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NASA's Mega Hubble - The Roman Space Telescope

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  • NASAs Mega Hubble - The Roman Space Telescope

    13:10


    What do you do when the NRO (National Reconnaissance Office) makes you an offer you can't refuse?. Well in the case of NASA you update an existing design to create a Hubble on steroids that can cover the same amount of sky as one hundred Hubble's, drastically cutting down the time survey the sky and also more accurately look for Neptune sized planets around nearby stars and gather evidence to hopefully find out what dark energy really is, this is NASA upcoming Roman space telescope.

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    Written, Researched and Presented by Paul Shillito

    Images and Footage : NASA, Northrop Gumman, Harris Corp, Boeing, ESA, NRO, CAASTRO

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  • NASA’s Roman Space Telescope Deepens Its Infrared View

    3:18

    NASA’s Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope will be able to explore even more cosmic questions, thanks to a new near-infrared filter. The upgrade will allow the observatory to see longer wavelengths of light, opening up exciting new opportunities for discoveries from the edge of our solar system to the farthest reaches of space.

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    With the new filter, Roman’s wavelength coverage will span 0.5 to 2.3 microns – a 20% increase over the mission’s original design. This range will also enable more collaboration with NASA’s other big observatories, each of which has its own way of viewing the cosmos. The Hubble Space Telescope can see from 0.2 to 1.7 microns, which allows it to observe the universe in ultraviolet to near-infrared light. The James Webb Space Telescope, launching in October, will see from 0.6 to 28 microns, enabling it to see near-infrared, mid-infrared, and a small amount of visible light. Roman’s improved range of wavelengths, along with its much larger field of view, will reveal more interesting targets for Hubble and Webb to follow up on for detailed observations.

    Expanding Roman’s capabilities to include much of the near-infrared K band, which extends from 2.0 to 2.4 microns, will help us peer farther across space, probe deeper into dusty regions, and view more types of objects. Roman’s sweeping cosmic surveys will unveil countless celestial bodies and phenomena that would otherwise be difficult or impossible to find.

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    Video Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
    Scott Wiessinger (USRA): Lead Producer
    Ashley Balzer (ADNET): Lead Science Writer
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    This video can be freely shared and downloaded at While the video in its entirety can be shared without permission, some individual imagery may have been obtained through permission and may not be excised or remixed in other products. Specific details on stock footage may be found here: For more information on NASA’s media guidelines, visit:

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  • 4 Future Space Telescopes NASA wants to build

    25:58

    4 future space telescopes NASA wants to build are the Habitable Exoplanet Explorer (HabEx), the Lynx X-Ray telescope, Origins Space Telescope, and the Large Ultraviolet Optical Infrared Explorer (LUVOIR) . If approved, these 4 future space telescopes will succeed the James Webb Space Telescope and the Nancy Grace Roman space telescopes. To that end, NASA and astronomers now have four final reports for these space telescopes that if selected, will find habitable Earth-like worlds:

    0:00 Start
    2:54 Habitable Exoplanet observatory (HabEx)
    8:53 Lynx X-Ray observatory
    12:00 Origins Space Telescope (OST)
    17:17 Large Ultraviolet, Optical, Infrared Surveyor (LUVOIR)

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  • The Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope

    1:22:03

    Jennifer Wiseman & Julie McEnery, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA recently announced that its next-generation space telescope, formerly called the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST), has been named in honor of Dr. Nancy Grace Roman. As NASA’s first Chief Astronomer, Dr. Roman paved the way for space telescopes focused on the broader universe. She is credited with making the Hubble Space Telescope a reality, leading to her nickname as the mother of Hubble.

    When it launches in the mid-2020s, NASA’s Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope will create enormous space panoramas of unprecedented detail. The mission’s wide field of view will enable scientists to conduct sweeping cosmic surveys, yielding a wealth of information about celestial realms from our solar system to the edge of the observable universe.

    Roman will survey the sky in infrared light, which is invisible to human eyes. It will have the same resolution in near-infrared wavelengths as NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, but will capture a field of view about 100 times larger.

    Roman’s surveys will deliver new insights into the history and structure of the universe, including the mysterious dark energy that is making space itself expand faster and faster. This powerful new observatory will also build on the broad foundation of work begun with Hubble and other observatories on planets outside our solar system. It will discover thousands of exoplanets using its wide-field camera and study the atmospheres of giant gaseous planets orbiting other stars with a sophisticated technology demonstration coronagraph.

    Host: Frank Summers, Space Telescope Science Institute
    Recorded live on Tuesday, October 6, 2020
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  • Roman Space Telescope has bigger field of view than Hubble for pics, same sharpness

    1:30

    The Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope can image an area of the sky at least 100 times larger than Hubble with the same crisp sharpness, according to the Space Telescope Science Institute.

    Credit: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

  • The Most Exciting Telescope That No-one Is Talking About

    9:03

    The Vera C. Rubin Observatory is perhaps the next most exciting observatory to the James Webb Space Telescope. So why is it that hardly anyone has heard of it? Displate 20% off link:

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  • NASAs Roman Space Telescope Primary Mirror Finally Completed

    2:46

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has wrapped up the work on the primary mirror of its Roman Space Telescope based on a press release from the space agency’s blog.

    NASA writes that the finished primary mirror will help collect and focus the light coming from various cosmic objects in our universe regardless of distance. At 2.4 meters across (7.9 feet), Roman’s primary mirror is of the same size compared to the Hubble Space Telescope’s main mirror. However, it only weighs a portion of it at only 186 kilograms (410 pounds). This was made possible thanks to the technological advancements used in the making of it.

    How does it work?

    NASA details that Roman’s primary telescope will use infrared light, light which is not visible to the naked eye, in order to conduct its probe of the heavenly bodies in space. It is expected that it will be able to gather more data and more detailed photos of the cosmos for the quality of its output is directly proportional to the mirror’s size.

    #NASA #Telescope #Mirror

  • One Image, One Million Galaxies

    1:30

    One of the Hubble Space Telescope’s most iconic images is the Hubble Ultra Deep Field, which unveiled myriad galaxies across the universe, stretching back to within a few hundred million years of the Big Bang. Hubble peered at a single patch of seemingly empty sky for hundreds of hours beginning in September 2003, and astronomers first unveiled this galaxy tapestry in 2004, with more observations in subsequent years.

    NASA’s upcoming Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope will be able to photograph an area of the sky at least 100 times larger than Hubble with the same crisp sharpness. Among the many observations that will be enabled by this wide view on the cosmos, astronomers are considering the possibility and scientific potential of a Roman Space Telescope “ultra-deep field.” Such an observation could reveal new insights into subjects ranging from star formation during the universe’s youth to the way galaxies cluster together in space.

    Roman will enable new science in all areas of astrophysics, from the solar system to the edge of the observable universe. Much of Roman’s observing time will be dedicated to surveys over wide swaths of the sky. However, some observing time will also be available for the general astronomical community to request other projects. A Roman ultra deep field could greatly benefit the scientific community, say astronomers.

    As an example, a Roman ultra-deep field could be similar to the Hubble Ultra Deep Field – looking in a single direction for a few hundred hours to build up an extremely detailed image of very faint, distant objects. Yet while Hubble snagged thousands of galaxies this way, Roman would collect millions. As a result, it would enable new science and vastly improve our understanding of the universe.

    One of the greatest challenges of the Roman mission will be learning how to analyze the abundance of scientific information in the public datasets that it will produce. In a sense, Roman will create new opportunities not only in terms of sky coverage, but also in data mining.

    A Roman ultra-deep field would contain information on millions of galaxies – far too many to be studied by researchers one at a time. Machine learning — a form of artificial intelligence — will be needed to process the massive database. While this is a challenge, it also offers an opportunity.

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    Video credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
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  • Should the James Webb Space Telescope Be Worried? | The Upcoming Extremely Large Telescope

    16:25

    Looking forward to the James Webb Space Telescope? Just wait until ESO's Extremely Large Telescope (ELT) is completed. Astrum merch now available! Apparel: Metal Posters:

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  • Hubble discovers collection of black holes in globular cluster

    2:42

    Globular cluster NGC 6397 is host to a concentration of black holes, according to new observations made the Hubble Space Telescope team.

    Video credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
    Paul Morris: Lead Producer

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    Artist’s Impression of the Black Hole Concentration in NGC 6397
    Video credit: ESA/Hubble, N. Bartmann

    Callout of the Black Hole Concentration in NGC 6397
    Video credit: ESA/Hubble, N. Bartmann

    Artist Rendition of Gaia Spacecraft
    Image credit: ESA, C. Carreau

  • Nancy Grace Roman vs. Hubble Telescopes Deep Field Zoom Out

    28

    This zoom-out animation begins with a view of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (outlined in blue), which represents the deepest portrait of the universe ever achieved by humankind, at visible, ultraviolet and near-infrared wavelengths.

    The view then expands to show a wider Hubble survey of that area of sky (white outline), which captured about 265,000 galaxies in a large mosaic.

    Expanding further, we see the Hubble data overlaid on a ground-based view using data from the Digitized Sky Survey. An orange outline shows the field of view of NASA’s upcoming Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope.

    Roman’s 18 detectors will be able to observe an area of sky at least 100 times larger than the Hubble Ultra Deep Field at one time, with the same crisp sharpness as Hubble.

    CREDITS: NASA, ESA, A. Koekemoer (STScI), and A. Pagan (STScI)

  • JAMES WEBB SPACE TELESCOPE - Hubble Successor

    12:23

    Alien-hunting James Webb Space Telescope -NASA completes final tests and It's almost ready.
    Hubble Space telescope successor, James Webb Space Telescope, is almost ready to fly.
    It will be the largest, most powerful and complex space telescope ever built and launched into space. It will fundamentally alter our understanding of the universe.
    NASA has completed testing on the James Webb Space telescope, which ensures it will be able to withstand the launch and operate fully when it is in Earth's orbit. The space agency said there were two significant tests, which shows that all the internal electronics are performing as they should be and that it will withstand the pressure when it is being blasted into orbit. The testing took place at Northrop Grumman, in Virginia, which took a total of 17 days. This means we are getting closer to the launch date!
    But what's the James Webb Space Telescope? How does it work? Wh will his contribution be fundamental for Astrophysicists?

  • COMPARING THE HUBBLE AND JAMES WEBB | NASA SPACE TELESCOPES

    5:10

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    The new James Webb telescope will be launched by NASA in 2021 and will replace the Hubble telescope in operation for more than three decades. But do you know the differences between the two NASA telescopes? What's new in James Webb? Watch the video and understand the differences.
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  • What Comes After James Webb and WFIRST? Four Amazing Future Space Telescopes

    14:50

    The Hubble Space Telescope has been in space for 28 years, producing some of the most beautiful and scientifically important images of the cosmos that humanity has ever taken. But let’s face it, Hubble is getting old, and it probably won’t be with us for too much longer.

    NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope is in the final stages of testing, and WFIRST is waiting in the wings. You’ll be glad to know there are even more space telescopes in the works, a set of four powerful instruments in design right now, which will be part of the next Decadal Survey, and helping to answer the most fundamental questions about the cosmos.

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  • The Hubble Space Telescope

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    The first 100 people to go to are going to get unlimited access for one week to try it out. You’ll also get 25% off if you want the full membership.

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  • NASA’s Future Telescopes Will Float at the Edge of Space

    8:24

    NASA wants a new type of space telescope. A team of scientists and engineers at NASA are developing ways to send ultra cold and ultra large balloon telescopes to the edge of space, which could open up a brand new way of seeing the cosmos.
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    NASA, SpaceX and Blue Origin are practically synonymous with rockets... those massive, powerful vehicles allow us to travel beyond Earth. But while the ongoing competition to launch the world's next best rocket tends to dominate news headlines, there’s a little known mission at NASA to develop a new kind of space telescope… and this project is using something else entirely - balloons.

    You can do more science in a single balloon flight than you could do from years and years of observing from any of these existing observatories. You can take technology risks on a balloon that would never be able to take on a space mission. So, you can do all kinds of crazy things.

    Like sending massive telescopes that are cooled to near absolute zero to the edge of space. These ultra cold, balloon telescopes could heighten our understanding of the universe overnight. Not only can you see things that you wouldn't be able to see but you can look for things well beyond our own galaxy and even to the edge of the universe all the way back to the Big Bang.

    #NASA #telescope #technology #seeker #science #focalpoint


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    This historic form of transportation could be the future of space exploration

    “Today, balloons are largely relegated to party decorations and state-fair rides, but once hot air balloons were the cutting edge of transport technology, able to convey people and things to places humans had never ventured before. Now, scientists are turning to balloons once more — this time, as a way to create floating space observatories and internet service stations.”

    NASA Creates Technologies to Gather Great Observatory Science from a Balloon

    “NASA Scientist Al Kogut has found a way to do Hubble Space Telescope-class science from a relatively inexpensive scientific balloon and is well on the way to proving the concept.”

    NASA Kicks off 2019 Balloon Campaign in New Mexico

    “BOBCAT is a technology demonstration developed by Dr. Alan J. Kogut of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. Kogut and his team plan to develop a series of experiments for balloon flights that would radically improve the sensitivity of the next generation of observations in the far-infrared universe, which is a wavelength commonly used to study black holes, nebulas and the formation of new solar systems.”

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  • LUVOIR 15m Space Telescope Concept Deployment Sequence

    1:24

    Video created by NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center to show the deployment sequence for the LUVOIR 15m Space Telescope Mission concept. For more information about the LUVOIR concept see:

  • NASA releases new images from Hubble Space Telescope

    5:05

  • James Webb Space Telescope Is About To Fly: Are You Ready For The Revolution?

    14:26

    Guys, cross your fingers! There are still several months to the launch scheduled for next October 31, but, apparently, in front of the James Webb Space Telescope, the instrument that is about to revolutionize astronomy, has opened a fast highway, without obstacles or clouds on the horizon.
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    Developed by NASA with the collaboration of the European Space Agency and the Canadian Space Agency, the Webb Telescope should have been in orbit for a few years, at least according to the initial plans of its designers, but a host of problems has raged against this project. After all, building a satellite and put it in orbit is difficult and expensive, but building a space telescope weighing 6.5 tons is enormously more so. Progressive postponements due to technical problems and various contingencies were compounded by economic ones. The planned cost in 1996 was about two billion dollars, with the launch scheduled between 2007 and 2011. A first postponement brought the cost to 4.5 billion; after that in 2011 followed a deep revision of the project, made of cancellations, reconsiderations and battles with the U.S. Congress for funding.
    It is certainly true that the new space telescope will allow us to observe distant galaxies and stars with a definition never seen before, giving us the opportunity to observe the first lights that lit up the Universe, about 13.8 billion years ago, but in the end, it will cost at least $ 9.5 billion, and more than a billion will be needed for its maintenance and management of the mission once the telescope will be in orbit.
    Was it worth it? You be the judge!
    The proposal to build a new large space telescope, dedicating it to the memory of James Webb, NASA's director at the time of Apollo, was first floated in 1996. The idea, which still remains the basis of the project, was to offer an instrument for the observation of deep space to complement Hubble, the space telescope that for 30 years has been offering amazing and useful images for research on our solar system, the Milky Way and other galaxies.
    While the James Webb Space Telescope is billed as the successor to the legendary Hubble Space Telescope, in a sense it is not. The Hubble is primarily an optical telescope, capturing wavelengths of light similar to those used by the human eye. But the Webb is different. It will observe entirely in the infrared. In other words, it will study a universe drawn by radiation that reaches us from space at a much higher wavelength, and that is largely invisible to human experience.
    In trying to extend observations of the sky to these spectral bands, we are in fact faced with the problem of absorption by the Earth's atmosphere. In fact, only a small part of the infrared bands, the one closest to the red, is accessible to observation from Earth, while the mid and far-infrared never reach the Earth's surface. The atmosphere becomes transparent again only at wavelengths longer than about 1 mm, making observations from Earth in the radio band possible.
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    #InsaneCuriosity #JamesWebbSpaceTelescope #Hubble

  • James Webb Space Telescope is built for Space Exploration

    11:11

    'James Webb Space Telescope' is a space documentary about the james webb telescope
    for space exploration.The james webb NASA launch will takes place 10-31-21

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    0:00 - Introduction
    0:10 - Weird telescope
    1:09​ - Hope for a suprise
    3:37​ - Capabilities testing
    4:58​ - Motivation and practice
    6:49 - The questions we ask
    9:34​ - Unfolding in orbit

    #jameswebbspacetelescope #spaceexploration #jwst

    The James Webb Space Telescope is the next great space science observatory following the Hubble space telescope, designed to answer outstanding questions about the Universe and to make breakthrough discoveries in all fields of astronomy. the James Webb will see farther into our origins: from the formation of stars and planets, to the birth of the first galaxies in the early Universe. Webb is an international partnership between NASA, ESA and CSA. The telescope will launch on an Ariane 5 from Europe's Spaceport in French Guiana.The instrument is a camera and spectrometer for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), which is so sensitive that it can see a candle on a Jupiter moon. A true marvel of cosmology is about to enter the stage this Halloween.

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  • James Webb Telescope Is Ready To Go

    7:08

    The James Webb space telescope just took another step toward its highly anticipated 2021 launch. That long-awaited liftoff is scheduled to occur on Oct. 31, 2021, atop an Ariane V rocket from Europe's Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana.

    James Webb's Gold Mirror Explained:

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  • TESS Completes its Primary Mission

    2:58

    On July 4, NASA’s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) completed its primary mission, a two-year-long survey that imaged about 75% of the starry sky. In capturing this giant mosaic, TESS has found 66 new exoplanets, or worlds beyond our solar system, as well as nearly 2,100 candidates astronomers are working to confirm.

    TESS monitors 24-by-96-degree strips of the sky, called sectors, for about a month using its four cameras. The mission spent its first year observing 13 sectors comprising the southern sky and then spent another year imaging the northern sky.

    Now in its extended mission, TESS has turned around to resume surveying the south. In addition, the TESS team has introduced improvements to the way the satellite collects and processes data. Its cameras now capture a full image every 10 minutes, or three times faster than during the primary mission. The faster measurements will allow TESS to better resolve brightness changes caused by stellar oscillations and to capture explosive flares from active stars in greater detail.

    These changes will remain in place for the duration of the extended mission, which will be completed in September 2022. After spending a year imaging the southern sky, TESS will take another 15 months to collect additional observations in the north and to survey areas along the ecliptic – the plane of Earth’s orbit around the Sun – that have not yet been imaged by TESS.

    TESS looks for transits, the telltale dimming of a star caused when an orbiting planet passes in front of it from our point of view. During its primary mission, TESS also observed the outburst of a comet in our solar system, as well as numerous exploding stars, and even watched as a black hole in a distant galaxy shredded a Sun-like star.

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    Video credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
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  • How Arrokoth Shocked NASA Scientists

    12:46

    Almost everything you could want to know about New Horizon's visit to Arrokoth.
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  • New Hubble Telescope Images Released By NASA

    3:52

    NASA just released more than 50 new images from the Hubble telescope. We talk with Max Mutchler, who is the Principal Staff Scientist of the Roman Telescope Branch. He joined us from Maryland.
    WCCO This Morning - Dec. 11, 2020

  • Hubble: Voyage of Discovery

    2:35

    The Hubble Space Telescope has transformed our understanding of the universe, its view from orbit unleashing a flood of cosmic discoveries that have changed astronomy forever. From its discovery of dark energy to its quest to determine the age of the universe, Hubble has helped answer some of the most compelling astronomical questions of our time and revealed even stranger phenomena, opening our eyes to the grandeur and mystery of space.

    For more information, visit

    Video credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
    Tracy Vogel: Lead Writer
    Paul R. Morris (USRA): Lead Producer

    Music: Above the Stars by Magnum Opus [ASCAP] via Universal Production Music

    This video is public domain and along with other supporting visualizations can be downloaded from the Scientific Visualization Studio at:

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  • NASAs Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope: Broadening Our Cosmic Horizons

    2:20

    Scheduled to launch in the mid-2020s, the Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope, formerly known as WFIRST, will function as Hubble’s wide-eyed cousin. While just as sensitive as Hubble's cameras, the Roman Space Telescope's 300-megapixel Wide Field Instrument will image a sky area 100 times larger. This means a single Roman Space Telescope image will hold the equivalent detail of 100 pictures from Hubble.



    The mission’s wide field of view will allow it to generate a never-before-seen big picture of the universe, which will help astronomers explore some of the greatest mysteries of the cosmos, like why the expansion of the universe seems to be accelerating. Some scientists attribute the speed-up to dark energy, an unexplained pressure that makes up 68% of the total content of the cosmos.

    The Wide Field Instrument will also allow the Roman Space Telescope to measure the matter in hundreds of millions of distant galaxies through a phenomenon dictated by Einstein’s relativity theory. Massive objects like galaxies curve space-time in a way that bends light passing near them, creating a distorted, magnified view of far-off galaxies behind them. The Roman Space Telescope will paint a broad picture of how matter is structured throughout the universe, allowing scientists to put the governing physics of its assembly to the ultimate test.

    The Roman Space Telescope can use this same light-bending phenomenon to study planets beyond our solar system, known as exoplanets. In a process called microlensing, a foreground star in our galaxy acts as the lens. When its motion randomly aligns with a distant background star, the lens magnifies, brightens and distorts the background star. The Roman Space Telescope's microlensing survey will monitor 100 million stars for hundreds of days and is expected to find about 2,500 planets, well targeted at rocky planets in and beyond the region where liquid water may exist.

    These results will make the Roman Space Telescope an ideal companion to missions like NASA's Kepler and the upcoming Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS), which are designed to study larger planets orbiting closer to their host stars. Together, discoveries from these three missions will help complete the census of planets beyond our solar system. The combined data will also overlap in a critical area known as the habitable zone, the orbiting distance from a host star that would permit a planet's surface to harbor liquid water — and potentially life.

    By pioneering an array of innovative technologies, the Roman Space Telescope will serve as a multipurpose mission, formulating a big picture of the universe and helping us answer some of the most profound questions in astrophysics, such as how the universe evolved into what we see today, its ultimate fate and whether we are alone.

    Music credit: Climb the Ladder from Universal Production Music

    Video credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
    Scott Wiessinger (USRA): Lead Producer
    Claire Andreoli (NASA/GSFC): Lead Public Affairs Officer
    Barb Mattson (University of Maryland College Park): Narrator
    Francis Reddy (University of Maryland College Park): Science Writer
    Michael Lentz (USRA): Animator
    Chris Meaney (KBRwyle): Animator
    Adriana Manrique Gutierrez (USRA): Animator
    Scott Wiessinger (USRA): Animator
    Scott Wiessinger (USRA): Editor

    This video is public domain and along with other supporting visualizations can be downloaded from NASA Goddard's Scientific Visualization Studio at:

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  • Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope – A Wide-angle Lens on the Universe

    6:05

    The Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope is designed to provide data that might settle some of the most enduring mysteries of the universe – dark energy, dark matter, exoplanets and undiscovered galaxies.

  • NASA Roman Space Telescopes Completed & Passed the Major Review

    2:44

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Roman Space Telescope has completed and passed its first ground system review – meeting all design, schedule, and budget standards.

    Personnel at NASA were ecstatic about the progress. Ken Carpenter, project scientist of the Roman ground system at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland was quoted saying “this is an exciting milestone for the mission’, on a NASA press release.

    Detecting planetary events

    The Roman Space Telescope, even though it has the same resolution as the Hubble, is more powerful and will be capable of having a better field of view hundredfold. Not only that, but Roman would also be able to collect data 500 times faster than the Hubble. Because of the large amounts of data involved in the project, scientists at NASA would be employing new techniques in handling them – this includes using cloud-based services and more advanced tools to store and analyze big data.

    #NASA #RomanSpaceTelescope #review

  • Nancy Roman — The mother of Hubble

    7:50


    This new Hubblecast episode features the story of Nancy Roman and her role in forging the path of one of the greatest scientific instruments in modern history.

    Credit:
    Directed by: Mathias Jäger
    Visual design and editing: Martin Kornmesser
    Written by: Calum Turner
    Narration: Sara Mendes da Costa
    Images: NASA, Nancy Grace Roman, Lego™, Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA), Westerlund 2 Science Team, HUDF Team, A. Riess (STScI/JHU), A. Nota
    Videos: NASA, ESA, ESO/B.Tafreshi, ESO/C. Malin (christophmalin.com), M. Kornmesser, ESO
    Interviews: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
    Music: Johan B. Monell (
    Web and technical support: Mathias André and Raquel Yumi Shida
    Executive producer: Lars Lindberg Christensen

  • The Nancy Grace Roman Telescope vs. Hubble - How do they compare?

    26

    NASA's upcoming Nancy Grace Roman Telescope will provide images with detail as great as Hubble, but seen over a field 100 times larger.

    Here is a preview of what this would mean for an observation of the Eagle Nebula - best known for The Pillars of Creation image recorded by Hubble.

    Video credit: L. Hustak (STScI)

  • Roman Space Telescopes simulated image

    2:43

    NASA’s Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope, will capture the equivalent of 100 high-resolution Hubble images in a single shot, imaging large areas of the sky 1,000 times faster than Hubble. In several months, the Roman Space Telescope could survey as much of the sky in near-infrared light—in just as much detail—as Hubble has over its entire three decades.

    Although Roman has not yet opened its wide, keen eyes on the universe, astronomers are already running simulations to demonstrate what it will be able to see and plan their observations.

    This simulated image of a portion of our neighboring galaxy Andromeda (M31) provides a preview of the vast expanse and fine detail that can be covered with just a single pointing of the Roman Space Telescope. Using information gleaned from hundreds of Hubble observations, the simulated image covers a swath roughly 34,000 light-years across, showcasing the red and infrared light of more than 50 million individual stars detectable with Roman. #space #astrophysics #universe

  • Roman Field-of-View Zoom

    26

    This video of the Eagle Nebula showcases the superb resolution and wide field of view of NASA’s upcoming Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope. It begins with a Hubble image of the famous Pillars of Creation superimposed on a ground-based image. The view then zooms out to show the full field of view of Roman’s Wide Field Instrument. Roman’s images will have the resolution of Hubble while covering an area about 100 times larger in a single pointing.

    Credit: L. Hustak (STScI)

    Read more:

  • Aging Hubble Telescope glitches, on last legs?

    2:58

    After suffering a software glitch, NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope has gone into what’s called ‘safe mode’ in which it is no longer operating. The team who operates back here on Earth say that they don’t believe the glitch has damaged the science systems onboard and the telescope appears stable, so they remain optimistic that that they will be able to return it to normal operations, which is good news, because the Hubble Telescope is kind of a legend. The Resident discusses. Follow her at



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  • Simulated Image Shows the Power of NASA’s WFIRST

    2:43

    NASA’s Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope, WFIRST, will capture the equivalent of 100 high-resolution Hubble images in a single shot, imaging large areas of the sky 1,000 times faster than Hubble. In several months, WFIRST could survey as much of the sky in near-infrared light—in just as much detail—as Hubble has over its entire three decades.

    Although WFIRST has not yet opened its wide, keen eyes on the universe, astronomers are already running simulations to demonstrate what it will be able to see and plan their observations.

    This simulated image of a portion of our neighboring galaxy Andromeda (M31) provides a preview of the vast expanse and fine detail that can be covered with just a single pointing of WFIRST. Using information gleaned from hundreds of Hubble observations, the simulated image covers a swath roughly 34,000 light-years across, showcasing the red and infrared light of more than 50 million individual stars detectable with WFIRST.

    While it may appear to be a somewhat haphazard arrangement of 18 separate images, the simulation actually represents a single shot. Eighteen square detectors, 16-megapixels each, make up WFIRST’s Wide Field Instrument (WFI) and give the telescope its unique window into space.

    With each pointing, WFIRST will cover an area roughly 1⅓ times that of the full Moon. By comparison, each individual infrared Hubble image covers an area less than 1% of the full Moon.

    WFIRST is designed to collect the big data needed to tackle essential questions across a wide range of topics, including dark energy, exoplanets, and general astrophysics spanning from our solar system to the most distant galaxies in the observable universe. Over its 5-year planned lifetime, WFIRST is expected to amass more than 20 petabytes of information on thousands of planets, billions of stars, millions of galaxies, and the fundamental forces that govern the cosmos.

    For astronomers like Ben Williams of the University of Washington in Seattle, who generated the simulated data set for this image, WFIRST will provide a valuable opportunity to understand large nearby objects like Andromeda, which are otherwise extremely time-consuming to image because they are so big on the sky.

    WFIRST could survey Andromeda nearly 1,500 times faster than Hubble, building a panorama of the main disk of the galaxy in just a few hours.


    Read more:


    Music credit: Flight Impressions from Universal Production Music

    Credits: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
    Scott Wiessinger (USRA): Lead Producer
    Ben Williams (U. Washington, Seattle): Visualizer
    Scott Wiessinger (USRA): Narrator

    This video is public domain and along with other supporting visualizations can be downloaded from NASA Goddard's Scientific Visualization Studio at:

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  • Science Writers Workshop on the Roman Space Telescope

    1:36:40

    This workshop for science journalists, presented by the Space Telescope Science Institute, provides an overview of major areas of scientific inquiry that NASA’s Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope will address. A panel of prominent astronomers speaks on a variety of topics, including:

    Dr. Nancy Grace Roman
    Overview of Roman Science with the Wide Field Instrument and Coronagraph
    The Dark Universe
    Galaxies Across Cosmic Time
    Science Synergies of the 2020’s

  • Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope | Mother Of Hubble Telescope | हिंदी में In Hindi

    3:56

    Nancy Grace Roman (May 16, 1925 – December 25, 2018) was a noted American astronomer who made important contributions to stellar classification and motions, and became the first female executive at NASA, and served as NASA’s first Chief of Astronomy throughout the 1960s and 1970s, establishing her as one of the visionary founders of the US civilian space program She created NASA’s space astronomy program and is known to many as the Mother of Hubble for her foundational role in planning the Hubble Space Telescope. Throughout her career, Roman was also an active public speaker and educator, and an advocate for women in the sciences.

    On 20 May 2020, NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine announced that the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope would be named the Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope in recognition of her enduring contributions to astronomy.

    Let' Explore

  • Meet the Mother of Telescopes

    4:32

    WASHINGTON — NASA has renamed its next-generation Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope after Nancy Roman, the agency’s first chief astronomer known as the Mother of Hubble. NASA plans to launch the Roman Space Telescope in the mid-2020s.

    SOURCES: NASA, Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope, YouTube (NASA)




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  • Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope Eagle Nebula Field-of-View Zoom

    26



    This video of the Eagle Nebula showcases the superb resolution and wide field of view of NASA’s upcoming Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope. It begins with a Hubble image of the famous Pillars of Creation superimposed on a ground-based image. The view then zooms out to show the full field of view of Roman’s Wide Field Instrument. Roman’s images will have the resolution of Hubble while covering an area about 100 times larger in a single pointing.

    Credit: L. Hustak (STScI)

  • How Can We Know of the Existence of Pitch Black Rogue Planets?

    9:39

    Gravitational microlensing events are revealing the mysteries of rogue planets, but what are they, and how does it work? And what role does the Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope play in helping us spot more rogue planets in the future? Astrum merch now available!
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    Image Credits: NASA/ESA/ESO
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  • James Webb vs Hubble | Complete Comparison of Telescopes

    2:11

    James Webb telescope is a much more advanced telescope. It has a much larger mirror which will help it to collect more light. It can see farther than Hubble. It'll be launched on October 21, 2021.

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  • The Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope with Dr. Ken Carpenter | All Space Considered

    15:16

    All Space Considered is Griffith Observatory’s live science program that is free and open to the public, held the first Friday of every month.

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  • Astronomy in Space: From Hubble to Roman

    1:19:19

    Telescopes are placed into orbit around Earth or are sent farther out into space to get a clearer view of the universe.

    Thirty years ago, the U.S. launched the famous Hubble Space Telescope, whose unique design allowed astronauts to repair and upgrade it in space using advanced technology. It is one of the NASA’s longest-living and most valuable space-based observatories, beaming transformational astronomical images to Earth for decades. Hubble has fundamentally changed our understanding of the cosmos, and its story — filled with challenges overcome by innovation, determination, and the human spirit — inspires us.

    The newly named Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope – or Roman Space Telescope, (formerly known as WFIRST) – is set to launch in the mid-2020s. It will investigate long-standing astronomical mysteries, such as the force behind the universe’s expansion and search for distant planets beyond our solar system. The Roman Space Telescope project passed a critical programmatic and technical milestone in February, earning the official green light to begin hardware development and testing.

    We invited two scientists whose careers have been strongly connected with space telescopes to discuss the Hubble Space Telescope’s success and the potential of the upcoming Roman Space Telescope:

    Professor Meg Urry, Director of the Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, studies the growth of supermassive black holes over cosmic time to understand their co-evolution with galaxies by using multiple space telescopes.
    Dr. John Grunsfeld, an astrophysicist and astronaut went on three Space Shuttle flights to repair and upgrade the Hubble Space Telescope, including eight spacewalks.

    These scientists will discuss their contribution to the Hubble Space Telescope's scientific and technological endeavor and what they expect from the future Roman telescope and the future of NASA space telescopes at large.

    Molly Bentley, executive producer and co-host of the radio program and podcast, Big Picture Science, will moderate the talk.

    Once again, we are planning to hold this month’s SETI Talks online. Registration is required in order to receive the link and password; however, capacity is limited. Access will be on a first come first serve basis. Once the virtual room reaches capacity, we will not be able to accommodate more people. We apologize for this inconvenience, but have experienced large numbers of registrations for people who are unable to participate at the last minute, leaving others unable to register. As always, SETI Talks will be recorded and available to everyone after it takes place.

  • NASAs New Super Telescope - 100 Times More Powerful Than Hubble

    2:38

    The James Webb Space Telescope (sometimes called JWST or Webb) will be a large infrared telescope with a 6.5-meter primary mirror. The telescope will be launched on an Ariane 5 rocket from French Guiana in October of 2018. JWST will be the premier observatory of the next decade, serving thousands of astronomers worldwide. It will study every phase in the history of our Universe, ranging from the first luminous glows after the Big Bang, to the formation of solar systems capable of supporting life on planets like Earth, to the evolution of our own Solar System.

    Orbiting through space nearly a million miles from Earth, the Webb telescope will open up new expanses of the near and distant universe to our view.

    Webb's infrared-detecting gaze will penetrate clouds of dust within our own galaxy to reveal previously hidden secrets, and reach back in space and time to view the very edge of the cosmos.

    Webb will monitor the weather and atmospheres of the giant planets and study the composition of smaller objects in our solar system.

    Webb will search for signs of life-sustaining water on planets beyond our solar system, and help us learn how planets form.

    Webb will see through dust-cloaked regions impenetrable to visible light, revealing the birth of stars and swirling material around black holes.

    Webb will see the first, tiniest galaxies of the cosmos, and witness their evolution into vast islands of stars.

    The epoch of galaxy formation is currently completely hidden from our view, and we haven’t yet observed how galaxies formed or when. We have a lot to learn about how galaxies got supermassive black holes in their centers, and we don't really know whether the black holes caused the galaxies to form or vice versa. We can't see inside dust clouds with high resolution, where stars and planets are being born nearby, but JWST will be able to do just that. We don't know how many planetary systems might be hospitable to life, but JWST could tell whether some Earth-like planets have enough water to have oceans. We don't know much about dark matter or dark energy, but we are expecting to learn more about where the dark matter is now, and we hope to learn the history of the acceleration of the universe that we attribute to dark energy. And then, there are the surprises we can't imagine!

    By viewing the universe at infrared wavelengths JWST will show us things never before seen by any other telescope. It is only at infrared wavelengths that we can see the first stars and galaxies forming after the Big Bang. And it is with infrared light that we can see stars and planetary systems forming inside clouds of dust that are opaque to visible light.

    The primary goals of JWST are to study galaxy, star and planet formation in the universe. To see the very first stars and galaxies that formed in the early universe, we have to look deep into space to look back in time (because it takes light time to travel from there to here, the farther out we look, the further we look back in time).

    The universe is expanding, and therefore the farther we look, the faster objects are moving away from us, redshifting the light. Redshift means that light that is emitted as ultraviolet or visible light is shifted more and more to redder wavelengths, into the near- and mid-infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum for very high redshifts. Therefore, to study the earliest star and galaxy formation in the universe, we have to observe infrared light and use a telescope and instruments optimized for this light.

    Star and planet formation in the local universe takes place in the centers of dense, dusty clouds, obscured from our eyes at normal visible wavelengths. Near-infrared light, with its longer wavelength, is less hindered by the small dust particles, allowing near-infrared light to escape from the dust clouds. By observing the emitted near-infrared light we can penetrate the dust and see the processes leading to star and planet formation.

    Objects of about Earth's temperature emit most of their radiation at mid-infrared wavelengths. These temperatures are also found in dusty regions forming stars and planets, so with mid-infrared radiation we can see the glow of the star and planet formation taking place. An infrared-optimized telescope allows us to penetrate dust clouds to see the birthplaces of stars and planets.

  • Mother of Hubble | Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope Explained In Hindi |

    2:16

  • NASA dedica novo telescópio a Nancy Grace Roman, a “mãe” do Hubble

    1:36

    A NASA batizou o seu telescópio espacial de última geração, atualmente em desenvolvimento, em homenagem a Nancy Grace Roman, a primeira astrónoma chefe da agência espacial norte-americana.
    O Telescópio Espacial Roman será lançado em meados da década de 2020 e terá como principal missão a investigação de mistérios astronómicos.
    Partirá também em busca de planetas distantes além do nosso Sistema Solar.
    O telescópio possui um espelho primário com quase dois metros e meio de diâmetro e dois instrumentos: um de campo amplo e um de coronografia.
    Roman, considerada a “mãe” do Telescópio Hubble, defendeu incansavelmente o desenvolvimento de novas ferramentas que permitiriam aos cientistas estudar o Universo mais amplo a partir do Espaço.
    Ativista pela igualdade de direitos das mulheres, a astrónoma tornou-se conhecida por ser a primeira mulher na NASA a ocupar um cargo executivo.

    Quando faleceu, em 2018, deixou um tremendo legado na comunidade científica.


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  • WFIRST Will See the Big Picture of the Universe

    5:14

    Scheduled to launch in the mid-2020s, the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) will function as Hubble’s wide-eyed cousin. While just as sensitive as Hubble's cameras, WFIRST's 300-megapixel Wide Field Instrument will image a sky area 100 times larger. This means a single WFIRST image will hold the equivalent detail of 100 pictures from Hubble.

    The mission’s wide field of view will allow it to generate a never-before-seen big picture of the universe, which will help astronomers explore some of the greatest mysteries of the cosmos, like why the expansion of the universe seems to be accelerating. Some scientists attribute the speed-up to dark energy, an unexplained pressure that makes up 68 percent of the total content of the cosmos.

    The Wide Field Instrument will also allow WFIRST to measure the matter in hundreds of millions of distant galaxies through a phenomenon dictated by Einstein’s relativity theory. Massive objects like galaxies curve space-time in a way that bends light passing near them, creating a distorted, magnified view of far-off galaxies behind them. WFIRST will paint a broad picture of how matter is structured throughout the universe, allowing scientists to put the governing physics of its assembly to the ultimate test.

    WFIRST can use this same light-bending phenomenon to study planets beyond our solar system, known as exoplanets. In a process called microlensing, a foreground star in our galaxy acts as the lens. When its motion randomly aligns with a distant background star, the lens magnifies, brightens and distorts the background star. WFIRST's microlensing survey will monitor 100 million stars for hundreds of days and is expected to find about 2,500 planets, well targeted at rocky planets in and beyond the region where liquid water may exist.

    These results will make WFIRST an ideal companion to missions like NASA's Kepler and the upcoming Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS), which are designed to study larger planets orbiting closer to their host stars. Together, discoveries from these three missions will help complete the census of planets beyond our solar system. The combined data will also overlap in a critical area known as the habitable zone, the orbiting distance from a host star that would permit a planet's surface to harbor liquid water — and potentially life.

    By pioneering an array of innovative technologies, WFIRST will serve as a multipurpose mission, formulating a big picture of the universe and helping us answer some of the most profound questions in astrophysics, such as how the universe evolved into what we see today, its ultimate fate and whether we are alone.

    This video is public domain and along with other supporting visualizations can be downloaded from the Scientific Visualization Studio at:

    Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/Scott Wiessinger

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  • Nancy Grace Roman | NASAs First Chief Astronomer | Roman Telescope | #studio64podcasts

    11:00

    #studio64podcasts | #socialtechpioneers
    This Episode: Nancy Grace Roman | NASA's First Chief Astronomer | Roman Telescope | #studio64podcasts
    Social Tech Pioneers: Nancy Roman | Tribute | Roman Telescope | Jon English | Words Are Not Enough
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    NASA's First Chief Astronomer, the Mother of Hubble:
    Nancy Grace Roman Mother of the Hubble Telescope:
    NASA's Mega Hubble - The Roman Space Telescope:
    Meet the Mother of Telescopes:
    NASA's Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope: Broadening Our Cosmic Horizons:
    Jon English - Words Are Not Enough (1978):

  • NASAs new SPHEREx space telescope will study Big Bang, origin of the universe

    1:33

    #NASA
    #Big_Bang

    NASA's upcoming space telescope, the Spectro-Photometer for the History of the Universe, Epoch of Reionization and Ices Explorer, or SPHEREx, is one step closer to launch. The mission has officially entered Phase C, in NASA lingo.
    The Big Bang theory is a cosmological model describing how our current, observable universe came to be. But there is still much to learn about the concept, particularly when it comes to what occurred in those early microseconds after the big bang itself.

    Photo Credit : NASA

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  • Space Factories - Building 3D Printed SpaceCraft in Space.

    10:49

    Get MagellanTV here: & get an exclusive offer extended to our viewers: an extra month FREE. MagellanTV is a new kind of streaming service run by film-makers with 3,000+ documentaries! Check out our personal recommendation and MagellanTV’s exclusive playlists:

    Building spacecraft on earth and then launching them into space is fine for small things, even the ISS isn't that big but if we really want to make larger spacecraft that we will need to grow food on and carry tens or hundreds of people on then we need to build these in space. We are just moving to a stage where we can build simple structures in space with additive construction and robotic assembly will build the first true spacecraft and in this video, we look at how it will be done.

    This video is sponsored my Magellan TV.

    Written, researched and presented by Paul Shillito
    Images and Footage : NASA, ESA, Made in Space, TechShot, MAG SOAR, MosOil Ru, SpaceX Neo-Dyne

    We would also like to thank all of our Patreons too :-)

    Eριχθόνιος JL
    Abrakodabra Kobra / 25%
    Alistair Brown
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    Andrew SMITH
    Arnold J. Rimmer, BSc, SSc
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    Music from the Youtube library
    Two Moons by Bobby Richards
    Heaven and Hell by Jeremy Blake

  • Nancy Roman - The Mother of Hubble

    5:26

    The story of Nancy Roman and her role in forging the path of one of the greatest scientific instruments in modern history.

    Credit: ESA/Hubble.
    Directed by: Mathias Jäger
    Visual design and editing: Martin Kornmesser
    Written by: Calum Turner
    Narration: Sara Mendes da Costa
    Images: NASA, Nancy Grace Roman, Lego™, Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA), Westerlund 2 Science Team, HUDF Team, A. Riess (STScI/JHU), A. Nota
    Videos: NASA, ESA, ESO/B.Tafreshi, ESO/C. Malin (christophmalin.com), M. Kornmesser, ESO
    Interviews: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
    Music: Johan B. Monell (
    Web and technical support: Mathias André and Raquel Yumi Shida
    Executive producer: Lars Lindberg Christensen

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