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On route 7 into the heart of Patagonia | DW Documentary

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  • On route 7 into the heart of Patagonia | DW Documentary

    42:31

    A trip along Chile’s National Route 7, the Carretera Austral, takes us into the stunning wilderness of Patagonia - a place that many German emigrants chose as their new home almost a century ago.

    The Carretera Austral is straddled by mountain ranges, primeval forests, fjords, volcanoes and a huge ice field. It has taken decades to carve its way through the almost impassable terrain - even now a lot of traffic is forced to take a detour across the border into Argentina. The military dictator Augusto Pinochet made the construction of the road a national priority in the 1970s, sending thousands of soldiers to the region to work under the most adverse conditions. One of the last surviving members of Pinochet's junta, former military police chief Rodolfo Stange, talks about the road’s strategic importance for the regime.

    German marine biologist Vreni Häussermann tells us about a catastrophe in one of the Patagonian fjords - an event that underlines how economic expansion along the route has adversely affected the natural environment in southern Chile. On our journey we meet descendants of German emigrants who found a new home in Patagonia’s remote vastness after the First World War. An insight into the past and present of this unique region.

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  • The Patagonia Expedition - Full Documentary

    1:12:58

    In this Patagonia Documentary I take you on one of my most memorable trips through Patagonia from north to south filled with loads of adventures along the way
    ➸ My Patagonia Guides:

    All music used in this Video was provided by Epidemic Sound. Use the following link to get a free 30 day trial (free music for your videos with no obligation to sign up after!):


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    On an 8 week lasting trip Kristin and I are exploring the best Patagonia has to offer. This Documentary covers all of our adventures from Bariloche in the north all the way down to Torres del Paine. Besides trekking in the most beautiful places we hitchhiked the Carretera Austral, explored a number of impressive glaciers and met locals who told us more about life in this region.

    Please use these chapters to navigate through the video:
    00:00 Intro
    01:37 About this Trip & Itinerary
    02:43 Bariloche
    09:45 The Carretera Austral
    11:22 Chaiten & Puyuhuapi
    18:20 Cerro Castillo & Puerto Rio Tranquilo
    25:46 Exploradores Glacier & Villa O’Higgins
    33:21 Border Crossing & El Chalten
    41:38 The Huemul Circuit Trek
    51:00 The Perito Moreno Glacier
    53:00 Torres del Paine Full Circuit Trek
    1:05:25 Day Tours in Torres del Paine
    1:11:08 Outtakes

    You can use this Patagonia Documentary to plan your own trip to Patagonia, on my website you’ll find all essential information needed.

    Following I list all places & things to do in Patagonia as seen in this video:
    - Bariloche
    - Nahuel Huapi National Park
    - Chocolateria Rapa Nui
    - Cerro Campanario
    - San Martin de los Andes
    - Circuito de los 7 Lagos
    - Villa La Angostura
    - Center of Bariloche
    - Villa Catedral
    - Cerro Catedral
    - Refugio Frey
    - Refugio Otto Meiling
    - Cerro Tronador
    - Pampa Linda
    - Glaciar Castaño Overo
    - Puyuhuapi
    - Queulat National Park / Parque Nacional Queulat
    - Bosque Encanta
    - Coyhaique / Coihaique
    - Cerro Castillo / Villa Cerro Castillo
    - Puerto Rio Tranquilo
    - Marble Caves / Capillas de Marmol
    - Lago General Carrera
    - O'Higgins Glacier / Bernardo O’Higgins National Park
    - Southern Patagonian Ice Field
    - Candelario Mancilla
    - Villa O'Higgins
    - O’Higgins Lake / Lago O’Higgins or Lago San Martin
    - Cerro Torre and Laguna Torre
    - Monte Fitz Roy and Laguna de los tres / laguna sucia
    - Lago del Desierto
    - El Chalten
    - Puerto Montt
    - Hornopiren
    - Pumalin Park
    - Chaiten
    - Villa Santa Lucia
    - La Junta
    - Puyuhuapi
    - Queulat National Park / Parque Nacional Queulat
    - Queulat Glacier / ventisquero queulat (colgante)
    - Perito Moreno Glacier
    - Torres del Paine
    - Huemul Circuit

    ===

    MY CAMERA EQUIPMENT
    ▸ Cam1:Sony RX 100 V
    ▸ Cam2:Sony A7 II
    ▸ Cam3: GoPro
    ▸ Drone1: Mavic Pro
    ▸ Drone2: Phantom 3 Pro
    ▸ Joby Gorillapod
    ▸ Audio Recorder: Zoom H2n
    ▸ SDHC Memory Card
    ▸ Waterproof Memory Card Case
    ▸ Backpack Osprey Farpoint 40
    ▸ 3 Axis Gimbal Stabilizer

    The Patagonian Expedition is a 95% self funded video documentary project following my trip in 2012/2013. Our aim is to show you the beauty of the rather unknown parts in Patagonia alongside with the famous spots.

    Beside beautiful landscape you can expect loads of information and our personal experiences and struggles along the way.

    The whole trip was executed over the course of 2 months using mostly local transport such as busses, cars and trucks. A big thank you goes to Lufthansa for providing the flights into and out of South America in their new Premium Economy Class!

    --- my travel equipment ---
    insurance
    packing list
    Online Language Course

    ===
    MY HOTEL & HOSTEL RECOMMENDATIONS


    DISCLAIMER: All Links provided marked with „▸“ are Affiliate Links for products, which means that if you click on one of the product links, I’ll receive a small commission (but the price for you stays the same). This helps support the channel and allows me to continue to make videos like this. Thank you for the support!
    ===

    Follow me:

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  • From Rio to Lima – Transoceânica, the worlds longest bus journey | DW Documentary

    42:30

    From Brazil’s Rio de Janeiro to Lima, Peru, the world’s longest bus ride takes 100 hours and spans 6,300 kilometers. Hop aboard for an unforgettable journey along the South America’s Transoceânica highway!

    The first leg of the journey starts on the Atlantic shore, exploring the Costa Verde, one of the most beautiful coastlines in the country. But it’s not long until the bus crosses into Mato Grasso, the agricultural heart of Brazil, where soy fields and sugar cane plantations dominate the landscape.

    The region is also the home of the rodeo, a regular event in the villages along the Transoceânica route. We even find female rodeo riders here in spite of all the cultural prejudices.

    Parts 2-5:
    Part 2:
    Part 3:
    Part 4:
    Part 5:
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  • Blue Heart Full Film | The Fight for Europe’s Last Wild Rivers

    44:00

    The Balkan Peninsula is home to the last wild rivers in Europe. However, a deluge of more than 3,000 proposed hydropower developments threaten to destroy the culture and ecology of this forgotten region. Blue Heart, now in its first digital release, documents the battle for the largest undammed river in Europe, Albania’s Vjosa, the effort to save the endangered Balkan lynx in Macedonia, and the women of Kruščica, Bosnia and Herzegovina, who are spearheading a months-long, 24/7 protest to protect their community’s only source of drinking water.

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  • St. Helena - a remote island in the Atlantic | DW Documentary

    26:02

    Every third week, a British Royal Mail ship begins its journey from Cape Town to Saint Helena, the remote island in the Atlantic where Napoleon was once in exile.

    It’s like the end of the world in the middle of the Atlantic. Five days, with a northwesterly course, and only then do the sheer black cliffs appear in front of RMS St. Helena. The island’s 4500 residents are often waiting impatiently for the ship’s arrival and panic if the schedule changes. Director Thomas Denzel and his team went on the journey to Saint Helena and met the people living on the island. Many of the residents are descendants of people who were sent into exile there by the British crown - the most famous among them, the French Emperor Napoleon. This is a report about life at the end of the world, loneliness, unique vegetation, and a very special journey.
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  • Motorcycle Ride Through Patagonia In 2020 | Mark On A Bike

    30:15

    In the premiere episode of STORIES, Mark Wallace rides south to Coyhaique, Chile to meet Ayleen Martinez and explore the Carretera Austral. Mark and Ayleen visit a few small towns along the way. They stop in Rio Tranquilo to hike the Glaciar Exploradores and view the Marble Caves. They cross the Andes in Patagonia National Park and have an unexpected turn of events in Argentina.

    LIVE Q&A WITH MARK AND AYLEEN (BONUS VIDE0)


    AYLEEN MARTINEZ




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    CHAPTERS

    0:00 - Intro
    0:54 - This Story is about Patagonia
    1:45 - Puerto Murta to Puerto Montt and The Waterway Route
    2:16 - My First Ferry Crossing
    2:50 - Waiting for the Ferry in Hornopirén, Chile
    4:08 - Hornopirén to Coleta Gonzal to Chaitén
    4:30 - Riding on the Carretera Austral to Coyhaique, Chile
    7:02 - Meeting Ayleen Martinez in Coyhaique, Chile
    7:37 - Puerto Aysen, Chile Day Trip
    8:44 - Riding to Puerto Murta, Chile and seeing Huemul
    10:09 - Visiting General Carrera Lake at night
    11:05 - Eating at The End of the World Puerto Murta
    11:27 - Riding to Rio Tranquilo, Chile
    12:02 - A Day of Rest in Rio Tranquilo, Chile
    13:30 - Early Morning in Rio Tranquilo, Chile
    14:36 - Driving from Rio Tranquilo to Exploradores Glacier
    15:08 - Hiking Exploradores Glacier and taking photos
    16:06 - Photos of the Exploradores Glacier Ice Caves
    17:10 - Boat Ride to the Marble Caves in Rio Tranquilo, Chile
    18:10 - Marble Cathedral, Chile
    19:40 - Rio Tranquilo to Puerto Bertrand, Chile
    20:05 - Cochrane, Chile
    20:53 - The Route from Chile to Argentina
    21:29 - Crossing Patagonia National Park on Motorcycles
    21:53 - Guanaco in Patagonia National Park
    22:31 - Crossing the Border Chile to Argentina
    23:16 - Ayleen Martinez has a Motorcycle Malfunction
    24:36 - Ayleen Gets Bad News
    25:27 - Hotel and Dinner in Bajo Caracoles, Argentina
    26:37 - Saying Goodbye to Ayleen
    26:50 - The Ride to Ushuaia
    27:25 - Ushuaia, Argentina
    27:42 - The End of The Road and my weird experience
    28:41 - Stories Teaser

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  • Rumbo al corazón de la Patagonia | DW Documental

    42:31

    La ruta 7 de Chile, la carretera Austral, se adentra en la magnífica naturaleza patagónica, un territorio que los expatriados alemanes también eligieron como su nuevo hogar.

    Desde hace décadas, la carretera Austral se abre paso por la intransitable naturaleza del norte al sur de la Patagonia. La gente, que hasta entonces vivía aislada, de pronto estaba conectada a las modernas urbes, con consecuencias inciertas. Se dice que la carretera Austral une el centro de Chile con su extremo sur. Por tierra, solo se podía llegar por Argentina. En Chile, el camino estaba bloqueado por montañas escarpadas, bosques primigenios, amplios fiordos, volcanes y un enorme campo de hielo. En la década de 1960, el dictador militar Augusto Pinochet convirtió la construcción de esta carretera en una prioridad nacional. A sus órdenes, hasta 10.000 soldados de la construcción trabajaron en las condiciones más adversas. Uno de los últimos miembros aún con vida de la junta militar de Pinochet, Rodolfo Stange, antiguo jefe de Carabineros de Chile, habla sobre la importancia de la carretera para el régimen. La bióloga marina alemana Vreni Häussermann informa sobre una catástrofe en uno de los fiordos patagónicos. Particularmente este evento deja en evidencia con qué fuerza la expansión económica que trajo consigo la carretera afecta a la naturaleza del sur de Chile. El viaje también conduce hasta los descendientes de expatriados alemanes que encontraron un nuevo hogar en la lejana Patagonia después de la Primera Guerra Mundial. Los relatos de estas y otras personas dan una idea de la historia y el presente de esta región única.

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  • A train ride through American history – New Orleans to New York | DW Documentary

    42:32

    From New Orleans to New York, a train ride aboard the Crescent takes you on an extraordinary journey through American history.

    This train journey begins in the cradle of jazz - New Orleans. Three famous express trains start and terminate here: the City of New Orleans, the Sunset Limited and the Crescent, named after a New Orleans neighborhood. Every morning at 7 a.m. the Crescent sets off from New Orleans on its 1,377-mile journey from the Deep South to pulsating New York City.

    The distance is covered in around 31 hours. The route takes in various famous cities on the journey northeast. Birmingham, Alabama is also known as Bombingham after the attacks launched there by the Ku Klux Klan during the civil rights movement era between 1947 and 1965. The train then heads to Atlanta, the largest city in Georgia. Charlotte in North Carolina was named nearly 250 years ago after Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, the German wife of Britain’s King George III. Our next stop is Washington D.C., capital of the United States since 1800. Beforehand that honor had gone to a city further north: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where the Declaration of Independence was proclaimed in 1776. The final stop on this unique train journey is New York City aka the Big Apple.
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  • A train ride into Japans past | DW Documentary

    42:26

    Kyushu is said to be the wellspring of Japanese civilization. Yet few tourists visit the southernmost of Japan's main islands. This documentary contrasts modern Japanese cities with traditional customs in the countryside.

    The rail journey begins in Fukuoka - a city with a metro population of 2.5 million - and ends at the southern tip of the island, in the city of Ibusuki. As the train rolls along, it travels through time - and reveals the amazing diversity and contrasts of the most southerly of Japan's four main islands. The trip provides spectacular landscape views, as well as deep insight into a foreign culture, and its ancient traditions and modern lifestyles.

    In the West, Kyushu is one of the lesser-known regions in the Land of the Rising Sun. Even for the Japanese, the green, mountainous island is seen mostly as a holiday spot. Europeans rarely visit this part of the country - but there are plenty of restaurants and cafes that have names like Wolfgang, Bavaria, or Côte d'Azur. Travel guides say that these words sound European to Japanese.

    The family of the emperor, or Tenno, comes from Kyushu as well. This is also where the dynasties of the proud warrior class, the samurai, have their roots.
    And there are a number of active volcanoes on Kyushu. One of the most famous is Mount Aso. Its caldera - the cauldron-like hollow at the top -- has a circumference of about 120 kilometers.

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  • The Mennonites – a trip back in time | DW Documentary

    42:26

    Like the Amish in the US, the Mennonite Christian community shuns the modern world. Most Mennonites live in secluded, self-sufficient colonies. We get a rare glimpse into the life of a devout and isolated community.

    The Mennonites embrace isolation, which in their eyes helps protect them from the temptations of the modern world. At first glance, time seems to have stood still in the Mennonite colony in Belize, where people still travel by horse-drawn carriage and do without conveniences such as televisions and electricity. They still speak an old form of the German dialect Plattdeutsch. But modern life is slowly making inroads in Little Belize. Wilhelm, the community’s former doctor, was expelled for owning a mobile phone. Fearing that their community was being tainted, some more traditional members decided to found a new colony in a remote jungle in Peru, where they hope to live according to old customs and religious beliefs. For the first time ever, a camera team was granted access to one of Central and South America’s traditional Mennonite colonies.

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  • Kiribati: a drowning paradise in the South Pacific | DW Documentary

    42:56

    Climate change and rising sea levels mean the island nation of Kiribati in the South Pacific is at risk of disappearing into the sea.

    But the island’s inhabitants aren’t giving up. They are doing what they can to save their island from inundation. Can COP23 help make a difference?

    UN estimates indicate that Kiribati could disappear in just 30 or 40 years. That’s because the average elevation is less than two meters above sea level. And some of the knock-on effects of climate change have made the situation more difficult. Kiribati can hardly be surpassed in terms of charm and natural beauty. There are 33 atolls and one reef island – spread out over an area of 3.5 million square kilometers. All have white, sandy beaches and blue lagoons. Kiribati is the world’s largest state that consists exclusively of atolls. A local resident named Kaboua points to the empty, barren land around him and says, There used to be a large village here with 70 families. But these days, this land is only accessible at low tide. At high tide, it's all under water. Kaboua says that sea levels are rising all the time, and swallowing up the land. That’s why many people here build walls made of stone and driftwood, or sand or rubbish. But these barriers won't stand up to the increasing number of storm surges. Others are trying to protect against coastal erosion by planting mangrove shrubs or small trees. But another local resident, Vasiti Tebamare, remains optimistic. She works for KiriCAN, an environmental organization. Vasiti says: The industrialized countries -- the United States, China, and Europe -- use fossil fuels for their own ends. But what about us? Kiribati's government has even bought land on an island in Fiji, so it can evacuate its people in an emergency. But Vasiti and most of the other residents don't want to leave.
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  • Into Patagonia with Dakota Jones | Salomon TV

    19:25

    Stretching in an unbroken sweep of agitated geology, Patagonia spans a massive area of over a million square kilometres and yet is home to less than two million people. With no clear objective and no set goal, American Alpine Runner, Dakota Jones, journeys to Northern Patagonia to explore the culture and landscape of one of the most romanticised regions in the world. Travelling South along the famed Carretera Austral he discovers a people rich in smiles and a land littered with mountains and glaciers.

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  • Train across Turkey: the Dogu Express | DW Documentary

    25:57

    The Dogu Express travels across Turkey from Ankara to Kars. During the nostalgic journey, the train travels at about 70 kilometers an hour and needs a full day for the 1,310 kilometer trip. Young people especially are clamoring for tickets.

    A ticket costs less than 10 euros - but because they're in short supply - bootleg fares can be more than sixteen times that price. Sometimes it takes months to get a ticket. Almost 300,000 people use the train annually. This documentary joins young devotees of the Dogu, who prefer it to low-cost airlines. They say they make the journey to slow down. The young couple, Melve and Atalay, are no exception: They booked the trip to spend quality time with one another. Conductor Hüseyin Celik has been working the route for many years and still loves his job, and the views of the beautiful landscapes the train travels through.

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  • By train across Sri Lanka | DW Documentary

    42:31

    Asia’s most beautiful railway line? The “Main Line” cuts through tea plantations and jungle, then passes Buddhist temples and relicts of the British Empire.

    In the 19th century the British built a railway in what was then their colony of Ceylon. Their idea was to transport goods such as tea from the highlands to the port of Colombo. Today it’s mainly only locals and tourists who use the so-called Main Line. The route is considered one of the most picturesque in the whole of Asia.

    Our trip takes us from the capital, Colombo, to Ella in the highlands. Our first stop is one of the country’s largest elephant orphanages. And then on to Kandy, the former capital of the Singhalese kingdom. The city is home to the famous Temple of the Tooth, which is said to house the Buddha’s top left canine. The train then winds its way further up into the highlands. We watch tea pickers at work and go to a tea factory to discover where the aroma comes from. Nuwara Eliya is Sri Lanka’s highest town at an altitude of almost 1900 meters, where a racecourse still brings the colonial era back to life. The stations have also retained their own colonial charm: in 1901, a signaling system was set up to make the long journey safer. And those suffering from the altitude can catch their breath at the final stop, the spa in Ella.
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  • From Rio to Lima – Transoceânica, the worlds longest bus journey | DW Documentary

    42:31

    In the final installment of Transoceânica, the bus goes from the Andes to the Peruvian coastal desert and then on to the capital Lima.

    In Peru, roughly three times as many people, per capita, are killed on the roads as in Germany or France. Dangerous places in the Andes are often given names such as Death Bend or Jinxed Bend”, marking the spot where people have died. On the high plateau of the Andes, we find vicuñas, a type of lama, which produce the most expensive wool in the world. However, a parasite has recently decimated vicuña stocks, attacking the animals’ skin, leaving them unable to cope with the cold and rain. The western slopes of the Andes are dusty and dry. These mark the start of the Peruvian coastal desert, where the Nazca culture developed over 2,000 years ago. All that remains now are the famous Nazca Lines, enormous geoglyphs etched into the hard floor of the desert. The road then turns north along the Pacific coast, where there are numerous fishing villages. One of them is Pisco, where the local fishing trade has been badly hit by the El Niño weather phenomenon. And then finally, after 144 hours and 6,300 kilometers on the bus, we arrive in Lima - just two days late.

    Watch the other parts of the journey:
    Part 1:
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    Part 3:
    Part 4:
    _______

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  • Singapore – belief in ghosts and high-tech | DW Documentary

    42:25

    Singapore has boomed in the last few years. A city of contrasts, the people there believe in ghosts and spirits but also live in a high-tech metropolis. Singapore: an ethnically diverse city with strict laws, wild jungle and spectacular architecture.

    After its independence in 1965, the island state of Singapore became a melting pot of different ethnic groups. Chinese, Malays and Indians live here peacefully together. Forty percent of the inhabitants come from abroad. It features both breath-taking skyscrapers and colonial buildings. Here Asian culture meets western influences. And tropical nature is never far away. So, as people move further and further into the jungle with their settlements, they may come across snakes or even monitor lizards who stray into their houses in search of food. Every day, animal rescuers like Kalai Balakrishnan from the Acres Wildlife Rescue are on call to free the trapped animals. Singapore is also a culinary paradise. Li Ruifang runs a cookshop in the lively Little India district. She quit her office job to keep her parents' and grandparents' family recipes alive. When the rest of the city is still asleep, she is busy preparing her famous shrimp noodle soup. It is a tough job, now a rarity among the younger generation. Grandmaster Chew and his son also place great importance on tradition. When business is slow, someone's health is failing, or a relationship crisis is threatening, they communicate with the spiritual world and investigate which ghost is causing the problem. And then they chase the ghosts away using methods based on old teachings and customs.


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  • Bhutan – change comes to the Himalayan Happy Kingdom | DW Documentary

    42:27

    Bhutan's other name is The Happy Kingdom. The small Himalayan country has one foot in the distant past and the other in the digital age. It's quite a balancing act for Bhutan's citizens.

    No other country has recently undergone more radical change than Bhutan. The millennium brought television, the internet and democratization to the last Himalayan kingdom almost overnight. The capital Thimphu has become one of South Asia's fastest growing cities. At the same time, just a few kilometers to the north, 20 thousand nomads still live from herding yak on the high plains of the Himalayas. This documentary tells of the challenges these people face.

    We meet young Chewang , who often has to leave his family for months and trek to heights above five thousand meters in search of the caterpillar fungus, a fabled medicinal mushroom. We also follows the journey of five-year-old Doryi, who is separated from his poverty-stricken family when they send him to a monastery. Meanwhile, the committed organic farmer Choki is trying to bring the advantages of modern life to her village. And 73-year-old bowman Ap Chimi is finding the modern world quite a challenge, so he's decided to compete in his last archery tournament to show youngsters in the village that he can still hit the bull's eye as easily as they do.
    This documentary takes viewers on a trip through a time that mirrors Western development in the last century. The loss of a communal life in harmony with nature is juxtaposed against the gains made through globalization. Director Irja von Bernstorff, who has made her home in the Happy Kingdom, gives us a unique peek behind the country's tourist façade to reveal what makes the wondrous world of Bhutan so special.

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  • Traveling Ecuador by train | DW Travel Documentary

    42:32

    The train line through Ecuador is considered one of the most spectacular train lines in South America. A train journey of discovery.

    The Trans-Andean railroad takes in the infamous Nariz del Diablo, or Devil’s Nose, a mountain with almost perpendicular walls. To overcome this obstacle, the train zigzags to ascend 500 meters in less than 12 kilometers. With steep ascents and descents, it’s no ride for the faint-hearted! The main line along the country’s Andean spine links the coastal city of Guayaquil with the capital Quito. It was finished in 1908, but was mostly shut down after a series of weather-related disasters destroyed much of the Ecuadorian rail network in the 1990s. After extensive restoration, a new cross-Andean service was opened in 2013, following the original narrow-gauge line. It’s 450 kilometers long and runs from the Pacific coast up to the Andean highlands. On its cross-country journey, the train is accompanied by guards on motorcycles who, in the absence of railway gates, stop traffic at every level crossing along the way to let the train pass. The Tren Crucero, - or cruise train- is the centerpiece of Ecuador’s rejuvenated railway. A revamped luxury steam train, it runs once a fortnight and has room for 54 passengers. The most exhilarating stretch of the ride begins deep down in the gorge of the River Chanchán. The train zigzags up the Nariz del Diablo - the Devil's Nose - in a series of dizzying switchbacks in which the tracks almost seem to lie on top of each other. Join the reporters for the ride of a lifetime, as the train journeys on to Urbina, the highest station at 3,609 meters above sea level, and along the so-called Avenue of Volcanoes, to the Cotopaxi National Park and onwards to Quito, the world's highest capital.
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  • The Akha tribe in Laos: Between tradition and modernity | DW Documentary

    42:12

    The Akha in Laos live almost untouched by modern civilization. They still adhere to their archaic customs. But they are on the verge of upheaval.

    Cut off from the rest of the world, without a paved road, the village of Peryensang Mai has remained almost untouched by modern civilization to this day. Its inhabitants are from the Akha tribe, and they seem to live in a different time: Their language isn’t even written down; their everyday life is defined by the laws and rituals handed down from their ancestors such as animal sacrifices to ward off bad luck. This adherence to customs that are often quite brutal endows the Akha’s lives with stability and direction. The women of the village have a particularly busy life. Because the Akha are largely self-sufficient, their tasks range from agriculture to housework and making traditional clothing. This documentary tells the story of the Laovan family. Mother Yeapheun has always had to work hard to support her large family. Her husband is the village elder and ensures the Akha observe the strict laws and commandments. The couple and their eldest children cannot imagine life beyond the mountaintop, so the family is pinning its hopes on youngest son Kienglom, who has been going to school in a nearby town since he was eleven years old. Like many mountain tribes in Laos, the Akha are facing a difficult choice: between a move down into the valley, which would mean they would have electricity, running water and better medical care - but also abandoning their ancient rituals. The film takes the viewer on an emotional journey of discovery to a tribe torn between tradition and modernity and facing the need to reinvent itself in today's world.

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  • Cities BURNED: Uncontrolled Wildfires are raging in the west of Chubut, Argentina / Disasters

    8:02

    #NDNews: Natural Disasters News #NDN every day. Climate change: Disaster March 9-10. Breaking news about bad weather. Earth's pain will cleanse the Planet from the humanity. In the world in a day about severe nature. Catastrophes are here and now. Global warming is not far off.
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    CITIES BURNED. UNCONTROLLED WILDFIRES ARE RAGING IN THE WEST OF CHUBUT, ARGENTINA
    Argentine authorities on Tuesday had to evacuate hundreds of people from the Andean Region due to six new forest fire outbreaks that have injured at least 20 people in the last 24 hours. Local fire departments reported the blazes have also caused damage to vehicles and residences in the municipalities of El Lago Puelo, El Hoyo, El Maiten, and Cholila, in the Chabut province. Hydrant planes were deployed in the burned areas to support firefighters and volunteers. The fire has also caused traffic cuts on different roads in the area. El Hoyo Hospital officials are considering evacuating its patients to another city due to the large smoke that is affecting the municipality. In this territory, power lines collapsed due to burned transformers, and the gas was disconnected to avoid explosions.
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    The channel lists such natural disasters as:
    1) Geological emergencies: Earthquake, volcanic eruption, mudflow, landslide, landfall, avalanche;
    2) Hydrological emergencies: Flood, Tsunami, Limnological catastrophe, floods, flooding;
    3) Fires: Forest fire, Peat fire, Glass Fire, Wildfire;
    4) Meteorological emergencies: Tornado, Cyclone, Blizzard, Hail, Drought, Hail, Hurricane, Storm, Thunderstorm, typhoon, Tempest, Lightning.

    Playlist by region, SOUTH AMERICA:


    Playlist by disaster type, FIRE:



    Climate change has already begun. Humanity will destroy Mother Nature. Extreme weather caught on camera.


    ATTENTION: Video material is taken from social networks. It is selected by date of publication, title, description and location of the event. Sometimes, due to unscrupulous posting of news on social networks, the video may contain fragments that do not correspond to the date and place. It is not always possible to check their reliability. Thank you for your understanding.

    #Weather #NaturalDisaster #Disasters #NaturalDisasters #ndn #Storm #Chubut #fire #ElBolsón #Argentina #Cholila #LagoPuelo #ElBolsón

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  • Along the Amazon in Peru | DW Documentary

    28:26

    The government intends to expand and deepen the River Amazon’s tributaries to allow passage for large container ships and is meeting stiff resistance from the region’s indigenous peoples.

    A decrepit old cargo ship is the only means of transport on the Amazon in Peru. South America's great river is still relatively narrow here, but it’s also the only lifeline for the region's people and economy. We travel on the Eduardo III, an overcrowded steamship on its three-day voyage up the winding river from Yurimaguas to Iquitos. Timber and other goods are loaded in chaotic ports, and people doze in hammocks on the cramped passenger deck as the ship passes through one of the last untouched natural paradises in the world. If Peru's government goes ahead with its plans, the Amazon region in the northeast of the country will soon be developed and links to the country’s economic infrastructure significantly improved. A Chinese company, for example, is to deepen the Amazon tributaries Marañón, Ucayali and Huallaga to allow large container ships all-year passage. But the excavation project is highly controversial and the region’s indigenous peoples are putting up a stiff fight against it. Water has a deep spiritual meaning for the tribes of the Amazon, who believe the spirits of their ancestors live on in the river. But will Peru’s advocates of progress allow objections like that to get in their way of their plans?

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  • Americas new gurus – in search of enlightenment | DW Documentary

    42:32

    According to the US Constitution, anyone can found a religion and spread its message. Many Americans are doing just that The range of religious communities is diverse and stretches from sea to shining sea.

    For some years now, the US has been in the midst of a second New Age wave. Shamans, life coaches and spiritualists are doing good business thanks to people’s search for meaning. One current trend is self-healing using kambo, a highly toxic secretion of the American giant macaque frog, which is administered in group ceremonies. It leads to vomiting, palpitations and dizziness, which adherents regard as a cleansing of the body. If used incorrectly, the substance can lead to cardiac arrest. One guru’s career is continuing, despite the deaths of his followers. Life-coach James Arthur Ray was sentenced to two years in prison in 2011, after three participants in one of his workshops died in a home-made sauna. In 2019, he celebrated his comeback in Las Vegas, and now sells self-realization seminars for thousands of dollars. For his followers, it’s proof that Ray's strategy works. The US has given birth to huge sects that survive thanks to the utter financial dedication of their members. In 2019, cult-founder Keith Raniere was convicted in a sensational trial, having exploited and at times abused 15,000 women. One former member shares the barbaric methods that were used to keep women in the cult. This documentary takes a journey through America’s quest for spiritual fulfillment, shedding light on the questionable practices of self-appointed gurus.

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  • The New Silk Road, Part 1: From China to Pakistan | DW Documentary

    42:31

    The New Silk Road is a mammoth project intended to connect China with the West. It's a gigantic infrastructure project that Beijing says will benefit everyone. But this two-part documentary shows China’s predominant self-interest and geopolitical ambitions.

    The old Silk Road is a legend, whereas the New Silk Road is a real megaproject. China wants to reconnect the world though a network of roads, railways, ports and airports between Asia and Europe. A team of reporters travels by sea and land along the New Silk Road and shows how China, with the largest investment program in history, is expanding its influence worldwide. Their journey begins in Shenzhen on the Pearl River Delta. This is where China's legendary rise to an economic superpower began 40 years ago. The private market economy experiment unleashed forces that allowed Shenzhen to grow into a mega-metropolis.
    The team takes a container ship towards Southeast Asia. Its first stop is the port city of Sihanoukville in Cambodia. A joke is making the rounds there these days: you can now travel to China without a passport and without leaving your own country. Sihanoukville is now almost part of China itself! The Chinese have financed practically everything built here in the recent past: the extension of the port, new roads, bridges and factories. Many Cambodians are unhappy and feel like losers in the boom. Rising prices and rents are making the poor even poorer. But for land and house owners, on the other hand, it’s a bonanza.
    In Myanmar, resistance is already growing. Locals in Kachin have successfully blocked a new dam project, asking how the Chinese could produce energy for their own country whilst leaving the locals themselves without electricity? The Myanmar government pulled the emergency brake and the huge Chinese dam project did not get beyond the first concrete piers in the river.
    The Karakorum Highway from Kashgar in China across the Roof of the World to Islamabad in Pakistan is one of the most difficult and dangerous roads in this breathtaking mountain world. Once the road is finished, it often disintegrates again, and rock falls and landslides block the highway as if the Karakorum Mountains are trying to deny China strategic access to the Arabian Sea. The first part of the report ends in Islamabad.

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  • Tour of the Arctic – from Svalbard to Siberia | DW Documentary

    42:26

    The Arctic is one of the most fascinating regions on our planet, and one of the most threatened. Two film crews explore its spectacular wilderness in a two-part documentary. Part one takes viewers from Norway’s Svalbard archipelago to Siberia.

    The region around the North Pole is one of the greatest and least-known wildernesses in the world, and it’s rapidly changing due to global warming. The retreat of Arctic sea ice can be observed everywhere along the Arctic Circle, presenting those who live there with dramatic changes. This documentary takes viewers on a journey through the Arctic circle and explores those changes.
    It begins in Norway’s Svalbard archipelago, a place to see one of nature’s most spectacular displays — the northern lights. With the ice retreating, cruise ships can now travel further north than was previously possible. This places a strain on the fragile ecosystem. But more visitors may also mean more awareness about the risks that face the region, and more motivation to protect the Arctic.
    But as if often the case, protecting nature in the Arctic is at odds with economic interests. Russia, in particular, is keen to sell Arctic fossil fuels to the rest of world. The film next takes viewers to the gas-rich Yamal Peninsula in northwestern Siberia, where the Russian company Novatek has built the northernmost industrial facility on the globe.

    Further East in Yakutia, two noises fill the air: the relentless buzzing of mosquitoes that infest the Siberian tundra in summer, and the steady dripping of the thawing permafrost on the banks of the Kolyma River. The film’s journey ends in Chukotka in the northeast of Russia, a region closer to Alaska than to the Russian capital Moscow.

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  • Bangladesh: worlds of work - Founders Valley | DW Documentary

    26:02

    This episode of Founders’ Valley takes Fridtjof Detzner to Bangladesh. In one of the world’s poorest countries, the German entrepreneur encounters brutal working conditions and meets optimistic founders seeking to move their country forward.

    This documentary series won the Bronze World Medal in the Documentaries category at New York Festivals 2018. Congratulations to the team! :)

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  • Traveling Iran by train | DW Documentary

    42:31

    Iran is opening its doors to foreigners and a train ride from the Persian Gulf to the Caspian Sea is a great way to get to know the country and its people.

    The travel restrictions that are now being lifted were in place for decades. Many Iranians are hoping they will now be able to lead a freer life – and we meet many of these hospitable and welcoming people on our journey through the Middle Eastern nation.

    The country’s most important rail link, the Trans-Iranian Railway, runs for approximately 1400 kilometers from the Persian Gulf via Teheran to the Caspian Sea. The journey starts in Khorramshahr on the Shatt al-Arab, the river border between Iraq and Iran.

    Traveling past oil fields, the train reaches Shushtar. One of the top sights here is the historic hydraulic system, now a UNESCO World Heritage Site. After that, the train heads up into the Zagros Mountains. The journey is interrupted by a break for prayer. Breath-taking landscapes move past the train window until we reach the highest point not only of our journey but of the entire rail network: 2,200 meters above sea level between Dorud and Arak.

    During a brief stop in Qom, travelers can refuel with sohan, a pastry made of wheat germ, flour and sugar. The next section of the track is high-speed and we continue on to Teheran at 160 km/h. The metropolitan area is home to more than 15 million people. The last leg takes us to the north of the country.

    In the Alborz Mountains, we find out what role the Trans-Iranian Railway played during Stalin’s major offensive against the German army in World War II. Our oriental rail adventure ends in Bandar-e Torkaman on the Caspian Sea.
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  • The world’s most polluted river | DW Documentary

    42:26

    The Citarum River in Indonesia is the world’s most polluted river. One of the main polluters is the fashion industry: 500 textile factories throw their wastewater directly into the river.

    The filmmakers teamed up with international scientists to investigate the causes and consequences of this pollution. With the help of concerned citizens, the ‘Green Warriors’ team analyzed water samples, rice, children’s hair, etc. and discovered that toxic chemicals are endangering the lives of the 14 million Indonesians who use the Citarum water. What was once considered paradise is now a brown sludge of human waste and dangerous substances like nonylphenol, antimony and tributylphosphate. These findings prompted the Indonesian government to change its wastewater regulations. Recently, President Joko Widodo announced a new plan to clean up the Citarum. The fashion brands questioned in this documentary promised to better monitor their Indonesian suppliers.

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  • Climate change in the desert | DW Documentary

    28:17

    Climate change is leaving its mark on Morocco’s oases, too. Sandstorms are becoming more and more frequent, groundwater levels are sinking and palm trees are shrivelling up and dying. An age-old way of life is in danger.

    Halim Sbai says an oasis really is a paradise. But drought and desertification are now taking their toll on oases like M'hamid El Ghizlane in southeastern Morocco where he grew up. The survival of a whole region is at stake. Over hundreds of kilometers between the Anti-Atlas mountains and the Sahara desert there is one palm-fringed oasis after the next. Close to two million people live in these settlements. Up to now, many earned their living by harvesting dates from the palm trees. But this is proving more and more difficult. Decreasing and irregular rainfall is having a devastating impact on the trees and their yields.

    Halim Sbai is planting new palm trees and preserving as much precious water as he can in a bid to keep the oasis of M'hamid El Ghizlane and the region’s traditional way of life alive. Up to now, he has also been supplementing his income with earnings from tourism. Global warming could put an end to all this.
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  • How poor people survive in the USA | DW Documentary

    42:31

    Homelessness, hunger and shame: poverty is rampant in the richest country in the world. Over 40 million people in the United States live below the poverty line, twice as many as it was fifty years ago. It can happen very quickly.


    Many people in the United States fall through the social safety net. In the structurally weak mining region of the Appalachians, it has become almost normal for people to go shopping with food stamps. And those who lose their home often have no choice but to live in a car. There are so many homeless people in Los Angeles that relief organizations have started to build small wooden huts to provide them with a roof over their heads. The number of homeless children has also risen dramatically, reaching 1.5 million, three times more than during the Great Depression the 1930s. A documentary about the fate of the poor in the United States today.

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  • Patagonia Video Guide | Expedia

    10:39



    At the fabled ‘edge of the world’ the natural wonders of Patagonia await. This last frontier of South America slopes down from The Andes towards Antarctica.

    This is a land of legendary beauty, where Mother Nature runs the show. Prepare to feel dwarfed by mighty volcanoes, towering glaciers and floating icebergs.

    On the Argentinean side, a relaxing day trip takes you from sleepy San Martín de los Andes to Villa La Angostura. Simply follow the scenic Road of the 7 Lakes, taking in two national parks. This will bring you to San Carlos de Bariloche, a popular mountain resort on the shores of Lake Nahuel Huapi.

    Take a detour along the famous Ruta 40 to the town of El Chaltén: Argentina’s trekking capital in the southern Andes. Hike to the idyllic Laguna Capri or higher lookout points to gaze up at Fitz Roy mountain. View the jagged peaks of Cerro Torre, which few dare to climb.

    El Calafate is nestled on the southern shores of Lago Argentino, the gateway lake to Los Glaciares National Park. Embark on an epic journey to the world’s third-largest freshwater reserve: the Perito Moreno Glacier.

    Board the 'End of the World Train’ to Tierra del Fuego National Park or join a cruise along the Beagle Channel, to experience Antarctica without actually going there.

    On the Chilean side, you can find fascinating historic and cultural attractions in pretty colonial cities, such as the regional capital Punta Arenas.

    On your way north, take a detour to the Milodón cave. This prehistoric shelter held the remains of a giant ground-dwelling sloth and other huge extinct species.

    The dramatic national park of Torres del Paine is brimming with lakes that spill out into gorgeous waterfalls, such as Salto Grande.

    Spot the spectacular outline of the Osorno Volcano, the focal point of Los Lagos, the lake region that forms the northern border of Chilean Patagonia.

    This magical wilderness at the far edge of the world reminds us that we are just temporary spectators of nature’s infinite beauty.

  • Bitter chocolate | DW Documentary

    42:26

    Chocolate may be a sweet treat, but its production leaves a bitter taste. Rainforests are cleared so slaves and children laborers can harvest cocoa beans on illegal plantations. Cocoa is produced under the most dubious conditions.

    In Ivory Coast, the dark side of cocoa and chocolate production is hard to miss. Many people – including children – are driven here from neighboring Burkina Faso by drought and famine to find work. They often come alone, without their families, to find jobs on one of the many cocoa plantations. The conditions are spartan. They work with sharp machetes, carry heavy loads, are exposed to toxic herbicides, and lack protective clothing.

    Major international cocoa companies and giants of the chocolate industry such as Nestlé, Cargill and Ferrero looked on as 90 percent of the Ivory Coast's primeval forests were destroyed. In 2001, the companies agreed to stop child labor, wage dumping and the further clearance of rainforests for five years. But 20 years later, the commitment has yet to be implemented. This moving documentary shows the dark side of the chocolate industry and its sweet, luxury product.

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  • Libyas Forbidden Deserts | Full Documentary | TRACKS

    50:25

    The vast desert country veiled from the East by fear, prejudice and misunderstanding. Adams follows in the wheel tracks of Ancient Rome's 'chariots of fire' - the first wheeled vehicles to cross the Sahara and discover a little-known land of exotic brilliance, ancient cities and forbidding deserts.

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  • Mallorca island - German tourists are coming! | DW Documentary

    12:32

    It’s just a pilot project, but it has ramifications. The first tourists since the easing of the coronavirus lockdown are arriving in Mallorca. Only a few hotels are allowed to take part in this test run. Not all residents are thrilled by the idea.

    Thomas and Antonia Tobor have been looking forward to a chance to unwind from their stressful lives. Especially Antonia: As a nurse caring for coronavirus patients, she’s been on the front line of the pandemic. But how relaxing can a vacation really be when there are so many regulations about meticulous hygiene and social distancing to keep in mind? The hotel staff is relieved that the long dearth of customers is finally coming to an end. Many people who depend on the tourism sector are struggling to survive. Yet some Mallorca residents are not pleased. Things are moving too quickly, they say. They don’t want to be treated as guinea pigs and fear that the tourists will not only bring money to the island, but also the dreaded coronavirus. A report by Jan-Philipp Scholz and Johannes Meier.

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  • A modern Catholic church in Spain | DW Documentary

    25:57

    Many Spaniards perceive the Catholic Church as old-fashioned. A priest in Madrid is trying to change that by leading a modern, inclusive congregation ready to receive anyone 24 hours a day.

    This documentary visits Father Ángel García Rodríguez, the priest at San Antón's, which is likely one of Spain's most unusual houses of prayer. Open 24 hours a day, the church in Madrid is furnished with comfortable chairs instead of hardwood pews. Free Wi-Fi is available, along with breakfast and lunch for the needy, and there are live sports on TV in the nave. Father Ángel has made San Antón's a place of community for the whole community. The 81-year old's parish has caught the attention of the moral martinets in the Catholic hierarchy. The church doors are open to gays. Same-sex couples often ask Father García for his blessing, which he grants, even though it is inconsistent with Catholic teachings. In addition to his work as a priest, Father Ángel has also established an organization that cares for the socially disadvantaged. It is controversial. Critics say the priest's social projects are profit-oriented and relieve the Spanish state of its obligations to the poor.

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  • Patagonia Video Guide | Expedia

    10:39



    Patagonia Region City Video Guide | Expedia

  • Alexander von Humboldt in the Americas — Part 1 | DW Documentary

    8:32

    In celebration of Alexander von Humboldt’s 250th birthday, we invite you to learn all about the adventurous life of the great German natural scientist in seven short documentaries.

    In the first installment, following in Humboldt's footsteps, DW's reporter hears from historian Segundo Moreno in Quito how important the German scientist-explorer still is. And Latin America's first licensed female mountain guide takes you up 'Humboldt's volcano', Chimborazo.

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  • The last nomads of Borneo | DW Documentary

    42:25

    The Penan are one of the last indigenous hunter-gatherer tribes on earth. They are a semi-nomadic people who live in the rainforests of the Malaysian state of Sarawak on the island of Borneo -- and their way of life is now threatened.
    Peng Megut is one of the last forest nomads who still carry a blowgun as they roam the jungle. Peng and a number of men from his tribe are defending their community against a palm-oil plantation that they believe has trespassed on their land. Until just a few years ago, this region was home to one of the oldest primeval forests in the world. It covered an area that was half the size of Germany.

    Then timber companies started clear-cutting trees, and destroyed 90-percent of the forest. Forty tribes and ethnic groups, including the Penan, live in what's left. The Penan have resisted adopting a modern lifestyle longer than any other indigenous tribe in Borneo. They call their home Tong Tana -- which means both forest and world.

    The woodland is a central component of the Penan's identity. It is the final resting place of their ancestors, and represents the heart of their spirituality, culture, and history. The tribe's existence is sustainable, and the people live in harmony with nature. They hunt for food -- and the forest supplies all their other needs, as well. But since the mid-20th century, the lives of the Penan have changed radically. They still live in the jungle, but most of them have now moved into villages.

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  • Shooting a species to save it | DW Documentary

    28:27

    Big game hunting causes outrage - but it also offers opportunities to preserve threatened species.
    Big game hunters bag elephants or lions and pose with their trophies. It can cause outrage - but hunting can offer a way to preserve nature and protect threatened species. Such as the one-hundred elephants that will be resettled in Zimbabwe.

    Angry online commentators agree: trophy hunting is reprehensible, immoral and absolutely unnecessary. But is it really that simple? There are hunting projects that guarantee the survival of endangered species - provided they are managed well.

    Sango, a private game reserve in southeastern Zimbabwe, is owned by German businessman Wilfried Pabst. Sixty percent of Sango’s operating costs is financed through what it calls sustainable use - in other words, trophy hunting. Pabst has faced enormous hostility, but is that fair? The concept behind Sango is to allow some animals to be hunted to generate capital to support the rest. Pabst has been so successful with this model that he now has too many animals of various species for Sango or Zimbabwe to support.

    The elephants in particular are a huge problem. The giant pachyderms spend around 20 hours a day eating, and destroy their own habitat. Pabst has to reduce their number to protect the habitat. He gets permission to cull 100 elephants - but he loves his animals and looks for alternatives. He finds a surprising way out.

    Hundreds of kilometers further north is picturesque Rifa on the Zambezi River. Another German businessman, Ralph Koczwara, leases the land and comes up with a spectacular idea. The elephants should be relocated. A unique rescue maneuver begins. But how do you transport elephant families?

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  • Land grabbing in Romania | DW Documentary

    26:01

    Land grabbing in Romania is a problem. Large areas of arable land are falling into the hands of major foreign investors, at the expense of local people.

    So-called land grabbing, buying up large areas of agricultural land, is no longer just a phenomenon in Africa or Latin America - it is a topic around the world. Countries in Eastern Europe are also increasingly affected. The documentary looks at the people affected by large-scale land acquisitions. A change to the law in 2014 has made Romania’s pastures and arable land highly attractive to foreign investors, from Europe and around the world. Buying agricultural land brings in big EU farming subsidies. And when farming no longer pays off for domestic smallholders, they feel forced to sell their holdings. It’s turned into a kind of mass fire sale. But in many cases of land grabbing, the land isn’t used for agricultural purposes. Pasture and arable land is left fallow, or it goes into private ownership. And local farmers and people are paying a heavy price. Monoculture is destroying biodiversity and cheap agricultural products from abroad are wrecking the country’s domestic markets. The land is being pulled from under the feet of an entire generation of Romanian farmers. But a group is keen to mobilize Romania's five million small-scale farmers to oppose land grabbing in the country.
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  • The Secrets of Antarctica | Full Documentary | TRACKS

    50:09

    Join a team of marine scientists as they embark on an unprecedented journey across the Great Southern Ocean and beyond to Antarctica.

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    TRACKS publishes unique, unexpected and untold stories from across the world every week.

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  • Can green investment change the world? | DW Documentary

    25:55

    A new generation of investors wants to force businesses to become environmentally-friendly. Even climate conservationists know that money talks, but can green investments really save the world?

    Green investment rewards companies that use sustainable production practices and protect the environment. At the same time, companies that pollute or contribute to global warming are deprived of funds. The strategy converts the once secondary issue of the environment into hard, cold cash.

    Antonis Schwarz is 30 years old -- and an investor, philanthropist, and activist. His slogan is cash against climate change. Schwarz, like many other wealthy millennials, sees climate change as the key variable when it comes to investing money. These people intentionally put their cash into companies and projects that protect the environment.

    Schwarz believes that those who are well-off have a special responsibility to follow this strategy. He says, When you are able to change something and you don't, you're complicit. We all have to become fully involved, so we can prevent a climate disaster.

    This philosophy can be summed up with the following question: What's the point of having loads of money if it becomes worthless because you're living on a planet that's becoming increasingly chaotic?

    Institutional investors have more money at their disposal than wealthy private individuals do. Their approach is also changing -- and not out of pure idealism. Extreme weather events caused by climate change, for example, are bad for business. They can force corporations to write off billions in damages.

    This documentary goes behind the scenes to take a closer look at the financial markets. How well does impact investing work? Can investors really move large, powerful corporations to change their strategies? Politicians have so far failed to do precisely that.

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  • AlphaGo - The Movie | Full Documentary

    1:30:28

    With more board configurations than there are atoms in the universe, the ancient Chinese game of Go has long been considered a grand challenge for artificial intelligence. On March 9, 2016, the worlds of Go and artificial intelligence collided in South Korea for an extraordinary best-of-five-game competition, coined The DeepMind Challenge Match. Hundreds of millions of people around the world watched as a legendary Go master took on an unproven AI challenger for the first time in history.

    Directed by Greg Kohs and with an original score by Academy Award nominee Hauschka, AlphaGo chronicles a journey from the halls of Oxford, through the backstreets of Bordeaux, past the coding terminals of DeepMind in London, and ultimately, to the seven-day tournament in Seoul. As the drama unfolds, more questions emerge: What can artificial intelligence reveal about a 3000-year-old game? What can it teach us about humanity?

  • When food becomes scarce – high-tech farms of the future | DW Documentary

    25:57

    Agriculture will have to change drastically in the future if it is to meet global demand. Food production will become increasingly difficult in the face of growing challenges like rapid population growth, climate change and soil exhaustion.

    In Berlin, too, you can find lettuces growing in beds without soil and under artificial lighting next to restaurant kitchens or in some supermarkets. But in Japan and the US the practice of growing vegetables in huge factory buildings has been around longer. These are a world away from your normal greenhouses. The plants are grown in sterile conditions without the use of any pesticides. The fruit and vegetables produced can be eaten without being washed. And the yield is 100 times greater than in a same-sized area outdoors. The Japanese maker of such high-tech farms is successfully exporting them around the world - to customers in the Arab Emirates and in Asia’s megacities, for example.

    We will all have to wake up to the fact that food production methods will have to change if our food supplies are to be secure in the future. Increasingly, our cities will have to come up with ways of growing more for themselves and becoming less dependent on rural areas and global food supply chains. At the same time it is imperative to reform conventional farming to make it more weather resistant and less resource intensive.

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  • A journey through Mongolia | DW Documentary

    42:33

    Fashion and Mongolia - on a journey through her homeland, Saruul Fischer explains how she connected her two passions.

    Saruul Fischer left Mongolia for East Germany at the age of eleven. But she still felt a strong attachment to her homeland. Later she developed a fashion label that would allow her to connect her two homes. In Ulaanbaatar, her company Edelziege” manufactures clothing from fine cashmere which is then sold in Germany.

    This documentary accompanies Saruul Fischer on a trip back home to Mongolia. The capital of Ulaanbaatar is no longer the city of her childhood memories, but she still regularly visits relatives there. Her trip takes her to the west of the country, where she sleeps in a yurt on the expansive steppe. What does the fashion designer think about the changes that have taken place in Mongolia? How has this transformation affected the Mongolians’ affinity with their traditions? Saruul shows us a life far from civilization, a life that may not exist much longer.
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  • Worlds Most Dangerous Places: Coldest Road, Trip Antarctica, Wittenoom | Free Documentary

    50:57

    The Most Dangerous Places on Earth: Coldest Road, Trip Antarctica, Australia's Ghost Town: Wittenoom | Free Documentary

    Most Dangerous Places on Earth are...:
    00:00 The world's coldest Road
    If you want true adventure, you've come to the right place. We are going to take you to the coldest road in the world. Where? You guessed it - Siberia.

    11:01 Trip Antarctica
    We visited the largest German research station in Antarctica: Neumayer Station III. Among other things, data is being collected for a possible flight to Mars.
    Researchers are planting vegetables in Antarctica. They hope to gain insight into how cultivation on other planets, such as Mars, can work. The team travels directly to Antarctica to learn everything about cultivation on other planets.

    34:15 Australia's Ghost Town: The contaminated city Wittenoom
    Our reporter Raphael travels to Wittenoom and explores this Australian ghost town. Asbestos contamination made it uninhabitable, forever losing its place on the maps of our world.

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    Free Documentary is dedicated to bringing high-class documentaries to you on YouTube for free. With the latest camera equipment used by well-known filmmakers working for famous production studios. You will see fascinating shots from the deep seas and up in the air, capturing great stories and pictures from everything our beautiful and interesting planet has to offer.

    Enjoy stories about nature, wildlife, culture, people, history and more to come.

  • The deceptive promise of free trade | DW Documentary

    42:31

    Global trade is a hot topic of the G7 summit in Canada. Is free trade truly free - and fair? What roles do US President Trump, economic powerhouse China, and the EU play in global trade?

    When it comes to global trade, it would seem that trickery, threats and deception are the order of the day - yet all this takes place largely beyond the reach of the public eye. Donald Trump has made America First” his agenda and rallying cry. Along with aiming sharp criticism at global export champion Germany, Trump has also introduced punitive tariffs and warned of further measures. Will this fresh wave of protectionism lead to economic isolationism and threaten global free trade? And what about those for whom free trade’s promise of prosperity increasingly rings hollow? Around the world, many people have come to regard themselves as the losers of globalization. If the true winners of free trade and globalization are not ordinary citizens, has the time come to revise the liberal orthodoxy of free trade? This documentary visits Germany, Switzerland, the United States and Cameroon to explore these issues by way of some everyday examples, including the trade in onions, floor tiles, and bicycles.
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  • Fine-tuning the climate | DW Documentary

    42:26

    Engineers and scientists are trying to intervene in the Earth’s geochemical cycles. Because it appears efforts to cut CO2 won’t suffice to avoid irreversible climate change. But does geoengineering offer a real solution? Or is it just human hubris?

    Some scientists believe that we need to explore radical, and perhaps dangerous, technologies in order to be able to lower the earth’s temperature through geoengineering in the near future.
    Science journalist Ingolf Baur explores the feasibility and risks of leading geoengineering projects. His journey takes him to meet scientists in Switzerland, Iceland, the US and Peru. Along the way, he encounters two very different strategies: One is to fish climate-damaging CO2 from the atmosphere and sink it underground or in the deep sea. The other, and this is the far more controversial strategy, seeks to develop techniques that dim sunlight.

    Global warming is causing entire mountain ridges like the Moosfluh above Switzerland’s Aletsch Glacier to break off. Such dramatic changes could increase the pressure to try geoengineering.
    Its most prominent proponent is David Keith from Harvard University in the US. He’s devised experiments to to sound out the possibilities of solar geoengineering. His idea is for fleets of aircraft to dump millions of tons of sulfur into the stratosphere every year, where it should reflect part of the incoming sunlight back into space. As audacious as this method seems, it’s actually no different to what happens during volcanic eruptions.

    Or could we still manage to get greenhouse gases out of the atmosphere again? In Iceland, a group of researchers is using a special process to filter carbon dioxide from the air and pump it 2,000 meters deep into basalt rock. The surprise: after a few months, the CO2 is already reacting chemically and turning to stone, which renders it harmless - permanently. The quantities are still far too small, but it shows that as controversial and risky as some geoengineering methods may be, in the end we may need technology to avert or at least mitigate the effects of climate collapse.

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  • Tour of the Arctic – from Greenland to Alaska | DW Documentary

    42:26

    Two film crews explore the spectacular wilderness of the Arctic. The people who live there face dramatic changes. Part two takes viewers from East Greenland to Alaska.

    The region around the North Pole is one of the greatest and least-known wildernesses in the world - and it’s rapidly changing due to global warming. 350 people, most of them Inuit, live in Ittoqqortoormiit in Greenland. The nearest settlement is on neighboring Iceland. Almost 800 kilometers of Arctic Ocean separate the two islands. The film team accompanies an Inuit family through Scoresby Sound, a fjord system on the eastern coast of Greenland. They travel hundreds of kilometers in small boats through pack ice, passing icebergs as high as skyscrapers. On the way they meet whalers who are hunting for narwhals in summer. In this Inuit culture, narwhal skin and polar bear goulash have ensured survival for thousands of years. Greenpeace and WWF activists want to stop whaling and polar bear hunting - but this poses a threat to the indigenous way of life on Greenland. On the expedition through the world's largest fjord system, the team learns about the consequences of global warming: melting permafrost and a rapid increase in greenhouse gases. The changes are worrying. Some say they have brought benefits to the far north — the ice breaks up earlier and so too does the hunting season. However, the risks outweigh this benefit. The knowledge and way of life that have been passed down from generation to generation may soon be unsustainable.

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  • Beiruts cultural decline | DW Documentary

    12:34

    The explosion in Beirut was a shock for Mary Cochrane, a member of one of Lebanon’s most prominent aristocratic families. Sursock Palace, where the family lives, was severely damaged in the blast, but there‘s no money to save it.

    Beirut's reputation as the Paris of the Middle East was built on the city's many historic structures. These architectural gems elegantly combined both European and Middle-Eastern influences. After the explosion in early August, thousands of these buildings now lie in ruin. Most of them are privately owned, but their owners currently lack the means to secure them. Beirut's cultural scene is sounding the alarm: the destruction of these buildings threatens the soul of the city. But there is no money to rescue them. Donations are currently their only hope. Mary Cochrane is struggling to reconstruct the family home, or at least make it winter-proof. After all, Sursock Palace is one of the most famous landmarks in Beirut's Christian quarter, Ashrafieh. A report by Theresa Breuer and Vanessa Schlesier.

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  • documenta 14 - learning from Athens | DW Documentary

    42:31

    documenta 14’s exhibit in Athens has opened its doors for its fourteenth season. Germany’s renowned modern art exhibition is running in two cities for the first time in its history: Athens and Kassel.

    Learning from Athens is the tagline given by artistic director Adam Szymczyk to documenta 14. The modern art exhibition is one of the largest in the world and has been held in Kassel, Germany, since 1955. But this year, the exhibit is split between two cities in two different countries: it’s a controversial move.

    Athens is currently struggling with economic problems and is also on the frontline of the refugee crisis. While curators and artists hope it will reinvigorate the Greek capital’s art scene, the plan’s detractors complain that it smacks of cultural imperialism.

    One of the critics, former Greek finance minister Yanis Varoufakis, called it ‘a gimmick’ to exploit the tragedy in Greece. Will the troubled city end up little more than a striking backdrop for the international art élite? What can wealthy northern Europe really learn from a city that’s struggling to stay afloat?

    What happens when the event is over? And what purpose does art serve in times of crisis? A look behind the scenes of documenta 14, which kicks off in the Greek capital on April 8 and moves on to Kassel in June.

    Find out more about documenta 14 in our web special:

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