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Record breaking space jump - free fall faster than speed of sound - Red Bull Stratos

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  • Record breaking space jump - free fall faster than speed of sound - Red Bull Stratos.

    8:23

    Watch the record breaking space jump from 24.2 miles(38.9 km) above the surface of earth by 'Felix Baumgartner'.

    The video features the recording from the on-board camera, giving a true and absolute experience of the jump.

    It also features a free fall which breaks the sound barrier (speed of sound) at 846 miles/hr or 1361.5 km/hr without the use of any heavy machinery.

    Worth watching.
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    Copyright owned by Red Bull and GoPro.
    All credit goes to Red Bull Stratos.

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  • Felix Baumgartner Space Jump World Record 2012 Full HD 1080p FULL

    19:55

    The Mission -

    Red Bull Stratos, a mission to the edge of space, will attempt to transcend human limits that have existed for 50 years. Supported by a team of experts Felix Baumgartner plans to ascend to 120,000 feet in a stratospheric balloon and make a freefall jump rushing toward earth at supersonic speeds before parachuting to the ground. His attempt to dare atmospheric limits holds the potential to provide valuable medical and scientific research data for future pioneers.

    The Red Bull Stratos team brings together the world's leading minds in aerospace medicine, engineering, pressure suit development, capsule creation and balloon fabrication. It includes retired United States Air Force Colonel Joseph Kittinger, who holds three of the records Felix will strive to break.

    Joe's record jump from 102,800 ft in 1960 was during a time when no one knew if a human could survive a jump from the edge of space. Joe was a Captain in the U.S. Air Force and had already taken a balloon to 97,000 feet in Project ManHigh and survived a drogue mishap during a jump from 76,400 feet in Excelsior I. The Excelsior III mission was his 33rd parachute jump.

    Although researching extremes was part of the program's goals, setting records wasn't the mission's purpose. Joe ascended in helium balloon launched from the back of a truck. He wore a pressurized suit on the way up in an open, unpressurized gondola. Scientific data captured from Joe's jump was shared with U.S. research personnel for development of the space program. Today Felix and his specialized team hope to take what was learned from Joe's jumps more than 50 years ago and press forward to test the edge of the human envelope.


    Felix Baumgartner -


    On a mission like this, you need to be mentally fit and have total control over what you do, and I'm preparing very thoroughly.

    Felix consistently challenges his personal limits while pushing the physical boundaries of human flight. In 2003, Felix completed an unprecedented flight across the English Channel with a carbon wing, and subsequently began to consider an even bigger goal: the supersonic freefall. With a team of the world's top scientists, engineers and doctors behind him, Felix will attempt to rewrite history and advance aeronautical research with Red Bull Stratos.



    This footage belongs entirely to Red Bull™ and I'm just sharing it, nonprofit.




    ©2012 RED BULL

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  • Red Bull Stratos - World Record Freefall

    4:25

    Baumgartner reached an estimated speed of 1,357.6 km/h or 843.6 mph(Mach 1.25) jumping from the stratosphere, which when certified will make him the first man to break the speed of sound in freefall and set several other records while delivering valuable data for future space exploration.

    ▶︎Watch the Highlight Clip:
    ▶︎See the full Red Bull Stratos Playlist:



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  • SPACE JUMP -FREE FALL FASTER SPEED OF SOUND -RED BULL STRATOS

    4:26

    SPACE JUMP from 24.2 miles(38.9 km) above the surface of the earth by FELIX BAUMGARTNER.
    #spacejump #nasa #space #spacestation #freefalljump #highjump #knowledge #nature #breakingrecordspacejump

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  • Jumping From Space! - Red Bull Space Dive - BBC

    4:17

    The moment has finally arrived, it's time for Felix Baumgartner to perform the space dive. Taken from Red Bull Space Dive.


    This is a commercial channel from BBC Studios. Service & Feedback

  • Red Bull Stratos - Official Video: Felix Baumgartners World Record Skydive From 128,000ft

    14:03

    is the #1 source for skydiving videos.
    ________________
    Mission accomplished! After flying to an altitude of more than 128,000 feet (39,000 meters) in a helium-filled balloon, Red Bull Stratos pilot Felix Baumgartner completed a record breaking skydive on October 14, 2012 from the edge of space. During his 4:20 freefall, Felix reached a maximum speed of 833mph (1,342.8 km/h), which set a new world record as the first human in history to break the sound barrier with his body! Mach 1.24... in a spacesuit! The 43-year-old Austrian also broke two other world records (highest freefall, highest manned balloon flight), leaving the record for the longest freefall to project mentor Col. Joe Kittinger.

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  • Red Bull Stratos - Space Jump LIVE Stream Video FULL - Felix Baumgartner - Oct 14,2012

    1:17:48

    For more information visit:
    Jump at 1:01:43
    Music video at 1:15:49
    Twin Atlantic - Free (Stratos Spaced Out Mix)


    Max velocity of 833.9 MPH (Mach 1.24)
    Height of jump 128,100 feet (approximate value)
    Duration of fall 4:20 (approximate value)
    Length of fall 119,800 feet (approximate value)

    After flying to an altitude of 39,045 meters (128,100 feet) in a helium-filled balloon, Felix Baumgartner completed a record breaking jump for the ages from the edge of space, exactly 65 years after Chuck Yeager first broke the sound barrier flying in an experimental rocket-powered airplane. Felix reached a maximum of speed of 1,342.8 km/h (833mph) through the near vacuum of the stratosphere before being slowed by the atmosphere later during his 4:20 minute long freefall. The 43-year-old Austrian skydiving expert also broke two other world records (highest freefall, highest manned balloon flight), leaving the one for the longest freefall to project mentor Col. Joe Kittinger.

    All content copyright respective owners.
    Red Bull Stratos Jump LIVEstream [FULL] - Felix Baumgartner - Oct 14,2012

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    Felix Baumgartner - RED BULL STRATOS
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  • breaking space jump free fall faster than speed of sound Red Bull Stratos

    3:26

  • Red Bull Stratos Record Space Jump

    4:30

    An gaisce déanta - léim nár dearnadh cheana riamh. Tá áit a saothraithe go maith ag Felix Baumgartner as an Ostair sa stair - Dé Domhnaigh sé caite chaith sé léim sa strataisféar ag siúl 1,137 ciliméadar

    Mission Accomplished - Record jump from edge of space. Austria's Felix Baumgartner earned his place in the history books on Sunday by reaching an estimated speed of 1,137 km jumping from the stratospher--

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  • World First - Skydiver Luke Aikins Jumps 25000 Feet Into Net With No Parachute

    4:22

    On July 30 2016, Skydiver Luke Aikins, made history, when he jumped from 25,000 feet out of an airplane without a parachute, landing safely in a net set up in the desert of Simi Valley, California, setting a world record.

    Luke, who was 42 at the time of the jump, is a third generation skydiver, who has been skydiving since the age of 16 and has deployed a parachute more 18,000 times over the course of his skydiving and BASE jumping career.

    Luke is also is a safety and training adviser for the United States Parachute Association, where he provides advanced skydiving training, to elite military special forces.

    After jumping out of the Cessna airplane at 25,000 feet, Luke quickly reached a terminal velocity of 120 miles per hour.

    Using his GPS, and only the air currents around him, he lined up his fall to the center of a specialized 100-by-100-foot net, which was designed to stop Luke's fall, as softly as if you were to stand on a trampoline, and merely drop onto your back.

    The total time from jumping from the plane to hitting the net, took about 2 minutes. But when you are falling from 25,000 feet into a small net you can’t even see from 25,000 feet, I bet it felt like a life time.

    Thanks for watching.

    #Skydive #Skydiving

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    ★ For personal story suggestions or business enquiries about product stories / reviews, please contact me on my email from the ABOUT page. Note: All suggestions are welcome, but may not be chosen as they are not suitable for this channel.

    ★★ NOTE: Please do not ask for permission to use footage in this video, or the whole video itself, as the ownership of all footage remains that of the owners who gave me permission to use it. If you want to use any of the footage click on the links above and seek permission from the owners.

  • Felix Baumgartners skydive from the edge of space

    1:31

    Austrian daredevil jumps into the record books with a 128,000 ft skydive, in which he broke the speed of sound, in footage provided by mission sponsor Redbull.

  • A Man Who Fell from Space to Earth

    9:24

    We already know about aircraft that travel at supersonic speeds. That’s mind-boggling on its own. But what about a human doing the same? You know, without the plane! One man flew faster than the speed of sound while freefalling 120,000 feet from space. Was it Superman? Well, close but not exactly.

    Felix Baumgartner is an Austrian Skydiver and a bit of a daredevil. Ever since he was little, he loved heights, and his life-long dream was to become a skydiver. He began working on his goal at the age of 16. His achievements started getting more and more thrilling. He was the first person in the whole world to Cross the English Channel with a pair of carbon wings, and the first person to fly next to an airplane.

    Other videos you might like:
    Why Planes Don't Fly Faster
    A Pilot Survived a Plane Crash And 15 Hours Among Hungry Sharks
    He Survived on a Plane's Wing And a Fall from the Sky

    TIMESTAMPS:
    Why job as a skydiver got tiring for Felix 0:31
    The lowest BASE jump 1:36
    Kittinger’s record 3:32
    Btw, what's the speed of sound? 4:18
    What his innovative pressure suit looked like 5:23
    The record-breaking day 6:46

    #skydiving #basejumping #brightside

    Preview photo credit:
    This picture provided by shows pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria jumping out of the capsule during the final manned flight for Red Bull Stratos on October 14, 2012. The Austrian daredevil became the first man to break the sound barrier in a record-shattering freefall jump from the edge of space, organizers said. The 43-year-old leapt from a capsule more than 24 miles (39 kilometers) above the Earth, reaching a speed of 706 miles per hour (1,135 km/h) before opening his red and white parachute and floating down to the New Mexico desert: By AFP PHOTO/ Jay Nemeth/EAST NEWS,
    Animation is created by Bright Side.

    SUMMARY:
    - By 1988, Felix started doing skydiving exhibitions for the well-known company. Even though his job as a skydiver was filled with adrenaline and excitement, it got tiring for Felix at some point.
    - In 1999, he achieved his first record for the lowest BASE jump. He leaped from the Hand of the “Christ the Redeemer” statue in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
    - Felix transformed from a regular sky-diver into a daredevil. He would parachute from different fixed objects all the way down to the ground.
    - His most mind-boggling achievement came with the Red Bull Stratos Project on October 14th, 2012. When Felix was 43 years old, he made his life-long dream come to life.
    - Back in the day, there was another legendary man named Joseph Kittinger. He was an Air Force Command Pilot, and in the 1960s he performed the highest dive in history.
    - The speed of sound is calculated by a Mach Number. When something approaches the speed of sound, they get close to the Mach number 1.
    - Baumgartner’s team put together an advanced capsule that would operate as Felix’s controlled climate during his ascent to 120,000ft.
    - His suit was specifically coated to keep his body protected. Since the whole mission was going to be recorded, he was equipped with cameras on both his legs and his helmet.
    - After extensive training, the record-breaking day had arrived. It was October 14th, 2012.
    - Baumgartner climbed to 128,100 feet with the high-tech balloon. The sliding doors of the capsule opened, and his most thrilling and terrifying experience began.
    - As he was falling, his speed was accelerating, and so was his heartrate. He could see the earth’s curve. He was both amazed and terrified.
    - The moment he reached his maximum velocity, he slowed down. He was in a free fall for 4 minutes and 20 seconds before deploying his parachute at 8,200 ft.
    - His mission was a success, despite the minor difficulties. His excitement for the supersonic fall that broke all the records was indescribable.

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  • Red Bull Stratos FULL POV | Felix Baumgartners Stratosphere Jump

    9:25

    See through the eyes of Felix Baumgartner as he completes his world record breaking jump from the stratosphere!

    ► Watch more stratos videos:

    Baumgartner reached an estimated speed of 1,357.6 km/h or 843.6 mph(Mach 1.25) jumping from the stratosphere, which when certified will make him the first man to break the speed of sound in freefall and set several other records while delivering valuable data for future space exploration.

    #redbull #redbullstratos #FelixBaumgartner

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  • Speed Of Sound Skydive Set For October 8th 2012

    3:09

    © Red Bull Media House
    ROSWELL (New Mexico) - The final countdown for Felix Baumgartner's history making jump from the edge of space began on Monday after the Red Bull Stratos Technical Project Director Art Thompson declared the repaired space capsule is fit and all systems are go. The tentative launch date for Baumgartner's attempt to jump from an altitude of 36,576 meters has now been set for October 8, ending a period of uncertainty for the team and, for Baumgartner, the agony of waiting. The Austrian extreme sport athlete had to endure delays due to the repairs but is now delighted that the countdown is on for his attempt to become the first person to break the sound barrier in freefall and set four other world records in the process.

    I feel like a tiger in a cage waiting to get out, said Baumgartner, 43, one of the world's most celebrated B.A.S.E. jumpers and extreme athletes, who in 2003 became the first person to make a freefall flight across the English Channel with the aid of a carbon wing. He will be flying as fast as speeding bullet during his supersonic journey to Earth.

    Aviation pioneer Baumgartner and the Red Bull Stratos team have been preparing for years to break the record for highest-altitude jump, eclipsing a mark set more than 52 years ago. The capsule, which at about 1.315 kilogram weighs a little bit more than a VW Beetle, was damaged in a hard landing following Baumgartner's final test jump from a near-record altitude of 29,610 meters in July -- during the jump Baumgartner was freefalling at speeds of up to 864 kilometers per hour, or as fast as a commercial airliner. The Austrian landed safely in another part of the New Mexico desert.

    On September 24, the repaired capsule underwent testing in an altitude chamber at Brooks City-Base in San Antonio, Texas. The capsule was exposed to the extreme conditions it will face in the unforgiving environs of the stratosphere. After passing all the tests, the capsule was sent back to Roswell.

    A central aim of the Red Bull Stratos project is to collect valuable data for science that could ultimately help improve the safety of space travel and enable high-altitude escapes from spacecraft. The jump will also attempt to break an assortment of records such as highest speed in freefall, highest jump, highest manned balloon flight and longest freefall.

    Thompson is cautiously optimistic about the launch date of October 8, while acknowledging that perfect weather conditions are needed for the delicate 850.000 cubic meters helium balloon, which is made of plastic that has 1/10th the thickness of a Ziploc bag. Mission meteorologist Don Day confirmed, Early fall in New Mexico is one of the best times of the year to launch stratospheric balloons.

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  • INSPIRATIONAL - Felix Baumgartner - Headcam footage space Jump!! FULL

    8:18

    Truly INSPIRATIONAL footage of Felix Baumgartner jumping from space.

    Felix Baumgartner, an Austrian daredevil skydiver, has become the only human being to beat the speed of sound (768 miles/hour) after skydiving from 128,100 feet above the earth at an incredible speed of 833 miles/hour. This video features slow motion and footage from Felix's chest camera while free-falling to earth on Oct. 14, 2012 Sunday and landing in New Mexico, USA. Felix spent 4 minutes 20 seconds in freefall before he released his parachute.

    Copyright owned by Felix Baumgartner and Red Bull Stratos.

    World Records:
    833.9 mph (1,342.8 km/hr) - highest speed (faster than speed of sound: 768 mph)
    128,100 ft (39.045 km, 24.26 miles ) - highest altitude
    4 minutes 20 seconds - total freefall time without parachute
    119,846 ft (36,529 meters) - total freefall distance without parachute

    ****************************************­*****************
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    The footage, captured using body mounted GoPro cameras, gives a first person view of the epic space jump, which saw him freefall more than 24 miles.

    Baumgartner's amazing stunt, which broke multiple skydiving world records in October 2012, was broadcast live on the internet.

    But the newly released footage gives a whole new perspective on the jump, allowing viewers to watch the freefall as he would have seen it.

    Baumgartner, 43, reached a top velocity of 833.9 miles per hour, making him the first man to break the sound barrier in freefall.

    He is also set a new record for the highest ever jump, leaping from the capsule at 128,000 ft, as well as the highest ever manned balloon flight.

    Felix, 43, jumped from a tiny shelf outside the 11-by-8-foot fiberglass and acrylic capsule that was carried to 128,000 feet by an enormous balloon.

    Baumgartner's ascent into the stratosphere was in a capsule attached to a 30 million-cubic-foot (850,000-cubic-metre) plastic balloon, which was about the thickness of a dry cleaning bag.


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  • Red Bull Stratos - Skydiver Felix Baumgartner breaks sound barrier with world record free fall

    1:39

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    Austrian Felix Baumgartner has become the first skydiver to break the speed of sound, reaching a top speed of 833.9mph, officials say.

    Felix Baumgartner, an Austrian skydiver hoping to break the records for the highest and longest freefalls, as well as become the first man to break the sound barrier, lept from over 128,000 feet above Roswell, New Mexico - the infamous site of a few 'out-of-this-world' incidents.

    The Red Bull Stratos team have spent years developing this project, and kitted Fearless Felix out with a special pressurised capsule to protect him on his balloon assisted ascension, and a purpose-built full pressure suit to shield him coming down.

    As the crew, including mother Eva Baumgartner, watched on anxiously, Felix seemed eerily calm as he set about making history.

    Plummeting from over 128,000 feet, or 24 miles, Felix smashed the record for the highest freefall, and though he plummeted for four minutes and 19 seconds, just missed out on the record for the longest freefall held by Joe Kittinger - who was acting as his radio link in mission control at Roswell airport.

    Officials have since confirmed the 43-year-old broke the sound barrier during his descent, and when his feet finally touched down, mission control erupted.

    He's performed over 2,500 skydives in his lifetime, and after this small leap of faith Felix Baumgartner will forever be the man who fell to Earth.

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  • Baumgartner: I didnt feel sonic boom

    1:58

    Felix Baumgartner tells Anderson Cooper what it felt like to break the sound barrier during his record-breaking jump.

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  • Science Behind the Redbull Stratos Jump!

    3:22

    A big thanks to all current and future patrons who are helping fund this science and filmmaking outreach via Patreon:

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    On October 14, 2012, millions of people watched Live as Felix Baumgartner broke the speed of sound in free-fall via the Red bull Stratos Mission to the Edge of Space. If you haven't seen it, you should check it out here (redbullstratos.com). When it was all said and done, he reached 834 miles per hour, or Mach 1.24. He also broke the record for the highest jump at nearly 128,000 feet.

    I edited this up within a few hours of watching the final jump. I used the data the Red Bull Stratos mission gave out post jump, so I apologize if some of the numbers are not the current record breaking ones.

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  • Supersonic Freefall - Red Bull Stratos CGI

    3:07

    For more adventure, check out

    Felix has Landed!

    In October of 2012, Felix Baumgartner will attempt a record-breaking freefall jump from 120,000 feet - 23 miles - above the earth as part of Red Bull Stratos: a mission to the edge of space. The attempt will take place near Roswell, NM, USA, and if successful, Felix Baumgartner could be the first person to break the speed of sound with his own body, protected only by a space suit. As no one has successfully jumped from this height before, it's uncertain what the highest supersonic freefall in history will look or feel like.



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  • Skydiving Faster Than the Speed of Sound

    4:37

    Austrian skydiver Felix Baumgartner will attempt to break the world record for highest skydive, jumping from 120,000 feet in the air. Baumgartner will be traveling so fast he will break the sound barrier. Photo: Associated Press.
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  • Can You Skydive From The International Space Station?

    5:08

    While the sight from the International Space Station is a beautiful one, jumping off of it won't be. It will be a deadly journey for any astronaut who jumps off the ISS to reach Earth's surface.

    Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science: space, medicine, biotech, physiology, and more.

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    --------------------------------------------------

    Following is the transcript of the video:

    Most skydivers jump off a plane flying 3.8 km above the ground. But imagine jumping off something even higher, like the International Space Station.

    Unless you have a supersuit like Tony Stark, it's not gonna end well. But let's pretend Iron Man lends you one.

    Ok, ready? 3 … 2 … 1 … Jump! Wait … what?

    That's right, you wouldn't fall straight down. In fact, it'll take you at least 2.5 years before you reach the surface. So what's going on?

    Height isn't the main reason your fall takes so long. In fact, if you fell like a normal skydiver, it would only take about 2 hours.

    But the thing is, you don't fall straight down. You fall into orbit. The reason is speed. You see, the ISS might be called a station, but it's hardly stationary.  It's actually moving 12 times faster than a jet fighter.

    If you shot anything at that speed on Earth, by the time it was about to hit the ground, it would miss! In the same way, the ISS isn't floating in space, it's falling towards Earth and missing!

    And when you jump off the ISS, you're initially moving at that same speed. So you end up in orbit, too — at least for a while.

    Now, even though it's so high up, the ISS is pushing through a very thin atmosphere. And that friction slows it down. So the station fires engines to maintain speed and keep from crashing into the Earth.

    But sadly your supersuit doesn't come with engines strapped to your feet. This has two consequences:

    First, it means you can't maneuver and have to hope that any of those 13,000 chunks of space debris don't impale you. Second, without rockets to maintain your speed, you'll slow down and spiral toward Earth.

    But it won't be quick. The Chinese space station Tiangong 1, for example, about 2 years to fall out of orbit. On the ISS, you're higher up, so you'll take roughly 2.5 years. But once you strike the atmosphere, your long wait is over. And it's go time.

    As you re-enter, you have one goal: slow down. You're traveling at hypersonic speeds. So, if you deployed a parachute now, it'll shred to pieces.

    And that's not the only problem. Falling through the atmosphere at such break-neck speeds generates a lot of pressure on your suit — at least 8Gs of force — that's 8 times the gravity you feel at sea level.

    And if you're falling feet first, that'll push the blood away from your brain and toward your feet. So you'll probably pass out unless you're one of those fighter pilots who train to withstand up to 5Gs.

    Now, if you don't pass out, you may worry about the freezing temperatures up here.  But, it turns out, your suit's more likely to melt than freeze. You know how you can warm your hands by rubbing them together?

    Now imagine your supersuit rubbing against air molecules in the atmosphere at least 6 times the speed of sound. You'll heat up to about 1,650 ºC — hot enough to melt iron!

    In fact, the heat is so intense, it strips electrons from their atoms forming a pink plasma around you that will ultimately destroy suit.

    If that's not enough of a problem, the drag will rip off your limbs. But thankfully, Tony Stark has your back, and somehow, your supersuit holds with you intact.

    At 41 km up you've now reached the world record for highest skydive. In 2014, Alan Eustace wore a pressurized space suit as he rode a balloon up to this height. He broke the sound barrier on his way down before deploying his parachute and landed about 15 minutes after the drop.

    But you'll be falling much faster than Eustace — about 3 times the speed of sound. So, in reality, you're not going to slow down enough to safely deploy your chute. That's where Iron Man can help us one last time. By 1 km up you've reached the territory of ordinary skydivers who don't need fancy suits to survive.

    And at this point, your parachute can do its thing.  And it's finally time to land softly.

    Whew, what a ride! What sort of daring feat would you want us to try next? Let us know in the comments below. And thanks for watching.

    A special thanks to Shawn R Brueshaber at Western Michigan University and Kunio Sayanagi at Hampton University for their help with this video.

  • Terror at 60,000 Feet - Red Bull Space Dive - BBC

    4:16

    It's take off time for Felix as he begins his journey into space. But just before Felix passes into atmosphere he makes a deadly discovery...

    Taken from the one-off documentary Space Dive, which chronicles Felix Baumgartner's Red Bull Stratos space diving project.


    This is a commercial channel from BBC Studios. Service & Feedback

  • Felix Baumgartner emotional after jump

    1:28

    Felix Baumgartner speaks of the emotional strain after his record-breaking
    skydive that saw him fall faster than the speed of sound.

  • Red Bull Stratos Press Conference Fixed Audio

    29:09

    For more information visit:
    Video cuts out due to drop of signal on their end.

    Max velocity of 833.9 MPH (Mach 1.24)
    Height of jump 128,100 feet (approximate value)
    Duration of fall 4:20 (approximate value)
    Length of fall 119,800 feet (approximate value)

    After flying to an altitude of 39,045 meters (128,100 feet) in a helium-filled balloon, Felix Baumgartner completed a record breaking jump for the ages from the edge of space, exactly 65 years after Chuck Yeager first broke the sound barrier flying in an experimental rocket-powered airplane. Felix reached a maximum of speed of 1,342.8 km/h (833mph) through the near vacuum of the stratosphere before being slowed by the atmosphere later during his 4:20 minute long freefall. The 43-year-old Austrian skydiving expert also broke two other world records (highest freefall, highest manned balloon flight), leaving the one for the longest freefall to project mentor Col. Joe Kittinger.

    All content copyright respective owners.

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  • Red Bull Stratos CGI - The Official Findings

    3:07

    Check out the CGI clip for Felix Baumgartner's World Record Supersonic Freefall.
    Baumgartner reached an estimated speed of 1,357.6 km/h or 843.6 mph(Mach 1.25) jumping from the stratosphere, which when certified will make him the first man to break the speed of sound in freefall and set several other records while delivering valuable data for future space exploration.

    Watch the Highlight Clip:


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  • Breaking the Sound Barrier Without a Plane | Earth Lab

    3:51

    Jets have been able to break the sound barrier for a long time, but Felix Baumgartner tries to break it without the plane.

    Subscribe to Earth Lab for more fascinating science videos -

    All the best Earth Lab videos
    Best of BBC Earth videos

    Here at BBC Earth Lab we answer all your curious questions about science in the world around you. If there’s a question you have that we haven’t yet answered or an experiment you’d like us to try let us know in the comments on any of our videos and it could be answered by one of our Earth Lab experts.

  • World Record Jump From Space || సాహసమే ఊపిరిగా స్పేస్ నుంచి దూకి చరిత్ర సృష్టించిన వ్యక్తి ..!

    4:20

    Watch ► World Record Jump From Space || సాహసమే ఊపిరిగా స్పేస్ నుంచి దూకి చరిత్ర సృష్టించిన వ్యక్తి ..!

    -------
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  • Felix Baumgartner Jump From The Edge of Space

    1:22

    Please Subscribe Me :)
    Red Bull Stratos
    Felix Baumgartner (born 20 April 1969) is an Austrian skydiver and a BASE jumper. He set the world record for skydiving 127,000 feet in the sky on October 14, 2012. He is also renowned for the particularly dangerous nature of the stunts he has performed during his career. Baumgartner spent time in the Austrian military where he practiced parachute jumping, including training to land on small target zones.
    Baumgartner's most recent project was Red Bull Stratos, in which he jumped to Earth from a helium balloon in the stratosphere on 14 October 2012. As part of said project, he reached the altitude record for a manned balloon flight.

  • Space Man Felix Jump Out of Its Capsule & Free Fall & Breaks Speed of Sound

    4:41




    One of my life time event... Space Jumping world record...


    A la Da Vinci Hook & Eye Clasp W/Own Lock By Helene Dinand Innovative/Designer - YouTube

















  • Jumping From Space | Red Bull Stratos - World Record Freefall | Austrian skydiver Felix Baumgartner

    2:52

    Jumping From Space | Red Bull Stratos - World Record Freefall | Austrian skydiver Felix Baumgartner
    Click on the below Link to watch my all videos


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  • Felix Baumgartner Skydives From Space

    9:19

    A skydiver has made history by smashing the world record for the highest skydive after leaping from 128,097ft.

    Daredevil Felix Baumgartner ascended to the edge of space in a pressurised capsule suspended beneath a giant helium balloon. He then jumped out, freefalling for four minutes and 19 seconds before opening his parachute.

  • Space Jump-Col. Joe Kittinger

    3:07

    This video is courtesy of Defense Media Activity and first shown on their YouTube Channel:

    As jets flew higher and faster in the 1950s, the Air Force became increasingly worried about the safety of crews who had to eject at high altitude. Joe Kittinger was the first man to test a newly designed suit that protected pilots upon ejection.

  • HISTORICAL JUMP FROM OUTTA SPACE - FELIX BAUMGARTNER - RED BULL STRATOS

    5:19

    Felix Baumgartner made an HISTORICAL JUMP from space. Over 365 million people watched it via internet and two German/Austrian TV channels. Here's my live video made from my MacBook with iPhone to share the first minutes of the jump, asap. As the jump was one minute earlier on TV than on internet live-feed, you hear us shouting a bit earlier. As we already saw it on German TV. This man is the New Hero on Earth...!! The man who was so brave to get into the very edge of space with his Helium balloon and opened the door of his capsule, watched the Earth, waved, stood up and JUMPED.....!! UNBELIEVABLE...! For me it was the MOST EXCITING TV SINCE THE MOONLANDING!! He is the first man ever breaking the sound barrier without a vehicle, just by jumping from sky/space. He made the highest jump ever. The fastest Free Fall jumping ever. It's a moment we will never forget.
    (It was all sponsored by Red Bull, which is based in Salzburg, the same city as the home city of Space Jump Hero Felix Baumgartner.)gtgt

  • Red bull stratos jump highlight

    5:50

    Record of best freefall. Freefall from the edge of space. felix baumgartner LEGEND
    Austrian Felix Baumgartner has become the first skydiver to go faster than the speed of sound, reaching a top speed of 833.9mph (1,342km/h).

    The 43-year-old has also broken the record for the highest ever freefall by jumping out of a balloon 128,100ft (24 miles; 39km) above New Mexico.

  • Red Bull Felix Baumgartner Jump

    26:13


    Skydiver Felix Baumgartner landed safely taking place Earth following a record-breaking free-fevery individual commencing 128,000 feet. His parachute deployed fruitfully along the way.

    In a casing executing place commencing a helium balloon, Baumgartner worked his mode headed before 120,000 feet (about 23 miles) — more than three times the cruising altitude of the average airliner.

  • Felix baumgartner Space jump

    41

    © Red Bull Media House
    ROSWELL (New Mexico) - The final countdown for Felix Baumgartner's history making jump from the edge of space began on Monday after the Red Bull Stratos Technical Project Director Art Thompson declared the repaired space capsule is fit and all systems are go. The tentative launch date for Baumgartner's attempt to jump from an altitude of 36,576 meters has now been set for October 8, ending a period of uncertainty for the team and, for Baumgartner, the agony of waiting. The Austrian extreme sport athlete had to endure delays due to the repairs but is now delighted that the countdown is on for his attempt to become the first person to break the sound barrier in freefall and set four other world records in the process.

    I feel like a tiger in a cage waiting to get out, said Baumgartner, 43, one of the world's most celebrated B.A.S.E. jumpers and extreme athletes, who in 2003 became the first person to make a freefall flight across the English Channel with the aid of a carbon wing. He will be flying as fast as speeding bullet during his supersonic journey to Earth.

    Aviation pioneer Baumgartner and the Red Bull Stratos team have been preparing for years to break the record for highest-altitude jump, eclipsing a mark set more than 52 years ago. The capsule, which at about 1.315 kilogram weighs a little bit more than a VW Beetle, was damaged in a hard landing following Baumgartner's final test jump from a near-record altitude of 29,610 meters in July -- during the jump Baumgartner was freefalling at speeds of up to 864 kilometers per hour, or as fast as a commercial airliner. The Austrian landed safely in another part of the New Mexico desert.

    On September 24, the repaired capsule underwent testing in an altitude chamber at Brooks City-Base in San Antonio, Texas. The capsule was exposed to the extreme conditions it will face in the unforgiving environs of the stratosphere. After passing all the tests, the capsule was sent back to Roswell.

    A central aim of the Red Bull Stratos project is to collect valuable data for science that could ultimately help improve the safety of space travel and enable high-altitude escapes from spacecraft. The jump will also attempt to break an assortment of records such as highest speed in freefall, highest jump, highest manned balloon flight and longest freefall.

    Thompson is cautiously optimistic about the launch date of October 8, while acknowledging that perfect weather conditions are needed for the delicate 850.000 cubic meters helium balloon, which is made of plastic that has 1/10th the thickness of a Ziploc bag. Mission meteorologist Don Day confirmed, Early fall in New Mexico is one of the best times of the year to launch stratospheric balloons.

  • Austrian skydiver seeks to break highest free-fall record

    2:26

    Austrian skydiver Felix Baumgartner, nicknamed Fearless Felix, plans this year to try to break the world free-fall record by jumping from a helium balloon nearly 37,000 metres (120,000 feet) off the ground.Duration: 02:25

  • Record Breaking Space Jump Full HD 1080p -Amazing

    13:15

    Record Breaking Space Jump Full HD 1080p -Amazing

    Felix' world record jump from 38 km.

    Felix Baumgartner (German: [felɪks baʊmɡaːɐtnəʁ]; born 20 April 1969) is an Austrian skydiver, daredevil and BASE jumper. He set the world record for skydiving an estimated 39 kilometres (24 mi), reaching an estimated speed of 1357.64 km/h (843.6 mph), or Mach 1.25, on 14 October 2012, and became the first person to break the sound barrier without vehicular power on his descent. He is also renowned for the particularly dangerous nature of the stunts he has performed during his career. Baumgartner spent time in the Austrian military where he practiced parachute jumping, including training to land on small target zones.
    Baumgartner's most recent project was Red Bull Stratos, in which he jumped to Earth from a helium balloon in the stratosphere on 14 October 2012. As part of this project, he set the altitude record for a manned balloon flight, parachute jump from the highest altitude, and greatest free fall velocity

    The Mission -

    Red Bull Stratos, a mission to the edge of space, will attempt to transcend human limits that have existed for 50 years. Supported by a team of experts Felix Baumgartner plans to ascend to 120,000 feet in a stratospheric balloon and make a freefall jump rushing toward earth at supersonic speeds before parachuting to the ground. His attempt to dare atmospheric limits holds the potential to provide valuable medical and scientific research data for future pioneers.

    The Red Bull Stratos team brings together the world's leading minds in aerospace medicine, engineering, pressure suit development, capsule creation and balloon fabrication. It includes retired United States Air Force Colonel Joseph Kittinger, who holds three of the records Felix will strive to break.

    Joe's record jump from 102,800 ft in 1960 was during a time when no one knew if a human could survive a jump from the edge of space. Joe was a Captain in the U.S. Air Force and had already taken a balloon to 97,000 feet in Project ManHigh and survived a drogue mishap during a jump from 76,400 feet in Excelsior I. The Excelsior III mission was his 33rd parachute jump.

    Although researching extremes was part of the program's goals, setting records wasn't the mission's purpose. Joe ascended in helium balloon launched from the back of a truck. He wore a pressurized suit on the way up in an open, unpressurized gondola. Scientific data captured from Joe's jump was shared with U.S. research personnel for development of the space program. Today Felix and his specialized team hope to take what was learned from Joe's jumps more than 50 years ago and press forward to test the edge of the human envelope.


    Felix Baumgartner -


    On a mission like this, you need to be mentally fit and have total control over what you do, and I'm preparing very thoroughly.

    Felix consistently challenges his personal limits while pushing the physical boundaries of human flight. In 2003, Felix completed an unprecedented flight across the English Channel with a carbon wing, and subsequently began to consider an even bigger goal: the supersonic freefall. With a team of the world's top scientists, engineers and doctors behind him, Felix will attempt to rewrite history and advance aeronautical research with Red Bull Stratos.

    Daredevil Felix Baumgartner ascended to the edge of space in a pressurised capsule suspended beneath a giant helium balloon. He then jumped out, freefalling for four minutes and 19 seconds before opening his parachute.

    The 43-year-old Austrian also broke the record for the highest manned balloon flight after riding with the capsule 24 miles above New Mexico.

    He also achieved the fastest freefall after reaching a top speed of 834mph (1,342km/h) and broke the sound barrier, according to mission spokeswoman Sarah Anderson.

    The speed - revealed at a news conference a few hours after the leap - was significantly higher than that given earlier by a spokeswoman, who had put his maximum speed as 706mph (1,136km/h).

    This footage belongs entirely to Red Bull™ and I'm just sharing it, nonprofit.

  • Felix Baumgartner to skydive from 23 miles up

    34

    DOWNLOAD HERE:
    Austrian skydiver Felix Baumgartner, 42, plans to jump from a helium balloon nearly 23 miles in the sky. If successful, he would break several world records, including highest-altitude freefall and fastest freefall and become the first human to break the speed of sound without using a machine. Baumgartner would reach speeds of more than 690mph during the 10-minute fall. His pressurized suit will be able to withstand the force of a sonic boom and temperatures of minus 70° C. Source: BBC

  • Official Felix Baumgartner freefall from the edge of space with New World Record

    10:22

    This is the FULL + REAL Version of Felix Baumgartner freefall jump from the edge of space w/ New World Record: 128 000 Ft!

    The mans name is Felix Baumgartner, he manages to break the speed of sound.

    World Record:128,097 ft 39.044 m Felix Baumgartner made history Sunday when he jumped from a space capsule 128,097 feet above the Earth and free fell at Mach 1.24 (834 mph). Baumgartner became the first person to break the sound barrier in free fall before landing safely in the New Mexico desert. The 43-year-old Austrian pilot and skydiver broke two other records Sunday: the highest free fall and highest manned balloon flight. Red Bull Stratos 120,000 feet / 36,576 meters - today no Start abgebrochen -
    The next weather window for Felix Baumgartner and Red Bull Stratos opens on Sunday Oct 14 - 6AM MDT/12PM GMT Sunday October 14th
    Leben hängt an der Kapsel - Today's mission aborted due to gusty winds - Red Bull Stratos - Extremsportler im freien Fall aus 36 000 Metern
    Felix Baumgartner wird für seinen Sprung aus der Stratosphäre in einer von Hand gebauten Kapsel in 36 km Höhe gebracht. Diese dient dem 42-Jährigen während der fast dreistündigen Reise an den Rand des Weltraums als einziger Schutz. Von den ersten Planungen bis zur Enthüllung der Kapsel sind fünf Jahre vergangen.

    Red Bull Stratos is a mission to the edge of space that will try to surpass human limits that have existed for more than 50 years. Supported by a team of experts, Felix Baumgartner will undertake a stratospheric balloon flight to more than 120,000 feet / 36,576 meters and make a record-breaking freefall jump in the attempt to become the first man to break the speed of sound in freefall (an estimated 690 miles / 1,110 kilometers per hour), while delivering valuable data for medical and scientific advancement.

    COPYRIGHT INFORMATIONS!

    No copyright intended

    Red Bull Stratos is a mission to the edge of space that will try to surpass human limits that have existed for more than 50 years. Supported by a team of experts, Felix Baumgartner will undertake a stratospheric balloon flight to more than 120,000 feet / 36,576 meters and make a record-breaking freefall jump in the attempt to become the first man to break the speed of sound in freefall (an estimated 690 miles / 1,110 kilometers per hour), while delivering valuable data for medical and scientific advancement.


    Copyright Disclaimer [ignore]
    Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made
    for fair use for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching,
    scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that
    might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the
    balance in favor of fair use.


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    Red Bull Stratos - freefall from the edge of space
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    Red Bull Stratos - freefall from the edge of space

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    Felix Breaks 100k Feet!
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    felix, baumgartner, stratos, red bull stratos, mission to edge of space, space dive, freefall, live jump


    Red Bull Stratos is a mission to the edge of space that will try to surpass human limits that have existed for more than 50 years. Supported by a team of experts, Felix Baumgartner will undertake a stratospheric balloon flight to more than 120,000 feet / 36,576 meters and make a record-breaking freefall jump in the attempt to become the first man to break the speed of sound in freefall (an estimated 690 miles / 1,110 kilometers per hour), while delivering valuable data for medical and scientific advancement.

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    Live Felix Baumgartner Stratosphere Jump Review 2012 [HD]
    Live Felix Baumgartner Stratosphere Jump Review 2012 [HD]
    Live Felix Baumgartner Stratosphere Jump Review 2012 [HD]

    Felix Baumgartner's Test Jump - Red Bull Stratos
    Felix Baumgartner's Test Jump - Red Bull Stratos
    Felix Baumgartner's Test Jump - Red Bull Stratos

    Felix Jumps At 128k feet! Red Bull Stratos - freefall from the edge of space
    Felix Jumps At 128k feet! Red Bull Stratos - freefall from the edge of space
    Felix Jumps At 128k feet! Red Bull Stratos - freefall from the edge of space

    128,000 foot jump from space

    Insane Jump from space

    Felix jumps for his life

  • Felix Baumgartner - Red Bull Stratos - Complete Space Jump - GoPro

    14:09

    Felix Baumgartner reacts to becoming the first skydiver to go faster than the speed of sound, after freefalling from 24 miles above the earth.

    More on Felix Baumgartner:
    Felix completes his jump:
    Felix disappointed by aborted skydive:
    Felix prepares:
    Felix completes test flight:

  • The First Man To Break The Speed Of Sound In Freefall

    11:45

    The First Man To Break The Speed Of Sound In Freefall

    AUSTRIA'S FELIX BAUMGARTNER EARNED HIS PLACE IN THE HISTORY BOOKS ON SUNDAY OCT 14 AFTER OVERCOMING CONCERNS WITH THE POWER FOR HIS VISOR HEATER THAT IMPAIRED HIS VISION AND NEARLY JEOPARDIZED THE MISSION.

    BAUMGARTNER REACHED AN ESTIMATED SPEED OF 1,342.8 KM/H (MACH 1.24) JUMPING FROM THE STRATOSPHERE, WHICH WHEN CERTIFIED WILL MAKE HIM THE FIRST MAN TO BREAK THE SPEED OF SOUND IN FREEFALL AND SET SEVERAL OTHER RECORDS* WHILE DELIVERING VALUABLE DATA FOR FUTURE SPACE EXPLORATION.

  • What Felix Baumgartner Was Thinking Before His Supersonic Jump

    2:41

    It's been close to a year since Austrian skydiver Felix Baumgartner floated above Earth in a small, pressurized space capsule and became the first person to break the speed of sound in a free fall.

    In an interview with Business Insider during a visit to New York City, the 43-year-old revealed how he mentally and physically prepared for his record-breaking October jump.

    Fear can be your friend as long as you're able to control it, Baumgartner explained, but as soon as fear turns into panic, you lose it, he said.

    To maintain focus, Baumgartner paid attention to his breathing and thought about good things, like success, he told us.

    Baumgartner has just two items from his historic jump — a piece of the super-thin balloon that was attached to his space capsule and the Zenith wristwatch he wore during the dive. This is the first watch to break the sound barrier on a human. Soon, Baumgartner will be in possession of his space suit, which he plans to donate to the Smithsonian.

    The Austrian also talked about his meeting with iconic astronaut Neil Armstrong before the supersonic leap, a conversation that focused on what to eat and how to pee.

    Read more: Business Insider is the fastest growing business news site in the US. Our mission: to tell you all you need to know about the big world around you. The BI Video team focuses on technology, strategy and science with an emphasis on unique storytelling and data that appeals to the next generation of leaders – the digital generation.

  • Felix Baumgartner Space Jump World Record 2012

    1:46

    Felix Baumgartner free falls rushing toward earth at supersonic speeds from 24 miles high

  • Felix Baumgartners historic jump

    1:31

    Felix Baumgartner's historic jump. Watch daredevil Felix Baumgartner make a record-breaking leap from the edge of space. See more at:

  • Felix Baumgartner - Red Bull Stratos - Space Jump - Breaking the sound barrier

    4:41

    The Redbull Stratos skydiver Felix Baumgartner lives after his streaming trip from space covering miles and miles in the attempt to break the sound barrier.

    Baumgartner, the extreme athlete, landed safely on Earth after a 24-mile jump from the stratosphere in a dramatic, daring feat that may also have marked the world's first supersonic skydive.


    Baumgartner came down in the eastern New Mexico desert minutes after jumping from his capsule 128,097 feet, or roughly 24 miles, above Earth. He lifted his arms in victory shortly after landing, sending off loud cheers from jubilant onlookers and friends inside the mission's control center in Roswell, N.M.


    It wasn't immediately certain whether he had broken the speed of sound during his free-fall, which was one of the goals of the mission. Organizers said the jump lasted for just over nine minutes, about half of it in free-fall.


    Three hours earlier, Baumgartner, known as Fearless Felix, had taken off in a pressurized capsule carried by a 55-story ultra-thin helium balloon. As he exited his capsule from high above Earth, he flashed a thumbs-up sign, aware that his feat was being shown on a live-stream on the Internet.


    During the ensuing jump from more than three times the height of the average cruising altitude for jetliners, Baumgartner was expected to hit a speed of 690 mph.


    Any contact with the capsule on his exit could have torn his pressurized suit, a rip that could expose him to a lack of oxygen and temperatures as low as minus-70 degrees. That could have caused lethal bubbles to form in his bodily fluids


    He activated his parachute as he neared Earth, gently gliding into the desert east of Roswell.


    Coincidentally, Baumgartner's attempted feat also marked the 65th anniversary of U.S. test pilot Chuck Yeager successful attempt to become the first man to officially break the sound barrier aboard an airplane.


    At Baumgartner's insistence, some 30 cameras recorded the event Sunday. While it had been pegged as a live broadcast, it was actually under a 20-second delay. Shortly after launch, screens at mission control showed the capsule as it began rising high above the New Mexico desert, with cheers erupting from organizers. Baumgartner could be seen on video, calmly checking instruments inside the capsule.

  • Felix Baumgartner breaks the sound barrier

    2:07

    Keep up to date with all the latest Irish and international news and current affairs with

    Follow us on twitter @rtenewsnow and on Facebook

    Austrian skydiver Felix Baumgartner has become the first person to break the sound barrier after he successfully jumped from a balloon 39 kilometres above earth. The 43-year-old also broke the record for the highest ever skydive.

  • Stratos - Felix Baumgartner the Man Who Broke The Speed of Sound!

    4:55

    Thank you for your inspiration !!!

    -Army

  • First Man to Jump from Outer Space and Break the Sound Barrier

    1:16

    First Man to Jump from Outer Space and Break the Sound Barrier

    On 14 October 2012, space daredevil Felix Baumgartner jumped nearly 96,000 feet from the stratosphere, landing unharmed in the New Mexico Desert.

    Doing so, he set world records for skydiving an estimated 39 km (24 mi), reaching an estimated top speed of 1,357.64 km/h (843.6 mph), or Mach 1.25. He became the first person to break the sound barrier without vehicular power relative to the surface on his descent.



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  • Red Bull Stratos - Felix Baumgartner

    8:47

    Red Bull Stratos, a mission to the edge of space, will attempt to transcend human limits that have existed for 50 years. Supported by a team of experts Felix Baumgartner plans to ascend to 120,000 feet in a stratospheric balloon and make a freefall jump rushing toward earth at supersonic speeds before parachuting to the ground. His attempt to dare atmospheric limits holds the potential to provide valuable medical and scientific research data for future pioneers.

    The Red Bull Stratos team brings together the world's leading minds in aerospace medicine, engineering, pressure suit development, capsule creation and balloon fabrication. It includes retired United States Air Force Colonel Joseph Kittinger, who holds three of the records Felix will strive to break.

    Joe's record jump from 102,800 ft in 1960 was during a time when no one knew if a human could survive a jump from the edge of space. Joe was a Captain in the U.S. Air Force and had already taken a balloon to 97,000 feet in Project ManHigh and survived a drogue mishap during a jump from 76,400 feet in Excelsior I. The Excelsior III mission was his 33rd parachute jump.

    Although researching extremes was part of the program's goals, setting records wasn't the mission's purpose. Joe ascended in helium balloon launched from the back of a truck. He wore a pressurized suit on the way up in an open, unpressurized gondola. Scientific data captured from Joe's jump was shared with U.S. research personnel for development of the space program. Today Felix and his specialized team hope to take what was learned from Joe's jumps more than 50 years ago and press forward to test the edge of the human envelope.

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