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Rubber tires — a dirty business | DW Documentary

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  • Rubber tires — a dirty business | DW Documentary

    28:31

    The booming global tire market is worth billions - but this comes at a high price, both to humans and the environment. Over 50 million car tires are sold each year in Germany alone. But where does the natural rubber for them come from?

    The biggest producer of natural rubber for tires is Thailand. More than four million tonnes of rubber are harvested annually in plantations there. And demand for rubber is ever growing - because ever more tires are needed. But the labor conditions in Southeast Asia are harsh - with working days of up to 12 hours and very low wages. In addition, toxic herbicides banned in Europe are used to fight weeds on the plantations. After the harvest, the ‘white gold’ rubber is sold to brokers, who, in turn, sell it on. German tire manufacturers, like Continental, for example, are keen to stress that they use natural commodities conscientiously.” But many car drivers don’t give a second thought about where the rubber in their tires comes from - and why we don’t recycle used tires more effectively.

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  • Why Tire Prices Are Rising

    11:51

    Along with the pandemic, big tire brands are facing unique challenges. While trends have increasingly shifted online due to Covid, the tire market has been more hesitant to growing its e-commerce presence. Trade tariffs and the growing popularity of SUV's and electric vehicles are also driving up the price of tires, posing an issue with attracting focus-savings consumers. Existing in a competitive market, many of the world's biggest tire brands are focused on standing out to customers.

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    Why Tire Prices Are Rising

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  • Scrap Tyre Recycling Plant -- Discover Tire Recycling Technology | How To Machines

    6:01

    Visit Website►
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    More Video:-
    Please Don't Forget Like And Share.
    ===================================
    How To Make Tires In Factory :-
    =========================
    Scrap Tyre Recycling Plant -- Discover Tire Recycling Technology | How To Machines
    =========================
    Tire recycling is a process of using large-capacity machines for crushing size reduction of the tire. Then the rubber is recycled for use in the molding process of the new car tires.
    ======================================
    Disclaimer: How To Machines is not affiliated with the businesses whose products are shown in this review. Any trademarks depicted are the property of their respective owners.

    #technology #RecyclingPlant #HowTo

  • CAR TYRES | How Its Made

    5:10

    Have you ever wondered how car tyres are made? In this video, you're going to see that you need much more than just a rubber.

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  • The Dirty Secrets Of The Tire Industry!

    17:41

    Here are the secrets of the tire industry! Watch today's episode of Talking Mods as Ron shares the behind the scenes TRUTH of the automotive tire industry. Stick around for a bonus towards the end of the video!

    Ron gives you an insight on the tire industry from profit margins, how things work, and a more detailed look from a retailers perspective. And how YOU can get the best deals when you're looking to purchase new or used tires.

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  • Dirty Business: what really happens to your recycling

    46:00

    Thousands of tons of plastic scrap collected for recycling from British households have been transported and dumped on sites across the world.

    We follow the trail of the UK's plastic waste through the country and around the world. Can Britain cope as the largest importer of our recycling shuts the door?

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  • How Old Tires Are Turned Into Electricity | World Wide Waste

    3:52

    Every year, billions of tires end up in landfills around the world. Now, power plants like this one in Erzincan, Turkey are turning those tires into electricity for thousands of homes.

    MORE BUSINESS INSIDER VIDEOS:
    Plates Made From Pineapple Scraps Grow Edible Plants | World Wide Waste

    NYC Street Tailor Aims To Reduce Fast Fashion Waste

    How This Company Saved Thousands Of Flowers During The Pandemic


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    How Old Tires Are Turned Into Electricity | World Wide Waste

  • HOW IT WORKS | Tyre recycling, Sugar, Doormats, LPG conversion | Episode 26 | Free Documentary

    23:33

    How it Works - Episode 26
    - Tyre recycling
    - Sugar production
    - Doormats
    - LPG conversion

  • The dirty business with old clothes

    28:54

    Most people believe, that old clothes donations collected by various organisations are immediately sent to countries in need. What they don't know is, the majority of the donated clothing is sold per kilogramme. Some aid organisations merely place their logo on the collection containers of used clothes firms.

    A small amount of the clothing is given to the needy in the country of origin. The better, still useful items are sent to Eastern Europe and the Arab states. 60% of the articles are sent to Africa. But just what happens to the used items there? Michael Höft and Christian Jentzsch travelled to Tanzania in search of answers. Their conclusion: Not only German companies and several major aid organisations earn well from the donations; for many traders in Africa, old clothes donations are a lucrative business model. Even the poorest of the poor have to pay at least something for them. The cheap clothes flood the markets of the respective countries and bring the African textile industry to its knees.

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  • Soyalism | DW Documentary

    42:27

    Industrial agriculture is increasingly dominating the world market. It’s forcing small farmers to quit and taking over vast swathes of land. This documentary shows how destructive the lucrative agribusiness is.

    Whether in the USA, Brazil, Mozambique or China, agricultural giants rule the market. Food production has become a gigantic business as climate change and population growth continue. This is having devastating consequences for small farmers and for the environment. On the banks of North Carolina’s New River, there’s a vile stench. Clean water activist Rick Dove takes a flight to show us what’s causing the smell. Scores and scores of pigs are living upriver, in so many pens the farms look more like small towns. We have eight to ten million pigs here. And the problem is that they are kept so close together and their excrement pollutes and threatens the water and natural life on the North Carolina coastline. From above, you can see large cesspools everywhere, shimmering red-brown in the sun. Dove is giving us a bird’s-eye view of industrialized agriculture. In the late 1970s, companies in the US began to industrialize farming. Large corporations like Smithfield built entire value chains, from raising livestock to slaughter to packaging and sales. A Chinese holding company bought Smithfield a few years ago. Industrial meat production is supposed to support increased Chinese demand for meat as the country’s prosperity grows. Dan Basse is the head of a company analyses global agriculture. He says calorie demand will also increase in countries like India, Bangladesh and Nigeria in the next few years. And with it, the demand for even more inexpensive meat of the kind agribusinesses produce and market.


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  • Bitter chocolate | DW Documentary

    42:26

    Chocolate may be a sweet treat, but its production leaves a bitter taste. Rainforests are cleared so slaves and children laborers can harvest cocoa beans on illegal plantations. Cocoa is produced under the most dubious conditions.

    In Ivory Coast, the dark side of cocoa and chocolate production is hard to miss. Many people – including children – are driven here from neighboring Burkina Faso by drought and famine to find work. They often come alone, without their families, to find jobs on one of the many cocoa plantations. The conditions are spartan. They work with sharp machetes, carry heavy loads, are exposed to toxic herbicides, and lack protective clothing.

    Major international cocoa companies and giants of the chocolate industry such as Nestlé, Cargill and Ferrero looked on as 90 percent of the Ivory Coast's primeval forests were destroyed. In 2001, the companies agreed to stop child labor, wage dumping and the further clearance of rainforests for five years. But 20 years later, the commitment has yet to be implemented. This moving documentary shows the dark side of the chocolate industry and its sweet, luxury product.

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  • How Old Tires Are Retreaded So They Can Be Used Again

    4:17

    The disposal of tires represent a significant burden on the environment. Tires can't go to landfills; they take up too much space and are not biodegradable. Companies like Marangoni, therefore, developed methods to recycle and reuse old tires. Watch how retreading machines make old tires usable again.

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    Why Tesla's Model X Was The First SUV To Receive A Perfect Crash Test Rating

    How To Increase Your Car's Horsepower

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    How Old Tires Are Retreaded So They Can Be Used Again

  • The Dark History Behind Your Tires | WheelHouse

    9:07

    Rubber is all around us, especially in our cars. Our tires, belts, seals, and interiors are full of the versatile material. But did you know that not long ago, people would kill for rubber? Here’s the story of one country’s brutal pursuit of rubber.

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  • What Happens To Used Tires? | Doc Bites

    14:49

    What Happens To Used Tires? | Free Documentary Shorts

    All over the world, more than 3,000 old tires are produced every minute, and this is a serious environmental disaster. The industry is looking for solutions to recycle tires. But what exactly is being done? What are the plans for all these tires? And who will benefit?

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    Doc Bites is dedicated to bringing high-class short documentaries to you on YouTube for free. With the latest camera equipment used by well-known filmmakers working for famous production studios. You will see fascinating shots from the deep seas and up in the air, capturing great stories and pictures from everything our beautiful and interesting planet has to offer.

    Enjoy stories about nature, wildlife, culture, people, history and more to come.

  • Heres Why China Is Killing The Global Recycling Industry

    7:49

    ???? Get your free copy of Poorly Made in China from Audible, in addition to a free 30-day trial!
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    China has been the leader of the recycling industry for over 30 years, importing materials more than any country in the world and making billions of dollars in the process. But recently, the Chinese government took a tougher stance on recycling, effectively disrupting the global recycling industry. More importantly, China's decision has caused major problems for many Western countries, since they were the ones exporting millions of tons of recyclable waste to China.

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  • The limits of learning – kids in crisis | DW Documentary

    12:27

    Surveys show that the majority of German students feel hopeless, listless and even depressed as a result of the long lockdown. Homeschooling is overwhelming for many of them, and some families are struggling to cope. We visited students at home.

    Every morning, 14-year-old Catharina sits down at the dining table and tries to study Latin, Math, or English. Her 10-year-old brother, Philipp, sits next to her. He also has to study — and likes using Catharina as a teaching assistant. How are either one supposed to concentrate? Their single mother can’t help, because she is a doctor and has to go to work. Anna has it a little bit easier. She is 16 years old and considers the time she has spent in lockdown to be the most productive of her life so far. She can finally concentrate, and work in peace. Leandro is 14 and can't understand this. He feels completely overwhelmed by the massive heap of tasks. What should he tackle first and how should he do it? He can't provide the structure and guidance he used to get every day in the classroom for himself, and often has trouble getting out of bed in the morning —an indication of early-onset depression. Axel Rowohlt visited Catharina, Philipp, Anna and Leandro, and also spoke to Felix, their student representative. He conducted a survey among students in Berlin — with alarming results.


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  • Old Tires Are Retreaded To Be Good As New

    4:17

    The disposal of tires represent a significant burden on the environment.Companies like Marangoni, therefore, developed methods to recycle and reuse old tires. Watch how retreading machines make old tires usable again.

    MORE CARS INSIDER CONTENT:
    How Luxury Porsches Are Transformed Into Off-Road Vehicles

    How This Putty Can Increase Your Horsepower

    Company Makes Accessible Vehicles For People In Wheelchairs


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    Old Tires Are Retreaded To Be Good As New

  • Oil promises – how oil changed a country | DW Documentary

    1:24:53

    When oil was discovered in Ghana in 2007, the country began to dream big. It dreamed that the ‘black gold’ would bring economic upswing and long-awaited prosperity to its nation. But what happens when dreams and globalization meet?

    The global economy continues to rely on oil — but the so-called ‘black gold’ is becoming scarce. If a country has oil, so we tend to believe, it has all it needs to become a wealthy country. When oil was discovered in Ghana in 2007, Ghanaians also believed that economic prosperity would soon sweep over their country. By 2010, drilling had started. Ghana was determined to do better than Nigeria, a country that exports oil, but has to import gasoline.

    This documentary, shot over a period of ten years, is a case study of globalization. Filmed in a coastal region where people lived off fishing and rubber cultivation for decades, it shows the impact the oil discovery has had on their lives. Would the promises come true? Would the ‘black gold’ bring modern life and progress, paved streets, electricity and jobs even to small villages? Filmmaker Elke Sasse and journalist Andrea Stäritz spent ten years documenting the developments on Ghana’s western coast. Nigerian animator Ebele Okoye adds her personal perspective through art, as a citizen of a nation hit by the oil curse.

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  • The dirty business with the shrimps

    29:13

    Once a luxury commodity, now discounter goods: shrimps. They are tasty, low in fat and cost little. 56.000 tonnes of the crustaceans are consumed annually in Germany alone. Most of the shrimps come from Southeast Asia, especially from Thailand. Meanwhile, environmentalists are sounding the alarm: the aquacultures of a gigantic shrimp industry have already destroyed large areas of Thailand’s mangrove forests.

    Intensive chemical use and untreated sewage are destabilising entire regions, they warn. But to which consequences has the mass production of shrimps actually led? The authors Michael Höft and Christian Jentzsch accompanied Greenpeace experts on a trip to Thailand with a camera team.

  • Making cheese in the Alps - a story of integration | DW Documentary

    26:01

    A cheese making business in the Alps is the project of Ethiopian entrepreneur, Agitu Ideo Gudeta. Forced to flee Ethiopia, she has built a new life in Italy.

    A political activist forced to flee Ethiopia has built a new life for herself in northern Italy, where she’s founded a successful business producing and selling goat’s cheese. The move has helped increase numbers among an increasingly rare breed of the animals, which are allowed to graze on abandoned communal pastures.

    Agitu Ideo Gudeta had to leave her homeland eight years ago after getting involved in protests against land grabs by international corporations. Arriving in Europe, the trained sociologist had to start again from scratch - and set out to found a business in the alpine Trento region. At the ‘La Capra Felice’ or ‘The Happy Goat’, she only uses milk from Pezzata Mochena goats, a local indigenous breed whose numbers have declined dramatically in the last few years. Starting with a herd of just 15 goats, Gudeta now has 180, and her firm has attracted media attention at both the national and international levels. Young people from all over the region are flocking to her dairy farm to learn how to make her popular cheese. The documentary tells the story of a brave entrepreneur with a smart approach who has managed to turn her concept into a success story.

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  • How contract workers are exploited | DW Documentary

    28:27

    A Covid-19 outbreak at German meat-processing company Tönnies brought to light dubious conditions. The meat industry has become a hotbed of precarious employment, greedy businesses and impotent unions.


    Tönnies Holding is Germany's largest meat company. Around 25,000 pigs are slaughtered and processed each day at the main plant in the town of Rheda-Wiedenbrück. Most of the plant’s employees are contract workers from eastern Europe. They’re often hired by subcontractors who coerce them into accepting exploitative working conditions.

    As well as the meat industry, contract work is common in the construction and logistics sectors, at cleaning companies and in the automotive industry - in other words, wherever employers want to avoid the high wage costs that come with a permanent workforce. Professor Marcel Fratzscher from the German Institute for Economic Research is strongly critical of the practice. Adjusted for inflation, corporate profits have risen by almost 80% over the past 30 years, while real wages have only risen by around 15%. That’s causing a dangerous shrinking of the middle class. Today, Germany has the largest low-wage sector in western Europe. Denmark shows that there is an alternative. Despite the country being one of Europe’s big pork producers, there are no comparable Coronavirus outbreaks in the Danish meat industry. According to Jim Jensen from the Danish Food Union, this is in part because in Denmark, no employee has to fear that taking sick leave may lose them their job. There is no contract work through subcontractors; all workers are permanently employed and usually unionized. In Germany, Labor Minister Hubertus Heil now wants to improve working conditions in the meat industry. In July 2020, the German government approved a draft law banning contract work in the meat industry. From January 1, 2021, it will no longer be permitted to use outside workers in slaughtering, cutting or meat processing.

    The documentary examines the extent to which precarious and exploitative employment undermines the German welfare state, and how it is misused on a large scale in order to maximize corporate profits.


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  • The Arctic is melting | DW Documentary

    26:02

    Nowhere has experienced global warming like Svalbard, midway between Norway and the North Pole. Readings by a joint Franco-German research team show average temperatures have risen by 1.6 degrees in just ten years.

    Temperatures in Ny Ålesund, a village on the island of Spitsbergen, are rising 15 times faster than elsewhere in the world. Scientists from the AWIPEV polar station are monitoring the rapid changes - all the while keeping an eye out for dangerous polar bears. When Marion Maturilli trudges through the slush to get to her meteorological measuring instruments, station manager Piotr Kupiszewski goes with her, armed with a rifle in case they meet one. Rain in January and melting snow in early May are just the latest indications of global warming that are surprising even the scientists themselves.

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  • Climate change – living on the water | DW Documentary

    42:27

    Sea levels are rising faster and faster, threatening 700 million people who live on the world’s coasts. Will water become the habitat of the future? Visionary projects for a life with the tides are forging ahead worldwide.

    Experts forecast that by 2100, sea levels will be two meters higher than they are today. This could force 40 percent of the world’s population out of their homes, for example, in Mumbai, Tokyo, Guangzhou or Bangladesh. The US won’t be spared either. Miami, New Orleans and New York would also have to be evacuated. Entire city districts would be under water. Climate change would drastically alter our metropolitan areas.

    That's why ideas that originated in science fiction have now becoming reality. Floating and underwater buildings could become places of refuge. What sounds like a utopia is soon to become reality. The first pioneers are already living in floating neighborhoods. Could the South Pacific paradise of Tahiti also be saved in this way?

    This is still all tantalizing luxury. Visionary hotel operators offer rooms with an underwater view. Or dinner during which fish and marine life are a feature in floating restaurants. Many of these futuristic plans involve water. Will we be farming on the sea? Will the SeaOrbiter” floating research station designed by Parisian architect Jacques Rougerie get underway soon? Or will we walk through seaports on floating boulevards?

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  • No more fish — empty net syndrome in Greece | DW Documentary

    26:02

    The EU says 93% of Mediterranean fish stocks have been overfished, and blames big trawlers in particular. The fish are getting smaller, and some species have disappeared completely. What comes next, Greek fisher Evgenia asks.

    Five kilos of fish at three euros a kilo makes 15 euros per day. How can you make a living from it? Evgenia Floris asks herself this question every day. For over 50 years, she and her husband have been fishing on the Greek island of Chios. Although there are fewer and fewer fish now, the Evgenia and Georgios still keep going, because the sea is their life. They used to catch around ten to 20 kilos of fish off Chios in the past, which brought them in a good income. Today it’s no longer enough to live on: sometimes they can’t even afford fuel for their boat. State controls in Greece are virtually non-existent. Evgenia is 69 and Georgios 78, and they both say they will fish as long as they can, but they know that a tradition is finally coming to an end.

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  • Tire Recycling

    25:35

    Did you know that burning rubber from tires pollutes the atmosphere? Join Curiosity Quest Goes Green host Joel Greene as he finds other ways to recycle tires and how they can be used in the creation of cement. On this DVD you will be able to see some of the biggest earth-movers on the planet as they travel around a rock quarry to find the correct materials to create cement. What does this have to do with recycled tires? That’s just it, Greene spends a good portion of the episode trying to find the answer to that same question…but it all becomes clear as a massive pile of tires is fed into a hopper where the tires disappear instantly.

  • Spains water problem | DW Documentary

    28:12

    There are believed to be a million illegal boreholes in Spain, used to irrigate agricultural zones. The country’s water crisis and illegal water extraction is having fatal consequences, not only for the environment.

    Last year, a toddler died after falling into an open borehole near Malaga, Spain. Felipe Fuentelsaz is an activist campaigning against illegal boreholes and water extraction and pushing for sustainable water usage, hoping to improve awareness of the issue among both farmers and consumers. For the past 16 years, Felipe has been using satellite imaging to locate illegal boreholes and agricultural zones, which he then reports to the local water authority. But so far his efforts have had little impact. He is mainly active in the Doñana National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage site which is under threat because some 1,000 illegal boreholes have been drilled here for fruit cultivation. 30 percent of the EU’s strawberry production is located in the region. Groundwater levels in the park have fallen dramatically as a result of the illegal wells: its marshes, streams, rivers and lagoons are increasingly dry. Felipe Fuentelsaz believes that Europe uses too much water, and is determined to help bring about improved management of water resources. But Spain faces a dilemma: the country is still struggling with the fallout from the financial crisis and its economy relies heavily on agriculture, one of its few stable economic sectors. But export commodities such as fruit and vegetables are highly water-intensive.

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  • In Humboldts footsteps — Part 3 | DW Documentary

    8:59

    In celebration of Alexander von Humboldt’s 250th birthday, we invite you to learn all about the adventurous life of the great German natural scientist in seven short documentaries.

    German scientist Alexander von Humboldt was intrigued by the way of life of indigenous peoples in South America. In that spirit, in part three we visit members of the Achuar people, who live in relative isolation deep in the Amazon forest.

    For the full playlist go to:


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  • Born poor, die poor? How to tackle poverty - Founders Valley | DW Documentary

    26:01

    Children denied education; girls sold into brothels, lonely, neglected elderly people. Poverty defines the lives of millions. Social Entrepreneurs are trying to break the cycle of poverty – by tackling human trafficking, poor education and isolation.

    When it comes to happiness, people's dreams and desires are the same all over the world: a steady income, good health and opportunities for personal development. But those who come from poor backgrounds barely have a chance. Inequality begins in childhood. At what point is the course of someone’s life set? How can disadvantaged people guard against false promises? Who can they turn to for help?

    We meet three founders of social ventures. They want to overcome the barriers in society and are committed to improving equal opportunities and creating more social justice. Poverty means not only a low income, but above all a lack of opportunities to shape one's own life and advance in society. Many do not succeed in this on their own, but need support.

    Report by Claudia Laszczak

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  • Can Africas forests help save the world? | DW Documentary

    29:25

    Humans are destroying more and more natural habitats, which brings animals into closer contact with people -- and this can contribute to the outbreak of pandemics, like Covid-19. But several African countries are trying to protect forested areas. For example, most researchers believe that the Covid-19 virus originated in bats, and then crossed over to humans. The precise origins of Covid-19 are not yet clear. But there is no doubt that a number of new viruses have originated in the animal kingdom or are transmitted in the wild. The primary source of Covid-19 is widely believed to be bats; pangolins may have served as intermediate hosts. And the destruction of forests by humans has brought many animals closer to populated areas, which has increased the threat of new diseases.

    In Uganda and Kenya, virologists and zoologists are trying to determine whether there's a connection between human contact with wild animals and the spread of viruses. They're concerned that a deadly virus like Covid can spread from humans to certain species of animals. At the Bwindi National Park in Uganda, Dr. Gladys Kalema-Zikusoka, is working to protect mountain gorillas, an endangered species. She fears that the gorillas could fall victim to Covid-19, transmitted by humans. Her job has become more difficult, because a number of men who lost their jobs due to Covid restrictions have now turned to poaching gorillas.

    Kenyan scientist Augustine Baraza Obuyele is an expert on bats. He's been working at Mount Elgon on the Kenyan-Ugandan border, trying to discover new kinds of viruses among the bat population there -- viruses that could one day spread to humans, as Covid has. As humans continue to encroach on animal habitats, such as clear-cutting forests, there is an increased risk that infections could spread from animals to humans.

    The international community is concerned about these developments. For example, the U-N has declared a decade-long effort, set to begin next year, to protect and revive the world's ecosystems. The project, led by the UN's Environment Programme and its Food and Agriculture Organization, includes a number of re-forestation projects.

    Many African countries are cutting down forests to generate income, but others are committed to conservation efforts. For example, Kenya is trying to protect as much of the Mau Forest as possible. But to do this, the authorities have driven large numbers of indigenous people from their ancestral homeland. It will be difficult to find the right balance between protecting ecosystems and preserving the rights of people who live in those areas.

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  • Fighting poverty with fish | DW Documentary

    12:32

    Mouhamed Mbaye lives in Germany, and wants to import fish from Senegal, where he was born. Freshly caught, sustainable, fair. His business would create new jobs – jobs the region urgently needs. But international competition is fierce.

    A German wholesaler has expressed interest in Mouhamed Mbaye’s assortment of exotic fish. But meeting the hygiene regulations poses a tough challenge: The refrigerated supply chain has to stay uninterrupted for the entire journey. That’s not an easy feat in Senegal, where you can expect high temperatures year-round. Mouhamed Mbaye takes the trip to oversee preparations. If he can manage to get this import-export business running, he could ensure a steady income for himself and his workers. And the revenue it generates would strengthen the local economy. A report by Eva Beyer and Ralph Weihermann.

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  • Luxury for the super rich | DW Documentary

    42:26

    The largest private yacht in the world is the 180 meter-long Azzam, owned by the Emir of Abu Dhabi. Arab sheikhs, Russian oligarchs and American billionaires are battling to own the most luxurious and most expensive ship. The largest private yacht in the world cost around 600 million euros. The Azzam, which belongs to the Emir of Abu Dhabi, is a staggering 180 meters long. And it’s high maintenance — staff, diesel and servicing cost around ten million euros a year. These mega yachts are designed and furnished by top architects, like Philipp Starck. This film takes viewers onto some of the most expensive yachts in the world. Meet Norwegian ship designer Espen Oeino, who has inside knowledge of what this league of luxury really means. His clients’ requests have included a helicopter landing pad, and even a personal submarine on board. Along with destinations like Monaco, Miami and Dubai, yacht owners have recently also begun heading to more adventurous locations, like the Arctic Ocean.
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  • The great death of insects | DW Documentary

    42:26

    Insects are dying out and scientists and environmentalists are sounding the alarm. Our film team meets entomologists, farmers, scientists, chemical companies and politicians in a bid to lay bare the causes of insect mortality.

    Insects aren’t really likeable. They sting, bite, transmit diseases and frighten children. But, on the other hand, they are also fascinating: 480 million years ago, insects were the first animals to learn to fly, and they took over the Earth. Even now, they are fundamental to life on Earth, and are at the beginning of the food chain on which all human beings are ultimately dependent.
    But insect numbers worldwide are dropping, creating a rupture of the food chain. Environmentalists and scientists are now extremely worried. Landscape ecology professor Alexandra-Maria Klein from Freiburg, for example, has been researching the effects of human interventions in natural environments for decades and has launched an experiment in a fruit plantation on Lake Constance: What happens when insects disappear? An ominous silence is settling on places that were once humming and buzzing. Why are the insects dying? Author Christoph Würzburger takes a journey into the fascinating world of insects and meets entomologists, farmers, scientists, chemical companies and politicians in a search for the causes of insect mortality.

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  • How poor people survive in the USA | DW Documentary

    42:31

    Homelessness, hunger and shame: poverty is rampant in the richest country in the world. Over 40 million people in the United States live below the poverty line, twice as many as it was fifty years ago. It can happen very quickly.


    Many people in the United States fall through the social safety net. In the structurally weak mining region of the Appalachians, it has become almost normal for people to go shopping with food stamps. And those who lose their home often have no choice but to live in a car. There are so many homeless people in Los Angeles that relief organizations have started to build small wooden huts to provide them with a roof over their heads. The number of homeless children has also risen dramatically, reaching 1.5 million, three times more than during the Great Depression the 1930s. A documentary about the fate of the poor in the United States today.

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  • Sustainable business, rethinking growth - Founders Valley | DW Documentary

    26:02

    An entire generation of young people is rejecting the idea of unlimited economic growth on a planet with finite resources. Among them are social entrepreneurs in Indonesia looking for ways to do business that don’t harm the environment.

    The poles are melting. Sea levels are rising. Dozens of species go extinct every day. Environmental migration is already happening on a vast scale. It’s long past time to admit that the biggest threat humanity faces is climate change. In this episode of ‘Founders Valley’, we talk with Indonesian entrepreneurs trying to alter the rules of the game. They’re determined to run profitable businesses that are part of the solution, rather than part of the problem. We desperately need new sustainable concepts in business – but can humanity change?

    Part 2:
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    Watch the first and second seasons of Founders Valley here:

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  • Can farmers grow money? | DW Documentary

    42:26

    What kind of agriculture do we really want? How sustainable, regional, animal-friendly and expensive can it be? These and other pressing issues are part of a debate about radical agricultural reform of policy currently going on in Brussels.

    When negotiations on the common agricultural policy from 2020 are held in Brussels, one of the more contentious issues will be how to redistribute 60 billion Euros in EU agricultural subsidies. How will MEPs prioritize their options? Will they reach independent decisions or cave in to the big agricultural conglomerates and special interest groups? Our exclusive report uncovers their close ties with politicians in both Brussels and Berlin and shows how efforts to make farming more environmentally sustainable are being stymied.

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  • Have you ever heard of the Emoji Commission? | DW Documentary

    49:53

    Every day we send seven billion emojis worldwide. Although the colorful icons called emojis can no longer be ignored in our daily communication, little is known about it. Who has power over the emoji? Where are emojis coming from?

    There is one High Council of online communication that is difficult to access and has the power over our emoji selection on the keyboard: The Unicode Consortium. This group is difficult to access and meets four times a year on the west coast of the United States. This tech giants committee makes decisions about language and shapes the infrastructure of the online world. Representatives from Apple, Microsoft, Facebook, Google, IBM, Netflix, Amazon, and Intel set the global standard for symbols, characters, and fonts in digital (visual) language so that all our devices can communicate with each other effortlessly.

    Part of Unicode is the twelve-member Emoji Commission. Director Mea Dols de Jong got a foot in the door during the quarterly meeting at Microsoft's headquarters in Redmond, Seattle, but also ran into the shocking closedness of the tech sector. The deeper she delves into the world behind the seemingly little icons, the better she sees that this micro-world is a reflection of the real world. What does it take to get a new emoji on the phone's keyboard? Take a look at the campaign for a new white wine emoji. Why is the LGBTQI rainbow flag emoji in the keyboards, but not the one that stands for transgender people? Where lies the power to make such decisions?

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  • Fleeing climate change — the real environmental disaster | DW Documentary

    42:31

    How many millions of people will be forced to leave their homes by 2050? This documentary looks at the so-called hotspots of climate change in the Sahel zone, Indonesia and the Russian Tundra.

    Lake Chad in the Sahel zone has already shrunk by 90 percent since the 1960s due to the increasing heat. About 40 million people will be forced to migrate to places where there is enough rainfall. Migration has always existed as a strategy to adapt to a changing environment. But the number of those forced to migrate solely because of climate change has increased dramatically since the 1990s. It is a double injustice: after becoming rich at the expense of the rest of the world, the industrialized countries are now polluting the atmosphere with their emissions and bringing a second misfortune to the inhabitants of the poorer regions. One of them is Mohammed Ibrahim: as Lake Chad got hotter and drier, he decided to go where the temperatures were less extreme and there was still a little water, trekking with his wife, children and 70 camels from Niger to Chad and then further south. The journey lasted several years and many members of his herd died of thirst. Now he and his family are living in a refugee camp: they only have seven camels left. Mohammed is one of many who have left their homelands in the Sahel - not because of conflict and crises, but because of the high temperatures. He's a real climate refugee.
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  • Artificial intelligence and its ethics | DW Documentary

    42:31

    Are we facing a golden digital age or will robots soon run the world? We need to establish ethical standards in dealing with artificial intelligence - and to answer the question: What still makes us as human beings unique?

    Mankind is still decades away from self-learning machines that are as intelligent as humans. But already today, chatbots, robots, digital assistants and other artificially intelligent entities exist that can emulate certain human abilities. Scientists and AI experts agree that we are in a race against time: we need to establish ethical guidelines before technology catches up with us. While AI Professor Jürgen Schmidhuber predicts artificial intelligence will be able to control robotic factories in space, the Swedish-American physicist Max Tegmark warns against a totalitarian AI surveillance state, and the philosopher Thomas Metzinger predicts a deadly AI arms race. But Metzinger also believes that Europe in particular can play a pioneering role on the threshold of this new era: creating a binding international code of ethics.

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  • The New Silk Road, Part 2: From Kyrgyzstan to Duisburg | DW Documentary

    42:31

    The New Silk Road is a mammoth project meant to connect China with the West. It’s a gigantic infrastructure project that Beijing says will benefit all. But this two-part documentary shows another side: of China’s self-interest and geopolitical ambitions.

    China's path to global power leads through the legendary trade road. Our authors travel west on two separate paths: One team follows the sea route, along which China is expanding its support bases, while the other follows the ancient Silk Road through Central Asia. Their journey takes them through stunning landscapes and to magical places with ancient caravanserais, where the lore of the old Silk Road lives on. At the same time, they observe China’s overwhelming new influence in immense construction sites and shipping hubs. People everywhere are hoping the new trade will bring them and their children work and prosperity, just as the old Silk Road did hundreds of years ago. But others fear that a future dominated by China will bring them no good at all. Clean water, the mountains and nature are much more important than the money they give us, the filmmakers learn in Kyrgyzstan. Chinese investment has not only bestowed the country with better roads, power lines and railway lines, but also with environmental pollution, corruption and crippling debt. Oman is another stop on the line, where Beijing has taken over large parts of a new Special Economic Zone in the desert city of Duqm. You can still see traditional Arab dhows in the old harbor at Sur, but they no longer have a place in today’s international trade. Instead, the horizon is dotted with huge container ships, many of them flying the Chinese flag. Meanwhile, the French port city of Marseille is aiming to become the New Silk Road’s European bridgehead. A small container village in the hills above the city is the first step. Cheap textiles from the Far East are delivered here to the Marseille International Fashion Center”. MIF 68 for short - 68 is considered a lucky number in China - is geared towards distributing China’s products throughout Europe. The two-part documentary shows the breathtaking dimensions of this gigantic project - one where, it would seem, no stone will be left unturned.

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  • How the rich get richer – money in the world economy | DW Documentary

    42:31

    Exploding real estate prices, zero interest rate and a rising stock market – the rich are getting richer. What danger lies in wait for average citizens?

    For years, the world’s central banks have been pursuing a policy of cheap money. The first and foremost is the ECB (European Central Bank), which buys bad stocks and bonds to save banks, tries to fuel economic growth and props up states that are in debt. But what relieves state budgets to the tune of hundreds of billions annoys savers: interest rates are close to zero.

    The fiscal policies of the central banks are causing an uncontrolled global deluge of money. Experts are warning of new bubbles. In real estate, for example: it’s not just in German cities that prices are shooting up. In London, a one-bed apartment can easily cost more than a million Euro. More and more money is moving away from the real economy and into the speculative field. Highly complex financial bets are taking place in the global casino - gambling without checks and balances. The winners are set from the start: in Germany and around the world, the rich just get richer. Professor Max Otte says: This flood of money has caused a dangerous redistribution. Those who have, get more. But with low interest rates, any money in savings accounts just melts away. Those with debts can be happy. But big companies that want to swallow up others are also happy: they can borrow cheap money for their acquisitions. Coupled with the liberalization of the financial markets, money deals have become detached from the real economy. But it’s not just the banks that need a constant source of new, cheap money today. So do states. They need it to keep a grip on their mountains of debt. It’s a kind of snowball system. What happens to our money? Is a new crisis looming? The film 'The Money Deluge' casts a new and surprising light on our money in these times of zero interest rates.
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    Exciting, powerful and informative – DW Documentary is always close to current affairs and international events. Our eclectic mix of award-winning films and reports take you straight to the heart of the story. Dive into different cultures, journey across distant lands, and discover the inner workings of modern-day life. Subscribe and explore the world around you – every day, one DW Documentary at a time.

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  • Rich and poor – the inequality gap | DW Documentary

    42:31

    Christoph Gröner is one of the richest people in Germany. The son of two teachers, he has worked his way to the top. He believes that many children in Germany grow up without a fair chance and wants to step in. But can this really ease inequality?

    Christoph Gröner does everything he can to drum up donations and convince the wealthy auction guests to raise their bids. The more the luxury watch for sale fetches, the more money there will be to pay for a new football field, or some extra tutoring, at a children's home. Christoph Gröner is one of the richest people in Germany - his company is now worth one billion euros, he tells us. For seven months, he let our cameras follow him - into board meetings, onto construction sites, through his daily life, and in his charity work. He knows that someone like him is an absolute exception in Germany. His parents were both teachers, and he still worked his way to the top. He believes that many children in Germany grow up without a fair chance. What we see here is total failure across the board,” he says. It starts with parents who just don’t get it and can’t do anything right. And then there’s an education policy that has opened the gates wide to the chaos we are experiencing today. Chistoph Gröner wants to step in where state institutions have failed. But can that really ease inequality?

    In Germany, getting ahead depends more on where you come from than in most other industrialized countries, and social mobility is normally quite restricted. Those on top stay on top. The same goes for those at the bottom. A new study shows that Germany’s rich and poor both increasingly stay amongst themselves, without ever intermingling with other social strata. Even the middle class is buckling under the mounting pressure of an unsecure future. Land of Inequality searches for answers as to why. We talk to families, an underpaid nurse, as well as leading researchers and analysts such as economic Nobel Prize laureate Joseph Stiglitz, sociologist Jutta Allmendinger or the economist Raj Chetty, who conducted a Stanford investigation into how the middle class is now arming itself to improve their children’s outlooks.

    Part 1:
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  • Rubber in a Rice Bowl - Full documentary

    34:01

    This reportage addresses the topic of the current rubber boom and how it affects livelihoods and food security through the voices of the local population. It further raises the question as to how the local community takes part in the process of the agrarian transition driven by large scale rubber companies and to what extent they can benefit from the transformation.

    “Rubber in a Rice Bowl” tells the story of Cambodian farmers in a time of rapid change.




    Directors: Helena Ziherl, Reto Steffen, Christophe Gironde
    Editors: Reto Steffen, Helena Ziherl
    Research: Christophe Gironde, Amaury Peeters
    Interviews: Helena Ziherl
    Camera: Reto Steffen
    Drone aerial footage: Amaury Peeters


    The webpage of the research project can be found here:




  • Yokohama Rubber Corporate Profile Toward the Future 2019

    12:27

    Corporate profile the Yokohama Rubber Co., Ltd.
    Toward the Future 2019

    【Corporate website】

  • Rubber Technology Documentary

    43:29

  • Making fuel from tires in Egypt | DW English

    1:24

    Tires aren't biodegradable or easy to dispose of. What if you could turn them into fuel and reduce waste? That's exactly what a group of engineering students is doing in Egypt.
    For a related story, go to:

  • Humboldt discovers biodiversity in the Orinoco basin — Part 5 | DW Documentary

    10:23

    In celebration of Alexander von Humboldt’s 250th birthday, we invite you to learn all about the adventurous life of the great German natural scientist A. v. Humboldt in seven short documentaries.

    Travelling up and down the river, Alexander von Humboldt was ravished by the beauty and variety of the landscapes, flora and fauna. Today nature conservationists are battling to preserve the region's many threatened species.

    Watch the full seven videos here:


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  • Romania: Fipronil - the hidden threat | DW Documentary

    4:19

    A dangerous disinfectant is still being produced in Romania. This past spring, 1400 bee colonies died in the Romanian village of Puiesti after a pest controller sprayed an insecticide that contains fipronil, a known cause of colony collapse disorder. Now the destitute beekeepers are fighting for compensation.
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  • The motorsport with no gas - Formula E in Switzerland | DW Documentary

    16:41

    The motorsport with no petrol - cars powered purely by electricity. The Formula E race in Bern, Switzerland. Is the sport just an advertising space for the big auto companies? Or is it actually the path to a green future?

    Formula E is also a competition for the technology of tomorrow, a contest in which Switzerland has always been among the frontrunners. We went to see the first race held in Bern in over 65 years, accompanying Switzerland's best driver, Sebastien Buemi, at his first event at home. We also went on the road with the Swiss start-up Microlino, looking for solutions for the transport of tomorrow. What does sustainability mean beyond a label that some companies like to give themselves and what could mobility look like in the world to come? Who is leading the race for a green future?

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    DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

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  • Waiting for a lung — organ donors wanted | DW Documentary

    25:57

    Fewer and fewer Germans are willing to donate their organs after death, which often means long waits for transplant patients. Our documentary accompanied two such patients over a period of four years.

    Organ donation is a gift. I have to look after this organ now. Leo Veenendaal is well aware that he owes his current good health to his father, who gave him one of his kidneys. Meggy Wolsfeld, on the other hand, urgently needed a replacement organ - a lung - and could only hope a suitable donor would be found in time. She's been living with a stranger’s lungs for nearly four years now and says it makes her grateful and sad at the same time. She often thinks about her donor and says she even has the feeling that their soul is still with her. The film follows Meggy and Leo over a four-year period: from the tense time of waiting, through the energy-sapping organ transplantation to life with a new organ.

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    DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

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  • Our commitment to Sustainable Natural Rubber | Michelin

    3:45

    As one of the leading’s world buyers on the market, Michelin plays a key role in the natural rubber industry.
    In 2015, Michelin and Barito Pacific Group created a joint-venture (Royal Lestari Utama) to produce natural, eco-friendly rubber in Indonesia, in the provinces of Jambi (Sumatra) and North-East Kalimantan (Borneo). The project involves also a close collaboration with WWF.

    Subscribe to our channel for more videos:

    ➽ Who are we?
    Michelin, a leading premium brand, is dedicated to sustainably improving the mobility of goods and people by manufacturing and marketing tires and services for every type of vehicle, including airplanes, automobiles, bicycles/motorcycles, earthmovers, farm equipment and trucks.
    It also offers digital mobility services and publishes travel, hotel and restaurant guides along with maps and itineraries.

    ➽ On this channel, you will discover all our product range and learn more about our culture and innovations.
    You will also be able to find exclusive test, comparisons and testimonials about Michelin.

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