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Soil carbon -- Putting carbon back where it belongs -- In the Earth | Tony Lovell | TEDxDubbo

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  • Soil carbon -- Putting carbon back where it belongs -- In the Earth | Tony Lovell | TEDxDubbo

    20:46

    Tony Lovell will explain the reasoning behind how more green growing plants means more captured carbon dioxide -- more water -- more production -- more biodiversity -- more profit. Did you know that a 1% change in soil organic matter across just one-quarter of the World's land area could sequester 300 billion tonnes of physical CO2.

    TEDxDubbo focused attention on what we call FACETS -- Food, Agriculture, Climate, Energy, Topsoil and Sustainability. These FACETS are actually potent ideas shared by everyday people with an interest in these disciplines. In many of these topics there is an awareness campaign; the aim of bringing our community together united against catastrophic failures in our food-chain, environment and health. It is worth mentioning that we are also indebted to our natural systems for our economic wealth. Failures in Food, Agriculture, Climate, Energy, Topsoil and Sustainability are not just a local issue -- they are a global concern.

    In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

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  • Put carbon where it belongs… back in the soil

    6:41

    Fossil fuels, deforestation and industrial agriculture have released dangerous amounts of carbon into the atmosphere. We can store and stabilize large amounts of carbon where it belongs – in the soil.

    Soil scientists, Dr. Christine Jones and Elaine Ingham share farming and land management methods that will return carbon to the soil – and keep it there – for healthier crops, more resilient farms, and less extreme weather.

    For further information on restoring soil carbon:

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  • Tony Lovell Soil - Carbon - Part 1

    8:35

    Tony Lovell discusses soil carbon

  • Biochar -- Putting the carbon Genie back in the bottle: Rob Lerner at TEDxSanMiguelDeAllende

    12:18

    Biochar: Putting The Carbon Genie Back in the Bottle

    Rob Lerner is a biologist, environmentalist, and entrepreneur. A veteran of several start-ups, his business experience spans renewable energy, technology development, and other areas. He is a practicing sustainability advocate, green homebuilder, and biochar philanthropreneur, engaged in biochar project development in chosen hometown of San Miguel de Allende, and in sustainable agroforestry enterprises in Latin America.

    In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

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  • Putting carbon back into the soil

    3:16

    Regenerative farming techniques. Planting salt bush to regenerate scalded earth. Rejuvenating land over 20 year period. Interested in techniques for land owners to help make Australian agricultural land more drought tolerant and flood resistant. This 3 minute video is a case study on one such technique. It highlights a 20 year plus project on a property in central north New South Wales to regenerate and protect the top soil. This involved sustainable farming techniques to help put carbon back into the soil and rejuvenate scalded earth.

  • Tony Lovell - Soil Carbon - Part 4

    8:49

    Tony Lovell discusses Soil Carbon - Part 4

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  • ???? Tony Lovell, Sustainable Land Management Partners | Fixing the future, CCCB, Barcelona 2018

    16:40

    “Nature is incredibly forgiving. When we get out of her way, stop fighting her, and listen to what she has been screaming at us, her capacity to heal will never cease to amaze and inspire me.” Methane-burping cows are often the scape-goats (or scape-cows) for climate change. By giving the animals a more holistic hook, Tony Lovell, co-founder of SLM Australia Livestock Fund, has raised a whopping $100 million to help regenerate billions of hectares of damaged grasslands. The cowboy against climate change uses soil management, biodiversity restoration and grazing techniques. FutureHero Interview ►

    FIXING THE FUTURE
    The bad news: the world is broken. The good? We can fix it. And now for the ugly: it’s going to get messy. Luckily there are plenty of people who are happy to get stuck in. Having now mapped over 500 planet-changing projects, Atlas of the Future sees our role as providing a window to the work of these innovators. On 13 March 2018 a future-‘supergroup’ gathered at the CCCB in Barcelona, ‘City of the Possible’, for our first event: ‘Fixing the future: adventures in a better tomorrow’. Meet the innovators fixing our food, economy and energy, and tackling climate change and water scarcity:

    CONNECT WITH ATLAS OF THE FUTURE:
    Web:
    AtlasNews:
    Facebook:
    Twitter:
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  • Tony Lovell - Soil Carbon - Part 6

    9:30

    Tony Lovell discusses soil carbon - Part 6

  • Ag Matters: Soil carbon

    5:32

    Professor Louis Schipper of Waikato University explains what soil carbon is, why it matters, and why it’s currently difficult for New Zealand farmers and growers to verifiably increase their soil carbon stocks.

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  • Soil Carbon Sequestration and the Soil Food Web

    4:34

    Climate Change poses an existential threat to humanity. Soil Carbon Sequestration is widely being recognized as a part of the solution to this problem.

  • The Hans Jenny Memorial Lecture in Soil Science - The Genius of Soil

    1:4:34

    Garrison Sposito holds the Betty and Isaac Barshad Chair in Soil Science at Berkeley. He was a personal friend of Hans Jenny for nearly 30 years. Professor Sposito, whose academic degrees are in agriculture, specializes in physical chemistry applied to natural waters and soils. He was been elected a Fellow of six international scientific societies and has received numerous awards for his teaching and awards. In 2008 he was designated a Legend in Environmental Chemistry by the American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific organization.

  • Putting Carbon in the Soil

    14:26

    Roots of various plants together sequester carbon. Biochar persists in the soil. Johnson-Su increases soil fungi.

  • The Soil Story by Kiss The Ground

    3:57

    WATCH the follow up, The Compost Story!
    MIRA LA VERSION EN ESPAÑOL AQUI!

    Science meets inspiration in this tale of nature’s best hidden innovation: soil.

    The Soil Story, created by Kiss the Ground, is a five-minute film that shares the importance of healthy soil for a healthy planet.

    Learn how we can “sequester” (store) carbon from our atmosphere, where it is harmful, and pull it back into the earth, where it belongs, through regenerative agriculture, composting, and other land management practices.

    The film was directed in partnership with Louis Fox, best-known for the acclaimed viral series, “The Story of Stuff”.

    LEARN:

    FOLLOW:
    facebook.com/kissthegroundca
    instagram @kissthegroundca
    pinterest.com/kiss_the_ground
    Twitter @kissthegroundca

  • Carbon Farming: Harnessing The Power of The Soil

    5:22

    John Wick, co-founder of the Marin Carbon Project, was just trying to find a way to get rid of weeds on his ranch when he stumbled upon a powerful climate change solution. He learned about an approach to farming that helps sequester carbon in the soil.

    Credits:
    EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS: JOEL BACH, DAVID GELBER and DREW MAGRATTEN
    WRITER: JOEL BACH
    SCRIPT EDITORS: JOEL BACH, JOSH FUTTERSAK, DAVID GELBER, MAYA LILLY, DREW MAGRATTEN and MATT ROSENBAUM
    VIDEO EDITOR: ETHAN DAVID

    Sources:
    [i] Drovers.com. How rotational grazing improves pasture health. April 19 2016.
    [ia] MALT.org. Carbon Farming. Accessed: Mar 29 2019.
    [ii] PubMed.Gov. Greenhouse gas emissions from liquid dairy manure: Prediction and mitigation. Jul 18.
    [iii] MarinCarbobProject.org. Compost. Accessed: Mar 29 2019.
    [iv] EPA.Gov. Global Greenhouse Gas Emissions Data. Accessed: Mar 29 2019.

  • Tony Lovell - Soil Carbon Part 2

    9:29

    Tony Lovell discusses soil carbon - Part 2.

  • Soil, soul and society: Satish Kumar at TEDxExeter

    17:49

    Satish Kumar is an internationally renowned speaker on ecological and spiritual issues. When he was only nine years old, Satish renounced the world and joined the wandering brotherhood of Jain monks. He left the monastic order and became a campaigner for land reform, working to turn Gandhi's vision of a peaceful world into reality, before undertaking an 8,000 mile peace pilgrimage, walking from India to America without any money, through deserts, mountains, storms and snow.

    Since 1973 he has been Editor at Resurgence magazine and his books include No Destination; You Are Therefore I Am; Spiritual Compass; Earth Pilgrim.

    Satish teaches, lectures and runs workshops on reverential ecology, holistic education and voluntary simplicity. He was awarded an Honorary Doctorates in Education (2000), Literature (2001) and in 2009 an Honorary Doctorate of Law from the University of Exeter.

    Satish has regularly contributed to Radio 4's Thought for the Day and has appeared as a guest on Desert Island Discs. He featured in BBC2's Natural World Series -- Earth Pilgrim: A Spiritual Journey into the Landscape of Dartmoor. Satish is a Vice President at the RSPCA.

    In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.

  • 4 per 1000 | Soils for food security and climate

    3:31

    4 per 1000 | Soils for food security and climate

    Human activities release enormous quantities of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. This intensifies the greenhouse effect and accelerates climate change. The world soil contains 2 to 3 times more carbon than the atmosphere. Increasing this storage of carbon by 4 parts for 1000 in the top 30 or 40cm of the soil could stop the increase of CO2 in the atmosphere. This is the proposal of the 4 parts for 1000, soils for food security and climate.

    © Cirad-Inra-IRD, 2015

    More info on

    The 4 per 1000 website

  • The Carbon Farmer

    7:13

    100 years from present day - meet a man whose family have been working the same upland farm, based on peat soils, for generations and have radically evolved in the face of climate change. In a world where tax payer’s money is used to subsidise work to maintain the health of peatlands for numerous public benefits, he and his granddaughter show us what could be possible in our future – what we could gain, and what we could manage not to lose.

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  • DMC Science Seminar Series- Untangling the links: ocean life, carbon cycle, future climate

    47:40

    Dr. Margaret Estapa
    Assistant Professor of Geosciences, Skidmore College
    Assistant Professor of Chemical Oceanography, University of Maine, Darling Marine Center

    The global ocean acts as a “sponge” for atmospheric carbon dioxide, including human emissions. One of the processes that allow this is called the biological carbon pump, which starts when tiny single-celled, plant-like organisms grow and absorb carbon dioxide through photosynthesis. When these organisms die or get eaten, some of that carbon stays in the ocean and sinks into deeper water. Over long periods of time this transfer keeps carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere. However, scientists are still working out which organisms are the most important, and how they might react as the ocean warms, becomes more acidic and loses its wintertime sea ice cover. Will ocean biology keep contributing to ocean carbon uptake in the future? Since 2017, Dr. Estapa has been part of NASA study that is exploring these links through a series of expeditions at sea. She will talk about the clues her team has discovered in the North Pacific, and the questions they hope to answer closer to home, in the North Atlantic.

  • Soil -- from dirt to lifeline: Fred Kirschenmann at TEDxManhattan

    15:20



    Fred Kirschenmann has been involved in sustainable agriculture and food issues for most of his life. He currently serves as both a Distinguished Fellow at the Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture at Iowa State University, and as President of the Stone Barns Center for Food and Agriculture in Pocantico Hills, New York. He also still provides management over site of his family's 2,600 acre organic farm in south central North Dakota. He was recently named as one of the first ten James Beard Foundation Leadership Awards which recognizes visionaries in creating more healthful, more sustainable, and safer food systems. He is the author of a book of essays which track the development of his thought over the past 30 years; Cultivating an Ecological Conscience: Essays by a Farmer Philosopher, published by the University of Kentucky Press.

    More information at

    About TEDx, x = independently organized event:

    In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.*

    (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

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  • An archive of ancient tree genes | David Milarch | TEDxNASA@SiliconValley

    13:04

    David Milarch, co-founder of Archangel Ancient Tree Archive, and pioneer in the cloning of ancient trees, has dedicated his career to replanting Earth with the genetics of the world's ancient forests.

    In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

  • Industrial Hemp: transformation for NC agriculture? | Jack Whitley | TEDxGreensboro

    18:09

    Hemp, a long banned crop in the US, has great potential for North Carolina agriculture. Like the peanut, hemp has many uses in food and manufacturing.

    During a twenty-five year business career, he has worked for two organizations; a Fortune 50 consumer financial services company and a mid-market e-commerce specialty retailer.
    Jack’s work has been at the intersection of marketing, technology, e- commerce, strategy, corporate leadership, and both for-profit and non-profit board service.


    This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at

  • Carbon sequestration in soils | Francesca Cotrufo | Global Carbon Management Workshop

    31:46

  • ZBNF | How to Enrich Carbon Content of Soil | Sharath Pendekanti-6

    4:02

    Soil organic carbon is the basis of soil fertility and is a part of soil organic matter.It plays a key role in soil health through biological, physical and chemical functions.Before Planting Ginger crop,Sharath wanted to enrich carbon content in the soil.They
    identified Radish, as one of the best crop to improve soil carbon.He harvested French beans,Broad Beans,Cluster beans in order to fix the Nitrogen in Soil. Hense the carbon percentage in soil has been increased significantly.

  • Soil Carbon Sequestration 101: How it works

    26:26

    Learn how soil draws carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere, sequesters it in the ground and creates a critical element of soil health—soil organic carbon. Presented by Dr. Tracy Misiewicz, Associate Director of Science Programs at The Organic Center. The presentation took place at the Organic Alberta Conference 2018.

  • Biochar - the future of sustainable agriculture: Lauren Hale at TEDxUCR

    10:34

    Lauren Hale graduated with a Bachelors of Science from North Carolina State University in 2007. During her time there she studied the use of bacteria to degrade pollutants such as gasoline additives and chlorinated solvents. In 2009 she began a Ph.D. program at the University of California, Riverside where she currently researches the suitability of biochar to deliver plant growth-promoting bacteria into agricultural soils. When she completes her Ph.D. she hopes to continue to work with biochar and beneficial microorganisms and microbial generated enzymes of environmental significance.

    About TEDx:
    In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

  • Cooling the Planet with Carbon Farming - John Wick | Bioneers

    4:20

    John Wick and the Marin Carbon Project are developing innovative carbon farming practices based on their research of the carbon cycle’s impact on soil. These practices draw down dangerous levels of atmospheric carbon and sequester that carbon in the soil where it becomes an agricultural asset. More carbon in the soil increases fertility and yields and make farms more resistant to droughts. If adopted on a global scale, carbon farming can make agriculture a driving force that will help solve the climate crisis and cool the planet.

    Learn more at farming

    Videography: Guido Lois and Brenda Manookin

  • The carbon footprint of consumption | Diana Ivanova | TEDxTrondheim

    10:51

    Did you remember to turn off the lights before leaving home? Did you cut your shower short this morning? While these issues are important in decreasing your carbon footprint, Diana Ivanova argues that how you spend money is significantly more impactful.


    Diana Ivanova is currently a PhD candidate in the Industrial Ecology Programme at NTNU. She works with an EU project, GLAMURS, which aims to promote a global transition towards sustainable lifestyles and a green economy. Diana’s research focuses on environmental consequences of household consumption and lifestyles. She uses statistical, econometrical and other techniques to analyze the impacts of products and services consumed by households. Diana comes from an academic background based in environmental economics and sustainability and has earned degrees both from Denmark and Sweden.

    This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at

  • Cows, Carbon and Climate | Joel Salatin | TEDxCharlottesville

    17:05

    Joel Salatin, an organic farmer located in the Shanendoah Valley in Virginia, loves his grass - and so do his cows. In this talk Salatin outlines the role that this often unsung hero of the plant world plays in sustainable farming, and the effects that its efficient utilization can have on the world around us.

    Joel Salatin is a third generation beyond organic farmer and author whose family owns and operates Polyface Farm in Virginia's Shenandoah Valley. The farm produces salad bar beef, pigaerator pork, pastured poultry, forage-based rabbits and direct markets everything to 5,000 families, 50 restaurants, and 10 retail outlets. A prolific author, Salatin's nine books to date include both how-to and big picture themes. The farm features prominently in Michael Pollan's NYT bestseller Omnivore's Dilemma and the award-winning documentary, Food Inc.

    This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at

  • TEDxDubbo - Ben Bardon - The Creation of The Flannery Centre Strategy

    17:38

    Ben Bardon is CEO of Central West Group Apprentices, a group training company based in Bathurst. Ben has worked in the Community Training sector since 1990 and has held a number of representative positions including Board membership of the Adult Literacy and Numeracy Council, and National Employment Services Association.

    In 2006 Ben conducted a research project for The Commonwealth Department of Education, Science and Training into the role the not-for-profit training sector could play in the national reform agenda.

    Since then he has concentrated on developing international business opportunities in the UK and Timor Leste. These involve exporting the Group Apprenticeship Program through joint venture arrangements.

    TEDxDubbo focused attention on what we call FACETS -- Food, Agriculture, Climate, Energy, Topsoil and Sustainability. These FACETS are actually potent ideas shared by everyday people with an interest in these disciplines. In many of these topics there is an awareness campaign; the aim of bringing our community together united against catastrophic failures in our food-chain, environment and health. It is worth mentioning that we are also indebted to our natural systems for our economic wealth. Failures in Food, Agriculture, Climate, Energy, Topsoil and Sustainability are not just a local issue -- they are a global concern.

    In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

  • Carbon Cycle 2.0 Big Questions Panel Discussion Series - May 3rd, 2011

    1:24:15

    Kick-off Discussion Big Question:
    What is your vision for Earth's future carbon cycle?
    Panelists:
    Paul Alivisatos, Lab Director
    Don DePaolo, Energy & Environment Associate Lab Director and Earth Sciences Division Director
    Ashok Gadgil, Environmental Energy Technologies Division Director

    Moderator:
    Drew Isaacs, Director, New Management of Technology Programs, Haas School of Business at UC Berkeley

    In the coming months, we will convene panels of experts from around the Lab and beyond to tackle some of the Big Questions facing scientists in areas relating to energy and climate. This is not your typical research lecture: as the panelists answer the Big Question, new questions are sure to emerge, and the result will be a lively conversation including audience participation.

  • 3.5 billion ways microbes can save the earth: Doug Weatherbee at TEDxSanMigueldeAllende

    22:12

    Biologist Doug Weatherbee explains how microbes have created our world and are the key to saving it.

    Doug Weatherbee left the corporate IBM world of teaching technology a few years back to get his hands dirty working with microbes and farmers to transform dead dirt into living soil. He likes to say he works with the soil and not against it. He didn't know it then but going deep into the microscopic world of soil life would lead him to appreciate the profound interconnectedness of all life, including humans, and how this just might save the planet.
    Doug lives in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico. He uses an applied soil microbiological (eco)systems approach to regenerate the health and fertility of degraded soils, helping farmers save money on fertilizers, fungicides and water along the way to a sustainable agriculture. He teaches and consults with farmers in Canada, the US and Mexico and is a member of a Certified Organic farming cooperative in Mexico.

    In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

  • Putting Grasslands to Work - Day 2 - Session 1

    2:7:37

    | A celebration of genius – Tribute to Bruce Ward
    - Allan Savory
    - Suzie Ward
    - Tony Lovell

    A conversation about investing in people and land
    - Hunter Lovins
    - Catherine Collins

    Stay connected:





    About Savory Institute:
    Loss of grasslands leads to climate change, floods, droughts, famine, and worldwide poverty. It’s our mission to promote large-scale restoration of the world’s grasslands through Holistic Management.

    Holistic Management is a process of decision-making and planning that gives people the insights and management tools needed to understand nature: resulting in better, more informed decisions that balance key social, environmental, and financial considerations.

  • Holganix - Why is Carbon Important to Soil Health?

    7:07



    When you take a carbon heavy product like Healthy Grow and infuse it with a biology intensive product like Holganix, you’re addressing both sides of the equation. Healthy Grow provides the carbon that sustains the microorganisms living in Holganix, allowing them to help to build balanced soils and promote healthy plants.

    What are the benefits to Healthy Grow infused with Holganix?

    1. Promotes active and diverse soil biology
    2. Reactivates and sustains naturally occurring biological cycles
    3. Increases soil exchange capacity
    4. Improves soil structure facilitating air and water movement
    5. Increases soil available essential nutrients
    6. Enhances root function increasing access to nutrients and water
    7. Suppresses diseases and reduces stress
    8. Improves water management efficiencies
    9. Reduces excess soil biocarbonates and sodium accumulation
    10. Increases environmental stewardship

  • Carbon Farming on a Homstead Part II

    1:4:43

    Sharon Gensler, Carbon Outreach Coordinator for NOFA/MASS discusses carbon farming on a homestead. Sharon gives a great tour of her homestead while showing examples of cover crop mixtures, and green fertilizers in action.

    This is part of the Inspiring Ideas from Experts in the Field webinar series, presented by the Northeast Organic Farming Association, Massachusetts Chapter (NOFA/Mass) -

    Thanks to webinar sponsors Lancaster Agriculture and Frontier Co-op. Special Thanks to New Entry Sustainable Farming Project and Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy for providing access to the WebEx software used to host these online workshops.

  • Agriprove - Grow Top Soils - The Science of Soil Carbon

    3:56

    WEBINAR SERIES
    If you are keen to know more about the fundamentals of building soil carbon on your farm AgriProve is running the ideal webinar course for you.

    Join us for a seven-part series to discover how to grow soil carbon on your farm, with highly regarded soil scientist Declan McDonald. Declan will explore how to use all the regenerative tools at your disposal to improve soil organic matter and carbon in your soils.

    Declan is a professional soil scientist with over 30 years’ experience in agricultural and horticultural soil management and has extensive experience in regenerative agriculture in NSW, Victoria and Tasmania.

    Declan will dig into the science behind growing soil organic carbon, how to implement regenerative management techniques, and how to monitor and measure your success. Improving soil health and building soil carbon can improve the productivity of your soils, and you can earn carbon credits for the carbon you produce.

    The seven-part webinar series will support farmers participating in or interested in a soil carbon project. The series will cover best practice conventional and regenerative soil management to suit your soils, climate and enterprise.

    Sessions will be interactive to answer all your questions on soil carbon. The series will support all farmers to better understand their soils, however there will be a focus on grazing systems in moderate to high rainfall zones.

    This series will cover the following topics:

    3 February How soil works and how plants grow
    10 February Organic matter – the cornerstone of soil health and sustainable production
    17 February Soil biology – millions of years in the making
    24 February Mineral management – the role of macro and micro elements
    3 March Managing fertility to build soil carbon
    10 March Management practices to grow soil carbon
    17 March Bringing it all together – monitoring and evaluation

    Please see agriprove.io/events for further details

  • Lini Wollenberg: Soil Carbon and Climate Change - Finding a Middle Way

    56:12

    Increasing the storage of carbon in the soil has been a controversial strategy for addressing climate change mitigation. What is the potential and why is there debate about this? How can we push beyond the debate to constructive action?

    Lini Wollenberg, a Gund Fellow, is an anthropologist and natural resource management specialist concerned with rural livelihoods and the environment. She currently leads a research program on Low Emissions Agricultural Development for the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), based at the University of Vermont. Her work seeks to identify options for reducing the impacts of agricultural development and land use on the climate, while also improving livelihoods for the poor in developing countries.

    Learn more about the Gund Institute:
    Explore Gund events:

  • Optimising the management of soils and organic matter

    52:38

    The role of soil carbon in drought resilience

    Presenter: Dr Jeff Baldock
    Recorded: 22 September 2016

    Organic carbon is composed of a variety of materials and methods have been developed to allow us to quantify their composition. Knowing the composition of and well as the organic carbon content in soil is useful as it gives an insight into the vulnerability of soil carbon to change and it potential provision of nutrients. Predictive equations have been developed to relate the impact of organic matter on soil water holding capacity. These are typically site or soil type specific; however, now that we have better techniques for the measurement of soil carbon fractions these models are expected to improve.

  • Can we increase soil carbon & reduce greenhouse gas emissions in horticulture with soil amendments?

    25:18

    Justine discusses interim results of her 'Fruit Salad' project, evaluating the effect of soil amendments, biochar and compost, on soil carbon and greenhouse gas emissions. The project covers bananas, blueberries and melons, short, medium and long term crops, both rainfed and fertigated.

  • Stanford Seminar: Carbon Sequestration

    1:15:12

    EE292H: Engineering and Climate Change
    Carbon Sequestration
    Speaker: Brent Constantz

    About the Speaker:
    Brent Constantz is serial Silicon Valley entrepreneur who founded and led as CEO: Norian Corporation 1987- 1998, Corazon Technologies 1998- 2002, Skeletal Kinetics 2002-2007, Calera Corporation 2007 -2010, DeepWater Desal 2011-date, and Blue Planet 2012- date. Dr. Constantz is the inventor on over 100 issued US patents, with over 100 more currently pending. He is a Consulting Associate Professor at Stanford University, where he teaches biomineralization. Constantz discovered the basic process used by corals to form their skeletons in the 1980s, which he based modern biological bone cements on, which are found in most operating rooms around the world that perform orthopedic surgery. In 2007, he launched his efforts to address climate change by sequestering anthropogenic carbon dioxide as building materials, specifically concrete. In 2012, he brought a new discovery of basic biomineralization to practical reality with a scalable solution that can address climate change in an economically and technically sustainable manner. A Fulbright Scholar, Dr. Constantz has been awarded many grants from governments, including the US, Canada, and Australia, has testified before both the US Senate and the House of Representative about solutions to Climate Change, has won a number of awards and honors, and regularly contributes to philanthropic causes.

  • TEDxDubbo - Cameron Neil - Small Farmers: Enabling Heroes

    17:55

    Cameron is an accomplished project manager with significant experience in sustainable procurement and supply chains. He has 7 years' experience in regulatory systems for global agricultural markets and played a key role in building the Fairtrade Certification movement and market in Australia & New Zealand. Cameron has assisted more than 200 retailers and manufacturers to build ethical supply chains and implement robust control systems. Cameron has advised government bodies, large and small businesses and community sector organisations on ethical and sustainable procurement and the development of appropriate sourcing policies and procedures. While having particular knowledge of food supply chains and Fairtrade, Cameron has also worked with the garment sector and is knowledgeable in other standards and certifications covering forestry and eco-tourism.

    TEDxDubbo focused attention on what we call FACETS -- Food, Agriculture, Climate, Energy, Topsoil and Sustainability. These FACETS are actually potent ideas shared by everyday people with an interest in these disciplines. In many of these topics there is an awareness campaign; the aim of bringing our community together united against catastrophic failures in our food-chain, environment and health. It is worth mentioning that we are also indebted to our natural systems for our economic wealth. Failures in Food, Agriculture, Climate, Energy, Topsoil and Sustainability are not just a local issue -- they are a global concern.

    In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

  • Grow Top Soils - Week 6 - Management practices to grow soil carbon

    1:49

    If you are keen to know more about the fundamentals of building soil carbon on your farm AgriProve is running the ideal webinar course for you.

    AgriProve is hosting a seven-part series on how to build soil carbon and improve soil health, with highly regarded soil scientist Declan McDonald. In this series Declan explores how to use all the regenerative management tools at your disposal to increase organic carbon and the health of your soils.

    Declan is a professional soil scientist with over 30 years’ experience in agricultural and horticultural soil management and has extensive experience in regenerative agriculture in NSW, Victoria and Tasmania.

    The sixth weekly webinar focused on 'Management practices to grow soil carbon', and aired on 10 March 2021.

  • What is Carbon Pricing? - Climate X Change

    33:57

    Welcome back to another episode of Now You Know! Today, we sit down with Climate X Change, a nonprofit organization who's goal is to legislate Carbon Pricing, but what is carbon taxing? Watch this interview to find out!

    Learn more about your Legislators:

    Sign up for the Raffle:

    Learn more about Climate X Change:


    For information on the Tesla referral program, send us a message on Facebook:


  • DR JILL CLAPPERTON ON SOIL HEALTH March 27th, 2013

    1:31:17

    Dr Clappertons presentation in Monte Vista, CO on the importance of soil health with a concentrations for root crops such as potatoes.

  • Soil Organic Carbon: keystone to sustainability in a changing world

    13:24

  • CARBON X - CARBON EARTH CO - PLANT BUILD UPDATE

    5:40





    We've been on the road - A LOT! We met with our manufacturers that are building hoppers, conveyors, etc. Then we followed up with a trip to our plant site. We have one more building left to construct and the grade work just wrapped up. It's getting close!

  • Enriching soil carbon in an efficient way.

    3:51

  • 2. What is a Soil Carbon Project Worth?

    15:41

    What can you earn out of a soil carbon project? Terry McCosker outlines how carbon projects work, what drives profitability, the productivity benefits to your livestock enterprise and what you can stand to make over and above increased livestock production. The benefit of legumes to soil carbon sequestration and the carbon-nitrogen ratio is also discussed.

  • Soil Cycles and Carbon Sequestration

    47:41

    A discussion with Andre Leu, Jessica Chiartas, Jeff Borum, and Aidee Guzman about the importance of regenerative agriculture in sequestering carbon and fighting climate change, and the important role that the soil plays in sequestering carbon.

    Andre Leu is the former President of IFOAM - Organics International, the world change agent and umbrella body for the organic sector, and is the Director of Regeneration International in Australia, an organization that promotes food, farming and land use systems that regenerate and stabilize climate systems, the health of the planet and people, communities, culture and local economies, democracy and peace. He is also the author of ‘Poisoning our Children’ and the ‘Myths of Safe Pesticides.’



    Jessica Chiartas is a PhD Candidate at UC Davis studying Soil and Biogeochemistry. She is also the Executive Director of Soil Life

    Jeff Borum is the Soil Health Coordinator for the East Stanislaus Resource Conservation District. Over the past few years, he has focused on building a strong foundation for state wide grower-led networks while simultaneously managing other projects, such as a collection of 17 compost field trials and several cover crop demonstrations spanning across California.

    Aidee Guzman is a PhD Candidate at UC Berkeley who works with Southeast Asian and Latinx small-scale farmers embedded in the monoculture landscape of California's Central Valley. Her research explores how on-farm diversification practices influence ``soil health`` and its links to other ecological processes. Aidee’s research aims to use social and ecological approaches to support farmers and rural livelihoods.

    Presented at the Soil Not Oil 2018 Environmental Conference, San Francisco CA

    Soil Not Oil promotes agro-ecological practices and community powered solutions to restore ecosystems and reach environmental justice.


    Videos provided by our amazing worktrade filmmakers and Survival Media Agency

  • Dr. Kristine Nichols talks about soil, carbon sequestration and regenerative grazing

    4:55

    Dr. Nichols of the Rodale Institute talks about soil as our most important resource and how to manage it properly to sequester carbon, reverse global warming, solve food & water insecurity, and promoting human health. She also talks about the new 4p1000 initiative put forth by the French in conjunction with the COP21 talks in Paris.

    So, tell us about the 4P1000 we've been hearing so much about. What is the initiative and why is it so groundbreaking?

    Well, the initiative is so groundbreaking I think because it is really looking at trying to come up with a viable solution to climate change. And really looking at agriculture and agricology in the soil as a big potential for that, so the whole idea is what they want to do is they want to increase the amount of carbon in the soil every year by point-four percent. Which sounds like a very small number but its very significant over time, I mean in ten years your looking at increasing carbon very significantly in soils.

    It's something that can be a very strong type of thing to be able to solve the carbon problem that I had discussed here and the carbon problem is really this whole idea of the fact that focus too much on what we call issues and decided that those are problems like too little water, too little nutrients, not the right weather patterns all those types of things but what we really have in the end is the fact that our soils are starving for carbon. And if we can get more plants growing and manage the growth in plants appropriately we're going to be able to get more carbon into the soil and get more productivity out of the soil, manage water better, and um... provide for resiliency to allow plants and crops to continue to grow under climatic uncertainty that we're heading towards.

    And what are some of the strategies for success in that in getting that carbon back in the soil?

    The strategies for getting that carbon back in the soil are to increase your plant production which means not necessarily growing fence-row to fence-row and narrowing your row spacing but actually getting your plants to produce more. So, getting more vegetative growth in your plants. Some of that can be supplemented by doing things like cover crops. So, your adding an additional green growing crop, keeping it in a vegetative phase or its going to be putting more carbon below ground as apposed to putting carbon above ground into the grain.

    um... so that can be an important component of it. Getting more plants there growing, keeping the soil covered with living plants, making sure that you have a good diverse crop rotation to add that diversity to feed diverse number of different organisms that are in the soil.

    You have a whole plath row of organisms representing millions of different species in the soil and what you need to have is that great diversity so that you retain that resiliency of function and can manage diseases and pests and water and nutrients throughout the growing season.

    Um... so its very important to be able to have a good crop diversity when we have a mono-culture system. I acquaint this to the donut-dot and basically what we've done is we've fed our soil donuts and I use donuts not just because you know donuts are something that many people can relate to, wanting to eat some... a bunch of. But, donuts, it's important because the donuts are basically allot of what our mono-cultures are. Very high carbon so very high sugar types of things that isn't very good for the entire system to function. There's not allot of protein, there's not allot of other nutrients involved in that and thats what our mono-culture are based on are these um... donut-type crops rather than based on very diverse crops. So, the crop rotation can be important, again keeping your soil covered with a living plant can be important, keeping your soil, reducing the amount of disturbance that you have in your soil which can cause from excessive tillage.

    Tillage can be a tool to have to help to manage some pests, um... but you need to utilize tillage appropriately, utilize the appropriate tools, and make your decisions to utilize tillage as sort of a last resort.

    What are the other things I can do? If I did have cover crops, companion crops, could I manage weeds better that way so I wouldn't have to use tillage as a tool? And then, you know also be looking at I think livestock are a very important tool to be involved in this. Having a grazing animal is very important to being able to stimulate more carbon cycling in the system. It's stimulates the roots, breaks off root hairs, which feeds more biology. So you get more of the carbon flowing through the biology and when you do that you have different biological organisms that are now gonna take some of the more labial carbon, carbon rapidly turns over and actually to secure that using biological, chemical and physical methodologies so that its going to stay in soil for decades rather than just a year or two.

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