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Reef Life of the Andaman (full marine biology documentary)

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  • Ocean Life and Nature Documentary - Amazing Underwater Marine Life Documentary

    50:55

    Best Ocean Life 2020: Amazing Underwater Marine Life Documentary 2020 is about the life in the oceans in coral reef full documentary. Underwater Life in Our Oceans And Seas Documentary 2020. If you love nature documentaries, you will surely enjoy this.

    Please SUBSCRIBE & SHARE. Thanks.

    #fish #documentary #ocean
    Check my latest videos here:


    Vitamin D Deficiency Suppresses Immunity


    Top 10 Inflammatory Foods to avoid


    Fighting Inflammation to prevent permanent damage


    Ashwagandha Benefits

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  • Mucky Secrets - The Marine Creatures of the Lembeh Strait

    1:32:25

    Mucky Secrets is a documentary about the marine life of the Lembeh Strait at the heart of the Coral Triangle off north Sulawesi in Indonesia. The DVD is available at

    The Lembeh Strait is a popular scuba diving destination, famed for its excellent muck diving. A huge diversity of exotic marine creatures can be found on the mucky seabed, including everything from tropical fish to benthic sharks to nudibranchs. Critters compete for survival with an armoury including camouflage, mimicry, toxicity, and dazzling coloration.

    Mucky Secrets is an excellent resource for scuba divers, aquarists, and marine biology students. The documentary features underwater macro footage from many of Lembeh's famous dive sites including Critter Hunt, Police Pier, Tanjung Kusu-Kusu, Nudi Falls, Aer Perang, Jahir, Makawide, Nudi Retreat, Retak Larry, TK (Teluk Kembahu), Hairball and Aw Shucks.

    There are subtitles/CC tracks for the narration and for the scientific and common names of the marine species, and dive site names.

    Watch the 4-minute prologue video at

    Marine life featured:

    0:00:00 Introduction
    0:05:11 Corals
    0:05:57 Tunicates - sea squirts - ascidians
    0:06:37 Symbiosis - sea anemones - anemonefish (clownfish)

    CRUSTACEANS
    0:07:29 Commensal shrimps (partner shrimps)
    0:09:12 Emperor shrimp
    0:11:07 Mantis shrimps
    0:12:34 Squat lobsters
    0:13:27 Hermit crabs
    0:14:26 True crabs
    0:15:55 Sea Urchins

    ELASMOBRANCHS
    0:17:11 Blue spotted stingrays
    0:18:15 Brownbanded bamboo shark

    EELS
    0:18:59 Snake eels
    0:20:27 Moray eels
    0:21:34 Ribbon eels

    REEF FISHES
    0:22:33 Cardinalfishes
    0:24:43 Trumpetfish
    0:25:58 Seahorses
    0:27:06 Pygmy seahorse
    0:28:30 Pipefishes
    0:30:38 Ghost pipefishes
    0:33:22 Shrimpfishes - razorfishes
    0:33:58 Seamoths - short dragonfish
    0:35:03 Oriental flying gurnard
    0:35:58 Blennies
    0:36:49 Gobies
    0:37:46 Sea pen
    0:38:17 Dragonets
    0:40:49 Mandarinfish
    0:42:08 Frogfishes
    0:46:39 Juvenile fishes
    0:47:12 Spotted parrotfish
    0:48:20 Sweetlips
    0:49:05 Yellowblotch razorfish
    0:49:37 Filefishes
    0:50:24 Boxfishes - cowfishes
    0:50:57 Puffers (pufferfish)
    0:52:21 Sharpnose puffers (tobies)
    0:52:50 Porcupinefishes
    0:53:45 Panther grouper
    0:54:10 Whitemargin stargazer
    0:54:54 Leopard flounder
    0:55:25 Flatheads
    0:56:36 Scorpionfishes
    0:57:27 Ambon Scorpionfish
    0:58:04 Rhinopias
    0:59:50 Lionfishes
    1:02:29 Demon stinger (spiny devilfish, bearded ghoul)
    1:03:17 Fireworm
    1:03:45 Waspfishes

    MOLLUSCS
    CEPHALOPODS
    1:05:48 Cuttlefishes
    1:08:38 Octopuses
    1:11:34 Flame scallop
    GASTROPODS
    1:12:03 Sea snails
    1:14:37 Sea slugs - nudibranchs
    1:21:49 Sea slugs feeding
    1:23:57 Nudibranchs mating
    1:26:11 Sap-sucking slug
    1:26:59 Headshield slugs
    1:27:49 Sea hares
    1:30:21 Polyclad flatworm
    1:31:18 End credits

    I have more scuba diving videos and underwater footage on my website at:


    I post updates about my videos here:





    MUSIC CREDITS:
    Arrival of the Broken Kings by Klangachse (
    The Unknown by Jaycieh (

    All the following tracks are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license

    Covert Affair, Tenebrous Brothers Carnival - Snake Lady, Hitman, Sneak 'n Get Caught, Water Prelude, The Other Side of the Door, Sneaky Adventure, Umbrella Pants, Comfortable Mystery, Babylon, Mysterioso March, Sneaky Snitch, Hidden Agenda, Lightless Dawn, Tenebrous Brothers Carnival - Mermaid, Scheming Weasel (slower version), Brittle Rille, Perspectives by Kevin MacLeod (
    Mystery 2, Joy 2 by Tom Cusack (Leafy Lane Productions)(
    Divider, Air Hockey Saloon by Chris Zabriskie (
    Mountain Breeze (pad), Biosphere by Purple Planet (
    Second Thoughts by James Kirsch a.k.a. generalfuzz (
    Blade Walker by Lahniz (
    Untitled Ambient Tune by TekMerc (
    Melody of the Lost Ark by Ojini Project (

    Thanks to:
    - Two Fish Divers ( who I stayed and dived with on Lembeh Island, and especially to their keen-eyed dive guides for their critter spotting
    - Phiangpis Phanchana for diving and production assistance
    - Gerry Allen and Teresa Zubi ( for assistance with marine species identification
    - Bill Rudman for creating the now-idle sea slug forum ( still an invaluable source of knowledge.

    The video was shot by Nick Hope with a Sony HVR-Z1P HDV camera in a Light & Motion Bluefin HD housing with Light & Motion Elite lights, a flat port, and a Century +3.5 diopter.

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  • Australias Great Barrier Reef: Biodiversity and Marine Life Threatened

    52:49

  • 500 + Fish Identification Documentary by Pano4life

    52:31

    A few years ago I was stung by the Diving virus. I quickly became an instructor and over time I was able to accumulate more than 6000 dives mainly in Thailand, Indonesia, Philippines and Malaysia. During these dives, I noticed how fragile the ecosystems are. I came up with the idea of ​​filming everything I could for fear of not seeing it again one day. Of course I could not take my camera for each of these dives but I do it whenever I have the opportunity.

    Today we were able to identify and filmed in full HD 500 different underwater species. This documentary of 60 minutes retraces these different species with the scientific description and the Latin name of each species.

    Our goal is to show the world how precious the oceans are and full of life that unfortunately the humanity is likely to endanger ...

    We sometimes forget that the oceans provide us with more than 60% of the oxygen we we need to live. Half of the photosynthesis and removal of carbon dioxide takes place in the oceans. Marine species play a key role in this regulation. It is therefore important to identify and protect them. Unfortunately for humans, this protection is not a priority. On the contrary, the human pressures on the oceans are increasing every day, the impact is irreversible!

    Through this documentary, we hope to be able to arouse interest on the various underwater species and their protection. We also say to ourself that if our future generations also want to be able to contemplate the beauty of our planet, we have to act quickly! If we continue like this, our grandchildren will not even see a quarter of what you see in this documentary.

    I would especially like to thank my partner and dive Buddy Lily Romero who filmed and helped me editing this amazing video. As well as laurent Minsart for some macro shots in Lembeh, Indonesia. Special Big Up to all those who participated by loan or by far at this documentary, Dive Guide Local Boat Captain.


    More Info or collab

    Lily Romero & Pierre Bijloos


    IG: LILYRYOGA
    IG: PANO4LIFE

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  • Deep Sea Creatures National Geographic Documentary 2017 HD

    53:56

    Deep Sea Creatures [National Geographic Documentary 2017 HD]

    The Deep sea creature refers to organisms that live below the photic zone of the ocean. These creatures must survive in extremely harsh conditions, such as hundreds of bars of pressure, small amounts of oxygen, very little food, no sunlight, and constant, extreme cold. Most creatures have to depend on food floating down from above.
    These creatures live in very demanding environments, such as the abyssal or hadal zones, which, being thousands of meters below the surface, are almost completely devoid of light. The water is between 3 and 10 degrees Celsius and has low oxygen levels. Due to the depth, the pressure is between 20 and 1,000 bars. Creatures that live hundreds or even thousands of meters deep in the ocean have adapted to the high pressure, lack of light, and other factors.

    The depths of the ocean are festooned with the most nightmarish creatures imaginable. You might think you’re safe, because these critters live thousands of feet down in a cold dark abyss, but the vampire squid, which looks like a nightmare umbrella, and the frilled shark—a literal living fossil—will live on in the recesses of your mind long after you’ve clicked away. Enjoy these deep sea horrors and try to have a relaxing day afterward.

    ► NOTE : I'm a big fan of National Geographic and I just collect the best parts of National Geographic. I do not make money from National Geographic's Video.
    Thanks You very much

  • Undiscovered islands in Atlantic Ocean - Wildlife Secret Animals

    43:24

    The vast ocean separates continents meanwhile it also boasts hundreds of small island. From sandy beaches to remote and untouched nature

    Scattered across all 7 seas and from the tropics to the Antarctic are the UK's Overseas Territories some of the most remote places on the planet. This Documentary we explore this natural wealth of life in locations so remote that few have ever visited.

    Thousands of miles from the nearest anything these islands scattered across all 7 seas from the Antarctic to the tropics are amongst the remotest places on earth. But life here isn't lonesome. They teem with life from huge penguin colonies to the world's richest coral reefs. Because many are so remote they have acted as laboratories of evolution shaping life in unexpected and dramatic ways. Thrushes that once fed on seeds have evolved a taste for meat. Turtles have become extreme navigators and seabirds nest on single islands and nowhere else in the world. These islands all have one thing in common they are all British overseas territories....

    Undiscovered islands in Atlantic Ocean Islands born of fire run from the equatorial Atlantic down to Antarctica. Many are now home to unique species and all have intriguing stories to tell. From huge penguin turtle and seabird colonies to the world's richest coral reefs discover the UK's remarkable distant isolated territories.

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  • Chasing Coral | FULL FEATURE | Netflix

    1:28:59

    Chasing Coral taps into the collective will and wisdom of an ad man, a self-proclaimed coral nerd, top-notch camera designers, and renowned marine biologists as they invent the first time-lapse camera to record bleaching events as they happen. Unfortunately, the effort is anything but simple, and the team doggedly battles technical malfunctions and the force of nature in pursuit of their golden fleece: documenting the indisputable and tragic transformation below the waves. With its breathtaking photography, nail-biting suspense, and startling emotion, Chasing Coral is a dramatic revelation that won’t have audiences sitting idle for long.

    Learn more at and find educational resources here:

    US Rating: TV-PG. Parental guidance suggested.

    SUBSCRIBE:

    About Netflix
    Netflix is the world's leading streaming entertainment service with over 167 million paid memberships in over 190 countries enjoying TV series, documentaries and feature films across a wide variety of genres and languages. Members can watch as much as they want, anytime, anywhere, on any internet-connected screen. Members can play, pause and resume watching, all without commercials or commitments.

    Chasing Coral | FULL FEATURE | Netflix

  • The Underwater Wonderland of Australia | Free Documentary Nature

    45:03

    The Underwater Wonderland of Australia | Ocean Documentary

    Australia stands for tourism icons like the Ayers Rock, the Pinnacles and the Kakadu National Park. Crocodiles, Koalas and Kangaroos are possibly the most popular animals of the world. Venomous snakes, and spiders are in focus of the media as well as the famous great Barrier Reef and the Ningaloo Reef - the reef of the whale sharks. This under-water documentary concentrates on the two big coral reefs. The Australian Paul Waghorn is one of the underwater specialists of the Mountain Pictures team. He possibly spends more hours underwater than on land. He describes the biodiversity off the two reefs at the east and west coast of Australia as a symphony of the ocean. It teaches us to understand not only the animals but also our own humans variety of species as a miracle. Nature does not know man made rules and religions and it is anything but a happy wonderland. The species have developed her own methods of surviving. Pauls cinematic concert is asking the spectator to think about wrong or right, good and bad, stupidity and cleverness in the world of plants and creatures of the ocean.

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    Subscribe Free Documentary - Nature Channel for free:
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    #FreeDocumentaryNature #Documentary #Australia
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    Free Documentary is dedicated to bring high-class documentaries to you on youtube for free. With the latest camera equipment used by well-known filmmakers working for famous production studios. You will see fascinating shots from the deep seas and up in the air, capturing great stories and pictures from everything our beautiful and interesting planet has to offer.

    Enjoy stories about nature, wildlife, culture, people, history and more to come.

  • ► Vicious Beauties - The Secret World Of The Jellyfish

    44:04

    The family of the jellyfish or medusae are not only the most venomous ocean inhabitants but also some of the deepest divers. Medusae have been found as deep as 8.300 meters. Their existence is paramount to the oceans. Many of the large migrations of fish and mammals would not be possible without the existence of jellies. They are a crucial part of the food chain, many fish feed on jellies and in turn mammals or larger migratory predators feed on fish.The scientist Gerhard Jarms of the Zoological Institute of the University of Hamburg takes us on a journey into the exotic world of jellyfish. He is one of the most renowned medusae scientists in the world. Our expedition begins in the northern Atlantic where we will find the mysterious periphylla. We will continue on to the Azores in the Atlantic. There we will search for the XY jellies that seek shelter in caves in rough seas.
    In the Pacific we will swim with the jellies in the famous Jellyfish Lake and last but not
    least we will explore some of the world's most beautiful coral reefs of western Papua. And at the very end danger lurks around every corner as we set out to search off Australia's coast for the fatal sea wasp- one of the most poisonous ocean inhabitants. In the Pacific we will swim with the jellies in the famous Jellyfish Lake and last but not
    least we will explore some of the world's most beautiful coral reefs of western Papua. And at the very end danger lurks around every corner as we set out to search off Australia's coast for the fatal sea wasp- one of the most poisonous ocean inhabitants.

    Free Documentary is a channel that dedicated to bring high-class documentaries to you on YouTube.

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  • A Reef by Night and Day - Short Film

    12:43

    This short film about coral reefs features time-lapse photography, drone footage and underwater sequences, all in 4K resolution.

    Experience a coral reef like never before.

    Used gear:

    - Nikon D610 (time-lapse)
    - Canon EOS 7D Mark IV (time-lapse and underwater)
    - Sony FDR-AX100 (underwater)
    - DJI Mavic Pro (drone)

    Music by Purple Planet,

    Copyright 2019 Coral Publications / Tim Wijgerde.

    Nothing from this production may be used or altered in any form without prior written consent. Sharing the video link on social media and blogs is highly appreciated.

  • The Most Intelligent Animal on Earth? | Unedited Movie - Aliens of the Deep Sea | Nature Documentary

    43:34

    How has the octopus become so intelligent and capable of thinking in the abstract? Watch fascinating and often hilarious experiments to see just how smart they are.

    After this video, you'll never think about the octopus the same.

    In Aliens of the Deep Sea we get to see how octopuses behave in the wild too. Off the coast of Vancouver Island, underwater divers are watched by a huge octopus - a ghost like creature that lurks until it feels it's safe to emerge and be seen. It's an eerie encounter.

    This incredible documentary illustrates why the octopus is one of the ocean's most complex and enigmatic creatures which should be studied, not served in restaurants.

    The octopus uses cognitive reasoning to make deductions and understand its environment. It can shape shift, change color and texture on the fly to blend in with its surroundings to become either predator or defend itself from becoming prey.

    In one novel experiment we see an octopus wrap its tentacles around a screw-top jar that has a crab inside it. In slow but determined fashion, the octopus successfully opens the jar to get to its prey. The jar is unlike anything it would encounter in the wild - the octopus has used cognitive reasoning, not instinct, to catch its well-deserved lunch.

    The octopus has lived side-by-side with humankind from our earliest days. But it's only now that we're beginning to unravel the animal's secrets, and the extent of its formidable brain-power.

    Watch as an octopus slips out of its tank and slithers surreptitiously across a concrete floor. Is it making a break for freedom? Not at all. It knows that its prey is just a short distance away in another tank.

    As we learn, the octopus can move on land as well as underwater and the little round trip it has taken is not just to get from point A to point B. It's also taking this little detour because it's curious about the world it is living in.

    It's hard to believe that this animal is simply a mollusk. As far as his family tree goes, the octopus is more closely related to an oyster or a snail than to any other species of animal.

    And yet, as octopuses behave like shape shifters, moving in and out of tiny openings to get their reward, they are working out solutions the way humans do.

    They are able to think in the abstract.

    In Aliens of the Deep Sea we get to see how octopuses behave in the wild too.

    Amazingly, with all its powerful traits, the octopus has never become king of the sea. Researchers think that it's because of the female's short life span.

    They give up everything, including their life, for their eggs. But this sad reality may also be the reason that octopuses have an innate intelligence they have no choice but to learn by trial and error.

    Just how has an animal that is so different from humans become so intelligent?

    From Spain to Vancouver Island and finally to Capri, Italy, follow scientists as they try to understand how the octopus has evolved to have such intelligence, even by our standards.

    Through fascinating experiments audiences will discover there is still much to know about this mystifying creature.


    #Octopus
    #IntelligentOctopus
    #OctopusIntelligence
    #AmazingOctopus
    #AliensOfTheDeepSea

  • Symphony of life: Underwater world of Australia

    45:03

    Australia stands for tourism icons like the Ayers Rock, the Pinnacles and the Kakadu National Park. Crocodiles, Koalas and Kangaroos are possibly the most popular animals of the world. Venomous snakes, and spiders are in focus of the media as well as the famous great Barrier Reef and the Ningaloo Reef - the reef of the whale sharks. This under-water documentary concentrates on the two big coral reefs. The Aus-tralian Paul Waghorn is one of the underwater specialists of the Moun-tain Pictures team. He possibly spends more hours underwater than on land. He describes the biodiversity off the two reefs at the east and west coast of Australia as a symphony of the ocean. It teaches us to understand not only the animals but also our own humans variety of species as a miracle. Nature does not know man made rules and reli-gions and it is anything but a happy wonderland. The species have developed her own methods of surviving. Pauls cinematic concert is asking the spectator to think about wrong or right, good and bad, stu-pidity and cleverness in the world of plants and creatures of the ocean.

  • ►Track of the Tuna

    51:33

    For over 4000 years fishermen have been catching tuna during their migration through the Mediterranean. During the antiquity they were hailed as the manna of the oceans. We take a look at the long journey of the tuna to its mating grounds and witness their struggles including massive amounts of hunters and the strong presence of fishing boats.


    Free Documentary is a channel that dedicated to bring high-class documentaries to you on YouTube.

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  • Symbiosis & Anemonefish - Reef Life of the Andaman - Part 18

    6:16

    Symbiosis, including anemonefish & clownfish. Part 18 of my DVD, Reef Life of the Andaman, available at or view the whole 2-hour video at

    In this video we see how fishes form symbiotic relationships with other marine life in order to defend themselves. First we find sea urchin cardinalfish, Siphamia versicolor, protecting themselves amongst the spines of sea urchins and crown-of-thorns starfish at Koh Bon, near the Similan Islands, and in the Mergui Archipelago. This is known as a commensal relationship, whereby one partner in the relationship benefits while the other receives neither benefit nor harm.

    Anemonefish form symbiotic relationships with sea anemones. This is a mutually-beneficial symbiotic relationship. While the fish are protected, their faeces provide food for the anemone and they help keep it free of parasites. We see skunk clownfish, Clark's anemonefish, saddle anemonefish and the well-known ocellaris clownfish (Amphiprion ocellaris) finding their home in various species of sea anemone such as the magnificent anemone, Heteractis magnifica.

    Porcelain anemone crabs, Neopetrolisthes maculatus, are found in sea anemones in the Similan Islands, while a magnificent shrimp, Ancylomenes magnificus, shelters under the stinging tentacles of a tube anemone at Burma's Shark Cave, itself covered in phoronid worms.

    Finally we see how small and juvenile fish hitchhike in jellyfish to protect themself from predators.

    The following closed captions/subtitles are available by clicking the CC button under the video:

    NARRATION / COMMENTARY:
    - English
    - German (Deutscher Kommentar)
    - Spanish (Narración en Español)

    MARINE LIFE & DIVE SITE NAMES
    - Dutch (Nederlandse Namen)
    - English
    - German (Deutsche Bezeichnungen)
    - Thai ( ชื่อภาษาไทย & จุดดำน้ำ )

    Please get in touch with me if you would like to help translate the narration or marine life names into other languages.

    Thanks to Erik Verkoyen for the music track, Pattern Errors.

    I have more scuba diving videos and underwater footage on my website at:


    I post updates about my videos, and interesting underwater videos from other filmmakers here:



    Thanks to Santana Diving of Phuket ( to Elfi and Uli Erfort and Daniel Bruehwiler for help with the German translation, and to Frank Nelissen for the Dutch subtitles.

    Full list of marine life and dive sites featured in this video:

    00:00 Black Longspine Urchin, Diadema setosum, Koh Doc Mai
    00:05 Sea Urchin Cardinalfish, Siphamia versicolor, Koh Bon
    00:12 Sea Urchin Cardinalfish, Siphamia versicolor, Little Torres
    00:22 Yellow Cardinalfish, Ostorhinchus luteus, Shark Cave
    00:28 Skunk Clownfish, Amphiprion akallopisos, Home Run, Racha Yai
    00:34 Skunk Clownfish, Amphiprion akallopisos, Bungalow Bay, Racha Yai
    00:42 Skunk Clownfish, Amphiprion akallopisos, Staghorn Reef, Racha Yai
    00:49 Clark's Anemonefish, Amphiprion clarkii, Hin Daeng
    00:57 Clark's Anemonefish, Amphiprion clarkii, Fan Forest Pinnacle
    01:03 Clark's Anemonefish, Amphiprion clarkii, Anita's Reef
    01:15 Clark's Anemonefish, Amphiprion clarkii, East of Eden
    01:23 Clark's Anemonefish, Amphiprion clarkii, Koh Bon
    01:32 Clark's Anemonefish, Amphiprion clarkii, Rocky Point
    01:37 Clark's Anemonefish, Amphiprion clarkii, Shark Cave
    01:43 Clark's Anemonefish, Amphiprion clarkii, Maya Bay, Phi Phi Leh
    01:56 Saddle Anemonefish, Amphiprion ephippium, Richelieu Rock
    02:22 Ocellaris Clownfish, Amphiprion ocellaris, East of Eden
    02:34 Ocellaris Clownfish, Amphiprion ocellaris, Koh Tachai
    02:54 Ocellaris Clownfish, Amphiprion ocellaris, Koh Doc Mai
    03:07 Domino Damsel, Dascyllus trimaculatus, Bungalow Bay, Racha Noi
    03:18 Domino Damsels, Dascyllus trimaculatus, Black Rock
    03:26 Clark's Anemonefish and Domino Damsels, East of Eden
    03:32 Porcelain Anemone Crab, Neopetrolisthes maculatus, Anita's Reef
    03:44 Porcelain Anemone Crab, Neopetrolisthes maculatus, Shark Fin Reef
    04:02 Porcelain Anemone Crab, Neopetrolisthes maculatus, Moving Wall
    04:18 Tube Anemone, Cerianthus sp., Shark Cave
    04:29 Magnificent Shrimp, Ancylomenes magnificus, Shark Cave
    04:52 Rhizostome Jellyfish, Versuriga anadyomene, Anemone Reef
    05:05 Rhizostome Jellyfish, Versuriga anadyomene, Marita's Rock, Racha Noi
    05:16 Crowned Jellyfish, Cephea cephea, East of Eden
    05:22 Rhizostome Jellyfish, Crambione mastigophora, Shark Cave
    05:31 Rhizostome Jellyfish, Versuriga anadyomene, Richelieu Rock
    05:48 Australian Spotted Jellyfish, Phyllorhiza punctata, Staghorn Reef, Racha Yai

  • Australia. The Great White Shark | Full Documentary

    50:00

    We found the great white shark in the waters of the south coast of Australia, a crowded fed by waters from the Antarctic ice continent life. With its two-ton, this great wild predator prowls the Australian beaches in search of its most coveted prey, the sea lion. We dive on the Australian continent to see the beautiful and varied creatures that hide in its waters feared of the white shark.

    ▶ SUBSCRIBE! Full Documentaries every Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday!
    ▶ Documentary Australia. The Great White Shark

    The waters that bathe the south of Australia are a link preserved from a former union whit the Antarctic.
    For the sharks, this is a region of plenty. The basic design of their bodies is 300 million years old, and is literally perfect. But only one of them is called Death. Beyond the reef lies the kingdom of the great killer, the vast blue, the cold waters which are tinged with red when hunger demands. The great white shark, two thousand kilos of savage strength at the service of a mouth. A prodigious animal which, after hundreds of year of blind terror, we are now learning to admire.

    As we move further up the west coast of Australia, and approach the Tropic of Capricorn, corals are more in evidence, and start to form reefs. The coral reef is a very different ecosystem from that of the cold waters of the south. The coral reef is like a gigantic self-contained organism, in which energy passes from one layer to the next, with just two essential ingredients - the sun and the sea. The corals are specialists in poor waters like these, provided they are clear.

    We arrive in the dominions of the great white shark, the dark blue waters. And here, a tragedy, repeated every year, is about to occur. The sea lions sense that the breeding season is approaching. Along the coast of southern Australia and Tasmania, they begin to gather near suitable places, playing and swimming with their characteristic skill.
    The great white sharks like nothing better than a fresh fur seal – warm red meat, covered in delicious fat, clean and easy to digest. But the great white shark comes to its annual rendezvous with the seal cubs. All it need do is approach the colony, and wait for its chance.
    This individual is eight metres of sheer fury, and almost two thousand kilos of expert hunter. Though it is a fish, its blood is ten degrees centigrade warmer than the surrounding water, so its muscles perform better in attack. It detects the electrical fields generated by its victims, and it is equipped with a system of navigation based on the earth’s magnetic field. Its sense of smell is infallible, and the muscles around its eyes are warmer than the others, to give it optimum sight.

    The black legend of the white shark has been forged on the basis of exaggerations. Its fame as a monster, devourer of men, is far in excess of the reality. But, for decades, it has served as an excuse for uncontrolled fishing. Their impressive appearance made them the most sought after of all fisherman’s trophies.
    In reality, attacks on humans are rare and, strangely, many of the victims survive. Like these three mutilated men, who know spend their lives killing the white sharks that attacked them. The white shark possesses the curiosity of all prowlers.
    We now know that the white shark only attacks men by mistake or in self-defence, when in these cloudy waters it mistakes them for its normal prey, the sea lions. It is so elusive that, in seas where there are now hardly any seals, and the white sharks eat other prey that don’t resemble man, not only are there no attacks, but people don’t even suspect they exist.
    This fantastic animal is a symbol of the sea in which it lives, a sea which we are threatening, a much more deadly threat than the great white. It is relatively easy to defend the great white, but there are 350 other species of shark increasingly threatened over-fishing, with virtually no one paying any attention to their plight.
    No one knows how many answers lie in these waters, but one thing is certain, in the deep, vast blue, in the salty abyss in which all these creatures live, only one is king. Carcharodon carcharias, the white death.

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    Thumbnail By Elias Levy (Great White Shark) [CC BY 2.0 ( via Wikimedia Commons

  • Deep Sea Creatures: Norway | Alien Reefs | Catch

    5:21

    In waters of barely 4 degrees Celsius and against strong currents, this team of divers investigates what lies at the bottom of the Trondheim Fjord.

    Subscribe for new videos every week!

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    Content licensed from Sky Vision to Little Dot Studios. Produced by Tesche Dokcumentarfilm-Produktion.

    #Deepseadiving #Norway #Alienreefs #fishing #scaryfish #deepseafish

  • Reef Cleaning Stations | JONATHAN BIRDS BLUE WORLD

    8:52

    Jonathan explores cleaning stations on the reef, where animals get cleaned of parasites and infection by other animals. Some examples shown are anemones and anemonefish (clownfish), wrasses, shrimp, manta rays, moray eels, Goliath groupers, sea turtles and barracuda. This episode was filmed in many locations such as Malaysia, the Philippines, Yap, Australia's Great Barrier Reef and the Caribbean.

    This is an HD re-release of a previously released segment.

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  • Aurora Province: The Treasure of the Philippines | Free Documentary

    44:13

    Aurora Province: The Treasure of the Philippines | Nature Documentary

    The Aurora Province is located on the East-Central part of Luzon Island, the main Island of the Philippines. The province of Aurora covers the eastern portion of the Sierra Madre Mountains, hence it is generally mountainous. Its coastline spans 332 kilometres in length. Aurora is a province blessed with an abundance of tourist attractions. It has its share of historical sites such as the home and resthouse of former Phil-ippine President Manuel L. Quezon. The province also has a beautiful Catholic church and several historical markers. Its natural attractions include picturesque waterfalls, lush greenery on mountainsides, and panoramic beaches. Surfing, snorkelling, scuba diving, mountain climb-ing and trekking are only some of the activities you can enjoy in Aurora. The social life is dominated by a mixture of old traditions of the natives and modern arts. So the displeasing dances of former head hunters can be admired as well as the work of highly talented artists of today's time. The population lives predominantly on farming and skilled crafts. It is conspicuous how engaged scientists work out solutions for an eco-logical lasting way of managing agriculture and to increase the conser-vation management. The influence of Spanish conquerors in Auroras history is still present at many places trough to the architectural style of historic buildings. Also a big Part of the population is Catholic.

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    Free Documentary is dedicated to bringing high-class documentaries to you on YouTube for free. With the latest camera equipment used by well-known filmmakers working for famous production studios. You will see fascinating shots from the deep seas and up in the air, capturing great stories and pictures from everything our beautiful and interesting planet has to offer.

    Enjoy stories about nature, wildlife, culture, people, history and more to come.

  • Scavengers of the Seas - Documentary

    49:36

    Following the scavenger sharks that live off the remains of their aquatic neighbours, from the remnants of a blue whale to fins and fur. Filmed over four years in New Caledonia.

    Author(s): Cyril Barbançon, Bertrand Loyer
    Director(s): Cyril Barbançon, Bertrand Loyer
    Year: 2003
    Producer(s): Saint Thomas Productions, Canal+
    Running time: 52 mn
    Distributor(s): Village Distribution

    Awards:
    Japan Wildlife Film Festival
    Japan, 2003
    Best Underwater Film -

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  • Life On Coral Reef

    33:02

    Peaceful and relaxing 30+ minutes underwater footage of most beautiful tropical fish, soft and hard corals, anemones and sea creatures, octopus, mantis shrimps, cuttlefish and more. Filmed in Lembeh Strait, Indonesia

    Music By(Credit):
    Almost in F Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
    Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License


    See more at:

    Please Subscribe & Support my channel!

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  • Alien Invaders - Full Episode

    26:51

    In the waters of the western Atlantic and Caribbean, a voracious alien predator has taken hold. Native to the Indo-Pacific, the invasive lionfish is a major threat to biodiversity and the health of already stressed coral reef ecosystems.

    The popular aquarium fish is thought to have first been released into the wild in South Florida in the mid 1980s. With no natural predator in this part of the world, lionfish numbers have increased rapidly.
    To combat this problem, experts are encouraging people to eat'em to beat'em. Changing Seas joins scientists in the field to learn more about this beautiful, yet gluttonous feeder and the threat it is posing to native fish populations.

  • Hiding, Camouflage & Mimicry - Reef Life of the Andaman - Part 16

    6:37

    Hiding, camouflage & mimicry. Part 16 of my DVD, Reef Life of the Andaman, available at or view the whole 2-hour video at

    In this video we look at how fishes and other marine life use different strategies for hiding themselves from both predators and prey.

    First we see how the pastel tilefish, Hoplolatilus fronticinctus, hides by diving into enormous piles of rubble that it has built at dive sites in the depths of the Mergui Archipelago in Burma (Myanmar).

    Then we look at how the dwarf whipray, Himantura walga, and bluespotted stingray, Neotrygon kuhlii, camouflage themselves under sand on the seabed at various locations in Thailand including the Similan Islands.

    The day octopus, Octopous cyanea, shows us how it ejects ink as a decoy so it can make its escape.

    Mimicry is a clever way that marine life hides its presence. We see how the straightstick pipefish, Trachyrhamphus longirostris, mimics sea whips to avoid detection, and how the ornate ghost pipefish, Solenostomus paradoxus, can change its body coloration and orientation to mimic its surroundings.

    The giant frogfish, Antennarius commerson, is an ambush predator. They mimic sponges and their slender dorsal spine, the illicium, is waved around like a tiny fishing rod. Bypassers attracted to the lure at the end of the illicium are engulfed by the huge mouth in a fraction of a second. They are also known as anglerfish.

    Scorpionfish and stonefish are also ambush predators. They blend in perfectly with their environment so they can pounce on their unsuspecting prey, but have venomous spines as an extra defence. We see a moray eel colliding with a stonefish at Thailand's Boonsung wreck.

    The following closed captions/subtitles are available by clicking the CC button under the video:

    NARRATION / COMMENTARY:
    - English
    - German (Deutscher Kommentar)
    - Spanish (Narración en Español)

    MARINE LIFE & DIVE SITE NAMES
    - Dutch (Nederlandse Namen)
    - English
    - German (Deutsche Bezeichnungen)
    - Thai ( ชื่อภาษาไทย & จุดดำน้ำ )

    Please get in touch with me if you would like to help translate the narration or marine life names into other languages.

    Thanks to Coded for the first music track, Pattern Errors, and to Toao (SOILSOUND Music Publishing LLC, for the second music track, Starbeam.

    I have more scuba diving videos and underwater footage on my website at:


    I post updates about my videos, and interesting underwater videos from other filmmakers here:



    Thanks to Santana Diving of Phuket ( to Elfi and Uli Erfort and Daniel Bruehwiler for help with the German translation, and to Frank Nelissen for the Dutch subtitles.

    Full list of fishes and dive sites featured in this video:

    00:00 Bigeye Trevally, Caranx sexfasciatus, Richelieu Rock
    00:06 Pastel Tilefish, Hoplolatilus fronticinctus, South Twin
    00:40 Dwarf Whipray, Himantura walga, Boonsung Wreck
    01:09 Bluespotted Stingray, Neotrygon kuhlii, Shark Point
    01:19 Bluespotted Stingray, Neotrygon kuhlii, Shark Fin Reef, Similans
    01:27 Bluespotted Stingray, Neotrygon kuhlii, East of Eden
    01:35 Day Octopus, Octopus cyanea, Fan Forest Pinnacle
    01:55 Straightstick Pipefish, Trachyrhamphus longirostris, Lucy's Reef, Racha Yai
    02:03 Straightstick Pipefish, Trachyrhamphus longirostris, Shark Cave
    02:20 Ornate Ghost Pipefish, Solenostomus paradoxus, Koh Bida Nai
    02:35 Ornate Ghost Pipefish, Solenostomus paradoxus, Koh Bon
    02:46 Ornate Ghost Pipefish, Solenostomus paradoxus, Richelieu Rock
    02:59 Cheeklined Wrasse (juvenile), Oxycheilinus digramma, Racha Noi
    03:11 Giant Frogfish, Antennarius commerson, Richelieu Rock
    03:26 Giant Frogfish, Antennarius commerson, East of Eden
    03:31 Giant Frogfish, Antennarius commerson, Western Rocky Island
    03:49 Giant Frogfish, Antennarius commerson, Richelieu Rock
    03:55 Giant Frogfish, Antennarius commerson, East of Eden
    04:06 Tassled Scorpionfish, Scorpaenopsis oxycephala, Richelieu Rock
    04:28 Tassled Scorpionfish, Scorpaenopsis oxycephala, Staghorn Reef
    04:33 Tassled Scorpionfish, Scorpaenopsis oxycephala, Koh Bon
    04:37 Tassled Scorpionfish, Scorpaenopsis oxycephala, Black Rock
    04:42 Tassled Scorpionfish, Scorpaenopsis oxycephala, Bungalow Bay, Racha Yai
    04:49 Tassled Scorpionfish, Scorpaenopsis oxycephala, Richelieu Rock
    04:59 Devil Scorpionfish, Scorpaenopsis diabolus, Koh Bon
    05:04 Devil Scorpionfish, Scorpaenopsis diabolus, Shark Cave
    05:14 Devil Scorpionfish, Scorpaenopsis diabolus, Richelieu Rock
    05:19 Devil Scorpionfish, Scorpaenopsis diabolus, Shark Cave
    05:24 Devil Scorpionfish, Scorpaenopsis diabolus, Black Rock
    05:34 Stonefish, Synanceia verrucosa, Boonsung Wreck
    06:08 King Cruiser Wreck

  • Coral Reef Revival in Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary

    20:43

    Colton and Jack are revitalizing coral reefs in the Florida Keys and learn how to replace reefs that have been decimated by climate change and diseases. In this episode, the guys team up with eco-defender Sarah Hamlyn - a Coral Reef Restoration Technician - who is helping scientist come up with ways to grow coral in warm and acidic waters. The coral reef Colton and Jack are attempting to revitalize was once thriving. However, in today's climate, only about 10% of the reef is active and living. This is alarming because 1/4 of all marine life lives on or near reef schools.

    For more marine life videos check out:

    Underwater Canyon Off the Coast of St. Croix:
    Night Diving in the U.S. Virgin Island:
    Cayman Islands Scuba Dive:
    Marine Life: Kelp Forest:

    SUBSCRIBE to Jack's vlog The Pursuit is Happiness to get behind-the-scenes footage:

    Rock the Park is an Emmy award-winning adventure series seen every Saturday on ABC featuring our national parks and other public lands across America and the world. Now in its 6th season, Jack Steward and Colton Smith go off the beaten path to explore magnificent landscapes, incredible wildlife and all the exciting ways to immerse yourself in and around nature. Whether it’s swimming with sea turtles, climbing to the top of a volcano or repelling into a glacier, Jack and Colton are living life to the fullest and inspiring others to do the same.

    Join Jack and Colton every week as they post new episodes and new adventures. Go behind the scenes of their hit TV series with Jack’s YouTube series – The Pursuit is Happiness and tune into helpful hacks and how-to’s to make your outdoor adventures the best they can be. And if there’s a park or wilderness you’d like to see or a question or comment for the guys, just leave it for Jack and Colton.

    Subscribe to Jack's vlog The Pursuit is Happiness to get behind-the-scenes footage from Rock the Park!

    Jack Steward




    Rock on the Park:


  • Incredible underwater video : Fantastic video of sea creatures and their habitats

    28:40

    Video captured by NOAA and the Okeanos explorer as they look at life under the sea.

    You can find more about their work here:

    Subscribe For More Videos Like This:

    See my latest videos :

    Bringing you the BEST Space and Astronomy videos online. Showcasing videos and images from the likes of NASA,ESA,Hubble etc.





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  • Ocean Documentary National Geographic | Kings of Camouflage Ocean Monsters

    52:47

  • Molluscs - Reef Life of the Andaman - Part 14

    4:54

    Molluscs (mollusks, Mollusca) including cowries, sea slugs (in particular, nudibranchs) and giant clams. Part 14 of my DVD, Reef Life of the Andaman, available at or view the whole 2-hour video at

    The first category of molluscs we look at is cowries in the family Cypraeidae, which is in the class gastropods (Gastropoda). Cowries have a pretty, glossy shell which can be covered by their bilobed mantle. The mole cowry (Talparia talpa) and tiger cowrie (Cypraea tigris) are two common species that feature from the Mergui Archipelago in Burma (Myanmar).

    We then take a look at some of the sea slugs (opisthobranchs, Opisthobranchia) to be found in the Andaman Sea. The area has many pretty nudibranchs (Nudibranchia) and amongst others we find a Goniobranchus geminus at Richelieu Rock, north of the Similan Islands in Thailand, and a group of 3 Goniobranchus annulatus at Black Rock in the Mergui Archipelago. Wart slugs in the family Phyllidiidae are also represented, particularly those of the Phyllidia genus such as Phyllidia varicosa.

    Finally we take a look at the fluted giant clam, Tridacna squamosa, which is a large bivalve (bivalvia) found on many Thailand dive sites.

    The following closed captions/subtitles are available by clicking the CC button under the video:

    NARRATION / COMMENTARY:
    - English
    - German (Deutscher Kommentar)
    - Spanish (Narración en Español)

    MARINE LIFE & DIVE SITE NAMES
    - Dutch (Nederlandse Namen)
    - English
    - German (Deutsche Bezeichnungen)
    - Thai ( ชื่อภาษาไทย & จุดดำน้ำ )

    Please get in touch with me if you would like to help translate the narration or marine life names into other languages.

    Thanks to Mark Ellison for the first music track, Hidden Depths, and to Kevin MacCleod ( for the second music track, Deliberate Thought.

    I have more scuba diving videos and underwater footage on my website at:


    I post updates about my videos, and interesting underwater videos from other filmmakers here:



    The video was shot by Nick Hope with a Sony VX2000 DV camera in a Gates housing. It was edited in Sony Vegas Pro then deinterlaced with QTGMC and upscaled to 720p HD in AviSynth.

    Thanks to Santana Diving of Phuket ( to Elfi and Uli Erfort and Daniel Bruehwiler for help with the German translation, and to Frank Nelissen for the Dutch subtitles.

    Full list of molluscs and dive sites featured in this video:

    00:00 Red-Legged Swimming Crab, Portunus (Portunus) convexus, Nurse Bank
    00:05 Mole Cowry, Talparia talpa, Western Rocky Island
    00:47 Tiger Cowrie, Cypraea tigris, Shark Cave
    00:56 Tiger Cowrie, Cypraea tigris, Pinnacle Arch
    01:06 Arabian Cowrie, Mauritia arabica, Moving Wall
    01:37 Black-Margined Doriprismatica, Doriprismatica atromarginata, King Cruiser
    01:42 Strickland's Halgerda, Halgerda stricklandi, Shark Cave
    01:47 Ornate Sap-Sucking Slug, Elysia ornata, Staghorn Reef, Black Rock
    01:54 Twin Goniobranchus, Goniobranchus geminus, Richelieu Rock
    02:00 Girdled Glossodoris, Glossodoris cincta, Shark Cave
    02:05 Ringed Goniobranchus, Goniobranchus annulatus, Black Rock
    02:15 Ridged Dermatobranchus, Dermatobranchus gonatophorus, Richelieu Rock
    02:21 Indian Caloria, Caloria indica, Black Rock
    02:32 Beautiful Hypselodoris, Hypselodoris pulchella, Black Rock
    02:46 Ringed Goniobranchus, Goniobranchus annulatus, Black Rock
    02:51 Hikueru Glossodoris, Glossodoris hikuerensis, Western Rocky Island
    02:55 Spanish Dancer Egg Mass, Koh Tachai
    02:59 Nudibranch Egg Mass, Fan Forest Pinnacle
    03:04 Gemma's Phyllidiopsis, Phyllidiopsis gemmata, Staghorn Reef, Racha Yai
    03:08 Krempf's Phyllidiopsis, Phyllidiopsis krempfi, Banana Bay, Racha Noi
    03:12 Black Phyllidiella, Phyllidiella nigra, Shark Cave
    03:16 Pustulose Phyllidiella, Phyllidiella pustulosa, Shark Point
    03:20 Pustulose Phyllidiella, Phyllidiella pustulosa, Koh Ha
    03:24 Ocellate Phyllidia, Phyllidia ocellata, Staghorn Reef, Racha Yai
    03:29 Ocellate Phyllidia, Phyllidia ocellata, Phi Phi Island
    03:33 Varicose Phyllidia, Phyllidia varicosa, Black Rock
    03:37 Varicose Phyllidia, Phyllidia varicosa, Rocky Point
    03:42 Varicose Phyllidia, Phyllidia varicosa, Angel's Finger
    03:47 Fluted Giant Clam, Tridacna squamosa, Home Run, Racha Yai
    03:56 Fluted Giant Clam, Tridacna squamosa, South Reef, Racha Noi
    04:10 Fluted Giant Clam, Tridacna squamosa, Snapper Alley, Similans
    04:25 Tuna Wreck, Similans

  • Reef Fishes - Reef Life of the Andaman - Part 9

    7:47

    Reef fishes. Part 9 of my DVD, Reef Life of the Andaman, available at or view the whole 2-hour video at

    This episode features many of the colorful tropical fishes from the coral reefs of Thailand. First we encounter the famous school of teira batfish at Koh Tachai north of the Similan Islands, pinnate batfish from Koh Bon, and golden spadefish from the Surin Islands.

    We then meet 4 different types of colorful angelfish including the emperor angelfish which makes a dramatic transformation in coloration as it matures from juvenile to adult.

    We then encounter some of the species of pretty butterflyfish from the Andaman Sea, the closely related bannerfish, and the moorish idol, which at first glance is very similar to the bannerfish.

    We then take a look at surgeonfishes (tangs) and unicornfishes that comprise the family Acanthuridae, before meeting bigeyes (bulleyes) and the striking juvenile emperor red snapper.

    Finally we encounter the amazing colorful patterns of the Andaman sweetlips and oriental sweetlips.

    English, Spanish, German, Thai and Dutch closed captions are available by clicking the CC button under the video.

    Thanks to Toao (SOILSOUND Music Publishing LLC, for the 1st music track, Deep Blue, and to Mark Ellison for the 2nd music track, Tai Long Wan.

    I have more scuba diving videos and underwater footage on my website at:


    I post updates about my videos, and interesting underwater videos from other filmmakers here:



    Thanks to Santana Diving of Phuket ( to Elfi and Uli Erfort and Daniel Bruehwiler for help with the German translation, and to Frank Nelissen for the Dutch subtitles.

    Full list of species and dive sites featured in this video:

    00:00 Trumpetfish, Aulostomus chinensis, Koh Tachai
    00:05 Teira Batfish, Platax teira, Koh Tachai
    00:43 Teira Batfish, Platax teira, Richelieu Rock
    00:48 Pinnate Batfish, Platax pinnatus, Koh Bon
    00:59 Golden Spadefish, Platax boersii, Koh Torinla
    01:12 Teira Batfish (juvenile), Platax teira, Hin Daeng
    01:24 Emperor Angelfish (juvenile), Pomacanthus imperator, Koh Tachai
    01:38 Emperor Angelfish (adolescent), Pomacanthus imperator, Richelieu Rock
    01:43 Emperor Angelfish, Pomacanthus imperator, Deep Six
    01:54 Emperor Angelfish, Pomacanthus imperator, Tuna Wreck
    01:59 Blue Ring Angelfish, Pomacanthus annularis, King Cruiser
    02:06 Blue Ring Angelfish, Pomacanthus annularis, Koh Bon
    02:18 Regal Angelfish, Pygoplites diacanthus, East of Eden
    02:23 Regal Angelfish, Pygoplites diacanthus, Anita's Reef
    02:29 Blueface Angelfish, Pomacanthus xanthometopon, Anita's Reef
    02:34 Blueface Angelfish, Pomacanthus xanthometopon, Boulder City
    02:49 Copperband Butterflyfish, Chelmon rostratus, Anemone Reef
    03:02 Meyer's Butterflyfish, Chaetodon meyeri, Beacon Reef
    03:12 Black Pyramid Butterflyfish, Hemitaurichthys zoster, Hin Daeng
    03:20 Raccoon Butterflyfish, Chaetodon lunula, Koh Bon
    03:25 Redtail Butterflyfish, Chaetodon collare, Anita's Reef
    03:31 Redtail Butterflyfish, Chaetodon collare, Lucy's Reef, Racha Yai
    03:39 Redtail Butterflyfish, Chaetodon collare, Racha Noi
    03:44 Redtail Butterflyfish, Chaetodon collare, Snapper Alley
    03:50 Redtail Butterflyfish, Chaetodon collare, Silvertip Bank
    03:56 Longfin Bannerfish, Heniochus acuminatus, East of Eden
    04:12 Schooling Bannerfish, Heniochus diphreutes, East of Eden
    04:24 Schooling Bannerfish, Heniochus diphreutes, Deep Six
    04:29 Bannerfish, Heniochus sp., East of Eden
    04:36 Schooling Bannerfish, Heniochus diphreutes, Rocky Point
    04:45 Moorish Idol, Zanclus cornutus, East of Eden
    04:55 Moorish Idol, Zanclus cornutus, Nurse Bank
    05:01 Moorish Idol, Zanclus cornutus, Black Rock
    05:11 Red Sea Sailfin Tang, Zebrasoma desjardinii, Rocky Point
    05:21 Powder Blue Tang, Acanthurus leucosternon, Koh Tachai
    05:27 Powder Blue Tang, Acanthurus leucosternon, East of Eden
    05:33 Orangespine Unicornfish, Naso lituratus, Anita's Reef
    05:39 Orangespine Unicornfish, Naso lituratus, Koh Tachai
    05:45 Naso vlamingii, Bignose Unicornfish, East of Eden
    05:49 Whitemargin Unicornfish, Naso annulatus, East of Eden
    05:57 Crescent-Tail Bigeye, Priacanthus hamrur, Koh Bon
    06:04 Crescent-Tail Bigeye, Priacanthus hamrur, Bungalow Bay, Racha Yai
    06:09 Paeony Bulleye, Priacanthus blochii, Western Rocky Island
    06:13 Crescent-Tail Bigeye, Priacanthus hamrur, Rocky Point
    06:25 Emperor Red Snapper, Lutjanus sebae, Shark Cave
    06:41 Andaman Sweetlips, Plectorhinchus macrospilus, East of Eden
    06:51 Oriental Sweetlips, Plectorhinchus vittatus, Christmas Point
    06:56 Oriental Sweetlips, Plectorhinchus vittatus, Elephant Head Rock
    07:06 Oriental Sweetlips, Plectorhinchus vittatus, Christmas Point
    07:20 Blacktip Grouper, Epinephelus fasciatus, Racha Noi

  • Underwater Documentary - Adaptations of Marine Animals

    5:04

    A short documentary outlining some adaptations of pelagic and benthic fauna including many bony fish, nudibranchs, gastropods and even a marine reptile! Made as part of the Oceans Below Videography Internship in the Spring of 2013 on the island of Koh Tao, Thailand.

  • Reef Life of the Andaman - Part 1 - Introduction & Corals

    4:02

    The marine life of Thailand and Burma. Learn more and buy the Reef Life of the Andaman DVD at or view the whole 2-hour movie at

    Part 1 of Reef Life of the Andaman, an in-depth study of the marine life of Thailand and Burma (Myanmar), filmed over more than 1000 scuba dives beneath the Andaman Sea at 55 dive sites in the Similan Islands, Phuket, the Phi Phi Islands, Hin Daeng/Hin Muang, the Mergui Archipelago and the Burma Banks.

    This first episode features a glimpse of the coastal and fishing communities of Thailand and Burma, then we venture underwater to learn about the marine life such as corals, sea anemones and crinoids (feather stars) that colonise the marine landscape.

    The following closed captions/subtitles are available by clicking the CC button under the video:

    NARRATION / COMMENTARY:
    - English
    - German (Deutscher Kommentar)
    - Portuguese (Narração Português)
    - Spanish (Narración en Español)
    - Thai (คำบรรยายภาษาไทย)

    MARINE LIFE & DIVE SITE NAMES
    - Dutch (Nederlandse Namen)
    - English
    - German (Deutsche Bezeichnungen)
    - Thai (ชื่อภาษาไทย & จุดดำน้ำ)

    Please get in touch with me if you would like to help translate the narration or marine life names into other languages.

    I have more scuba diving videos and underwater footage on my website at:


    I post updates about my videos, and interesting underwater videos from other filmmakers here:



    The video was shot by Nick Hope with a Sony VX2000 DV camera in a Gates housing. It was edited in Sony Vegas Pro then deinterlaced with QTGMC and upscaled to 720p HD in AviSynth.

    Thanks to Santana Diving of Phuket ( Robert Royle for the clip of scuba divers jumping into the water, shot from underwater. Thanks to Erik Verkoyen for Prickly Shark, used during the opening titles. Thanks to Elfi and Uli Erfort and Daniel Bruehwiler for help with the German translation, Frank Nelissen for the Dutch subtitles, and Marcelo Shigueo Toyama for the Portuguese subtitles.

    Dive sites and marine life species featured in this video:

    00:24 Patong Beach, Phuket
    00:33 Kaw Thaung, Burma
    00:40 Phi Phi Island, Thailand
    00:44 Western Rocky Island, Mergui Archipelago, Burma
    00:51 Kaw Thaung, Burma
    01:09 Phi Phi Island
    01:14 Donald Duck Bay, Similan Islands
    01:43 Western Rocky Island, Mergui Archipelago
    01:49 Shark Cave, Mergui Archipelago
    02:02 Rocky Point, Similans
    02:12 Deep Six, Similans
    02:18 Mushroom Leather Coral, Sarcophyton trocheliophorum, Christmas Point
    02:25 Staghorn Coral, Acropora sp., Koh Bon
    02:31 Montipora Coral, Montipora sp., East of Eden
    02:37 Magnificent Sea Anemones, Heteractis magnifica, North Twin
    02:42 Magnificent Sea Anemones, Heteractis magnifica, North Twin Plateau
    02:51 Turtle Weed, Chlorodesmis fastigiata, Richelieu Rock
    03:01 Dendronephthya Soft Coral, Dendronephthya sp., Hin Daeng
    03:08 Hin Muang, Thailand
    03:14 Crinoids (Feather Stars), Little Torres
    03:20 Crinoid (Feather Star), Koh Tachai
    03:24 Giant Sea Fan, Annella mollis, Boulder City
    03:32 Giant Sea Fan, Annella mollis, Anemone Reef

  • The Evolution of Fish

    23:55

    The evolution of fish began about 530 million years ago during the Cambrian explosion. Early fish from the fossil record are represented by a group of small, jawless, armoured fish known as ostracoderms. Jawless fish lineages are mostly extinct. An extant clade, the lampreys may approximate ancient pre-jawed fish. The first jaws are found in Placoderm fossils. The diversity of jawed vertebrates may indicate the evolutionary advantage of a jawed mouth. It is unclear if the advantage of a hinged jaw is greater biting force, improved respiration, or a combination of factors. The evolution of fish is not studied as a single event since fish do not represent a monophyletic group but a paraphyletic one (by exclusion of the tetrapods).

  • Remoras, Cobias & Rainbow Runners - Reef Life of the Andaman - Part 22

    4:00

    Remoras, cobias and rainbow runners. Part 22 of my DVD, Reef Life of the Andaman, available at or view the whole 2-hour video at

    In this video we look at more fish that form symbiotic relationships with larger marine life.

    Live sharksuckers (Echeneis naucrates), a type of remora, attach themselves to sharks and other marine animals using their first dorsal fin which has evolved into a sucker. The sharksucker gets a free ride and feeds off food scraps left by the host, which also gives it protection. This is known as a commensal relationship, whereby the suckerfish benefits but the host derives neither significant benefit nor harm. Some scientists believe that the remora removes parasites etc. from the host, making the relationship a form of mutualism rather than commensalism. At various dive sites in Thailand and the Mergui Archipelago of Burma (Myanmar) we see live sharksuckers attached to zebra sharks, a whale shark, a spot-fin porcupinefish, a bridled parrotfish, and even a couple of scuba divers.

    In another example of commensal symbiosis, the cobia (Rachycentron canadum) is similarly usually found accompanying larger marine animals. We see them following manta rays, blotched fantail rays, and a grey reef shark. The cobia gains some protection from the larger host, and often feeds on its faeces.

    Rainbow runners (Elagatis bipinnulata), members of the jack family, are also often seen accompanying larger marine life, but for a different reason. They rub themselves against the skin of the host in order to remove parasites etc. from their own bodies. We see rainbow runners rubbing against a grey reef shark, a whitetip reef shark, and a Pacific hawksbill turtle.

    The following closed captions/subtitles are available by clicking the CC button under the video:

    NARRATION / COMMENTARY:
    - English
    - German (Deutscher Kommentar)
    - Spanish (Narración en Español)

    MARINE LIFE & DIVE SITE NAMES
    - Dutch (Nederlandse Namen)
    - English
    - German (Deutsche Bezeichnungen)
    - Thai ( ชื่อภาษาไทย & จุดดำน้ำ )

    Please get in touch with me if you would like to help translate the narration or marine life names into other languages.

    I have more scuba diving videos and underwater footage on my website at:


    I post updates about my videos, and interesting underwater videos from other filmmakers here:



    The video was shot by Nick Hope with a Sony VX2000 DV camera in a Gates housing. It was edited in Sony Vegas Pro then deinterlaced with QTGMC and upscaled to 720p HD in AviSynth.

    Thanks to Mark Ellison for the music track, Similan Sunrise.

    Thanks to Santana Diving of Phuket ( to Elfi and Uli Erfort and Daniel Bruehwiler for help with the German translation, and to Frank Nelissen for the Dutch subtitles.

    Full list of marine life and dive sites featured in this video:

    00:00 Live Sharksucker, Echeneis naucrates, Koh Bida Nok
    00:09 Live Sharksucker, Echeneis naucrates, Koh Bon
    00:19 Live Sharksucker, Echeneis naucrates, Christmas Point
    00:28 Whale Shark, Rhincodon typus, Fan Forest Pinnacle
    00:35 Live Sharksuckers, Echeneis naucrates, Fan Forest Pinnacle
    00:48 Spot-Fin Porcupinefish, Diodon hystrix, Boonsung Wreck
    00:57 Live Sharksucker, Echeneis naucrates, Boonsung Wreck
    01:06 Bridled Parrotfish, Scarus frenatus, Koh Tachai
    01:10 Live Sharksucker, Echeneis naucrates, Koh Phi Phi
    01:25 Live Sharksucker, Echeneis naucrates, Staghorn Reef, Racha Yai
    01:31 Cobia, Rachycentron canadum, Black Rock
    01:37 Manta Ray, Manta birostris, Black Rock
    02:05 Blotched Fantail Ray, Taeniura meyeni, Black Rock
    02:30 Grey Reef Shark, Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos, Shark Cave
    02:40 Rainbow Runners, Elagatis bipinnulata, Koh Tachai
    02:59 Rainbow Runners, Elagatis bipinnulata, Fan Forest Pinnacle
    03:14 Rainbow Runners, Elagatis bipinnulata, Richelieu Rock

  • National Geographic: Octopus the Smartest Creature in the Ocean Documentary 2017

    40:51

    The octopus is a soft-bodied, eight-armed mollusc of the order Octopoda. Around 300 species are recognised and the order is grouped within the class Cephalopoda with squids, cuttlefish and nautiloids.

    Hope you enjoyed if so hit that SUBSCRIBE button for more!

    Note : I do not own any of this content it's for Education and Entertainment reasons only, I will take this video down if the owner would like me to with evidence that they own it. Thank You!

  • Ocean Wanderers - Whale Shark Documentary

    28:50

    Towering underwater structures of the coast of Qatar are home to oilworkers above the waves. Beneath is a gathering place for giant fish, a wonder of the world's oceans: Whale sharks, the largest known extant fish species.

    This documentary follows the story of the Research trip undertaken by the Maersk Oil Research and Technology Centre (MO-RTC) in partnership with the Ministry of the Environment's Whale Shark Research Project.

    All the footage was captured on the Red Epic and, as such, has captured the majestic nature of these mysterious ocean wanderers.

    Director of Photography:
    Mark Barrs

    Director
    Nick Wollard

    Production Company: Myriad Global Media

  • Deep Ocean ~ Coral Reef Adventure Full Documentary

    2:44:54

  • Marine Biology | JONATHAN BIRDS BLUE WORLD

    9:24

    Jonathan visits the School for Field Studies in the Turks & Caicos Islands to learn how college students conduct field work in their pursuit of degrees in marine studies. He helps tag sharks, study conch and investigate marine protected areas!

    **********************************************************************
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    I’m off to the sunny but remote island of South Caicos, in the Turks and Caicos Islands, just southeast of the Bahamas.

    Here, the School for Field Studies operates a field research facility where college students from all over the United States come for some hands-on marine biology field work.

    Faculty at the School for Field Studies have ongoing research projects investigating fisheries management, reef health, shark populations and even human impact.

    My day begins with the shark research team led by Professor Aaron Henderson. Henderson and his students are investigating how the marine protected areas around South Caicos are affecting the shark population.

    Their first task for the day is to deploy some baited camera rigs. These rigs will hopefully attract and film several species of sharks. The goal: to learn how many and what species of sharks are here in the marine protected area.

    Many different species visit the cameras including Nurse sharks, Caribbean Reef sharks, Tiger sharks, Lemon sharks and even Great Hammerheads!

    Next the team deploys what are known as “drum lines.” These are baited hooks attached to a float and a weight. The goal is to catch sharks so they can be tagged and released.

    With five drum lines set, the team goes back to the first one and checks for a shark.

    Dr. Henderson places a tag on its dorsal fin, while the students take a small tissue sample from is tail for an isotope analysis of the shark’s diet.

    Another group is studying the fish population of the island, trying to determine the effectiveness of marine protected areas.

    Underwater, the team heads to a nice section of coral reef and begins a transect. Essentially they reel out a very long tape measure over the reef, which defines a specific path of a specific length.

    By comparing the transect results inside and outside of the marine protected areas, the students can learn not only how well the marine protected areas are working but on which species.

    Of course, fishing pressure is what affects fish populations, so it makes sense to also try to get a handle on what species of fish are being caught. The students work with the local fishermen who volunteer to allow the students to come down to the docks at the end of the day and see what kind of fish they are catching and how big they are. The fishermen know that research like this and marine protected areas will help to insure that there are always enough fish to catch.

    Another team of students, another research project. This team is working in snorkel depths without scuba--studying a big snail called a conch.

    The conch is one of the most popular seafoods in the Caribbean, and a whopping 10% of the world’s supply comes from the tiny island of South Caicos, so it’s an important resource.

    This transect in the seagrass bed is being used to count conch. They also collect a few conch for additional research on land.

    Back at the shore, alongside a representative from the Turks & Caicos Department of Environment and Maritime Affairs, the students crack the conch open in the traditional way.

    Fishermen often take the meat out of the shell at sea and return with only the meat and no shell. How can the government recommend or enforce size regulations if there is no shell to measure? So Daniel’s research is looking at other ways to gauge the maturity of a conch, without a shell.

    Baby sharks live in the mangroves, where they are safe from a lot of larger predators.

    A couple of nights a week, Dr. Henderson and his students head over to the mangrove areas to catch baby sharks.

    They start by setting a net in the chest-deep water, hoping to snare small sharks as they cruise by. Every 15 minutes they check the net, and when they have a shark, they bring it back to a makeshift lab on shore where they will weigh it, tag it with a electronic tag, take a small tissue sample, some ID photos, and then quickly get it back into the water.

    One of the students will swim the baby shark around for a few minutes to re-oxygenate its gills, and then they send it on its way.
    From sharks, to fish to conch and more sharks, my day with the marine biology students at the School for Field Studies in South Caicos was exhausting but exciting.

  • Crustaceans - Reef Life of the Andaman - Part 13

    3:23

    Crustaceans: Spiny lobsters, shrimps and a swimming crab. Part 13 of my DVD, Reef Life of the Andaman, available at or view the whole 2-hour video at

    This video covers various types of decapod in the subphylum of Crustacea. First we encounter 3 of the most common types of spiny lobster (Palinuridae) found in the Andaman Sea, the painted spiny lobster, Panulirus versicolor, at East of Eden in the Similan Islands in Thailand, the rare ornate spiny lobster, Panulirus ornatus, at Black Rock in the Mergui Archipelago in Burma (Myanmar), and the longlegged spiny lobster, Panulirus longipes, which line the walls of the underwater cave at Western Rocky Island.

    We then look at shrimps, another type of decapods. We encounter rock cleaner shrimps, Urocaridella sp., inhabiting the underwater caves at Richelieu Rock, the Durban hinge-beak shrimp (Durban dancing shrimp), Rhynchocinetes durbanensis, which are common at many site throughout the Andaman Sea, and thirdly the banded coral shrimp, Stenopus hispidus, also known as the banded boxer shrimp.

    Finally we meet a small and feisty swimming crab, Portunus sp., in open water in the Mergui Archipelago.

    The following closed captions/subtitles are available by clicking the CC button under the video:

    NARRATION / COMMENTARY:
    - English
    - German (Deutscher Kommentar)
    - Spanish (Narración en Español)

    MARINE LIFE & DIVE SITE NAMES
    - Dutch (Nederlandse Namen)
    - English
    - German (Deutsche Bezeichnungen)
    - Thai ( ชื่อภาษาไทย & จุดดำน้ำ )

    Please get in touch with me if you would like to help translate the narration or marine life names into other languages.

    Thanks to Mark Ellison for the music track, Hidden Depths.

    I have more scuba diving videos and underwater footage on my website at:


    I post updates about my videos, and interesting underwater videos from other filmmakers here:



    The video was shot by Nick Hope with a Sony VX2000 DV camera in a Gates housing. It was edited in Sony Vegas Pro then deinterlaced with QTGMC and upscaled to 720p HD in AviSynth.

    Thanks to Santana Diving of Phuket ( to Elfi and Uli Erfort and Daniel Bruehwiler for help with the German translation, and to Frank Nelissen for the Dutch subtitles.

    Full list of crustaceans and dive sites featured in this video:

    00:00 Titan Triggerfish, Balistoides viridescens, East of Eden
    00:07 Painted Spiny Lobster, Panulirus versicolor, East of Eden
    00:21 Painted Spiny Lobster, Panulirus versicolor, Mergui Archipelago
    00:28 Painted Spiny Lobster, Panulirus versicolor, Bungalow Bay, Racha Yai
    00:34 Ornate Spiny Lobster, Panulirus ornatus, Black Rock
    00:54 Longlegged Spiny Lobster, Panulirus longipes, Western Rocky Island
    01:17 Rock Cleaner Shrimp, Urocaridella sp., Richelieu Rock
    01:32 Durban Hinge-Beak Shrimp, Rhynchocinetes durbanensis, Moving Wall
    01:46 Durban Hinge-Beak Shrimp, Rhynchocinetes durbanensis, Richelieu Rock
    01:53 Durban Hinge-Beak Shrimp, Rhynchocinetes durbanensis, Shark Point
    01:58 Durban Hinge-Beak Shrimp, Rhynchocinetes durbanensis, Shark Cave
    02:04 Banded Coral Shrimp, Stenopus hispidus, Western Rocky Island
    02:10 Banded Coral Shrimp, Stenopus hispidus, Moving Wall
    02:21 Swimming Crab, Portunus sp., Black Rock
    02:33 Swimming Crab, Portunus sp., Nurse Bank
    02:55 Mole Cowry, Talparia talpa, Western Rocky Island

  • Austrailas Great Barrier Reef || Full Documentary with subtitles

    1:27:46

  • The Sea Anemone

    4:36

    There are many scientific studies that apply traditional approaches to ecological, physiological, and molecular research questions. However, these studies largely test these questions at only a single level of the biological hierarchy (microscopic to macroscopic). The Systems Science in Marine Biology (SSiMBio) group at Oregon State University believes that a broader, systems view is needed in order to make progress as it provides a powerful framework for understanding how the processes occurring at some biological levels lead to predictable outcomes at other levels. Our group is developing the temperate symbiotic sea anemone Anthopleura elegantissima as a model system for this systems biology approach. This video encapsulates the meaning and goals of our group by showing many different aspects of this system on many biological levels.

    More information on the project is available here:

  • Basket Stars - Reef Life of the Andaman - Part 28

    2:06

    Basket stars & conclusion. Part 28 of my DVD, Reef Life of the Andaman, available at

    This video features the naked basket star, Astroboa nuda, a type of echinoderm in the class of brittle stars.

    By day the naked basket star rests, although its wriggling arms are a mass of activity. By night the arms extend to filter plankton from the water. Like other stars, the basket star is able to move around the reef.

    The following closed captions/subtitles are available by clicking the CC button under the video:

    NARRATION / COMMENTARY:
    - English
    - German (Deutscher Kommentar)
    - Spanish (Narración en Español)

    MARINE LIFE & DIVE SITE NAMES
    - Dutch (Nederlandse Namen)
    - English
    - German (Deutsche Bezeichnungen)
    - Thai ( ชื่อภาษาไทย & จุดดำน้ำ )

    Please get in touch with me if you would like to help translate the narration or marine life names into other languages.

    I have more scuba diving videos and underwater footage on my website at:


    I post updates about my videos, and interesting underwater videos from other filmmakers here:



    The video was shot by Nick Hope with a Sony VX2000 DV camera in a Gates housing. It was edited in Sony Vegas Pro then deinterlaced with QTGMC and upscaled to 720p HD in AviSynth.

    Thanks to Mark Ellison for the music tracks, The Cool Of The Forest and Freefall Into The Blue.

    Thanks to Santana Diving of Phuket ( to Elfi and Uli Erfort and Daniel Bruehwiler for help with the German translation, and to Frank Nelissen for the Dutch subtitles.

  • Underwater Film of Various Sea Life in the Pacific: Video

    3:38

    Many sea creatures are featured, including: jellyfish, seahorses, cuttlefish, eels, crabs, and an inside look at a developing stingray embryo still in its egg case. And plenty of other fish, of course!

    © Ryan M. Bolton
    All imagery available for purchase. Please contact at

  • marine biology video project

    10:22

    movie project on marine bio

  • Shape of Life: Molluscs - The Survival Game

    15:09

    Molluscs have been masters in the survival game in life, evolving with new opportunities and new challenges.

  • The Marine Life Documentary

    8:31

    Marine life documentary
    By Destiny, Elizaveta ,Hargagan

  • Under the Sea - With Helen Scales

    59:13

    A dive into the spiralling world of seashells and the bizarre animals that make them. Helen Scales explains how hermit crabs like to party and butterflies learnt to swim.
    Watch the Q&A:
    Subscribe for regular science videos:

    Helen's book Spirals in Time: The Secret Life and Curious Afterlife of Seashells is available now -

    From shell-stealing octopuses to snails that suck sharks’ blood, molluscs are a weird bunch. Join marine biologist Helen Scales to find out how hermit crabs like to party and butterflies learnt to swim. This interactive talk dives into the spiralling world of seashells and the bizarre animals that make them.

    Helen Scales is a marine biologist, writer and broadcaster who manages to combine scuba diving, exploration and storytelling in one job,along with a passion for protecting the oceans. She spends as much time as possible by the sea, or preferably in it.

    She writes books and articles and make radio documentaries, searching for stories about the oceans and the natural world, of the wonders of science and of people.

    Subscribe for regular science videos:

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    Product links on this page may be affiliate links which means it won't cost you any extra but we may earn a small commission if you decide to purchase through the link.

  • Army of Sea Urchins? | Planet Earth | BBC

    3:50

    Sea urchins gather in large enough numbers to form an army.

    Subscribe:

    WATCH MORE:
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    Harry Enfield and Chums:

    Welcome to BBC Studios, bringing you the best of British TV! Here you'll find classic comedy, gripping drama, as well as the best documentaries, science and history! Take a look at complete listings for all our shows - we've got plenty to keep you entertained!

    Is there a BBC clip you'd love to see? Make sure you let us know by leaving a comment.


    This is a commercial channel from BBC Studios. Service & Feedback

  • Reef

    2:51

  • Maldives: diving paradise

    11:55

    The octopus mimics the environment to escape from predators, but also changes color depending on your mood: blue if excited, if it feel scared pale and red when angry.

    During mating the male impregnates the female with the introduction one of his tentacles. When finished mating, the female will try to devour the male, because they won't eat until the offspring are born months later. Usually the female dies shortly after hatching by the efforts.

    The octopus is a nocturnal animal. During the day they hide among the rocks. It is also an avid hunter. They, in turn, are the favorite prey of eels and eels.

    The elasticity of the octopus is prodigious. it can enter their tentacles in smaller loopholes in search of food. The most stiffer body part is the eye. Wherever he can pass his eye, literally, you can spend your whole body.

    One of the keys to the survival of the species is the adaptation to the environment. In the octopus is perfect. Mimicry, elasticity, ink jets to scare off predators ... but his most formidable adaptation is intelligence. Not only can identify colors and shapes, but also associate these colors and shapes with meanings and remember for years.

    Swimming with the manta ray is a privilege for the diver. It's like swimming next to one of the giants of the ocean. The manta ray, or giant manta ray can grow more than 8-foot wingspan, and 1,400 kilos of weight.

    Although the manta ray is present in the temperate waters around the world, remains a stranger to marine biologists. Until recently it wasn't known that the manta ray belong to the family of sharks.

  • Glimpse Of Marine Life Andaman Sea

    6:31

    Showcasing a wildlife found in sea. a clip shows life under the sea, red corals, aquatic life found in indian ocean.

    harlequin shrimp, great barracuda, leopard sharks, bat fish, whale sharks, corals.

  • Coral Reefs and Mangroves

    3:46

    CORAL REEFS AND MANGROVES:-

    Truck Lagoon is the largest coral reef in Micronesia, founded on Japanese ships sunk in World War II. Reefs are rich in biodiversity, and they also aid other ecosystems such as mangroves by sheltering them from the sea. This video also shows some of the damage caused by man's activities.

    Courtesy: Discovery Channel

  • How does marine life keep itself clean?

    1:00

    Coral reefs host cleaning stations, spaces where animals get rid of parasites from their bodies with help from cleaner fish. These stations provide a vital service in keeping animals, and the reef, disease-free.

    Subscribe to our YouTube channel @Mongabay India
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    For more news and inspiration from nature's frontline in India, visit Mongabay India
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