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Neil deGrasse Tyson Explains the James Webb Space Telescope

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  • Neil deGrasse Tyson Explains the James Webb Space Telescope

    15:22

    What is the James Webb Space Telescope? On this explainer, Neil deGrasse Tyson and comic co-host Chuck Nice explain the JWST and all the science behind it with the help of Chief NASA scientist Jim Green.

    What is JWST looking for? Will it be a replacement for Hubble? We explore the different wavelengths of light and how JWST will let us peer into the past. Is JWST essentially a time machine? What sort of objects will it help us see? Can it track objects within our solar system? We break down where the telescope will be pointed first and where it will be launched to. How far away will the JWST be from Earth? What is L2 and where is it? Finally, we attempt (and fail) at getting over the excitement of launching something that has never existed before!

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    Science meets pop culture on StarTalk! Astrophysicist & Hayden Planetarium director Neil deGrasse Tyson, his comic co-hosts, guest celebrities & scientists discuss astronomy, physics, and everything else about life in the universe. Keep Looking Up!

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  • James Webb Space Telescope with Neil deGrasse Tyson and Natalie Batalha — Cosmic Queries

    56:43

    What’s the deal with the James Webb Space Telescope? On this episode, Neil deGrasse Tyson and comic co-host Matt Kirshen learn about the JWST and what new things it will help us discover with NASA astronomer Natalie Batalha and filmmaker Nathaniel Kahn.

    Will this telescope help us find habitable planets? Another Earth perhaps? We discuss Nathaniel’s new documentary, The Hunt for Planet B, which follows scientists as they research and build humanity’s largest and most cutting-edge space telescope to date. Why was it delayed so much? Where is it being launched? What new engineering and feats of science were invented? What is it like to put your entire career into one object?

    Next, we speak with Natalie and her journey to work on the JWST. Find out the two main objectives of the JWST and how it may help us glimpse into the past. We get into spectroscopy and how JWST uses infrared light. What’s the difference between JWST and other space telescopes we’ve launched in the past? Why are we looking for exoplanets? Are we planning to leave? We get into our patron’s questions: How big would a telescope have to be to see cities on other planets? Why do we choose to send up one single telescope instead of an array? What does Natalie want to discover? We explore best case and worst case scenarios. What happens if it doesn’t deploy properly?

    What will JWST see that Hubble can’t? What would be the most exciting or surprising thing for it to detect? Can the telescope detect life? What about extrasolar objects like ‘Omuamua? What is the mechanism for how our moon formed? What is the usable lifespan of JWST? And finally, how will JWST further shape future generations’ vision of this world, just as Hubble had for the last generation of scientists?

    Thanks to our Patrons Stefan Fox, Cortex MC, Brenton Verlo, taylor primm, Charles Shieler, Alden Doolittle, and Thomas Harshbarger for supporting us this week.

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    00:00 - Beginning of Part 1 w/ Filmmaker Nathaniel Kahn
    2:23 - James Webb Space Telescope documentary The Hunt for Planet B
    6:45 - What is the JWST observing?
    10:48 - Where is the JWST getting launched?
    11:48 - The engineering of JWST
    13:17 - The process behind The Hunt for Planet B
    15:18 - How did the documentary's focus shift during its filming?
    19:56 - Where to watch The Hunt for Planet B
    20:41 - Beginning of Part 2 w/ NASA Astronomer Natalie Batalha
    21:37 - What is the Kepler Space Telescope?
    26:51 - How big would our telescopes have to be to see cities on other planets?
    29:28 - Why do we send one big telescope instead of multiple small telescopes?
    31:22 - What is JWST's priority?
    35:49 - How confident are we in JWST's success?
    39:47 - What can JWST do that Hubble can't?
    42:14 - What is the most exciting thing that JWST could detect?
    45:55 - Will JWST help us find extrasolar objects?
    48:15 - Do we understand how our moon formed?
    50:05 - How will JWST shape our vision of the universe?
    53:01 - What is the lifespan of JWST?

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  • Neil deGrasse Tyson Explains Space Telescopes

    16:24

    How did the first space telescope arrive in orbit? Neil deGrasse Tyson and comic co-host Chuck Nice explore the literal rise of telescopes from Earth into space. You’ll find out what telescopes were called before they were called telescopes. Discover more about early refractive telescopes and their issues with chromatic aberration. Then, you’ll hear how Sir Isaac Newton came in and changed the telescope industry for good by inventing the reflecting telescope. Neil explains why Earth’s atmosphere prevents you from seeing clear images from the ground. Take a trip through the space telescope hall of fame as we discuss the Hubble Space Telescope, the Spitzer Space Telescope, the Chandra X-ray Observatory, the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, and the soon to be launched James Webb Space Telescope. Lastly, you’ll learn why Hubble might be the most successful science instrument of all time. All that, plus, Neil shares why the different bands of light act as different dialects for the language of the universe.

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  • How Does The James Webb Space Telescope Work? - Smarter Every Day 262

    29:46

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    I greatly appreciate Dr. John Mather's time and patience with me. He did a fantastic job of breaking down the design of the telescope.


    Thanks to Travis Wohlrab Engagement Officer, NASA Goddard for the tour of testing equipment.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    GET SMARTER SECTION

    NASA's James Webb Space Telescope


    NASA's Explore Light and compare visible to Infrared:


    Many of the NASA 3D models were created by Goddard's Visualization Studio


    JWST Light Path:

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    Also, I wanted a cool James Webb Space Telescope shirt, so i commissioned an artist to create this design, which I LOVE.
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  • Neil deGrasse Tyson - What is the most POWERFUL Telescope?

    7:13

    Neil deGrasse Tyson - What is the most POWERFUL Telescope?

  • Things We’ve Never Seen: The James Webb Space Telescope Explores the Cosmos

    1:21:03

    #BrianGreene #NASA #JWST #UnfoldTheUniverse
    The powerful James Webb Space Telescope--the successor to the Hubble Space Telescope--promises insight into profound questions that have dogged philosophers and astronomers for millennia. What is the origin of the universe? How are stars and planets created? Is there life elsewhere in the universe? Brian Greene brings together four scientists who will use the Webb to investigate these very questions: John C. Mather, NASA’s lead scientist on the project and a Nobel Laureate; Natalie Batalha, NASA’s lead scientist on the Kepler Mission, which discovered the first rocky planets outside our solar system; Adam Riess, who earned a Nobel Prize for his revelations about the expansion rate of the universe; and Ewine van Dishoeck, a Kavli Laureate for her pioneering work in the field of astrochemistry.

    This program is part of the Big Ideas series, supported by the John Templeton Foundation.

    Participants:
    - John C. Mather
    - Natalie Batalha
    - Adam Riess
    - Ewine van Dishoeck

    Moderator:
    Brian Greene

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  • The James Webb Space Telescope Explained In 9 Minutes

    9:03

    What Will The James Webb Space Telescope Find?
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    #perception #space #universe #jwst #james #webb #telescope

  • What Elon Musk & Scientists Really Think Of James Webb Telescope

    10:09

    Even before its historic launch, the James Webb Space Telescope had captured the world's attention, so let's find out what Elon Musk and other scientists have to say about it! Stay tuned and subscribe to Futurity.

    #jwst #jameswebb #elonmusk

    Here at Futurity, we scour the globe for all the latest tech releases, news and info just so you don't have to! Covering everything from cryptocurrency to robotics, small startups to multinational corporations like Tesla and Jeff Bezos to Elon Musk and everything in between!

  • The Insane Engineering of James Webb Telescope

    31:23

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    Credits:
    Writer/Narrator: Brian McManus
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    Select imagery/video supplied by Getty Images
    Thank you to AP Archive for access to their archival footage.

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    Thank you to my patreon supporters: Adam Flohr, Henning Basma, Hank Green, William Leu, Tristan Edwards, Ian Dundore, John & Becki Johnston. Nevin Spoljaric, Jason Clark, Thomas Barth, Johnny MacDonald, Stephen Foland, Alfred Holzheu, Abdulrahman Abdulaziz Binghaith, Brent Higgins, Dexter Appleberry, Alex Pavek, Marko Hirsch, Mikkel Johansen, Hibiyi Mori. Viktor Józsa, Ron Hochsprung

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  • Neil deGrasse Tyson Says Webb Telescope Isnt Meant To Challenge Religion | TMZ

    3:05

    Neil deGrasse Tyson says the new NASA telescope observing the origins of the early universe isn't a shot across the bow at religion ... but being flexible is the key.

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  • StarTalk Podcast: Cosmic Queries – Hubble Space Telescope, with Neil deGrasse Tyson

    53:05

    It was only supposed to last 3-5 years and it’s been orbiting for 30. Neil deGrasse Tyson celebrates the Hubble Space Telescopes 30th anniversary with comic co-host Chuck Nice and Hubble senior project scientist Jennifer Wiseman, PhD.

    You’ll learn how proposals are selected to receive telescope time. Jennifer tells us about “director discretionary time” which allows the director of the Space Telescope Science Institute to allot time for ideas and research for larger projects or projects that might not be otherwise considered in the general selection process. Jennifer tells us about an instance when director discretionary time allowed for Hubble to be pointed at “nowhere” – resulting in the Hubble Deep Field image, one of the most iconic images Hubble has ever taken. Jennifer also explains how long an idea can take from proposal to final publication.

    You’ll learn about the Hubble science team’s massive data archive that’s open for everyone. Explore some of Hubble’s most interesting discoveries. Discover more about Hubble’s work on finding supermassive black holes in the center of galaxies. We also explore the work researching the expansion of the universe.

    We ponder what the most important fields of discovery will be over the next decade. You’ll find out about Hubble’s collaborative work alongside the Juno probe to Jupiter and the New Horizons probe that went to, and past, Pluto. We also discuss the exciting world of exoplanets. Lastly, Jennifer reveals how long she thinks Hubble can stay in orbit and whether the telescope could ever be sold to a private company. All that, plus, Jennifer shares her favorite Hubble discovery over the past 30 years!
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    Original air date: April 13, 2020

    About StarTalk:
    Science meets pop culture on StarTalk! Astrophysicist & Hayden Planetarium director Neil deGrasse Tyson, his comic co-hosts, guest celebrities & scientists discuss astronomy, physics, and everything else about life in the universe. Keep Looking Up!

    #StarTalk #NeildeGrasseTyson #NASA

  • What Are the Capabilities of the Most Powerful Telescope Ever? James Webb.

    11:04

    #eldddir #eldddir_space #eldddir_earth

  • Looking back in time with the James Webb Space Telescope

    13:20

    Scott Pelley reports on the James Webb Space Telescope, due to launch December 22. Scientists hope it will be able to see the universe’s first stars and galaxies.

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  • James Webb Telescope Will Make TERRIFYING Discoveries!

    12:56

    Decades after the idea, the James Webb Space Telescope has finally made it to space. Launched on this Christmas, the telescope started its deployment after it was sent to the space. Scientists are depending on the telescope to know the truth about our existence and also if there is any other life in this universe other than ours. The telescope fans are curious to know about its deployment and what’s next for this masterpiece, they are asking if the telescope is really going to find the answer to our creation? Welcome to Cosmos lab, your one station for all the news from space. Join us in today’s video to find out about the deployment of the James Webb Space Telescope, its goals, and what’s next for this massive beast.
    The James Webb Space Telescope is the world's most powerful and largest space telescope. It is an infrared space observatory that launched on Dec 25, 2021, from ESA's launch site at Kourou in French Guiana, onboard an Arianespace Ariane 5 rocket. The telescope will let scientists to peek back 200 million years after the Big Bang to see how our cosmos looked. Images of some of the first galaxies ever formed will be captured by the telescope. It will also be able to peek inside dust clouds to see where new stars and planets are developing, as well as investigate the atmospheres of planets orbiting other stars. It will be able to observe objects in our solar system from Mars outward.
    The $10 billion James Webb Space Telescope will explore the cosmos to learn more about the universe's history, from the Big Bang to the birth of alien planets and beyond. It's one of NASA's Great Observatories, huge space instruments that include the likes of the Hubble Space Telescope to peer deep into the cosmos.
    After being launched on Christmas Day, the James Webb Space Telescope will journey over a million miles or 1.5 million kilometers to its permanent home, a Lagrange point — a gravitationally stable place in space. At the second Lagrange point, the James Webb Space Telescope will orbit the sun (L2). L2 is a location in space near Earth that is opposite the sun; this orbit will keep the telescope in alignment with Earth as it orbits the sun. Several other space telescopes have used it, notably the Herschel Space Telescope and the Planck Space Observatory. If Webb gets to the right zone, it can use a minimum of fuel to stay in place thanks to a near-perfect alignment with the sun, Earth and moon.
    The new observatory, the world's largest space telescope, successfully unfolded its final primary mirror piece on January. 8, capping one of NASA's most challenging space deployments ever. After the deployment, Engineering teams cheered back at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, Maryland as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announced on Twitter that the final wing was deployed.
    ‘Final wing is now deployed! Short celebration, but we’ve still got work to do. Engineers are working to latch the wing into place, a multi-hour process. When the final latch is secure, NASA Webb will be fully unfolded in space.’
    Webb's five-layered sunshield — a 70-foot-long, kite-shaped structure that acts as a parasol — was deployed to keep the telescope's equipment cool so they could detect tiny infrared signals from the remote reaches of the Universe. The sun shield will be permanently installed between the telescope and the Sun, Earth, and Moon, with the Sun-facing side designed to resist temperatures of up to 230 degrees Fahrenheit (110 degrees Celsius).
    The telescope was folded up because it was too large to fit into the nose cone of a rocket in its working condition. According to Nasa, unfurling has been a sophisticated and difficult process - the most difficult of its kind ever attempted. However, it has now been successfully deployed and according to NASA officials, we have still got work to do.
    So, what is this work, and what is next for this gigantic space telescope? Webb is expected to arrive at its insertion location by Jan. 23. John Durning, Webb's deputy project manager at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, after the deployment in a press conference from Webb's control center at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, Maryland, said to the reporters that,
    ‘As Webb prepares for the engine fire, team members will spend the next 15 days aligning the 18 mirror segments to essentially perform as one mirror.' I should say also, that Webb will start turning on the instruments in the next week or so, Durning added. And then after we get into L2, as the instruments get cold enough, they [engineers] are going to be starting to turn on all the various instruments.’
    L2 is an excellent area for Webb to carry out its mission.

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  • NASAs Golden Eye: The James Webb Space Telescope Explained

    8:19

    Its sunshield is as big as a tennis court, it's covered in gold and can see light that has travelled for 13 billion years. But NASA's James Webb Space Telescope has also had a troubled history. Here's why this powerful space observatory is a game changer.

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  • Why you should believe the HYPE for the James Webb Space Telescope

    23:24

    The James Webb Space Telescope is set to revolutionize every single field in astrophysics; here's why you should believe the hype. Plus for 50% off your first month of any subscription crate from KiwiCo (available in 40 countries!) head to

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    00:00 - Introduction
    00:50 - What is JWST?
    01:45 - How is it different to the Hubble Space Telescope?
    05:49 - What can JWST do?
    07:42 - REASON 1: Exoplanet atmospheres
    09:02 - REASON 2: The birth of new stars and planets
    11:29 - REASON 2: The FIRST stars and galaxies in the Universe
    13:41 - Interview with Dr. Sarah Kendrew
    22:21 - Bloopers

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    ????????‍???? I'm Dr Becky Smethurst, an astrophysicist at University of Oxford (Christ Church). I love making videos about science with an unnatural level of enthusiasm. I like to focus on *how* we know things, not just what we know. And especially, the things we still don't know. If you've ever wondered about something in space and couldn't find an answer online - you can ask me! My day job is to do research into how supermassive black holes can affect the galaxies that they live in. In particular, I look at whether the energy output from the disk of material orbiting around a growing supermassive black hole can stop a galaxy from forming stars.


  • Can The James Webb Telescope POSSIBLY See The Creation Of The Universe?

    10:11

    What is the origin of this universe? What was it like before the big bang, and are we alone in this vast universe? These are just a few of the many questions that have kept some scientists awake at night for years. They devised numerous initiatives and missions in order to learn as much as possible about our existence and creation, but there wasn’t any technology that can show us all that. It took decades for the scientists to build a massive telescope, the James Webb Space Telescope that is supposed to explain to us the creation of this universe. But the question is, is this JWST capable of doing so? Welcome to Cosmos lab, your one station for all the news from space. Join us in today’s video to find if the James Webb Telescope can answer our creation or not.
    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) has begun its mission to image the birth of the universe after a nail-biting launch on Christmas Day. The $10 billion James Webb Space Observatory, NASA's largest and most powerful space research telescope, will explore the cosmos to learn about the universe's history, from the Big Bang to the birth of alien planets and beyond. It is one of NASA's Great Observatories, huge space instruments that include the likes of the Hubble Space Telescope to peer deep into the cosmos.
    JWST will go back in time more than 13.5 billion years to witness the faint infrared light from the first galaxies, illuminating a previously unseen period of cosmic history that shaped the universe as we know it today. According to NASA, JWST was designed not to see the beginnings of the universe, but to see a period of the universe's history that we have not seen yet before.
    The concern here is that can James Webb perform these functions or how is it going to see through thousands of light-years? James Webb Space Telescope is a cosmic time machine that can view galaxies and stars as they were as few as 100 million years after the Big Bang, the universe's unimaginably catastrophic birth.
    Webb will cover longer wavelengths of light than Hubble and will have greatly improved sensitivity. NASA said on its website, the longer wavelengths will enable Webb to look further back in time to see the first galaxies that formed in the early universe.
    John Mather, the mission’s senior project scientist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland said, “This telescope is so powerful that if you were a bumble bee 240,000 miles away, which is the distance between the Earth and the moon, we will be able to see you.”
    How is this even possible? The JWST is equipped with four science instruments that will enable observations in visible, near-infrared, and mid-infrared wavelengths. Infrared light is electromagnetic radiation with wavelengths longer than visible light but shorter than radio waves.
    Paul Geithner Deputy Project Manager - Technical for the James Webb Space Telescope at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center explains that there are several reasons to study in the infrared. One reason is that the ultraviolet and visible light released by the universe's first luminous objects when it was young has been stretched by the expansion of the cosmos and now reaches us as infrared light, nearly 13 billion years later. Webb will be on the lookout for the first rays of light.
    Another explanation is that stars and planets are formed in gas and dust clouds, which obscure our perspective. We can see inside these clouds because infrared light penetrates them. It's unclear how the cosmos evolved from a simpler state of hydrogen and helium to the universe we see today, but the Webb telescope will glimpse far-flung realms of space and a period of time never seen before, assisting us in answering these crucial questions.
    Webb will conduct ultra-deep near-infrared surveys of the Universe in order to find the first galaxies, followed by low-resolution spectroscopy and mid-infrared photometry. High-resolution near-infrared spectroscopy will be required to investigate reionization.
    With this, the James Webb Space Telescope is going to see things that have never been seen before. So maybe it will help us to finally find out about our existence.
    John Mather says, “what are we going to do with this great telescope? We’re going to look at everything there is in the universe that we can see.” He further said, “We want to know how did we get here. The Big Bang, how did that work? So we’ll look. We have ideas, we have predictions, but we don’t honestly know.”
    To find the answers, the science mission of JWST is divided into four sections. First light and reionization. Assembly of galaxies. Birth of stars and protoplanetary systems and Planets and origins of life.
    First light refers to the universe's early stages after the Big Bang when the universe as we know it today began.

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  • James Webb Telescope Terrifying Discoveries Will Change Everything!

    8:01

    The James Webb telescope has been conceptualized for more than a decade. Its fans would be happy to hear that it has finally been launched into the dark abyss known as space. It was launched last christmas, and it began its deployment immediately after it entered space. We hope that this telescope would allow us to know a lot more about both our existence, and the possibility of external life outside us.

    Since the launch of this $10 billion telescope, its fans have asked nonstop about its progress, and if it really will do what it was set out to do. Join us as we explore all the possibilities of this telescope and give some insight on how this telescope will finally make terrifying new discoveries.


    If you’re interested in space travel, you should know that there are a lot of limitations to this particular concept, one of which is the ability to view planets and stars past our solar system. It was even a challenge to view events occurring past mars due to the absence of light. Astronomers, engineers, and astronauts have dreamed of being able to see past our solar system. Now, the James Webb telescope is capable of making it possible.

    For those who don't know, the James Webb telescope was designed to the largest telescope ever created. It got launched on December 25th last year from the ESA space site at Koolu via an Arianespace Ariane 5 Rocket. If this telescope performs its purpose, it would allow us to be able to take a look at the events of the big bang. Imagine seeing how the events occurred during the big bang which happened as far back as 200 million years ago.

    We would be able to view the first galaxies that were born out of the big bang, and also look at any new planets or stars developing. This would be a phenomenal achievement, and would be such good news for science.

    Its journey spans over a million miles to a gravitationally stable point in space. Arriving at that point in space would keep it from leaving the solar system, and will keep it stable enough to take a look at several galaxies. The telescope would then land on a second gravitationally stable point, L2. L2 is a position in space that is in close proximity and alignment with earth and is directly opposite the sun. At this point, it will be able to orbit the sun even more closely.

    Interestingly, other telescopes have used this particular area at several points in time and have captured mind-blowing information. If it gets to this point perfectly, it would use the gravitational stability of that point as well as minimum fuel to stay in perfect alignment with the sun, moon, and the earth.
    Its successful launch from the earth took about 31 minutes, and scientists, engineers, and fans from all over the world cheered all the way through. We know you might be wondering how its going to survive the full force of the sun. The telescope’s designers understood this, and built a 5-layer, 70-foot long sun shield. It keeps the equipment of the telescope cool and prevents the telescope itself from getting destroyed due to the heat from the sun.

    This sun shield has been checked and given the okay by multiple engineers and scientists from around the world due to its ability to protect itself from temperatures of up to 250 degrees Fahrenheit. If you’re watching the video, you would probably notice that the telescope is way bigger than a rocket can fit. Because of that, it was designed in such a way that it can be folded up and safely transported in a rocket. According to NASA, opening it up has been one of the most sophisticated processes they have undergone. What’s more is that the process isn’t over yet, as they have said they still have some work to do.

    What’s Next?

    Although this telescope has not arrived at its destination yet, it is expected to arrive by January 23rd. The deputy project manager at NASA’s space flight centre said in a conference that between the start of January and the 23rd, the team would spend its time aligning the 18 mirror segments in order to successfully form one giant mirror.
    Beryllium was used to produce these mirrors because it is a lightweight metal, and it is fairly resistant to the sun’s rays.
    After it has been fully unfolded and assembled, its different compartments will be turned on. The engineers believe that this will happen between 7-14 days.

    The distance from the sun ensures that enough darkness is gotten for the heat seeking infra-red studies to be performed. These infra-red telescopes would allow the telescope to view distant galaxies, stars, and planets.

    This telescope will be the most powerful telescope ever created, and it has already started breaking records. It surpasses the capabilities of the hubble space telescope, among many others.

  • How the James Webb Space Telescope will revolutionize astrophysics

    9:40

    NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope was successfully launched on December 25th. This is the revolutionary successor to the Hubble Space Telescope. The spacecraft still has a long way to go in space, but if all goes well, the vehicle could transform our view of the Universe.

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  • An Introduction to the James Webb Space Telescope Mission

    3:44

    A look at the James Webb Space Telescope, its mission and the incredible technological challenge this mission presents.

    Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
    Michael McClare (KBRwyle): Lead Producer
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  • This Telescope Will Look Farther into the Universe than Ever Before

    7:34

    The James Webb Space Telescope, NASA's next iteration of the Hubble Telescope, is set to launch this week. It will park 1 million miles from Earth, and look farther into the Universe than ever before.

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  • Why the James Webb Space Telescope looks like that

    11:13

    A NASA astrophysicist explains humanity’s big new toy

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    After 25 years and nearly $10 billion, the James Webb Space Telescope has finally left planet Earth. Billed as a successor to the beloved Hubble Space Telescope, the Webb’s mirror is six times larger and its instruments are tuned to observe longer wavelengths, in order to detect the stretched-out light from primitive galaxies 13.5 billion light years away.

    That primary mission — to see the first stars and galaxies that formed after the Big Bang — determined the unusual and challenging design of the telescope. Instead of a shiny tube, the Webb Telescope looks like a giant honeycomb riding on a silver surfboard. The short answer to why it looks like that is: It needs to be very big and very cold.

    In the video above, NASA astrophysicist Amber Straughn and Vox's Joss Fong build a small model of the telescope to explore its extraordinary design.

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  • Exoplanets | Neil deGrasse Tyson

    11:42

    On this out-of-this-world episode of Wheel Of Science, Neil deGrasse Tyson and Chuck Nice answer questions about exoplanets, particularly now that the Kepler and K2 Missions telescope is no longer operating. Find out about NASA's James Webb Space Telescope, life on other planets, why exoplanet research is important, and more.

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  • The Insane Technology Behind The James Webb Telescope!

    16:01

    With decades and billions in the making, James Webb Space Telescope is something that is a successor to amazing space technologies. The technologies that covered most yet not what the scientists exactly needed. Either they were not that advanced or they got into problems with time. James Webb Space Telescope had to be free of any trouble ever during its time in space. It can not afford to go wrong. It had to be perfect. But why does Webb have to be so complicated? Isn't it possible that a simpler task would probably be sufficient? Why spend billions of dollars and almost three decades in its making?
    Welcome to Cosmos lab, your one station for all the news from space. Join us in today’s video to find out all about the struggle and the complex, never seen before technology of the James Webb Space Telescope.
    When the Hubble Space Telescope was launched in 1990, it was clear that something wasn't quite right. The photographs it brought back to Earth were unsatisfactory, fuzzy, and far from what scientists had hoped for. The fault was traced back to the great mirror of the telescope, which had been improperly polished during production. To fix the problem, a rescue mission with a team of astronauts was dispatched. Hubble was fitted with 'glasses' to rectify its short-sightedness and transformed into an astronomical powerhouse that has since produced hundreds of iconic and scientifically valuable photos.
    One of the most memorable photos in astronomy is the Hubble Space Telescope's first deep-field photograph. The image, which consists of a mind-boggling number of distant galaxies set against a blanket of black, was created from Hubble's scans of a small region in the constellation Ursa Major in December 1995.
    Even though the Hubble was amazing, something was still missing. Astronomers were inspired by this timeless vision to start designing a new mission to investigate the early universe - one that would go back even further in time, to 300 million years after the Big Bang, when the first galaxies emerged. To accomplish so, the world's largest observatory, far larger than Hubble's 2.4 m mirror, was needed.
    Scientists found their answers in the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) – a huge spacecraft with a 6.5 m segmented primary mirror that promised a whole raft of new discoveries. Excited by the NGST's potential, US astronomers quickly designated it as a top priority for space-based missions in the 2000 Decadal Survey, a wishlist of future projects compiled by the US National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Pegged for launch in 2007 at a cost of $1bn, in 2002 it was renamed the James Webb Space Telescope after the former NASA administrator.
    However, all the excitement and those dreams of a new telescope to study the evolution of galaxies, how stars and planets form and the answer of our creation quickly turned into a nightmare.
    The project's budget escalated to the point where the US House of Representatives sought to terminate it outright in 2011, only for the troubled project to be saved at the last minute by scientists, the public, and the media. When the expense was poised to break the $8 billion barrier in 2018, the US Congress had to vote to provide it with more funds.
    The JWST is now exactly $9.7 billion in cost. This is because, like the Hubble was rescued by the scientists, with the James Webb Space Telescope, rescue missions are impossible and therefore no failures are allowed. Part of the reason behind those skyrocketing costs was building a telescope of its enormous size.
    Mark McCaughrean, senior advisor for science and exploration at the European Space Agency and interdisciplinary scientist at the JWST science working group, told Space.com that, James Webb Space Telescope is a prototype and with prototypes, you can always have something that goes wrong. That's why JWST is so expensive. Because we've spent two decades building and testing every single piece a million ways to do everything to make sure it doesn't have problems.

  • How James Webbs Mirrors MUST Work

    16:47

    How James Webb's Mirrors MUST Work Claim your SPECIAL OFFER for MagellanTV here: Start your free trial TODAY so you can watch 'Planet Hunting with the James Webb Space Telescope' and the rest of MagellanTV’s science collection:

    Getting JWST's complex optical system to work is critical. But is Webb really more powerful than Hubble? And why does Webb use hexagons? Why are there black borders around the mirrors? How do the mirrors survive the cold? And why are JWST's mirrors gold?

    00:00 Webb's Optical System
    03:30 Magellan TV
    04:15 Webb vs. Hubble's Resolution
    06:40 How Webb Avoids Stray Light
    07:34 Golden Beryllium Mirrors
    09:52 Why Hexagons?
    10:40 How Webb Avoids Hubble's Mistake
    11:47 Mirror Deployment, Alignment, and Phasing
    14:32 Instrument Phasing and Calibration

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  • How NASA’s Webb Telescope Will Transform Our Place in the Universe

    14:55

    NASA's James Webb Space Telescope is the most powerful telescope in the history of humanity, and one of the most ambitious engineering projects ever attempted. It will witness the birth of stars and galaxies at the edge of time and probe alien skies for signs of life. In this new documentary from Quanta, JWST’s lead scientists and engineers discuss what inspired the telescope, how it was built, the extraordinary challenges it will face upon launch, and its potential discoveries.

    Read the feature article at Quanta:

    Quanta Magazine is an editorially independent publication supported by the Simons Foundation.

  • What Elon Musk & Scientists really think of the potential of NASA James Webb Space Telescope!

    8:33

    SpaceX Starship SN
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    Why the World’s Astronomers Are Very, Very Anxious
    Right Now?
    After years of delays, the James Webb telescope will finally lift off from a European launch site in French Guiana on its way to a point a million miles on the other side of the moon in a few hours.
    If successful, the $10-billions machine will transform the arena of space exploration, potentially rewriting our understanding of the early days of our universe — much like its predecessor, NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope.
    But to be honest, the telescope is endowed with the hopes and trepidations of a generation of astronomers.
    Why’s that?
    Let’s find out more in today’s episode of Great SpaceX!

    What do astronomers eat for breakfast on the day that their $10 billion telescope launched into space? Their fingernails.
    Indeed! You did not hear wrong!!
    Dr. Rieke admits her fingers will be crossed on the morning of Dec. 24 when she tunes in for the launch of the James Webb Space Telescope. For 20 years, she has been working to design and build an ultrasensitive infrared camera that will live aboard the spacecraft.
    And now, she expressed her concern, “you work for years and it all goes up in a puff of smoke”.
    Sounds too pessimistic!
    However, it is natural to have a possibility of failure. There will always be that window, no matter how many precautions are taken.
    There is plenty to be anxious about.
    The Ariane 5 rocket that is carrying the spacecraft has seldom failed to deliver its payload to orbit. But even if it survives the launch, the telescope will have a long way to go.
    What Elon Musk & Scientists really think of the potential of NASA James Webb Space Telescope!
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  • Neil deGrasse Tyson Explains Space Telescopes

    16:23

    Thanks to Storyblocks Video for sponsoring this video!

    How did the first space telescope arrive in orbit? Neil deGrasse Tyson and comic co-host Chuck Nice explore the literal rise of telescopes from Earth into space. You’ll find out what telescopes were called before they were called telescopes. Discover more about early refractive telescopes and their issues with chromatic aberration. Then, you’ll hear how Sir Isaac Newton came in and changed the telescope industry for good by inventing the reflecting telescope. Neil explains why Earth’s atmosphere prevents you from seeing clear images from the ground. Take a trip through the space telescope hall of fame as we discuss the Hubble Space Telescope, the Spitzer Space Telescope, the Chandra X-ray Observatory, the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, and the soon to be launched James Webb Space Telescope. Lastly, you’ll learn why Hubble might be the most successful science instrument of all time. All that, plus, Neil shares why the different bands of light act as different dialects for the language of the universe.

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  • Neil deGrasse Tysons Top 10 StarTalk Explainers of 2021

    13:44

    Happy New Year! Another year of Neil deGrasse Tyson explaining things we never knew we didn't know is in the books, and we're recapping the top 10 right here. Want more? The playlist of all 10 full Explainer videos is right here for your science-ing pleasure:

    This year, we dove into hot topics, like the James Webb Space Telescope and hot objects like meteors and the sun. Neil also explains some of our fan-favorite curiosities like alien visitations and Earth's rotation. Be sure to subscribe and turn on alerts so you don't miss our weekly Explainers in 2022!

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    00:00 - Introduction
    00:05 - The James Webb Space Telescope
    01:08 - Meteor Showers
    02:18 - “Weightless” in Space
    03:43 - The Spacetime Continuum
    04:58 - The Metric System
    06:07 - Electric Cars
    08:05 - Alien Visitations
    10:02 - Earth’s Rotation
    11:07 - The Color of the Sun
    12:15 - The Length of Day

  • James Webb is Good.. But This Telescope is 100x Better

    9:06

    It has only been a few weeks since NASA launched the James Webb Space Telescope, but talks of its successor have already begun, so let's get into it! Stay tuned and subscribe to Ayla Star.

    #space #jswt #jameswbb

  • How The Golden Eye Of The James Webb Space Telescope Will See The Edge Of The Universe

    7:48

    NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope is a time machine to the early universe, which uses massive golden mirrors to capture ancient light. The results will likely rewrite and expand our textbooks for years to come.
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    An international project like this that has countless “firsts” takes time, but the painstaking effort to design, construct and test Webb’s optical system will be worth the wait. Overnight, the eye of the telescope will revolutionize our understanding of the cosmos and be set loose on the biggest questions in astronomy.

    The astronomical community was after something that hadn’t been observed before… the early universe. The first stars and galaxies started to form 100 to 250 million years after the Big Bang, around 13.6 billion years ago. Because the universe is expanding, actually the light from the early universe gets stretched into the infrared and that's called a cosmological redshift. It's this cosmological redshift that Webb's optics will be hunting for, to uncover the story of the early universe. Infrared light can pass through dust in the universe. And so it allows us to peer through dust clouds and see, for example, stellar nurseries.

    No other telescope today has the collecting power and sensitivity that NASA’s JWST has to lift the veil on the universe’s secrets. The James Webb Space telescope is sensitive enough that if there were a bumblebee at the distance of the moon, we would be able to detect it. The telescope’s core superpowers come from its advanced optical system.

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    Webb vs Hubble Telescope

    “Webb often gets called the replacement for Hubble, but we prefer to call it a successor. After all, Webb is the scientific successor to Hubble; its science goals were motivated by results from Hubble.”

    The Five Big Ways the James Webb Telescope Will Help Astronomers Understand the Universe

    “The further into space scientists can look, the further back in time they can observe a galaxy. Webb, being the farthest seeing telescope yet, can root out the youngest looking galaxies humanity can observe.”

    The Webb Space Telescope Will Rewrite Cosmic History. If It Works.

    “The James Webb Space Telescope has been designed to answer many of the core questions that have animated astronomers over the past half-century. With a $10 billion price tag, it is one of the most ambitious engineering initiatives ever attempted. But for it to achieve its potential — nothing less than to rewrite the history of the cosmos and reshape humanity’s position within it — a lot of things have to work just right.”

    The $11-billion Webb telescope aims to probe the early Universe

    “If everything goes to plan, Webb will remake astronomy by peering at cosmic phenomena such as the most distant galaxies ever seen, the atmospheres of far-off planets and the hearts of star-forming regions swaddled in dust. Roughly 100 times more powerful than its predecessor, the Hubble Space Telescope, which has transformed our understanding of the cosmos over the past 31 years, Webb will reveal previously hidden aspects of the Universe.”

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  • Neil deGrasse Tyson Celebrates the Hubble Space Telescopes 30th Anniversary

    10:00

    Neil deGrasse Tyson celebrates the 30th anniversary of the Hubble Space Telescope launch with comic co-host Chuck Nice and Jennifer Wiseman, astrophysicist and senior project scientist for the Hubble Space Telescope. You'll learn why Hubble offers a different perspective being above Earth's atmosphere compared to ground-based telescopes.

    Find out why the size of the space shuttle dictated the size of Hubble itself. You'll learn how the Earth can sometimes be in the way when Hubble is trying to glimpse the cosmos. Lastly, discover more about Hubble's extended lifespan. Usually space telescopes are meant to last 3-5 years so you'll find out how Hubble has been able to stay in orbit for 30! All that, plus, we reminisce on the beautiful imagery we’ve received from Hubble.

    This episode originally aired April 13, 2020.

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  • James Webb Telescope Is FINALLY Proving Stephen Hawkings Black Hole Theory!

    11:27

    Stephen Hawking was one of the greatest scientists of our time! Even though he is
    gone, his legacy leaves on in the world of astrophysics and science at large. As we
    approach the fourth anniversary of this legend's death, the James Webb Space
    Telescope is about to prove yet one of Hawking's theories, the Black Hole theory, right!
    What is Hawking's Black Hole theory, why is it controversial, and how does the theory
    affect you personally? Join us as we dive into how the new James Webb Telescope will
    finally prove Stephen Hawking Black Hole theory!
    Black holes are one of the most fascinating features in space, and they attract the
    attention of many astronomers! From their creation to their features, black holes are
    mesmerizing! What are black holes anyway? A black hole is a region in space where
    the pulling force of gravity is so strong that light is not able to escape. Black holes have
    strong gravity forces because matter inside them has been pressed into a tiny space.
    Since no light can escape, you can't see black holes, and neither can most telescopes!
    However, space telescopes with special instruments can help find black holes. They
    can observe the behavior of materials and stars that are very close to black holes.
    Black holes can come in a range of sizes, but there are three main types of black holes.
    They are classified based on their mass and size. The smallest ones are known as
    primordial black holes. Scientists say this type of black hole is as small as a single atom
    but has the mass of a large mountain! The most common type of medium-sized black
    hole is called stellar. The mass of a stellar black hole can be up to 20 times greater than
    the mass of the Sun and can fit inside a ball with a diameter of about 10 miles! You will
    find dozens of stellar-mass black holes within the Milky Way galaxy.
    The largest black holes are called supermassive. This type has masses greater than 1
    million suns combined and would fit inside a ball with a diameter about the size of the
    solar system. Every large galaxy contains a supermassive black hole at its center. The
    supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way galaxy is called Sagittarius A. It
    has a mass equal to about 4 million suns and would fit inside a ball with a diameter
    about the size of the Sun.
    How do black holes come about? Well, if we are talking about primordial black holes,
    those were formed in the early universe, soon after the Big Bang. But stellar black holes
    form when the center of a very massive star collapses in upon itself. This collapse also
    causes a supernova, or an exploding star, that blasts part of the star into space.
    Scientists think supermassive black holes formed at the same time as the galaxy they
    are in. The size of the supermassive black hole is related to the size and mass of the
    galaxy it is in.
    What happens when you are near a black hole? That might never happen because the
    closes black hole to us is far away enough that you will never get near it. New black
    holes are found all the time, but the currently closest one to us is about 1,500 light years
    away from us! It was nicknamed the Unicorn and is located in the Monoceros
    constellation. However, imagine you somehow stray close enough to a black hole. It will
    pull you in, and lots of things will happen to you at the same time. You're ultimately
    going to get torn apart by the extreme gravity! No material, especially fleshy human
    bodies, could survive intact. So once you pass beyond the edge of the event horizon,
    you're done. There's no getting out. Even if you were still alive, you'd have to travel
    faster than the speed of light to escape, which is impossible!
    There is much to learn about black holes, including testing one of Stephen Hawking's
    controversial theories on dark matter in the universe. However, before scientists can
    test Hawking's theory, they need a powerful telescope that can see beyond all existing
    ones. This is where the James Webb Space Telescope, JWST, comes in!
    Decades in the making and costing almost 10 billion dollars, the JWST eventually
    launched to space late last year. The whole science world held its breath as the space
    telescope blasted off from French Guyana. It was so complicated that too much
    vibration during the launch would have caused damage and doomed the whole
    operation! Because of its massive size, the engineers had to fold it up in several places
    to fit into the launch rocket! The reflecting mirror, made up of smaller hexagonal gold-
    plated mirrors, had to be folded. If not, the six-meter structure would not have fit into any
    existing rocket! The heat shield also had to be folded and is even more delicate while
    being large! It contains five layers that must be set to align perfectly, or the whole setup
    won't work. Each of these layers, the size of a tennis court, is made from a special
    material.

  • Understanding The James Webb Space Telescope | Science Matters Special Episode | 100K Sub Special!

    28:17

    This week marks a very special moment in which the Origins Podcast passed 100,000 subscribers! In celebration of this, we've brought back Science Matters for a special episode to discuss the science of the James Webb Space Telescope. Thank you to everyone who has supported the Origins Project, both the podcast and the foundation as a whole. We have an excellent line-up of guests planned for 2022 and can't wait to share our newest episodes with you!

    You can show your support and access exclusive bonus content at

    The Origins Podcast, a production of The Origins Project Foundation, features in-depth conversations with some of the most interesting people in the world about the issues that impact all of us in the 21st century. Host, theoretical physicist, lecturer, and author, Lawrence M. Krauss, will be joined by guests from a wide range of fields, including science, the arts, and journalism. The topics discussed on The Origins Podcast reflect the full range of the human experience - exploring science and culture in a way that seeks to entertain, educate, and inspire.

  • James Webb Space Telescope: Humanitys Cosmic Gamble | EXPLAINED

    6:16

    James Webb Space Telescope: Humanity's Cosmic Gamble | EXPLAINED

    #JamesWebbSpaceTelescope #EyeInTheSky #NASA #RepublicTV

    After an almost 15-year delay, the James Webb Space telescope is all set to become the Earth’s most powerful ever space-based observatory, and what this means is that we are going to have an eye in the sky that is going to help us see what’s out there to a greater degree than ever before, but also that we are going to be able to look back through time, to the first light and closer in to the Big Bang almost 13.8 billion light-years ago.

    The reason for this extraordinary capability is because NASA, the European Space Agency ESA and the Canadian Space Agency did not skimp with their plans and ambitions for this mission. To put this into perspective, the James Webb Space Telescope is planned to succeed the iconic Hubble Space Telescope, but just as Hubble was thought to be powerful beyond measure at the time in was launched in 1990, James Webb changes the game completely.

    For one, while both are reflective telescopes, i.e. they have concave mirrors that focus the light from the heavens into their instruments, whereas Hubble’s mirror has a diameter of 2.4m, slightly more than the height of a really tall human being, the James Webb Space Telescope’s mirror is an enormous 6.5 m in diameter.

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  • James Webb Telescope May Detect Artificial Lights On Proxima b

    11:10

    #eldddir #eldddir_space #eldddir_earth #eldddir_future #eldddir_tech #eldddir_jupiter #eldddir_mars #eldddir_rockets

  • James Webb Space Telescope launches! | The Royal Society

    50

    #shorts
    On 25 December 2021 the James Webb Space Telescope launches. ???? Often called the successor to Hubble, Webb will gaze into areas of time and space never seen before. #UnfoldTheUniverse #JWST

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  • James Webb Space Telescope: Secondary Mirror Deployment - Mission Control Live

    1:27:15

    James Webb Space Telescope experts give real-time updates on deployment of the telescope’s secondary mirror. The secondary mirror is one of the most important pieces of equipment on the telescope, and is essential to the success of the mission.

    When deployed, this mirror will sit out in front of Webb's hexagonal primary mirrors, which form an iconic honeycomb-like shape. This smaller circular mirror serves an important role in collecting light from Webb’s 18 primary mirrors into a focused beam. That beam is then sent down into the tertiary and fine steering mirrors, and finally to Webb's four powerful scientific instruments.

    About the mirrors:
    Where is Webb?:

    Credit: NASA

  • FULL STREAM: NASAs James Webb Space Telescope launches

    2:12:46

    NASA’s long-delayed James Webb Space Telescope, a $10 billion marvel of engineering and scientific ambition, launched into deep space on Dec. 25 from French Guiana. Read more: Subscribe to The Washington Post on YouTube:

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  • Fingers Crossed for the James Webb Space Telescope - Sixty Symbols

    15:06

    Professor Mike Merrifield discusses the James Webb Telescope, which is due to launch soon.
    More links and info below ↓ ↓ ↓

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  • James Webb Telescope Terrifying Discovery Before Big Bang Will Change Everything!

    8:46

    How did this universe begin? Were we alone in this huge cosmos before the
    Big Bang? Just some of the numerous questions that scientists have been
    pondering for years, like this one: They planned a slew of projects and
    missions to gather as much information as possible about our origins and the
    universe we live in, but no technology existed to do it. The James Webb
    Space Telescope, a large telescope was then built by scientists and is
    expected to help us understand the origins of the cosmos.
    The projected Christmas Day 2021 launch of the $10 billion James Webb
    Space Telescope was both exhilarating and worrisome for the thousands of
    scientists, engineers, managers, and support staff who worked on the project
    for almost a decade. The scientific potential of the JWST is vast, and it could
    provide answers to some of the most fundamental problems in the universe's
    evolution. But the real question is, can this JWST achieve it? Is it possible that
    James Webb will be able to see thousands of light-years into the future? We'll
    be discussing this in today's video.
    But before we begin, kindly subscribe to this channel, like this video, and
    enable the notification feature If you haven't already. Come on, let's get
    started!
    A new era of astronomy is just around the corner, provided everything goes
    according to plan. After a nail-biting launch on Christmas Day, the James
    Webb Space Telescope (JWST) has launched its mission to capture the birth
    of the universe. James Webb Space Observatory will be NASA's largest and
    most powerful space research telescope, exploring the cosmos to learn more
    about the universe's history, from its Big Bang to the birth of alien planets
    and beyond. The observatory will cost $10 billion. It is a part of NASA's Great
    Observatories, which comprise the Hubble Space Telescope and other
    massive space telescopes that can stare into the universe.
    One of JWST's primary goals is the exploration of galaxy formation more than
    13.5 billion years before the Big Bang, a hitherto unobserved period of
    cosmic history that formed our universe as we know it today. According to
    NASA, JWST was built to observe a time in the universe's history that has not
    yet been observed before, rather than to study the origins of the cosmos.
    We prefer to think of the JWST as a successor to the Hubble Space
    Telescope, rather than a replacement. More than 30 years after its launch,
    the Hubble Space Telescope has provided us with breathtaking views of the
    universe and countless scientific discoveries. It is our hope and expectation
    that it will continue for many more years to come.
    However, the telescope's 2.4-meter diameter mirror, compared to ground-
    based telescopes, limits its sensitivity and ability to observe the faintest
    objects. This is a limitation. Even though Hubble can observe infrared light, it
    cannot access the light wavelengths from the very first stars and galaxies.
    Hubble has some capability to observe infrared light. JWST, on the other
    hand, will be able to do this task. For the first time, we may even be able to
    observe stars that were generated from primordial material from the Big
    Bang.
    Knowing when and how the first stars originated soon after the Big Bang is
    an important scientific subject and one of the key science aims of JWST.
    Carbon, silicon, and gold, which are essential to life and contemporary
    technology, were produced in the early stars, but how they did so is still a
    mystery to us.
    As a result, the design of this observatory has been influenced greatly by the
    fact that it needs to be extremely cool to reduce the amount of unwanted
    background light.
    It's not just the initial stars and galaxies that will be studied by JWST.
    Researchers from all over the world can apply for time at this observatory,
    which is designed to serve a variety of purposes. Infrared observation will
    allow JWST to see through the clouds of dust that enshroud very young stars,
    which are impenetrable to the visible light of the telescope.
    That means it will be able to see directly into star-forming regions,
    something Hubble hasn't been able to do yet. The findings will provide light
    on the formation of stars and the systems of planets that orbit them as a
    result of the collapse of dust and gas clouds.
    Webb will be able to see further into the universe than Hubble, and it will be
    far more sensitive. This will allow Webb to go back much further in time and
    view the earliest galaxies that formed in the early universe, according to

  • NASAs Hubble telescope successor The James Webb Space Telescope ready to take flight | WION

    3:09

    The James Webb space telescope, the successor of NASA's Hubble telescope is all set to take the space flight. It is the most expensive and powerful space observatory.

    #Hubble #JamesWebb #NASA

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  • Neil deGrasse Tyson Explains Meteor Showers

    17:52

    What is a meteor shower? On this explainer, Neil deGrasse Tyson and comic co-host Chuck Nice break down how these nighttime spectacles come to be and when you can see them in action.

    Why do meteor showers show up a the same time each year? What’s up with that? We discuss the Geminid and the Perseid meteor showers and what is difference between them. How much space debris does Earth plow through every day? Is a meteor hitting Earth just like a bug on a windshield? We discuss near-Earth objects and how comet’s tails give us a light show. There such thing as a meteor storm? What’s a bolide? Plus, we walk you through how to have your best meteor shower viewing experience. All that and more on another StarTalk explainer!

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    Science meets pop culture on StarTalk! Astrophysicist & Hayden Planetarium director Neil deGrasse Tyson, his comic co-hosts, guest celebrities & scientists discuss astronomy, physics, and everything else about life in the universe. Keep Looking Up!

    #StarTalk #NeildeGrasseTyson

  • LIVE: James Webb Space Telescope launches from French Guiana

    2:1:50

    The long-awaited James Webb Space Telescope launches from French Guiana on a mission to find the first galaxies and forming planetary systems.

    #Live #JWST #Reuters #Space

  • 100 times more powerful than Hubble, Webb space telescope to search for first light after Big Bang

    3:57

    At a cost of $10 billion, the James Webb Space Telescope is the biggest and most expensive science instrument to be sent to space. Mark Strassmann reports hundreds of things will have to go right in the weeks after launch before the telescope can take a single image.

    Each weekday morning, CBS Mornings” co-hosts Gayle King, Tony Dokoupil and Nate Burleson bring you the latest breaking news, smart conversation and in-depth feature reporting. CBS Mornings airs weekdays at 7 a.m. on CBS and 8 a.m. ET on CBSN.


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  • Live: James Webb Space Telescope launches on Christmas Day

    1:24:31

    The #JamesWebbSpaceTelescope, which astronomers hope will herald a new era of discovery, launches on #Christmas Day at the launch site in Kourou, French Guiana. After three delays due to some minor issues, the Webb telescope follows in the footsteps of the legendary Hubble, but will orbit the sun, rather than the Earth. It is hoped that the device will help answer fundamental questions about the universe by peering back in time 13 billion years.

  • Revolutionary James Webb telescope blasts off into space | DW News

    5:59

    A revolutionary telescope has been launched into space, marking the beginning of a new era of scientific exploration.
    The James Webb telescope - named after a former head of NASA - lifted off on board a rocket from the European Space Agency's launch base in French Guiana. The launch is the culmination of several decades of work by European, Canadian and US space agencies. It's being hailed as the world's most powerful telescope.
    The James Webb is expected to beam back new clues about the origins of the universe.
    The new eye in the sky is the successor to the legendary Hubble space telescope. Its six and a half meter mirror makes the Hubble look tiny by comparison.
    The James Webb, the biggest telescope ever sent into space, is made up of 18 segments plated with a razor-thin gold coating. The instrument has to be folded up to fit into the rocket’s nose-cone. The telescope will scan the heavens using long-wave infra-red light.
    Astronomers will be able to look back towards the Big Bang nearly 14 billion years ago. Back to the origins of the universe and the formation of the first stars and galaxies.
    The new telescope could also prove decisive in the search for extra-terrestrial life. It can probe so-called exo-planets. Nearly 5000 have already been discovered orbiting distant suns. The James Webb will monitor how exo-planets move in conjunction with the stars.
    Transits like these mean it can take a virtual fingerprint of the atmosphere of these remote worlds – and assess for the first time whether they hold the building blocks of life. Before the research can begin, there will be a delicate two-week operation in which the telescope has to unfold itself.
    Never before has a satellite been launched with so many moving parts, and nothing can be allowed to go wrong. And it will be six months after the launch, before the telescope is ready to gather its first scientific data.


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    #NASA #JamesWebbTelescope #Astronomy

  • James Webb Space Telescope: How will it work? - BBC News

    4:39

    The BBC’s science editor Rebecca Morelle on how the observatory hopes to capture the history of our Universe.

    The $10bn James Webb telescope has left Earth on its mission to show the first stars to light up the Universe.

    The observatory was lifted skyward by an Ariane rocket from the Kourou spaceport in French Guiana.

    Its flight to orbit lasted just under half an hour, with a signal confirming a successful outcome picked up by a ground antenna at Malindi in Kenya.

    Webb, named after one of the architects of the Apollo Moon landings, is the successor to the Hubble telescope.

    Engineers working with the US, European and Canadian space agencies have built the new observatory to be 100 times more powerful, however.
    Please subscribe HERE

    #BBCNews

  • MALCO - Neil DeGrasse Tyson on James Webb Space Telescope on Real Time With Bill Maher

    3:11

    MALCO - Neil DeGrasse Tyson on James Webb Space Telescope on Real Time With Bill Maher

    I emailed the video to Neil on his website's contact me section and he replied:

    Thank you, Heath, for sharing the link. I am always charmed when themes of the cosmos influence the creativity of artists.
    Best,
    -NDTyson


    soundcloud.com/malco-3

    video by Spock

  • James Webb Space Telescope launch to mark new chapter in space research

    1:50

    Astronomers and enthusiasts get a nice gift this Christmas in the form of a three-story tall space telescope.

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