project (

    Thanks to:
    - Two Fish Divers ( who I stayed and dived with on Lembeh Island, and especially to their keen-eyed dive guides for their critter spotting
    - Phiangpis Phanchana for diving and production assistance
    - Gerry Allen and Teresa Zubi ( for assistance with marine species identification
    - Bill Rudman for creating the now-idle sea slug forum ( still an invaluable source of knowledge.

    The video was shot by Nick Hope with a Sony HVR-Z1P HDV camera in a Light & Motion Bluefin HD housing with Light & Motion Elite lights, a flat port, and a Century +3.5 diopter.

  • Reef Life of the Andaman

    1:56:24

    Reef Life of the Andaman is a documentary of the marine life of Thailand and Burma (Myanmar). It is available on DVD at

    Scuba diving more than 1000 times from the coral reefs and underwater pinnacles of Thailand's Similan Islands, Phuket, Phi Phi Island and Hin Daeng, to Myanmar's Mergui Archipelago and Burma Banks, I encountered everything from manta rays to seahorses, whale sharks to shipwrecks. The 116-minute film features descriptions of 213 different marine species including more than 100 tropical fish, along with sharks, rays, moray eels, crabs, lobsters, shrimps, sea slugs, cuttlefish, squid, octopus, turtles, sea snakes, starfish, sea cucumbers, corals, worms etc..

    This marine biology documentary provides an overview of Indian Ocean aquatic life.

    Marine life & underwater subjects featured in the film:

    0:00:00 - Introduction
    0:01:42 - Underwater caves
    0:02:18 - Corals and anemones
    ELASMOBRANCHS - SHARKS
    0:03:37 - Carpet sharks (zebra sharks / leopard sharks and nurse sharks)
    0:06:45 - Whale sharks
    0:11:26 - Requiem sharks (grey reef sharks, silvertip sharks, whitetip reef sharks)
    RAYS
    0:13:44 - Stingrays
    0:17:05 - Eagle rays & devil rays / mobulas
    0:18:48 - Manta rays
    REEF FISHES
    0:21:24 - Moray eels
    0:25:50 - Seahorse
    0:27:12 - Cornetfish & trumpetfish
    0:28:50 - Batfish (spadefish)
    0:30:09 - Angelfish
    0:31:34 - Butterflyfish
    0:32:41 - Bannerfish
    0:33:30 - Moorish idol
    0:33:56 - Surgeonfish (tang) & unicornfish
    0:34:42 - Bigeye
    0:35:10 - Emperor Snapper
    0:35:26 - Sweetlips
    0:36:05 - Grouper (rockcod)
    0:38:24 - Humphead wrasse
    0:38:52 - Green humphead parrotfish
    0:39:38 - Barracuda
    0:40:37 - Trevally (jacks)
    0:41:21 - Pufferfish
    0:42:32 - Boxfish
    0:44:28 - Porcupinefish
    0:46:10 - Scrawled filefish
    0:46:33 - Triggerfish
    CRUSTACEANS
    0:48:23 - Spiny lobster
    0:49:35 - Shrimps
    0:50:39 - Red-legged swimming crab
    MOLLUSCS - GASTROPODS
    0:51:13 - Cowries
    0:52:46 - Sea slugs / nudibranchs
    BIVALVES
    0:54:55 - Fluted giant clam
    0:55:38 - Tuna Wreck - Similan Islands
    0:56:00 - Schooling fish - Cardinalfish
    0:56:56 - Hardyhead silversides
    0:57:15 - Fusilier
    0:57:45 - African pompano
    0:57:49 - Striped eel catfish
    0:58:02 - Schooling snapper
    0:59:08 - Schooling barracuda
    1:00:30 - Dogtooth tuna
    1:00:45 - Bigeye trevally
    HIDING
    1:01:15 - Pastel Tilefish
    1:01:49 - Stingrays in sand
    1:02:43 - Octopus ink
    CAMOUFLAGE - MIMICRY
    1:03:03 - Straightstick pipefish
    1:03:28 - Ornate ghost pipefish
    1:04:19 - Giant frogfish
    1:05:14 - Scorpionfish
    1:06:42 - Stonefish
    1:07:17 - King Cruiser shipwreck
    VENOMOUS SPINES
    1:07:29 - Lionfish
    1:09:25 - Crown-of-thorns starfish
    1:10:00 - Sea urchin
    SYMBIOSIS
    1:10:26 - Sea urchin cardinalfish
    1:10:49 - Anemonefish / Clownfish / Sea anemones
    1:13:53 - Porcelain anemone crab
    1:14:39 - Tube anemone
    1:15:13 - Rhizostome jellyfish
    1:16:09 - Fishes feeding
    1:16:16 - Streaked spinefoot
    1:16:31 - Parrotfish
    1:17:02 - Goatfish
    1:17:10 - Bluefin trevally
    1:17:29 - Smalltooth emperor
    1:17:51 - Fringelip mullet
    REPTILES
    1:20:26 - Banded sea krait (sea snake)
    1:21:46 - Pacific Hawksbill turtle
    1:23:26 - Green turtle
    SHRIMPS
    1:25:05 - Harlequin shrimp
    1:26:09 - Peacock mantis shrimp
    CLEANING
    1:27:08 - Skunk cleaner shrimp
    1:27:57 - Cleaner wrasse
    1:29:07 - Rock cleaner shrimp
    1:29:27 - False cleanerfish
    1:30:07 - Remora / live sharksucker
    1:31:38 - Cobia
    1:32:47 - Rainbow runner
    POLYCHAETE WORMS
    1:33:38 - Feather duster worm
    1:33:43 - Hard tube coco worm
    1:33:53 - Christmas tree worm
    1:34:39 - Sea cucumber
    SEX
    1:36:54 - Broadcast spawning
    1:37:42 - Oyster
    1:38:19 - Pharaoh cuttlefish mating
    1:40:15 - Bigfin reef squid
    1:40:36 - Day octopus fighting
    1:43:25 - Rough-toothed dolphin
    1:43:48 - Night diving
    1:49:38 - Crabs at night
    1:52:56 - Hermit crab
    1:54:22 - Basket stars

    MUSIC CREDITS:
    Prickly Shark, Black Corals, Jewel Squid by Erik Verkoyen
    Freefall Into The Blue, Buoyancy, Tai Long Wan, Andaman Resonance, Hidden Depths, Similan Sunrise, The Cool Of The Forest by Mark Ellison
    Blood Wine by Condor e (Velvet Night Album)
    Dream And You Will Fly by Menno Hoomans ( - Remastered version:
    Just Walk Away by Adam Fielding (
    Deep Blue, Starbeam by Toao (SOILSOUND Music Publishing LLC) (
    Space Frigate by Smashed Toy (
    Deliberate Thought, Modern Vibes by Kevin MacLeod (
    Pattern Errors by Coded
    Bird's Song (Edit) by Absorb Fish (

    Thanks to Santana Diving of Phuket ( to Rob Royle for a few of the clips, to Elfi and Uli Erfort and Daniel Bruehwiler for help with the German translation, and to Frank Nelissen for the Dutch subtitles.


  • Lembeh Muck Diving Weird, Ugly Wonderful Critters Highlights 1 - 2nd Trip.

    1:6:33

    I’ve been diving since 1970 and in all my thousands of dives I’ve never experienced anything equal to Lembeh Muck diving. From the Red Sea to Australia to Bonaire and Mexico, Lembeh is the most exciting.

    It’s for sure not the prettiest. It’s murky, there’s very little coral. But the critters are the things of dreams. We were diving in Lembeh in February of 2018 and in July, rather than head to the Caribbean, we went back to Lembeh for a 2nd crack at the critters. And I’m so glad we did. I’ve loved diving around the world. In fact I love diving in my own swimming pool. I even have my own SNUBA. But, nothing is as exciting as Blue Ring Octopuses Hunting, Hairy Frogfish Eating, Ribbon Eels Eating, Flamboyant Cuttlefish Eating and the list goes on and on. In fact, I was lucky enough to get Clownfish Eggs, up close. Plus Squid eggs, Nudibranch eggs and so much more.

    Honestly, I owe it mostly to the wonderful dive guide I found at Dabirahe Dive resort in Lembeh. His name is Puri, and while I’ve heard that other guides are great too, I’ve never had anyone find so many creatures. It’s amazing. Plus I’ve been so pampered getting in and out of the water, that I’m spoiled to dive anywhere else. But it’s really about the amazing creatures.

    I really find that I shoot more great video footage on a dive in Lembeh than I often shoot in a week in the Caribbean. It’s amazing. And I’m so thrilled with the critters that we’ve found that I put a special video monitor up over my desk that runs my Lembeh videos 24 hours a day. I just can’t get enough of these amazing, ugly, wonderful critters. So, if you can, head to Lembeh. I’m going back for my third trip in February of 19. I’m hooked.

    Oh, and I’ve shot everything with an inexpensive Olympus TG-5 in a housing with a tripod and a new 15,000 lumen light from Big Blue. I also have a 2800 lumen light that’s great, but the 15,000 lumen is awesome. You don’t need a big camera. But you do need to shoot MACRO. There’s virtually no wide angle shooting in Lembeh.

  • Mucky Secrets - Part 17 - Sea Snails & Flame Scallop - Lembeh Strait

    3:33

    Sea snails and electric flame scallop. Part 17 of my documentary, Mucky Secrets, about the fascinating marine creatures of the Lembeh Strait in Indonesia. Watch the full 90-minute documentary at

    As we continue to examine molluscs (mollusks, Mollusca) in this documentary series, we take a quick look at the electric flame scallop (Ctenoides ales), otherwise known as the disco clam, fire clam or electric clam. The flame scallop is a type of bivalve (Bivalvia). It appears to emit luminescent electrical pulses, but actually it is rolling and unrolling the edges of its mantle, revealing special particles that simply reflect light. The display is thought to attract phytoplankton as food and perhaps frighten off predators like crabs and shrimps.

    We then turn our attention to sea snail (gastropods, Gastropoda). The grey bonnet (Phalium glaucum) is a typical sea snail. It has a protective, coiled shell that it can withdraw its entire body into. It glides over the substrate on its large, muscular foot, and at the rear we see the operculum, a hard lid that is used to close the opening of the shell after the snail withdraws into it. Two simple eyes peer out from under the front of the shell, and important sensory feedback also comes from the two tentacles. To one side is the inhalent siphon, a tube that the sea snail uses to draw in water for respiration.

    The anatomy of another gastropod, the vomer conch (Euprotomus vomer), is different. Its mouth is much more obvious, at the end of a long protrusion called a proboscis. It is strictly a herbivore, and it uses the proboscis for locating and eating algae growing in the sand. It's eyes are much more prominent too, at the end of long stalks, and jutting out from these stalks are two highly sensitive tentacles. Rather than gliding, it uses its operculum to drag itself along the bottom in a lurching motion.

    Conchs are a popular food, and their shells have symbolic and religious significance in some cultures. They have been used for everything from musical instruments, to weapons, to ink holders.

    We then encounter a whitespotted hermit crab inhabiting an empty cone shell. The main sensory device of cones like the ivory cone (Conus eburneus) is the siphon itself which contains highly sensitive chemoreceptors. If it detects suitable prey the cone will unleash a harpoon from its proboscis containing a highly venomous neurotoxin, powerful enough to kill humans.

    There are English captions showing either the full narration or the common and scientific names of the marine life, along with the dive site names.

    The full Mucky Secrets nature documentary features a huge diversity of weird and wonderful marine animals including frogfish, nudibranchs, scorpionfish, crabs, shrimps, moray eels, seahorses, octopus, cuttlefish etc..

    Thanks to Kevin MacLeod of for the music track, Scheming Weasel (slower version), which is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

    Thanks to the staff and keen-eyed divemasters of Two Fish Divers ( for accommodation, diving services and critter-spotting.

    The video was shot by Nick Hope with a Sony HVR-Z1P HDV camera in a Light & Motion Bluefin HD housing with Light & Motion Elite lights and a flat port. A Century +3.5 diopter was used for the most of the macro footage.

    I have more scuba diving videos and underwater footage on my website at:


    I post updates about my videos here:





    Full list of marine life and dive sites featured in this video:

    00:00 Flame Scallop, Ctenoides ales, Nudi Retreat
    00:29 Grey Bonnet, Phalium glaucum, TK 2
    01:23 Vomer Conch, Euprotomus vomer, Jahir
    02:28 White-spotted Hermit Crab, Dardanus megistos, Two Fish Divers house reef
    02:40 Ivory Cone, Conus eburneus, TK 2
    03:03 Nudibranchs, Hypselodoris bullocki & Glossodoris cincta, Aer Perang
    03:08 Nudibranch, Doto sp., Nudi Retreat

  • Sea of Creepy Monsters - The Secrets of Nature

    51:06

    The Lembeh strait in the northern part of the Idonesian island of Sulawesi is a unique hotspot of marine biodiversity. Countless amazing creatures thrive in the underwater landscape surrounding Lembeh island. During four years a wildlife filmmaker couple spent many months in the region capturing hundreds of hours of behavior, lots of it never filmed before. Among other unique behavior the filmmakers were able to shoot an Anglerfish swallowing a Lionfish, a scene resembling Godzilla gulping down Dracula. Elegant seahorses, thumb-splitting Mantis shrimp, and deadly mini-octopuses are just some of the remarkable creatures traditional underwater films tend to overlook. As most of the underwater drama is hidden from plain sight only the groundbreaking macro photography in this film can reveal the awe and beauty of life in the Reef of Little Monsters.

  • Mucky Secrets - Part 1 - Coral Triangle, Lembeh Strait & Sessile Animals

    7:07

    Part 1 of my documentary, Mucky Secrets, about the fascinating marine life of the Lembeh Strait in Indonesia. Watch the full 90-minute documentary at

    In this video I introduce the Lembeh Strait's location off North Sulawesi, in Indonesia, at the heart of the Coral Triangle. The Coral Triangle has been designated on account of its extraordinary marine biodiversity, and the Lembeh Strait hosts a huge variety of marine critters on its seabed of dark, volcanic sand and silt. The type of exploration it offers has become known as muck diving. The conditions and cryptic critters of the Lembeh Strait contrast with the clear blue water and coral reefs of dive locations such as the nearby Bunaken National Park.

    I introduce some of the sessile animals that live in the Lembeh Strait, including corals and sea squirts, otherwise known as tunicates or ascidians, enjoying the currents at dive sites such as Critter Hunt.

    There are English captions showing either the full narration or the common and scientific names of the marine life, along with the dive site names.

    The full Mucky Secrets nature documentary features a huge diversity of weird and wonderful marine animals including frogfish, nudibranchs, scorpionfish, crabs, shrimps, moray eels, seahorses, octopus, cuttlefish etc..

    The music tracks are Mountain Breeze (pad) by Purple Planet ( and Arrival of the Broken Kings by Klangachse (

    Thanks to the staff and keen-eyed divemasters of Two Fish Divers ( for accommodation, diving services and critter-spotting.

    The video was shot by Nick Hope with a Sony HVR-Z1P HDV camera in a Light & Motion Bluefin HD housing with Light & Motion Elite lights and a flat port. A Century +3.5 diopter was used for the most of the macro footage.

    I have more scuba diving videos and underwater footage on my website at:


    I post updates about my videos here:





    Full list of marine life and dive sites featured in this video:

    00:26 Batu Lohang, Manado Tua
    00:31 Pyramid Butterflyfish, Hemitaurichthys polylepis, Ped, Nusa Penida, Bali
    00:35 Harlequin Shrimp, Hymenocera picta, Seraya Secrets, Bali
    00:39 Nudibranch, Hypselodoris kanga, Seraya Secrets, Bali
    00:43 Dispar Anthias, Pseudanthias dispar, Ron's Point, Bunaken
    00:48 Yellowstripe Goatfish, Mulloidichthys flavolineatus, Fukui, Bunaken
    00:52 Ocellaris Clownfish, Amphiprion ocellaris
    Coral Garden, Tulamben, Bali
    00:56 Porcelain Anemone Crab, Neopetrolisthes maculatus
    Pura Jepun, Padangbai, Bali
    01:25 Moorish Idols, Zanclus cornutus
    Mandolin, Bunaken
    01:30 Dispar Anthias, Pseudanthias dispar
    Ron's Point, Bunaken
    01:35 Green Turtle, Chelonia mydas
    Lekuan 1, Bunaken
    01:50 Macolor niger, Black And White Snapper
    Lekuan 1, Bunaken
    01:56 Blacktip Reef Shark, Carcharhinus melanopterus
    Ron's Point, Bunaken
    02:15 Lembeh Strait
    02:29 Mount Klabat, North Sulawesi
    02:36 Bitung, North Sulawesi
    02:56 Nudi Retreat, Lembeh Strait
    03:00 Hairball, Lembeh Strait
    03:15 Hairball, Lembeh Strait
    03:19 Ornate Ghost Pipefish, Solenostomus paradoxus, Hairball
    03:24 Whitemargin Stargazer, Uranoscopus sulphureus, Aer Perang
    03:31 Tuberculate Night Anemone, Alicia sp., Nudi Falls
    03:39 Nudibranch, Hypselodoris bullocki, Critter Hunt
    03:43 Humpback Batfish (juvenile), Platax batavianus, Jahir
    03:51 Birdbeak Burrfish, Cyclichthys orbicularis, TK 2 (Teluk Kembahu)
    03:56 Yellow Pygmy Goby, Lubricogobius exiguus, TK 1 (Teluk Kembahu)
    04:01 Greyface Moray, Gymnothorax thyrsoideus, Retak Larry
    04:08 Orbiculate Cardinalfish, Sphaeramia orbicularis, Two Fish Divers House Reef
    04:12 Nudibranch, Discodoris boholiensis, Two Fish Divers House Reef
    04:19 Panther Grouper, Cromileptes altivelis, TK 3 (Teluk Kembahu)
    04:26 Veined Octopus, Amphioctopus marginatus, Pantai Parigi
    04:32 Painted Sweetlips (juvenile), Diagramma pictum, TK 1 (Teluk Kembahu)
    04:36 Hairball
    04:41 Striated Frogfish, Antennarius striatus, Hairball
    05:13 Branching Flowerpot Coral, Alveopora gigas, TK 2 (Teluk Kembahu)
    05:24 Pulsing Xenia Coral, Xenia actuosa, Nudi Retreat
    05:57 Golden Sea Squirt, Polycarpa aurata, Critter Hunt
    06:04 Stalked Ascidian, Clavelina robusta, Critter Hunt
    06:24 Leach's Compound Ascidian, Botrylloides leachii, Critter Hunt
    06:37 Saddleback Clownfish, Amphiprion polymnus, Aer Perang
    06:42 Saddleback Clownfish, Amphiprion polymnus, Hairball

  • Deep Sea Creatures National Geographic Documentary 2017 HD

    53:56

    Deep Sea Creatures [National Geographic Documentary 2017 HD]

    The Deep sea creature refers to organisms that live below the photic zone of the ocean. These creatures must survive in extremely harsh conditions, such as hundreds of bars of pressure, small amounts of oxygen, very little food, no sunlight, and constant, extreme cold. Most creatures have to depend on food floating down from above.
    These creatures live in very demanding environments, such as the abyssal or hadal zones, which, being thousands of meters below the surface, are almost completely devoid of light. The water is between 3 and 10 degrees Celsius and has low oxygen levels. Due to the depth, the pressure is between 20 and 1,000 bars. Creatures that live hundreds or even thousands of meters deep in the ocean have adapted to the high pressure, lack of light, and other factors.

    The depths of the ocean are festooned with the most nightmarish creatures imaginable. You might think you’re safe, because these critters live thousands of feet down in a cold dark abyss, but the vampire squid, which looks like a nightmare umbrella, and the frilled shark—a literal living fossil—will live on in the recesses of your mind long after you’ve clicked away. Enjoy these deep sea horrors and try to have a relaxing day afterward.

    ► NOTE : I'm a big fan of National Geographic and I just collect the best parts of National Geographic. I do not make money from National Geographic's Video.
    Thanks You very much

  • Little Monsters - Hide & Cheat - The Secrets of Nature

    51:07

    Presents some of the animal kingdom's strangest survival strategies. The most startling behaviour patterns aren't found among the classic big animals such as lions or polar bears, but among nature's smaller creatures: Poison dart frogs, chameleons, praying mantises and scorpions, to name only a few. These Little Monsters are masters of survival. Until recently, only a handful of scientists enjoyed the technical means to study them up close. But now, thanks to 3D visualization, large audiences can experience a chameleon thrusting out its tongue at close range, rattlesnakes striking at their targets to within fractions of an inch, praying mantises hunting and hummingbirds feeding, filmed from inside the flower! Rather than simply delivering a flat representation of these amazing stunts, modern 3D provides for an emotional experience. And with its ingenious combination of slow-motion-3D and timelapse-3D, Little Monsters even improves upon state of the art 3D for greater impact, yielding unbelievable scenes the world has never seen and felt before.

  • Best Ocean Life 2020: Amazing Underwater Marine Life Documentary 2020

    50:55

    Best Ocean Life 2020: Amazing Underwater Marine Life Documentary 2020 is about the life in the oceans in coral reef full documentary. Underwater Life in Our Oceans And Seas Documentary 2020. If you love nature documentaries, you will surely enjoy this.

    Please SUBSCRIBE & SHARE. Thanks.

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  • Cocos Island - The mysterious island in the Pacific - FULL VERSION!!

    43:16

    Unfortunately, the previously uploaded version was not complete: It aborts in minute 22. Here finally is the complete documentary.
    Have fun with it! :)

    Coconut Island protrudes from the Pacific Ocean as the peak of a lone volcano, far off the Costa Rican coast. At the end of the 18th century, the English author Robert Louis Stevenson is said to have received the inspiration for his novel „Treasure Island“ here.

    The tiny island comprises just 25 sqm² and is covered by an impenetrable jungle. Numerous streams, waterfalls and gorges epitomise the world‘s largest uninhabited rain forest island. Due to its isolation, unique flora and fauna have developed here. Today, as a national park and world natural heritage, the island is closely supervised by park rangers.

    The outstanding underwater world surrounding the island abounds with marine fauna of every description. Hardly any other destination is as well-known for its countless large fish varieties, especially hammerhead, reef and offshore sharks. The film‘s author submerged to depths up to 400 meters on board the „Deep Sea“, a modern research submarine. During the dive, he ucceeded in shooting material of rare deep sea fish and shark species, which have never before been sighted near Coconut Island.

  • Secret Life in Oceans - Ocean Monsters

    51:20

    An ocean is a body of saline water that composes much of a planet's hydrosphere. On Earth, an ocean is one of the major conventional divisions of the World Ocean, which covers almost 71% of its surface. These are, in descending order by area, the Pacific, Atlantic, Indian, Southern, and Arctic Oceans.The word sea is often used interchangeably with ocean in American English but, strictly speaking, a sea is a body of saline water (generally a division of the world ocean) partly or fully enclosed by land.

    Saline water covers approximately 72% of the planet's surface (~3.6×108 km2) and is customarily divided into several principal oceans and smaller seas, with the ocean covering approximately 71% of Earth's surface[6] and 90% of the earth's biosphere. The ocean contains 97% of Earth's water, and oceanographers have stated that less than 5% of the World Ocean has been explored. The total volume is approximately 1.35 billion cubic kilometers (320 million cu mi) with an average depth of nearly 3,700 meters (12,100 ft)

  • Secrets Of The Australian Ocean ! | Real Wild

    51:09

    This intriguing documentary studies the harsh, cold water environment off Australia's south coast, home to many unique and fascinating marine creatures found nowhere else in the ocean. These seas are where you find the strangest of sharks including the angel shark which hides concealed beneath the sand to ambush its prey, and the saw shark, a rarely filmed and elusive creature from the deep.
    Click here for more documentaries:

    For exclusive clips, follow us Facebook:
    Any queries, please contact us at: owned-enquiries@littledotstudios.com

    Content licensed by DCD Rights.

  • Lembeh Strait, Manado, Indonesia - February 2018

    18:22

    We visited Lembeh Strait in Manado, Indonesia, also known as the critter capital of the world. It is, of course, famous for its muck diving. Although we saw quite a bit, I was a little disappointed due to high expectations. This was our second trip to this location, with the last being 13 years ago. We did see much more on our first go around. It just goes to show that nature is fickle and you should enjoy every encounter that comes your way. We did stay at the beautiful Lembeh Resort and enjoyed some fantastic cuisine, while diving with Murex Lembeh Critter divers. We also visited Tangkoko National park to see some of Manado's terrestrial critters, including Cuscus, Tarsiers, Tarantulas and Hornbills.

    Royalty free music provided by Sonicfire Pro music program.

  • Secrets Of The Australian Ocean | Catch

    50:55

    This intriguing documentary studies the harsh, cold water environment off Australia's south coast, home to many unique and fascinating marine creatures found nowhere else in the ocean. These seas are where you find the strangest of sharks including the angel shark which hides concealed beneath the sand to ambush its prey, and the saw shark, a rarely filmed and elusive creature from the deep.

    Content licensed from DCD. Any queries, please contact us at: realstories@littledotstudios.com

    #Australia #SouthCoast #angelshark #sawshark #shark #scaryfish #creepyfish #bigfish #travel #adventure #education

  • Deep Ocean: 10 Hours of Relaxing Oceanscapes | BBC Earth

    10:01

    Be wowed by incredible creatures in this journey through a mysterious part of our blue planet with this 10 hour loop. Subscribe:

    #OurBluePlanet is a digital collaboration between BBC Earth and Ocean X Media with featured media from both companies. Join the conversation over on Twitter @OurBluePlanet.

    Ocean X Media are a team of scientists, explorers and filmmakers driven to discover what lies beneath the waves and to document untold ocean stories. You can find out more here:

    WATCH MORE:
    New on Earth:
    Oceanscapes:
    Wild Thailand:

    Welcome to BBC EARTH! The world is an amazing place full of stories| beauty and natural wonder. Here you'll find 50 years worth of astounding, entertaining, thought-provoking and educational natural history content.

    Want to share your views with the team? Join our BBC Studios Voice:

    This is a commercial channel from BBC Studios. Service & Feedback

  • Critters of the Lembeh Strait | 2014 Highlights

    6:55

    The first video of 2015 shows some of the incredible highlights of 2014. It was hard to pick the scenes because there was so much great stuff, but here are some memorable moments for you to enjoy. Meanwhile, in January our Photo Pro will be hosting the booth at the BOOT dive show in Germany and will be back in Lembeh in February with all new episodes. Happy New Year to all our critter-loving friends!

  • Alien Reefs Coral Documentary | Real Wild

    48:05

    Coral reefs are some of the richest hotspots of biodiversity on the planet. The warm water reefs of the Pacific Ocean and Caribbean Sea are well know, but they dont only occur in warm waters. In some of the oceans coldest, darkest depths they are thriving. The deep water reefs are formed by icebergs as they slide across the sea bed, leaving behind perfect foundations for coral to build upon. Hidden from view, they criss cross the planet from the deep water tropics to the freezing Arctic. Some have never been explored by humans. Underwater cameramen have ventured down to the pitch blackness to find life thriving. In this one hour HD special, our team will enter this alien environment. And discover a strange, hidden world abundant with life, from the weird to the wonderful.

    Click here for more documentaries:

    For exclusive clips, follow us Facebook:
    Any queries, please contact us at: owned-enquiries@littledotstudios.com

  • Mucky Secrets - Prologue - The Marine Creatures of the Lembeh Strait

    4:05

    Watch the full 90-minute documentary at

    This is a prologue to my documentary Mucky Secrets, about the weird and wonderful marine life of the Lembeh Strait between North Sulawesi and Lembeh Island in Indonesia, one of my favorite scuba diving destinations.

    At the heart of the Coral Triangle, the Lembeh Strait is known for it's fascinating muck diving and the huge diversity of marine life. An astonishing array of weird and wonderful creatures can be encountered on every dive. Many of the animals have strong personalities, which I have tried to convey in this video. Mating mandarinfish take a starring role, as do mantis shrimps, sea slugs, snake eels, boxfish, scorpionfish, frogfish and other tropical fish and invertebrates.

    In the full 90-minute documentary I reveal the secrets behind the Lembeh Strait's critters, exploring the marine biology of dozens of species.

    Thanks to Two Fish Divers ( who I stayed and dived with on Lembeh Island.

    The Music, Journey, by Doxent Zsigmond, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license





    Please like, favorite, share, or leave a comment here or on my channel at My Facebook page is at and I have more scuba diving videos and underwater footage on my website at

    View the names of all the dive sites and names of all the tropical fish and other marine life by turning on closed captions with the CC button. Here is the full shot list of species and dive sites.

    0:00 Birdbeak Burrfish, Cyclichthys orbicularis, Jahir
    0:05 Eschmeyer's Scorpionfish, Rhinopias eschmeyeri, Aer Perang
    0:09 Compressed Toby, Canthigaster compressa, Two Fish Divers' House Reef
    0:12 Black-banded Flathead, Rogadius patriciae, Makawide
    0:15 Highfin Snake Eel, Ophichthus altipennis, TK1
    0:18 Trumpetfish, Aulostomus chinensis, TK3
    0:21 Starry Night Octopus, Callistoctopus luteus, Aer Perang
    0:25 Blue-Spotted Stingray, Taeniura lymma, Tanjung Kuskusu
    0:28 Mandarinfish, Synchiropus splendidus, Mandarin Point
    0:46 Rigid Shrimpfish, Centriscus scutatus, Mandarin Point
    0:54 Ambon Scorpionfish, Pteroidichthys amboinensis, Hairball
    0:57 Flasher Scorpionfish, Scorpaenopsis macrochir (tentative), Hairball
    1:00 Oriental Flying Gurnard, Dactyloptena orientalis, Retak Larry
    1:04 Starry Blenny, Salarias ramosus, Aer Perang
    1:07 Juvenile Thornback Cowfish, Lactoria fornasini, Aer Perang
    1:10 Juvenile Spotted Parrotfish, Cetoscarus ocellatus, Tanjung Kusukusu
    1:13 Pygmy Seahorse, Hippocampus bargibanti, Nudi Retreat
    1:16 Juvenile Panther Grouper, Cromileptes altivelis, TK3
    1:20 Graceful Anemone Shrimp, Ancylomenes venustus, Aer Perang
    1:24 Peacock Mantis Shrimp, Odontodactylus scyllarus, Aw Shucks
    1:29 Pink Tail Mantis Shrimp, Odontodactylus latirostris, TK1
    1:32 Golden Spearing Mantis Shrimp, Lysiosquillina lisa, Jahir
    1:36 Orange Mantis Shrimp, Lysiosquilloides mapia, Retak Larry
    1:39 Saddleback Clownfish, Amphiprion polymnus, Nudi Retreat
    1:44 Banggai Cardinalfish, Pterapogon kauderni, Police Pier
    1:48 Long-tailed Sea Hare, Stylocheilus longicauda, Retak Larry
    1:54 Box Crab, Calappa sp., TK1
    1:59 Leopard Flounder, Bothus pantherinus, Retak Larry
    2:03 Whitemargin Stargazer, Uranoscopus sulphureus, Hairball
    2:08 Vomer Conch, Euprotomus vomer, Jahir
    2:13 Purple-lined Nembrotha, Nembrotha purpureolineata, TK1
    2:19 Crinoid Cuttlefish, Sepia sp., Tanjung Kusukusu
    2:25 Spiny Flathead, Onigocia spinosa, Retak Larry
    2:28 Shortfin Puffer, Torquigener brevipinnis, TK2
    2:31 Oriental Flying Gurnard, Dactyloptena orientalis, TK1
    2:34 Painted Frogfish, Antennarius pictus, Jahir
    2:37 Striated Frogfish, Antennarius striatus, TK2
    2:41 Warty Frogfish, Antennarius maculatus, Jahir
    2:44 Juvenile Painted Frogfish, Antennarius pictus, Hairball
    2:47 Weedy Scorpionfish, Rhinopias frondosa, Aer Perang
    2:51 Fingered Dragonet, Dactylopus dactylopus, Retak Larry
    2:54 Squat Lobster, Galathea sp., TK2
    2:57 Emperor Shrimp, Periclimenes imperator, Hairball
    3:00 Stargazer Snake Eel, Brachysomophis cirrocheilos, Hairball
    3:03 Purple-edged Ceratosoma, Ceratosoma tenue, Makawide
    3:06 Flame Scallop, Ctenoides ales, Nudi Retreat
    3:10 Highfin Snake Eel, Ophichthus altipennis, TK1
    3:13 Juvenile longhorn cowfish, Lactoria cornuta (tentative), TK1
    3:17 Short-tailed Pipefish, Trachyrhamphus bicoarctatus, Critter Hunt
    3:20 Guineafowl Puffer, Arothron meleagris, Tanjung Kusukusu
    3:23 Morrison's Dragonet (female), Synchiropus morrisoni, Nudi Falls
    3:26 Dwarf Lionfish, Dendrochirus brachypterus, TK1
    3:29 Yellow Pygmy Goby, Lubricogobius exiguus, TK1

  • Mucky Secrets - Part 18 - Sea Slugs inc. Nudibranchs - Lembeh Strait

    7:43

    Sea slugs including nudibranchs. Part 18 of my documentary, Mucky Secrets, about the fascinating marine creatures of the Lembeh Strait in Indonesia. Watch the full 90-minute documentary at

    A huge and fascinating diversity of sea slugs, or opisthobranchs (Opisthobranchia), are found in the Lembeh Strait. Opisthobranch means gills behind, because their gills are located behind their heart.

    Most sea slugs have all but lost their protective shell, but compensate with more advanced weapons of defence.

    Over six thousand different species of sea slug are nudibranchs (Nudibranchia). The name means naked gills, referring to the rosette of branchial plumes on their back, surrounding their anus. These gills vary greatly in form, but all have a large surface area for oxygen exchange.

    There are English captions showing either the full narration or the common and scientific names of the marine life, along with the dive site names.

    The full Mucky Secrets nature documentary features a huge diversity of weird and wonderful marine animals including frogfish, nudibranchs, scorpionfish, crabs, shrimps, moray eels, seahorses, octopus, cuttlefish etc..

    Thanks to Jaycieh ( for the music track, The Unknown and to Kevin MacLeod of for the music track, Brittle Rille, which is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

    Thanks to the staff and keen-eyed divemasters of Two Fish Divers ( for accommodation, diving services and critter-spotting.

    The video was shot by Nick Hope with a Sony HVR-Z1P HDV camera in a Light & Motion Bluefin HD housing with Light & Motion Elite lights and a flat port. A Century +3.5 diopter was used for the most of the macro footage.

    I have more scuba diving videos and underwater footage on my website at:


    I post updates about my videos here:





    Full list of marine life and dive sites featured in this video:

    00:00 Hypselodoris bullocki & Glossodoris cincta, Aer Perang
    00:05 Doto sp., Nudi Retreat
    00:10 Hypselodoris tryoni, Tanjung Kusu-Kusu
    00:15 Hypselodoris maculosa, Critter Hunt
    00:20 Nembrotha kubaryana, Nudi Falls
    00:30 Hypselodoris tryoni, Tanjung Kusu-Kusu
    00:37 Hypselodoris kanga, Aer Perang
    00:43 Doriprismatica atromarginata, Nudi Falls
    00:50 Glossodoris cincta, Aer Perang
    01:08 Hypselodoris tryoni, Tanjung Kusu-Kusu
    01:23 Nembrotha kubaryana, Nudi Falls
    01:31 Chromodoris magnifica, Nudi Retreat
    01:35 Chromodoris elisabethina, Bunaken
    01:41 Chromodoris annae, Bunaken
    01:47 Jorunna funebris, TK 2
    02:09 Discodoris boholiensis, Two Fish Divers house reef
    02:25 Mexichromis trilineata, Retak Larry
    02:30 Hypselodoris kanga, Aer Perang
    02:35 Nembrotha yonowae, Police Pier
    02:40 Chromodoris annae, Tanjung Kusu-Kusu
    02:53 Chromodoris elisabethina, Nudi Retreat
    02:59 Chromodoris willani, Nudi Retreat
    03:05 Chromodoris magnifica, Nudi Retreat
    03:19 Ceratosoma gracillimum, TK 1
    03:33 Ceratosoma tenue, Jahir
    03:54 Banggai Cardinalfish, Pterapogon kauderni, Makawide
    04:17 Ceratosoma trilbatum, Aer Perang
    04:29 Phyllidiopsis shireenae, Tanjung Kusu-Kusu
    04:35 Phyllidiopsis shireenae, Nudi Retreat
    04:46 Phyllidia ocellata, Tanjung Kusu-Kusu
    04:54 Phyllidiopsis cardinalis, Nudi Falls
    05:10 Flabellina exoptata, Police Pier
    05:20 Flabellina rubrolineata, Critter Hunt
    05:31 Blue Dragon Nudibranch, Pteraeolidia semperi, Hairball
    05:54 Blue Dragon Nudibranch, Pteraeolidia semperi, Police Pier
    06:09 Blue Dragon Nudibranch, Pteraeolidia semperi, Hairball
    06:34 Phyllodesmium crypticum, Retak Larry
    07:04 Phyllodesmium crypticum, Hairball
    07:12 Hypselodoris emma, Aer Perang

  • Diving the Lembeh Strait

    19:17

    Muck diving in the Lembeh Strait. Weird and wonderful critters from north Sulawesi. This is the best footage from my 2006 trip with Two Fish Divers, featuring video from classic Lembeh Strait sites including Hairball, Aer Perang, TK (Teluk Kembahu), Aw Shucks, Police Pier, Angels' Window, Nudi Falls, Nudi Retreat and Jahir.

    This is available as a bonus feature on my DVD, Mucky Secrets - The Marine Creatures of the Lembeh Strait, available at

    More Lembeh Strait muck diving videos on

  • Mucky Secrets - Part 10 - Frogfishes - Lembeh Strait

    5:31

    Frogfishes. Part 10 of my documentary, Mucky Secrets, about the fascinating marine creatures of the Lembeh Strait in Indonesia. Watch the full 90-minute documentary at

    Frogfishes of the family Antennariidae, are a type of anglerfish in the order Lophiiformes. They are rare at most dive destinations but common in the Lembeh Strait.

    Frogfishes such as the painted frogfish, Antennarius pictus, are highly camouflaged to resemble sponges or rocks covered in algae. They have an amazing ability to adapt their skin color and texture to blend in with their surroundings, and numerous color variations of the same species can be found.

    Rather than blending into the surroundings, the warty frogfish, Antennarius maculatus, mimics toxic sea slugs to deter predators.

    Although frogfishes can swim, they usually walk around on their pectoral fins which have evolved into arm-like limbs complete with an elbow-like joint.

    Frogfishes are generally ambush predators, and have a very clever hunting technique. Their first dorsal spine, the illicium, ends in a fleshy lure known as an esca, which resembles a variety of marine creatures depending on the species. The frogfish waves the illicium like a fishing rod to attract prey. The appearance of the esca is useful in distinguishing between species. If the illicium and esca are removed, the frogfish can grow a replacement.

    The illicium is not always deployed, and opportunistic frogfishes will snatch what food they can. They will often just lie in wait, their upturned mouths ready to devour unsuspecting bypassers.

    We meet a giant frogfish, Antennarius commerson, taking up a more elevated position on a tube sponge, from which to ambush prey.

    A warty frogfish appears nervous as it finds itself in the path of a highly venomous flower urchin, Toxopneustes pileolus, before the urchin finally changed course.

    The striated frogfish, Antennarius striatus, is a real star amongst Lembeh critters, and high on most divers' list of favorites. Many examples in the area bear long skin filaments and are known amongst the dive community as hairy frogfish. They are usually found on the open sand amongst algae. The esca resembles a polychaete worm. A black phase of the striated frogfish, without significant skin appendages, is encountered. Its possible that the filaments may be seasonally shed.

    Finally we encounter a tiny juvenile painted frogfish, just a few millimeters in length.

    There are English captions showing either the full narration or the common and scientific names of the marine life, along with the dive site names.

    The full Mucky Secrets nature documentary features a huge diversity of weird and wonderful marine animals including frogfish, nudibranchs, scorpionfish, crabs, shrimps, moray eels, seahorses, octopus, cuttlefish etc..

    Thanks to Kevin MacLeod of for the music track, Babylon, which is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

    Thanks to the staff and keen-eyed divemasters of Two Fish Divers ( for accommodation, diving services and critter-spotting.

    The video was shot by Nick Hope with a Sony HVR-Z1P HDV camera in a Light & Motion Bluefin HD housing with Light & Motion Elite lights and a flat port. A Century +3.5 diopter was used for the most of the macro footage.

    I have more scuba diving videos and underwater footage on my website at:


    I post updates about my videos here:





    Full list of marine life and dive sites featured in this video:

    00:00 Painted Frogfish, Antennarius pictus, Jahir
    00:13 Painted Frogfish, Antennarius pictus, Police Pier
    00:26 Painted Frogfish, Antennarius pictus, Aer Perang
    00:40 Spotfin Frogfish (tentative), Antennarius nummifer, Retak Larry
    01:01 Warty Frogfish, Antennarius maculatus, Jahir
    01:16 Painted Frogfish, Antennarius pictus, Jahir
    01:42 Warty Frogfish, Antennarius maculatus, Jahir
    01:56 Painted Frogfish (juvenile), Antennarius pictus, Makawide
    02:06 Painted Frogfish, Antennarius pictus, Jahir
    02:18 Painted Frogfish (juvenile), Antennarius pictus, Makawide
    02:28 Painted Frogfish, Antennarius pictus, Hairball
    02:38 Giant Frogfish, Antennarius commerson, Aer Perang
    02:58 Warty Frogfish, Antennarius maculatus, Jahir
    03:03 Flower Urchin, Toxopneustes pileolus, Jahir
    03:27 Striated Frogfish, Antennarius striatus, TK 2
    04:16 Striated Frogfish, Antennarius striatus, Jahir
    04:30 Painted Frogfish (juvenile), Antennarius pictus, Hairball
    05:04 Spotted Parrotfish (juvenile), Cetoscarus ocellatus, Tanjung Kusu-Kusu

  • Mucky Secrets - Part 2 - Anemonefish, Shrimps & Mantis Shrimps - Lembeh Strait

    6:32

    Anemonefish, shrimps and mantis shrimps. Part 2 of my documentary, Mucky Secrets, about the marine life of the Lembeh Strait in Indonesia. Watch the full 90-minute documentary at

    In this video we take a look at the mutually symbiotic relationship between saddleback clownfish, a type of anemonefish, and the sea anemones found in the Lembeh Strait. The anemone's stinging tentacles provide protection for the clownfish, which are immune to the sting. The clownfish chase sway polyp-eating predators, and their feces provide food for the anemone.

    We then see how partner shrimps (commensal shrimps) also benefit from a commensal relationship with sea anemones. The shrimps use the anemone's tentacles for protection, but the anemone doesn't appear to benefit in any way.

    We then take a look at emperor shrimps and sexy shrimps (squat shrimps), then finally at mantis shrimps. A number of different species of spearing mantis shrimps and smashing mantis shrimps live in the Lembeh Strait. They all have extremely advanced eyes and a very fast attack with their claws.

    There are English captions showing either the full narration or the common and scientific names of the marine life, along with the dive site names.

    The full Mucky Secrets nature documentary features a huge diversity of weird and wonderful marine animals including frogfish, nudibranchs, scorpionfish, crabs, shrimps, moray eels, seahorses, octopus, cuttlefish etc..

    Thanks to James Kirsch a.k.a. generalfuzz ( & for the music track, Second thoughts and to Kevin MacLeod of for the music track, Scheming Weasel (faster version). These tracks are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

    Thanks to the staff and keen-eyed divemasters of Two Fish Divers ( for accommodation, diving services and critter-spotting.

    The video was shot by Nick Hope with a Sony HVR-Z1P HDV camera in a Light & Motion Bluefin HD housing with Light & Motion Elite lights and a flat port. A Century +3.5 diopter was used for the most of the macro footage.

    I have more scuba diving videos and underwater footage on my website at:


    I post updates about my videos here:





    Full list of marine life and dive sites featured in this video:

    00:04 Saddleback Clownfish, Amphiprion polymnus, Aer Perang
    00:09 Saddleback Clownfish, Amphiprion polymnus, Hairball
    00:32 Saddleback Clownfish (juvenile), Amphiprion polymnus, Nudi Retreat
    00:56 Holthuis Shrimp, Ancylomenes holthuisi, Aw Shucks
    01:22 Magnificent Shrimp, Ancylomenes magnificus, Hairball
    01:38 Tube Anemone, Cerianthus sp., Nudi Retreat
    01:47 Magnificent Shrimp, Ancylomenes magnificus, Nudi Retreat
    01:54 Night Anemone, Phyllodiscus semoni, Aer Perang
    02:01 Graceful Anemone Shrimp, Ancylomenes venustus, Aer Perang
    02:39 Curryfish Sea Cucumber, Stichopus horrens, Jahir
    02:45 Emperor Shrimp, Periclimenes imperator, Jahir
    02:55 Emperor Shrimp (male), Periclimenes imperator, Jahir
    03:01 Emperor Shrimp (female), Periclimenes imperator, Jahir
    03:19 Spotted Worm Sea Cucumber, Synapta maculata, TK 1 (Teluk Kembahu)
    03:26 Emperor Shrimp (female), Periclimenes imperator, TK 1 (Teluk Kembahu)
    03:32 Emperor Shrimp, Periclimenes imperator, Hairball
    03:48 Emperor Shrimp (male), Periclimenes imperator, Hairball
    03:59 Emperor Shrimp (female), Periclimenes imperator
    Hairball
    04:07 Tube Anemone, Cerianthus sp., Critter Hunt
    04:15 Sexy Shrimp, Thor amboinensis, Critter Hunt
    04:22 Sexy Shrimp, Thor amboinensis, Aw Shucks
    04:34 Orange Mantis Shrimp, Lysiosquilloides mapia, Retak Larry
    05:05 Golden Mantis Shrimp, Lysiosquilla tredecimdentata, Jahir
    05:17 Pink Tail Mantis Shrimp, Odontodactylus latirostris, TK 1 (Teluk Kembahu)
    05:36 Peacock Mantis Shrimp, Odontodactylus scyllarus, Aw Shucks
    06:02 Elegant Squat Lobster, Allogalathea elegans, Aer Perang

  • Mucky Secrets - Part 12 - Boxfishes, Puffers & Porcupinefishes - Lembeh Strait

    3:51

    Boxfishes, puffers and porcupinefishes. Part 12 of my documentary, Mucky Secrets, about the fascinating marine creatures of the Lembeh Strait in Indonesia. Watch the full 90-minute documentary at

    In this video I look at fishes in the order Tetraodontiformes. First of all we encounter a very young boxfish, possibly a longhorn cowfish, Lactoria cornuta. Along with toxic skin, the boxfish's main defence is a very hard carapace of bony plates. The juvenile's coloration helps it remain unnoticed while the body hardens.

    Next is a juvenile thornback cowfish, Lactoria fornasini, sheltering in Halimeda algae. Juvenile boxfishes and pufferfishes often tuck their tail to one side when it is not needed for swimming.

    Next we meet a juvenile starry puffer, Arothron stellatus, and its dramatically different adult counterpart.

    Although puffers are slow movers, the tail can give them a great turn of speed when threatened. As a further defence, puffers can inflate their bodies with water, vastly increasing their size and revealing short, sharp spines on their skin.

    They are believed to be the second most poisonous vertebrate on earth, after the golden poison frog. However some predators can tolerate the toxin, and some parts of them are carefully prepared as a delicacy in Japan, Korea and China.

    The juvenile guineafowl puffer, Arothron meleagris, has a black and yellow coloration that advertises its toxicity to potential predators. This is a common combination of warning colors in the animal kingdom.

    More elongate puffers are found in the Lembeh Strait too. We encounter a narrow-lined puffer, Arothron manilensis, at Hairball and a shortfin puffer, Torquigener brevipinnis, at TK.

    Sharpnose puffers, also known as tobies, have elongated snouts and slimmer bodies. We meet at a Valentini puffer, Canthigaster valentini, a Bennett's sharpnose puffer, Canthigaster bennetti, and a compressed toby, Canthigaster compressa.

    The birdbeak burrfish, Cyclichthys orbicularis, is a type of porcupinefish. It is covered in spines which are permanently erect, and it can inflate its body like puffers. It's eyes contain iridescent green specks.

    Conversely, the spines of the long-spine porcupinefish, Diodon holocanthus, lie flat against its body when not it is not inflated.

    Finally we encounter a long-spine porcupinefish sharing its home with a small birdbeak burrfish.

    There are English captions showing either the full narration or the common and scientific names of the marine life, along with the dive site names.

    The full Mucky Secrets nature documentary features a huge diversity of weird and wonderful marine animals including frogfish, nudibranchs, scorpionfish, crabs, shrimps, moray eels, seahorses, octopus, cuttlefish etc..

    Thanks to Kevin MacLeod of for the music tracks, Hidden Agenda and Sneaky Snitch. These tracks are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

    Thanks to the staff and keen-eyed divemasters of Two Fish Divers ( for accommodation, diving services and critter-spotting.

    The video was shot by Nick Hope with a Sony HVR-Z1P HDV camera in a Light & Motion Bluefin HD housing with Light & Motion Elite lights and a flat port. A Century +3.5 diopter was used for the most of the macro footage.

    I have more scuba diving videos and underwater footage on my website at:


    I post updates about my videos here:





    Full list of marine life and dive sites featured in this video:

    00:00 Juvenile Longhorn Cowfish (tentative), Lactoria cornuta, TK 1
    00:20 Thornback Cowfish (juvenile), Lactoria fornasini, Aer Perang
    00:33 Starry Puffer (juvenile), Arothron stellatus, Retak Larry
    00:41 Starry Puffer, Arothron stellatus, TK 3
    00:52 Map Puffer, Arothron mappa, Two Fish Divers house reef
    01:15 Guineafowl Puffer (juvenile), Arothron meleagris, Tanjung Kusu-Kusu
    01:32 Narrow-lined Puffer, Arothron manilensis, Hairball
    01:45 Shortfin Puffer, Torquigener brevipinnis, TK 2
    01:57 Valentini Puffer, Canthigaster valentini, Retak Larry
    02:11 Bennett's Sharpnose Puffer, Canthigaster bennetti, Makawide
    02:18 Compressed Toby, Canthigaster compressa, Two Fish Divers house reef
    02:26 Birdbeak Burrfish, Cyclichthys orbicularis, Jahir
    02:54 Long-spine Porcupinefish, Diodon holocanthus, TK 2
    03:13 Birdbeak Burrfish, Cyclichthys orbicularis, TK 2
    03:21 Birdbeak Burrfish, Cyclichthys orbicularis, TK 3

  • Lembeh Critters

    3:17

    A montage of footage of critters from Police Pier, Nudi Falls, Nudi Retreat, Angel's Window, Aw Shucks and Pantai Parigi in the Lembeh Strait. The video features amazing critters from these classic muck dives including moorish idols, a pinnate batfish, Clark's anemonefish, a school of coral shrimpfish (razor-fish), ribbon eels and Banggai cardinalfish.

    Also featuring a humpback grouper, striped eel catfish, snowflake moray, painted frogfish (anglerfish), striated frogfish (hairy frogfish), nudibranchs (sea slugs), a red lionfish, a highfin snake eel, a long-spine porcupinefish, a spotted seahorse, a short dragonfish (sea moth) and an oriental flying gurnard.

    Shot in June 2006 with

    The music is by Toao of

    More Lembeh Strait muck diving videos on

  • Mucky Secrets - Part 13 - Benthic fishes, stargazer, flounder, flathead - Lembeh Strait

    3:25

    Benthic fishes including stargazers, flounders and flatheads. Part 13 of my documentary, Mucky Secrets, about the fascinating marine creatures of the Lembeh Strait in Indonesia. Watch the full 90-minute documentary at

    After a quick look at the panther grouper, Cromileptes altivelis, also known as the humpback grouper or barramundi cod, I explore demersal fishes, those that live on or near the seabed. Of these, benthic fishes actually rest on the sea floor.

    The whitemargin stargazer, Uranoscopus sulphureus, spends most of its time buried in the substrate, with only its upper, or dorsal, surface exposed, where its eyes and mouth are located. Like frogfishes, stargazers are ambush predators. They have a worm-like lure that extends from the upturned mouth to attract fish that pass overhead. Stargazers are also equipped with poisonous spines at the rear of the operculum, the gill cover. The papillae fringing the mouth help stop sand from falling in when the fish is buried.

    The leopard flounder, Bothus pantherinus, has adapted to life on the bottom with a superb camouflage. Such lefteye flounders are symmetrical and swim upright like other fishes when young. As they develop, the eye on the right side migrates to the left, thus enabling them to lie flat on the bottom. Their eye stalks can be retracted for protection, but enhance their view when extended.

    Flatheads also have excellent camouflage and a stealthy, low profile, but unlike flounders, they are dorsally compressed and remain symmetrical. They are also ambush predators, and often hide by burying much of their body in the substrate. Flatheads are related to scorpionfishes and have short, venomous spines on top of their head.

    We meet a Japanese flathead (Inegocia japonica), a black-banded flathead (Rogadius patriciae), and finally a pair of spiny flatheads (Onigocia spinosa) at Retak Larry, a classic, dark sand muck diving site named after the late Lembeh pioneer, Larry Smith.

    There are English captions showing either the full narration or the common and scientific names of the marine life, along with the dive site names.

    The full Mucky Secrets nature documentary features a huge diversity of weird and wonderful marine animals including frogfish, nudibranchs, scorpionfish, crabs, shrimps, moray eels, seahorses, octopus, cuttlefish etc..

    Thanks to Kevin MacLeod of for the music tracks, Hidden Agenda and Lightless Dawn. These tracks are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

    Thanks to the staff and keen-eyed divemasters of Two Fish Divers ( for accommodation, diving services and critter-spotting.

    The video was shot by Nick Hope with a Sony HVR-Z1P HDV camera in a Light & Motion Bluefin HD housing with Light & Motion Elite lights and a flat port. A Century +3.5 diopter was used for the most of the macro footage.

    I have more scuba diving videos and underwater footage on my website at:


    I post updates about my videos here:





    Full list of marine life and dive sites featured in this video:

    00:00 Birdbeak Burrfish, Cyclichthys orbicularis, TK 2
    00:04 Birdbeak Burrfish, Cyclichthys orbicularis, TK 3
    00:10 Panther Grouper, Cromileptes altivelis, TK 3
    00:29 Whitemargin Stargazer, Uranoscopus sulphureus, Hairball
    00:55 Whitemargin Stargazer, Uranoscopus sulphureus, Retak Larry
    01:13 Leopard Flounder, Bothus pantherinus, Retak Larry
    01:44 Japanese Flathead, Inegocia japonica, Retak Larry
    01:52 Black-banded Flathead, Rogadius patriciae, Makawide
    02:28 Spiny Flathead, Onigocia spinosa, Retak Larryo:

  • Indonesia 2005 -- Lembeh Strait

    51:00

    A fantastic week of diving at Kungkungan Bay Resort in Lembeh Strait, Indonesia.

    Royalty-free music provided by Sonicfire Pro music program.

  • Mucky Secrets - Part 16 - Cuttlefishes & Octopuses - Lembeh Strait

    6:13

    Cuttlefishes and octopuses. Part 16 of my documentary, Mucky Secrets, about the fascinating marine creatures of the Lembeh Strait in Indonesia. Watch the full 90-minute documentary at

    In this video I look at cuttlefishes (Sepiida) and octopuses (Octopoda); types of cephalopod (Cephalopoda) found in the Lembeh Strait.

    The broadclub cuttlefish (Sepia latimanus) is the second largest species of cuttlefish, and the most common on coral reefs. It can adopt an infinite number of textures, colours and poses to camouflage itself, communicate and to hypnotize prey.

    As the name suggests, the crinoid cuttlefish (Sepia sp.) tends to hang around feather stars. We find one hiding amongst the branches of a decaying staghorn coral. This is an undescribed species known only from Indonesia, and recognised by the dark spots at the front of its lower arms.

    The dwarf cuttlefish, or stumpy-spined cuttlefish (Sepia bandensis) is a tiny species that is usually only seen at night. Rather than swimming, it usually uses its lower arms to walk on and explore the seabed. It is often found in association with echinoderms such as sea urchins.

    Another species that walks on its arms is one of the real stars of Lembeh, the flamboyant cuttlefish (Metasepia pfefferi). When disturbed it abandons its camouflage and the skin adopts spectacular shades of purple and yellow, with waves of white radiating down the mantle. The colour changes are achieved by adjusting millions of pigmented cells in the skin called chromatophores. This is an example of aposematic coloration whereby a creature warns potential predators of its toxicity. Scientists have recently discovered that the flamboyant cuttlefish's muscle tissue contains a unique and highly potent toxin, proving that this display is no bluff.

    We see an adult flamboyant cuttlefish using its special feeding tentacles to snatch prey such as small shrimps and gobes, and a tiny juvenile raising its median tentacles, a common threat display amongst cuttlefishes.

    Cuttlefishes' intelligence and unique powers compensate for their lack of a protective shell. They have the highest brain-to-body-mass ratio of all invertebrates, and researchers have shown them to possess a good memory and a high capacity for learning.

    Octopuses are closely related to cuttlefishes and have similar characteristics and intelligence.

    At TK we encounter an undescribed octopus, a near relative of the mimic octopus and wonderpus, retreating to its burrow with a captured crab. The octopus usually injects the crab with a paralysing saliva before using it's parrot-like beak at the centre its arms to excavate the meat from the crab.

    Finally on a night dive at Aer Perang we encounter a starry night octopus, Callistoctopus luteus, twisting and turning around the reef as it tries to escape my attention.

    There are English captions showing either the full narration or the common and scientific names of the marine life, along with the dive site names.

    The full Mucky Secrets nature documentary features a huge diversity of weird and wonderful marine animals including frogfish, nudibranchs, scorpionfish, crabs, shrimps, moray eels, seahorses, octopus, cuttlefish etc..

    Thanks to TekMerc ( for the music track, Untitled Ambient Tune and to Ojini Project ( for the track, Melody of the Lost Ark. These tracks are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

    Thanks to the staff and keen-eyed divemasters of Two Fish Divers ( for accommodation, diving services and critter-spotting.

    The video was shot by Nick Hope with a Sony HVR-Z1P HDV camera in a Light & Motion Bluefin HD housing with Light & Motion Elite lights and a flat port. A Century +3.5 diopter was used for the most of the macro footage.

    I have more scuba diving videos and underwater footage on my website at:


    I post updates about my videos here:





    Full list of marine life and dive sites featured in this video:

    00:00 Broadclub Cuttlefish (juvenile), Sepia latimanus, Critter Hunt
    00:08 Broadclub Cuttlefish, Sepia latimanus, Makawide
    00:19 Crinoid Cuttlefish, Sepia sp., Tanjung Kusu-Kusu
    00:41 Dwarf Cuttlefish, Sepia bandensis, Nudi Falls
    01:15 Flamboyant Cuttlefish, Metasepia pfefferi, Retak Larry
    02:35 Flamboyant Cuttlefish (juvenile), Metasepia pfefferi, Makawide
    02:49 Undescribed Octopus, TK 1
    03:37 Starry Night Octopus, Callistoctopus luteus, Aer Perang

  • Mucky Secrets - Part 19 - Sea Slugs Feeding & Mating - Lembeh Strait

    4:51

    Sea slugs feeding and mating. Part 19 of my documentary, Mucky Secrets, about the fascinating marine creatures of the Lembeh Strait in Indonesia. Watch the full 90-minute documentary at

    In this video we study how sea slugs (including nudibranchs) feed and mate.

    All known nudibranchs are carnivores. The biggest family of nudibranchs, the chromodoridids, feed exclusively on sponges.

    Most sea slugs have a ribbon-like tongue covered in microscopic teeth called a radula to help them consume their prey. The form of the radula varies greatly and is important as a basis for taxonomic classification.

    We see a pleurobranch, Pleurobranchus forskalii, a different type of sea slug, feeding on an ascidian, or sea squirt, a type of tunicate.

    Nembrotha nudibranchs also feed on ascidians. We see a Nembrotha lineolata feeding on a blue club tunicate. The ascidian feeds by filtering plankton from the water with its delicate, blue, sieve-like interior enclosed in a clear outer sac, its tunic. The sea slug everts its proboscis, its oral tube, out of its mouth and, with ruthless efficiency, sucks this fleshy interior right through the tunic. The radula teeth enable the slug to deal with the tougher parts of the sea squirt's intestines.

    Most sea slugs are quite specific in their choice of food, and so they are often drawn towards the same place. This increases the chances of encountering others of the same species and finding a mate. As they have no vision, nudibranchs locate each other initially through smell then touch.

    During copulation, they line up their genitals which are on the right side of their body. All sea slugs are hermaphrodites and contain both male and female reproductive systems. During mating, each nudibranch receives sperm from the other.

    We see a pair of Nembrotha chamberlaini nudibranchs mating. The penis, which is off to the side, is covered in tiny, sharp barbs which lock it into the vagina, which is at the centre of the stalk. The male organs often mature before the female ones. Small nudibranchs with an immature female reproductive system can store the sperm they receive until they start producing fertile eggs.

    We also encounter a mating pair of Hypselodoris bullocki nudibranchs. Their genitals are also covered in tiny spines that anchor them together during copulation.

    After fertilisation, a mucus-bound ribbon of eggs is laid in a spiral, often on or near the species' food source. Most egg masses are toxic to predators and are abandoned by the parent.

    Hypselodorid nudibranchs often follow each other around, top to tail. The reason for this 'trailing', or tailgating behaviour is a mystery. It's thought to be a prelude to mating, but in some cases the trailing slug might simply be getting an easy ride in the search for food.

    There are English captions showing either the full narration or the common and scientific names of the marine life, along with the dive site names.

    The full Mucky Secrets nature documentary features a huge diversity of weird and wonderful marine animals including frogfish, nudibranchs, scorpionfish, crabs, shrimps, moray eels, seahorses, octopus, cuttlefish etc..

    Thanks to Kevin MacLeod of for the music track, Perspectives, which is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

    Thanks to the staff and keen-eyed divemasters of Two Fish Divers ( for accommodation, diving services and critter-spotting.

    The video was shot by Nick Hope with a Sony HVR-Z1P HDV camera in a Light & Motion Bluefin HD housing with Light & Motion Elite lights and a flat port. A Century +3.5 diopter was used for the most of the macro footage.

    I have more scuba diving videos and underwater footage on my website at:


    I post updates about my videos here:





    Full list of marine life and dive sites featured in this video:

    00:00 Nudibranch, Hypselodoris emma, Aer Perang
    00:15 Nudibranch, Hypselodoris emma, TK 3
    00:21 Nudibranch, Hypselodoris apolegma, Police Pier
    00:28 Nudibranch, Hypselodoris whitei, Aw Shucks
    00:33 Nudibranch, Chromodoris annae, Tanjung Kusu-Kusu
    00:38 Nudibranch, Hypselodoris apolegma, Aer Perang
    00:43 Pleurobranch, Pleurobranchus forskalii, Two Fish Divers house reef
    00:59 Nudibranch, Nembrotha lineolata, Nudi Falls
    01:55 Nudibranchs, Nembrotha chamberlaini & Nembrotha yonowae, TK 1
    02:07 Nudibranch, Nembrotha chamberlaini, TK 1
    03:20 Nudibranch, Hypselodoris bullocki, Critter Hunt
    03:33 Nudibranch, Doriprismatica atromarginata, Nudi Falls
    03:43 Nudibranch, Ceratosoma tenue, Aer Perang
    03:53 Nudibranch, Hypselodoris tryoni, Nudi Falls

  • Mucky Secrets - Part 20 - Sap-sucking Slugs, Headshield Slugs, Sea Hares & Flatworms - Lembeh Strait

    5:31

    Sap-sucking slugs, headshield slugs, sea hares & polyclad flatworms. Part 20 of my documentary, Mucky Secrets, about the fascinating marine creatures of the Lembeh Strait in Indonesia. Watch the full 90-minute documentary at

    The sap-sucking slug (Sacoglossa, sacoglossan) Elysia sp. is not a nudibranch. It does not have gills as such but breathes through two leafy flaps called parapodia that run most of the length of its body. The rhinophores on its head have a semi-tubular form. It feeds by sucking the fluid from green algae, and the chloroplasts it contains give the body a bright green colour which fades if the slug goes short of food. Behind the rhinophores it has tiny photo-receptors for eyes. The white spots are raised glands that can secrete a repellent white substance.

    Headshield slugs (family Aglajidae, superfamily Philinoidea, clade Cephalaspidea) lack tentacles and most retain a small thin internal shell. They also have parapodia, which are wrapped up and around the body. Many excrete mucous to help them burrow into the substrate, and the headshield prevents sand entering the mantle cavity. The Gardiner's headshield slug (Philinopsis gardineri) feeds on polychaete worms. And the pleasant headshield slug (Chelidonura amoena) feeds exclusively on acoel flatworms that infest hard corals and sponges. Small, dark eyespots on the front of its head give it very primitive vision.

    Like the striated frogfish, the ragged sea hare (Bursatella leachii) is camouflaged with long papillae that help it disappear on a seabed strewn with algae. Sea hares (family Aplysiidae, superfamily Aplysioidea, clade Aplysiomorpha) get their name from the overall body shape and the long pair of rhinophores on the head, which are tubular, and give it an acute sense of smell. It also has a second pair of tentacles at the sides of the mouth and it gobbles up the thin layer of cyanobacteria that coats the seabed. Below the rhinophores it has a pair of tiny eyes. If it is disturbed it can release a noxious mixture of white opaline and purple ink. Recent research has shown that this sticks to the antennae of predators such as lobsters and dulls their senses. The bright blue eyespots covering the body are more vivid here than in populations in other parts of the world.

    Ragged sea hares and the similar but smaller lined sea hare (Stylocheilus striatus) sometimes form huge swarming aggregations comprising hundreds or even thousands of individuals of varying size. They tumble over each other, devouring cyanobacteria and defecating as they stampede across the sea floor. In an aggregation they are an easy target for predators. Pufferfishes and predatory sea slugs have been seen to pick them off one by one. They breed quickly and have even been sold into the aquarium trade as sea bunnies for eating unwanted algae and providing food for other tank inhabitants with their larvae. It is said that inhabitants of some of the Cook Islands and Austral Islands collect and eat swarms of these sea hares, discarding the toxic internal organs. It is a mystery why sea hares aggregate like this. They have been observed to all mate, spawn and die at the same time.

    Although they resemble sea slugs, polyclad flatworms (Polycladida) are quite different. The ruffled periphery of the glorious flatworm, Pseudobiceros gloriosus, forms a pair of pseudotentacles reminiscent of nudibranchs' rhinophores. Occasionally flatworms leave the seabed to swim and when they do, they are a spectacular sight.

    There are English captions showing either the full narration or the common and scientific names of the marine life, along with the dive site names.

    Thanks to Chris Zabriskie ( for the music track, Air Hockey Saloon and to Purple Planet ( for the music, Mountain Breeze (pad). These tracks are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

    Thanks to the staff and keen-eyed divemasters of Two Fish Divers ( for accommodation, diving services and critter-spotting.

    I have more scuba diving videos and underwater footage on my website at:


    I post updates about my videos here:





    Full list of marine life and dive sites featured in this video:

    00:00 Sap-sucking Slug, Elysia sp., Hairball
    00:48 Headshield Slug, Philinopsis gardineri, Makawide
    01:16 Headshield Slug, Chelidonura amoena, Aer Perang
    01:37 Ragged Sea Hare, Bursatella leachii, Hairball
    02:55 Lined Sea Hare, Stylocheilus striatus, Retak Larry
    04:09 Glorious Flatworm, Pseudobiceros gloriosus, Retak Larry

  • Mucky Secrets - Part 11 - Juvenile Fishes - Lembeh Strait

    3:39

    Juvenile fishes. Part 11 of my documentary, Mucky Secrets, about the fascinating marine creatures of the Lembeh Strait in Indonesia. Watch the full 90-minute documentary at

    The sheltered conditions make the Lembeh Strait a successful nursery, and juvenile fishes can be seen everywhere. First we encounted the bright orange and white coloration of a young spotted parrotfish, Cetoscarus ocellatus. Previously, all specimens bearing this pattern were thought to be of a species commonly known as the bicolor parrotfish (Cetoscarus bicolor), but those are now deemed to be local to the Red Sea. In later life it undergoes a dramatic change in coloration.

    Sweetlips are another family that change dramatically during their life cycle. We meet a juvenile painted sweetlips, Diagramma pictum, which bears bold stripes, and an adult which exhibits spots.

    The juvenile harlequin sweetlips, Plectorhinchus chaetodonoides, mimics toxic flatworms and sea slugs, and the movement is confusing for predators. As it matures, the movement slows down and the pattern starts to change. It's coloration as an adult is entirely different from that of the young.

    Juvenile yellowblotch razorfish, Iniistius aneitensis, a type of wrasse, are here too. This fish will dive head-first into the sand to sleep or if it is alarmed. The slim, bony head is optimized for this purpose. It prepares an area of sand in advance by loosening it to make it easier to dive into, and it is able to move significant distances under the sand before re-emerging. We see a white variation with two false eyespots on its dorsal fin.

    Juvenile filesfishes are a common sight in the Lembeh Strait too. Their retractable dorsal spine deters predators. The name filefish comes from the rough skin. It is said that dried filefish skin was once used like sandpaper to finish wooden boats. In Australia they are known as leatherjackets. We encounter both juvenile and adult strapweed filefishes, Pseudomonacanthus macrurus.

    There are English captions showing either the full narration or the common and scientific names of the marine life, along with the dive site names.

    The full Mucky Secrets nature documentary features a huge diversity of weird and wonderful marine animals including frogfish, nudibranchs, scorpionfish, crabs, shrimps, moray eels, seahorses, octopus, cuttlefish etc..

    Thanks to Kevin MacLeod of for the music track, Mysterioso March, which is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

    Thanks to the staff and keen-eyed divemasters of Two Fish Divers ( for accommodation, diving services and critter-spotting.

    The video was shot by Nick Hope with a Sony HVR-Z1P HDV camera in a Light & Motion Bluefin HD housing with Light & Motion Elite lights and a flat port. A Century +3.5 diopter was used for the most of the macro footage.

    I have more scuba diving videos and underwater footage on my website at:


    I post updates about my videos here:





    Full list of marine life and dive sites featured in this video:

    00:00. Spotted Parrotfish (juvenile), Cetoscarus ocellatus, Tanjung Kusu-Kusu
    00:09 Spotted Parrotfish, Cetoscarus ocellatus, Fiji
    00:29 Spotted Parrotfish (juvenile), Cetoscarus ocellatus, Tanjung Kusu-Kusu
    01:03 Starry Goby, Asterropteryx semipunctata, Tanjung Kusu-Kusu
    01:08 Painted Sweetlips (juvenile), Diagramma pictum, TK 1
    01:18 Painted Sweetlips, Diagramma pictum, Hairball
    01:25 Harlequin Sweetlips (juvenile), Plectorhinchus chaetodonoides, Aer Perang
    01:35 Harlequin Sweetlips (sub-adult), Plectorhinchus chaetodonoides, Nudi Falls
    01:43 Harlequin Sweetlips, Plectorhinchus chaetodonoides, Thailand
    01:52 Yellowblotch Razorfish (juvenile), Iniistius aneitensis, TK 2
    02:25 Undetermined Filefish (juvenile), TK 2
    02:38 Strapweed Filefish (juvenile), Pseudomonacanthus macrurus, Retak Larry
    02:51 Strapweed Filefish, Pseudomonacanthus macrurus, Nudi Falls
    03:00 Strapweed Filefish, Pseudomonacanthus macrurus, Jahir

  • Muck Diving in Lembeh Strait Episode 52

    3:25

    Welcome to episode 52 of Fresh Critters At Lembeh. This episode completes a full year of weekly videos from Lembeh Resort. For the last 52 consecutive weeks, we've shared a brief glimpse of the cool things we've seen. The Strait didn't let us down for this last episode. We had one of the most amazing weeks of the year for the finale. The cephalopods were over the top with 6 Blue Ring Octopus, and several Wunderpus, Mimic Octopus, Coconut Octopus, Long Arm Octopus, Pygmy Cuttlefish and Flamboyant Cuttlefish. The Frogfish were not to be outdone and Nudis and Crustaceans galore all showed up to compete for a spot in the anniversary show. It's now vacation time for the Photo Center, but we have stockpiled a couple special videos to upload over the next couple weeks to keep you entertained.

  • Mucky Secrets - Part 3 - Squat Lobsters, Hermit Crabs, True Crabs & Sea Urchins - Lembeh Strait

    5:11

    Squat lobsters, hermit crabs, true crabs and sea urchins. Part 3 of my documentary, Mucky Secrets, about the fascinating marine creatures of the Lembeh Strait in Indonesia. Watch the full 90-minute documentary at

    In this video we first look at more marine crustaceans. First we meet squat lobsters. The elegant squat lobster, Allogalathea elegans, lives commensally on the arms of crinoid feather stars. It feeds on plankton collected by its host, and its colour often matches the crinoid for camouflage.

    Next we encounter squat lobsters of the Galathea genus fighting for territory on branching sponges at TK 2.

    Hermit crabs don't have a hard carapace like other crabs, so they recycle an empty gastropod shell to protect their soft abdomen. They carry their adopted home around with them, and long eye stalks ensure that the crab has a wide angle of view. We encounter whitespotted hermit crabs, Dardanus megistos, living in empty cone shells and conch shells. We also meet an anemone hermit crab, Dardanus pedunculatus, carrying sea anemones on its back in a classic example of mutual symbiosis.

    We then meet a pair of wingless box crabs, Cycloes marisrubri. The male box crab carries the female everywhere with him until she has moulted her shell and is ready to mate.

    Camouflage is important for Lembeh's true crabs. We encounter a rear-spined elbow crab, Aulacolambrus hoplonotus, and a decorator spider crab, Achaeus sp., perfectly camouflaged in their environment.

    A zebra crab, Zebrida adamsii, clings to the spines on the underside of a highly venomous flower urchin, Toxopneustes pileolus, using the last segment of its legs which has evolved into a hook.

    Blue-spotted urchins, Astropyga radiata, are also highly venomous and gather in groups at dive sites such as Hairball. Juvenile emperor red snappers, Lutjanus sebae, often shelter amongst these sea urchins in a commensal relationship.

    There are English captions showing either the full narration or the common and scientific names of the marine life, along with the dive site names.

    The full Mucky Secrets nature documentary features a huge diversity of weird and wonderful marine animals including frogfish, nudibranchs, scorpionfish, crabs, shrimps, moray eels, seahorses, octopus, cuttlefish etc..

    Thanks to Tom Cusack of Leafy Lane Productions ( for the music track, Mystery 2 and to Kevin MacLeod of for the music track, Covert Affair. These tracks are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

    Thanks to the staff and keen-eyed divemasters of Two Fish Divers ( for accommodation, diving services and critter-spotting.

    The video was shot by Nick Hope with a Sony HVR-Z1P HDV camera in a Light & Motion Bluefin HD housing with Light & Motion Elite lights and a flat port. A Century +3.5 diopter was used for the most of the macro footage.

    I have more scuba diving videos and underwater footage on my website at:


    I post updates about my videos here:





    Full list of marine life and dive sites featured in this video:

    00:05 Elegant Squat Lobster, Allogalathea elegans, Aer Perang
    00:29 Squat Lobster, Galathea sp., TK 2 (Teluk Kembahu)
    00:58 White-Spotted Hermit Crab, Dardanus megistos, Two Fish Divers house reef
    01:22 White-Spotted Hermit Crab, Dardanus megistos, Retak Larry
    01:35 Anemone Hermit Crab, Dardanus pedunculatus, TK 2 (Teluk Kembahu)
    01:56 Wingless Box Crab, Cycloes marisrubri, TK 1 (Teluk Kembahu)
    02:55 Rear-Spined Elbow Crab, Aulacolambrus hoplonotus, Nudi Falls
    03:08 Decorator Spider Crab, Achaeus sp., Makawide
    03:25 Zebra Crab, Zebrida adamsii, Jahir
    03:33 Flower Urchin, Toxopneustes pileolus, Jahir
    03:40 Zebra Crab, Zebrida adamsii, Jahir
    03:56 Blue-Spotted Urchin, Astropyga radiata, Hairball
    04:34 Emperor Red Snapper (juvenile), Lutjanus sebae, Jahir
    04:42 Bluespotted Stingray, Neotrygon kuhlii, Hairball

  • Mucky Secrets - Part 14 - Scorpionfishes, Rhinopias, Lionfishes - Lembeh Strait

    6:29

    Scorpionfishes including Rhinopias and Lionfishes. Part 14 of my documentary, Mucky Secrets, about the fascinating marine creatures of the Lembeh Strait in Indonesia. Watch the full 90-minute documentary at

    There are many species of scorpionfish in the Lembeh Strait, and it is often impossible to accurately identify them from pictures alone due to the minor differences in their anatomy and the highly variable nature of their camouflage. All scorpionfishes possess venomous spines on the dorsal and anal fins for self-defence, and for stunning their prey. They can also deliver a painful, sometimes even deadly sting to humans. The sting can be deactivated and the pain alleviated with prolonged immersion in hot water.

    We first meet a flasher scorpionfish, Scorpaenopsis macrochir, at Aer Perang. Like so many cryptic Lembeh creatures, scorpionfishes are ambush predators, using camouflage to remain hidden, then pouncing on unsuspecting prey when it passes.

    One of the best camouflaged is the Ambon scorpionfish, Pteroidichthys amboinensis, named after the island to the south east in the Maluku islands. It has very long protrusions, particularly above its eyes. Due to its sedentary lifestyle, the Ambon scorpionfish gathers a lot of algae on its body which helps it disappear into the surrounding territory. Like many scorpionfishes it cleans itself by occasionally shedding the outer layer of its skin, known as the cuticle.

    The scorpionfish of the Rhinopias genus are fantastic and rare creatures, and considered by many to be the holy grail of muck diving finds. The Eschmeyer's scorpionfish, Rhinopias eschmeyeri, sometimes known as a paddle flap scorpionfish, is occasionally found. We encounter a pink specimen at Aer Perang.

    The weedy scorpionfish, Rhinopias frondosa, typically bears a spotted coloration and more skin filaments than the Eschmeyer's scorpionfish. We meet one also at Aer Perang.

    Lionfishes are close relatives of scorpionfishes. Rather than camouflage, they bear a bold warning pattern to advertise their toxicity and confuse predators. Like scorpionfishes, they have venomous spines along their dorsal fin, but the venom glands are smaller, so their sting is generally less potent. Human fatalities are very rare.

    The dwarf lionfish, Dendrochirus brachypterus, also known as a shortfin turkeyfish, splays its dorsal rays to maximise its defences. It feeds mainly on crabs at night. The male can be identified by its larger head and longer pectoral fins with more bands than those of its female partner.

    Red lionfish, Pterois volitans, are sometimes seen too. We encounter is a young red lionfish at Aer Perang, and a mature adult at Jahir. They have tentacles above the eyes, and some exhibit globular fleshy growths beneath these tentacles.

    Although indigenous only to the Indo-Pacific, red lionfish have been introduced to the east coast of the United States and spread all the way from North Carolina down to the Caribbean. With few natural predators and a voracious appetite for smaller reef fishes, the population has expanded exponentially, wiping out many native species and greatly upsetting the balance of reef ecosystems. Scientists are trying to understand why the native indo-pacific population is not out of control, in an effort to find solutions to the west-Atlantic invasion.

    There are English captions showing either the full narration or the common and scientific names of the marine life, along with the dive site names.

    Thanks to Kevin MacLeod of for the music track, Lightless Dawn and to Chris Zabriskie of for the track Divider. These tracks are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

    Thanks to the staff and keen-eyed divemasters of Two Fish Divers ( for accommodation, diving services and critter-spotting.

    I have more scuba diving videos and underwater footage on my website at:


    I post updates about my videos here:





    Full list of marine life and dive sites featured in this video:

    00:04 Flasher Scorpionfish (tentative), Scorpaenopsis macrochir, Hairball
    00:20 Undetermined Scorpionfish, Aer Perang
    00:33 Flasher Scorpionfish (tentative), Scorpaenopsis macrochir, Aer Perang
    00:43 Undetermined Scorpionfish, Retak Larry
    00:50 Undetermined Scorpionfish, Jahir
    00:55 Ambon Scorpionfish, Pteroidichthys amboinensis, Hairball
    01:32 Eschmeyer's Scorpionfish, Rhinopias eschmeyeri, Aer Perang
    02:35 Weedy Scorpionfish, Rhinopias frondosa, Aer Perang
    03:18 Zebra Lionfish, Dendrochirus zebra, Two Fish Divers house reef
    03:45 Dwarf Lionfish, Dendrochirus brachypterus, Makawide
    04:31 Red Lionfish, Pterois volitans, Aer Perang
    04:53 Red Lionfish, Pterois volitans, Jahir

  • Mucky Secrets - Part 4 - Stingrays & Sharks - Lembeh Strait

    2:20

    Stingrays & sharks. Part 4 of my documentary, Mucky Secrets, about the fascinating marine creatures of the Lembeh Strait in Indonesia. Watch the full 90-minute documentary at

    In this video we look at the two most common stingrays in the Lembeh Strait. The bluespotted stingray (Neotrygon kuhlii) and bluespotted ribbontail ray (Taeniura lymma), also known as the blue-spotted stingray, are both occasionally found. They both like to camouflage themselves by burying themselves in the sand, but the latter species prefers to seek the shelter of outcrops, and has a more circular shape and vivid coloration. Stingrays breathe through their spiracle, a hole just behind the eye.

    Pelagic sharks; sharks that must keep moving to breathe, are not at all common in the Lembeh Strait. But the benthic (bottom-dwelling) brownbanded bamboo shark (Chiloscyllium punctatum), sometimes known as a catshark, is sometimes seen. Juveniles bear strong banding, possibly mimicking the coloration of some dangerous snakes and eels. These sharks can pass water over their gills while remaining still on the seabed. In adulthood the coloration fades to a more uniform gray. The shark has two sensitive barbels above the mouth that help it find prey when it hunts at night.

    There are English captions showing either the full narration or the common and scientific names of the marine life, along with the dive site names.

    The full Mucky Secrets nature documentary features a huge diversity of weird and wonderful marine animals including frogfish, nudibranchs, scorpionfish, crabs, shrimps, moray eels, seahorses, octopus, cuttlefish etc..

    Thanks to the staff and keen-eyed divemasters of Two Fish Divers ( for accommodation, diving services and critter-spotting.

    The video was shot by Nick Hope with a Sony HVR-Z1P HDV camera in a Light & Motion Bluefin HD housing with Light & Motion Elite lights and a flat port. A Century +3.5 diopter was used for the most of the macro footage.

    I have more scuba diving videos and underwater footage on my website at:


    I post updates about my videos here:





    Full list of marine life and dive sites featured in this video:

    00:04 Bluespotted Stingray, Neotrygon kuhlii, Hairball
    00:12 Bluespotted Stingray, Neotrygon kuhlii, Makawide
    00:33 Bluespotted Ribbontail Ray, Taeniura lymma, Critter Hunt
    00:45 Bluespotted Ribbontail Ray, Taeniura lymma, Tanjung Kusukusu
    01:08 Brownbanded Bamboo Shark (juvenile), Chiloscyllium punctatum, Aw Shucks
    01:38 Brownbanded Bamboo Shark, Chiloscyllium punctatum, Aer Perang
    01:52 Convict Snake Eel, Leiuranus versicolor, Jahir

  • Welcome to the Lembeh Strait

    9:53

    A selection of clips from 2014, featuring Melibe Colemani and a whole host of other critters from the Lembeh Strait, muck diving capital of the world.

  • Mistery of Lembeh Strait

    19:53

    4 k Sony a 6500
    Macroconverter: Saga +10 - light: Sealife Seadragon 2000
    september - october 2017

  • Indonesia 2015

    21:23

    One of our best diving. We've never seen so many weird creatues before!

  • Muck Diving in Lembeh Strait - Critters of the Weeks 29 & 30

    2:44

    Mating blue-ring octopus, an iridescent bobbit worm lunging out of its hole in search of dinner, and footage of a rare, furry melibe nudibranch make this latest video by our Photo Pro Sascha Janson a must-see!

  • Diving in Lembeh Strait, Indonesia. Best muck diving with octopus, rhinopias, frogfish, seahorses

    2:30

    Scuba diving in the Lembeh Strait, Sulawesi with Experience the best muck diving in the world - dive Indonesia with frogfish, seahorses, mimic octopus, and countless more amazing critters

  • Lembeh Strait 2018

    7:05

    The Scavangers of Lembeh Strait
    Filmed by Marcelo Johan Ogata
    #bugDreamer

  • LEMBEH - IMMERSION!

    4:19

    Compilation of clips from Lembeh Strait in 2014

  • Life On Coral Reef

    33:02

    Peaceful and relaxing 30+ minutes underwater footage of most beautiful tropical fish, soft and hard corals, anemones and sea creatures, octopus, mantis shrimps, cuttlefish and more. Filmed in Lembeh Strait, Indonesia

    Music By(Credit):
    Almost in F Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
    Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License


    See more at:

    Please Subscribe & Support my channel!

  • DIVING LEMBEH, CRITTERS MARCH 15

    14:53

    Six days diving in Lembeh strait with Nad Lembeh Resort team, last March 2015 :) Loooooots of critters!

  • North Sulawesi Dive Trip - Part 2 : Lembeh Strait, Bitung

    3:23

    Lembeh Island lies directly opposite the port city of Bitung, which is the 2nd largest city in Northern Sulawesi after Manado. Between Bitung and Lembeh Island you find the Lembeh Strait, internationally famous for its amazing muck diving conditions.

    Muck diving is all about spotting tiny underwater critters, species that you would normally not look for or find easily during a regular dive. Diving at Lembeh Strait means you are on the lookout for numerous weird but amazing looking species such as the Pygmy Seahorses, Bangaii cardinalfish, Mimic Octopus, Coleman, Hairy, Commensal, Emperor and Tiger Shrimps, Hairy, Painted and Striated Frogfish, numerous types of nudibranches and many, many other species. For obvious reasons is Lembeh a real paradise for those that are into underwater macro photography.
    source : amazingsulawesi.com

    It was hard at the first time to spot those creatures but eventually it became more interesting and exciting since we found rare creatures such as mimic octopus, flying gurnard, frog fish. Unlike our dives at Bunaken which more focus on corals and turtles, this site offer new experience for us. Proper buyoancy is important because sometimes we had to be close enough to the sand to see the creatures. It means that if you're still kicking the sand, you'll ruin the visibility the entire area (just like I did :p)

  • Lembeh Strait 2016

    45:35

  • Lembeh Strait 2015 Short Version

    10:42

    Diving Lembeh Strain with Froggies Divers

  • Muck Diving in Lembeh Strait - Critters of the Weeks 37 - 40

    3:30

    One of the things we love about diving in Lembeh is the multi-level complexity of relationships between critters. Keep an eye out in this video for footage of a carrier crab with a large green tunicate on its back, and a green flatworm hitching a lift on the tunicate! There's also plenty of frogfish, beautiful footage of the rare hairy octopus and a mass congregation of sea hares. Enjoy!

  • Diving Lembeh Strait, Sulawesi, Indonesia HD

    10:49

    Photo/video compilation from Lembeh Strait, Sulawesi, Indonesia in August 2011. Shot with Canon G12, Canon WP-DC34, Dyron 67 mm and 77mm macro lenses, Inon D-2000, Fisheye Fix focus light.

    Tracklist:
    Armin van Buuren pres. Gaia - Status Excessu D
    Shogun feat. Melissa Loretta - Skyfire
    Andy Moor feat. Sue McLaren - Fight the fire (Norin & Rad Remix Edit)
    Orjan Nilsen - Between the rays
    Spark7 - Lightness
    Armin van Buuren - This light between us (Armin van Buuren's Great Strings Mix)

  • Jaime Burns The Diving Diaries Season 1 The Lembeh Straight Sulawesi Indonesia

    30:44

    Muck diving in the world famous Lembeh Strait, North Sulawesi, Indonesia with diving adventure, presenter and film maker Jaime Burns

  • Diving in Bunaken - Full Version

    1:27:37

    The '09 BBBrothers Summer Official Trip:

    ..... The everytime incredible Bunaken Park ...... A Underwater Paradise from Wide Angle to Macro......

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