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The Cosmic Scale

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  • The Cosmic Scale

    33:12

    How large is the universe? Where does it begin and end? And how does it expand? These are some of the biggest questions of astronomy. And while humanity is so small that we may never be able to fully understand the true scale of the universe, advancements in technology are helping us to look ever-deeper into the wilds of our existence- towards the edge of our observable universe, known as the Cosmic Horizon. Today, we will analyse the universe, its laws, and its awe-inspiring scale.

    Do you use these videos to sleep or for night time watching? Check out the new sleeping space playlist, a collection of my most chilled out and ambient videos.


    I don't have a Patreon, but if you would like to support the channel you can become a SeaSquad Member. Members gain access to exclusive badges, emojis, and early video previews! Join with the link below:


    Thumbnail made by Wimptastic:

    MUSIC:
    Special thanks to Lombus, who allowed me to use his song Doppler Shores in the title screen:
    - Source:
    - Artist:

    The following songs by Chris Zabriskie are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 licence.
    - The Theatrical Poster...:
    - Unfoldment, Revealment...
    - Cylinder Five:
    - Take Off and Shoot a Zero:
    - Oxygen Garden:
    Artist:

    Other songs are from the YouTube Audio Library:
    - Landing | Godmode
    - Tundras | Amulets
    - Dolphin-esque | Godmode
    - Space Chatter | Doug Maxwell
    - Traversing | Godmode
    - At The Precipice of a Dying Light | Dan Bodan

    FOOTAGE:
    The space scenes in this video were captured using SpaceEngine Pro, a virtual universe simulator:

    Get SpaceEngine on Steam:

    Stock footage provided by Videezy.com

    VIDEO CLIPS:
    - NASA Redshift Animations:
    - Dark Energy Expansion:
    - Zooming into the Ultra Deep Field:
    - Virtual Clips of Hubble Repair:
    - Final Servicing Mission:
    - Observable Universe Growing ESA:
    - ESO Type 1a supernova
    - Redshift Expansion [Creative Commons]:
    - Expanding Universe Animation [Hubble ESA]:

    IMAGES:
    - Observable Universe Logarithmic Illustration:
    - Hubble Images:
    - Observable Universe Graphic: By Andrew Z. Colvin - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0,
    - Accelerated Expansion Diagram: By Design Alex Mittelmann, Coldcreation, CC BY-SA 3.0,
    - Ursa Major:
    - Night Sky Image:

    SOURCES OF INFORMATION:
    - Number of Stars in the Universe:
    - Einstein and Achievements:
    - Edwin Hubble's 1929 Discovery:
    - The Hubble Deep Field Images:
    - How Much of the Unobservable Universe will we See Someday:
    - Some interesting notes on the sphere expanding model:
    - Type 1a Supernovae:
    - Frieman et al., Dark Energy & the Accelerating Universe:
    - Size of the Unobservable Universe [Oxford Physicists]:

    TIMESTAMPS:
    0:00 Introduction
    2:23 Defining the Universe
    6:51 The Big Bang
    9:12 The Observable Universe
    10:53 The Hubble Telescope
    11:46 The Hubble Deep Field
    16:49 Cosmic Expansion
    19:40 Redshift
    21:48 The Cosmic Horizon and the Unobservable Universe
    25:36 Accelerating Expansion
    28:29 Dark Energy
    30:14 The End of the Universe

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  • Beyond the Cosmic Horizon

    18:53

    Please Note: This is a very old video of mine. Watch the newer, updated HD version of this video:

    In 2012, scientists detected the most distant galaxy discovered to date. This galaxy is now expected to be over 46 billion light years from the Earth, at the very edge of the observable universe. But what differentiates the observable universe and the rest of the universe? Today, we examine how a 13 billion year-old universe can be hundreds of billions of light years in diameter, and what might be waiting for us behind the barrier of the cosmic horizon.

    Do you use these videos to sleep or for night time watching? Check out the new sleeping space playlist, a collection of my most chilled out and ambient videos.


    I don't have a Patreon, but if you would like to support the channel you can become a SeaSquad Member. Members gain access to exclusive badges, emojis, and early video previews! Join with the link below:


    FOOTAGE:
    - Observable Universe Logarithmic Illustration:
    (Artist:
    - 8 Minute Space Journey:
    - Green Nebula Fly-by:
    - Cruising Through:
    - Light Travelling Demonstration:
    - Particles:
    - Galaxy Loop:
    - Earth Footage:
    - Star Trails from Earth:
    - Milky Way & Andromeda Collision:
    - Nebula 360:
    - Pixel Orb:

    MUSIC:
    - CO.AG: This Fascinating World


    - Chris Zabriskie: Stories About the World That Once Was


    - Chris Zabriskie: They Call it Nature



    - Popular Playlists! -
    • Creepy Playlist:
    • Out of this World:
    • Conspiracy Cases:
    • G-News:

    - Out of this World -
    • The Fermi Paradox:
    • The Cold Spot:
    • Bootes Void:

    - Conspiracy Cases -
    • 11B-X-1371 Mystery:
    • Dyatlov Pass Incident:
    • Denver Airport Conspiracy:

    - GD -
    • G-NEWS:
    • The Best Of Lists:
    • Community Commentary:
    • Full GD Playlist:

    - Maps From Hell Series -
    • Bloodlust Episode:
    • Yatagarasu Episode:
    • Plasma Pulse Series Episode:

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  • Deciphering The Vast Scale of the Universe | STELLAR

    10:12

    Thank you to Draper and its Hack the Moon initiative for supporting PBS Digital Studios | Learn more at

    PBS Member Stations rely on viewers like you. To support your local station, go to:

    One of the fundamental questions humanity has always asked is how big is our Universe? For much of human history, people believed that Planet Earth was the very center of the entire universe. And Earth is pretty big. But compared the rest of the universe, we are infinitesimally small.

    The animation in this video the Digital Universe data collection curated by the American Museum of Natural History. The software is used to visualize these datasets is OpenSpace, which is developed through a collaboration between AMNH, Linköping University in Sweden, New York University, and the University of Utah. The software and datasets are open source and are free to download and explore.

    Credit: From the ESO Supernova to the end of the Universe at 00:52

    Credit: ESO/L. Calçada/M. Kornmesser/spaceengine.org

    Credit: Cepheid Variable 4:06

    NASA, ESA, M. Kornmesser

    I know, this video is a bit different from most Space Time videos. It's part of a PBS miniseries called Stellar, done in collaboration with Diana Cowern from @physicsgirl and Joe Hanson from @It'sOkayToBeSmart. Over six episodes we travel to telescopes, go inside space research centers, and chat with amazing scientists. Next up is Joe's episode where he explores where life might be outside our solar system.

    Check out Joe’s episode here:


    Check out the other episodes in this series:

    The Quasar from The Beginning of Time | STELLAR


    Seeing a Black Hole with a Planet-Sized Telescope | STELLAR


    I Visited the First Gravitational Wave Detector! LIGO | STELLAR


    How We’ll Find the Aliens in Our Solar System! | STELLAR


    Stellar is a part of the PBS Summer of Space. There'll be lots of awesome space related content all summer long on PBS. See what's happening at

    #SummerOfSpacePBS #astrophysics #space

    Hosted by Matt O’Dowd
    Written by: Sophia Chen, Matt O’Dowd, Andrew Kornhaber, Eric Brown
    Directed by: Andrew Kornhaber & Eric Brown
    Producer: Randa Eid
    Director of Photography: Eric Brouse
    Sound: Justin Pope & Brett Van Duesen
    Production Assistant: Marifisia Bel
    Editing: Pavel Ezrohi, Tom Levin, Rebbecca Senn
    Graphics: Murilo Lopes
    Assistant Editing: Daniel Sircar
    Produced By: Kornhaber Brown

    Check out the new Space Time Merch Store!


    Support Space Time on Patreon

  • Cosmic Eye — Zoom through the Universe!

    3:00

    This is the original landscape-format version of the short movie Cosmic Eye, designed by astrophysicist Danail Obreschkow. The movie zooms through all well-known scales of the universe from minuscule elementary particles out to the gigantic cosmic web. This project was inspired by a progression of increasingly accurate graphical representations of the scales of the universe, including the classical essay Cosmic View by Kees Boeke (1957), the short movie Cosmic Zoom by Eva Szasz (1968), and the legendary movie Powers of Ten by Charles and Ray Eames (1977). Cosmic Eye takes these historical visualisations to the state-of-the-art using real photographs obtained with modern detectors, telescopes, and microscopes. Other views are renderings of modern computer models. Vector-based blending techniques are used to create a seamless zoom.

    This 2018-version of Cosmic Eye contains improved graphics and minor technical corrections compared to the 2011-version in portrait format.

    ► Support via PayPal (US$):
    ► Support via PayPal (AU$):
    ► Support via PayPal (€):
    Donations are vital to develop, update and translate Cosmic Eye. Thank you for any support.

    All rights were obtained for third-party images and image-data:
    + Millennium Dark Matter simulation (V. Springel & Virgo Consortium)
    + 3D galaxy and star positions in the local universe (from
    + Synthetic rendering of the Milky Way (adopted from N. Rising)
    + Galaxy M51 (HST, NASA)
    + Oort cloud rendering (adopted from a BBC illustration)
    + Planet images (from NASA Voyager 2)
    + Satellite images by 2012 Google Maps, Europa Technologies, MapLink/Tele Atlas
    + Retina photography (C. Allison)
    + Electron microscopy of a leukocyte (J. Ehrman)
    + Microscopy of red blood cells (internet photos.net)
    + Synthetic DNA model (adopted from

    Music:
    Enter the Maze by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (
    Source:
    Artist:

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  • How Far Away Is It - 16 - The Cosmos

    40:37

    Text -
    Index -
    Music and ad free version -
    website -
    Wiki page


    In this final segment of our “How far away is it” video book, we cover the structure of the visible Universe as we currently know it.
    We start with some galaxy and galaxy clusters beyond our local superclusters, including: Abell 2029 with its supermassive galaxy IC 1101; Quasar Markarian; a massive cluster gravitationally lensing a more distant cluster; El Gordo; some distant supernovae remnants; gravitational lensing in giant galaxy clusters like Abell 1689, Abell 68, and more. We then cover dark matter discovery in the Coma cluster and evidence for it in the Bullet cluster. We see a gravitationally lensed supernova;
    Next, we cover slowly expanding space and the impact that has on measuring distances using GN-z11, currently beyond the visible horizon, as an example. We also cover how recent redshift measurements from distant Type 1a Supernovas have provided evidence that the expansion is accelerating. We explain how this leads to the concept of ‘Dark Energy’ by examining the concept of a cosmic scale factor and how it changes over time. With this we introduce ‘cosmological redshift’ as a measure of the expansion.
    We then cover the creation of the Cosmic Background Microwave (CMB) radiation and what that tells us about the formation of galaxy walls around great voids. We then cover some of the recent galaxy surveys that are helping us understand the fabric of the visible Universe. These include the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey of 52,000 galaxies out to 3 billion light years, and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey that mapped one million galaxies. We show the 3D supercomputer video that shows the fabric of the Universe is like a web of galaxies with massive voids. We show some of the galaxy surveys that show this web-like structure.
    We conclude with a review of the cosmic distance ladder and our last adjustment based on cosmological redshift. And we end with Edwin Hubble’s own words on the limits of our knowledge.


    Music:
    @00:00 Mendelssohn – “Violin Concerto in E Minor Op.64 Andante”; 101 Strings; from the album The Most Relaxing Classical Music, 1997
    @11:55 Mozart - Piano Concerto No.21 in C 'Elvira Madigan' K.467 - Andante; from the album The Most Relaxing Classical Music, 1997
    @21:34 Rachmaninov - Piano Concerto No 2 in C minor; from the album The Most Relaxing Classical Music, 1993
    @32:18 Mozart - Clarinet Concerto in A from the album The Most Relaxing Classical Music, 1997

  • The Cosmic Calendar | Cosmos: Possible Worlds

    2:45

    The Cosmic Calendar visualizes the chronology of the universe, scaling approx. 13.8 billion years to one single year for perspective.
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    #NationalGeographic #NeildeGrasseTyson #CosmosPossibleWorlds

    About Cosmos: Possible Worlds:
    Helmed by Ann Druyan and hosted by Neil deGrasse Tyson, COSMOS: POSSIBLE WORLDS is a triumphant voyage through humanity’s past, present, and future, taking viewers to previously unchartered territories and turning complex themes of science and exploration into a mind-blowing adventure beyond the realms of the imagination. Approximately 13.8 billion years in the making – the age of the universe –COSMOS: POSSIBLE WORLDS is a wonder-filled odyssey that maps a hopeful vision of our future.

    About National Geographic:
    National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible.

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    The Cosmic Calendar | Cosmos: Possible Worlds


    National Geographic

  • x
  • How small are we in the scale of the universe? - Alex Hofeldt

    4:08

    View full lesson:

    In 1995, scientists pointed the Hubble Telescope at an area of the sky near the Big Dipper. The location was apparently empty, and the whole endeavor was risky – what, if anything, was going to show up? But what came back was nothing short of spectacular: an image of over 1,500 galaxies glimmering in a tiny sliver of the universe. Alex Hofeldt helps us understand the scale of this image.

    Lesson by Alex Hofeldt, animation by Bliink.

    Hubble Deep Field Image Credit: R. Williams (STScI), the Hubble Deep Field Team, and NASA.

  • From Earth to Multiverse

    6:12

    Star Size Comparison - The Scale of the Universe And the Multiverse.

    The Multi-Universe Cosmos

    Source: Star Size Comparison 2 -
    Channel: morn1415 ©

    Credit: 1:05

    Music: Vangelis - Alpha


    Reupload

    * * *

    Star Size Comparison 3 ( Vortex V1 ):

    * * *

  • Scales of the Universe in Powers of Ten - Full HD 1080p

    9:36

    Cosmic Voyage is a 1996 short documentary film produced in the IMAX format, directed by Bayley Silleck, produced by Jeffrey Marvin, and narrated by Morgan Freeman.

    Cosmic Voyage has a format similar to Eva Szasz's Cosmic Zoom, and Charles and Ray Eames's classic Powers of Ten educational video. All were based on the 1957 book Cosmic View by Dutch educator Kees Boeke. Cosmic Voyage takes viewers on a journey through forty-two orders of magnitude, beginning at a celebration in Venice, Italy slowly zooming out into the edge of the observable universe. Then the view descends back to earth, and later zooms in upon a raindrop on a leaf on a hoop used in the celebration mentioned earlier, down to the level of subatomic particles (quarks).

  • x
  • The Observable Universe

    3:27

    -This video illustrates the scaled size of our universe from quarks to the entirety of the observable universe. Each circle used in the video represents a scale factor of 10; meaning each larger circle is zoomed out 10x more than its predecessor.

    ( i.e. after 1 circle you are now looking at 10x larger horizon, after 2 circles 100x, 3 would be 1000x, and so forth. This also applies to the speed, ignoring relativistic effects, at which the observer (you) would be traveling.)

    *EDIT: Please note that the zoom out from 2:26 - 2:34 is a simplistic model of the *hypothetical* mutliverse intended to aid conceptualization of the idea, but is currently not definitively known to science and is most certainly NOT part of the observable universe. I left some comments explaining why I kept it in the video for those who still aren't satisfied with this explanation. Thanks and enjoy!

    ***IMPORTANT INFORMATION UPDATE***:

    In October of 2016, NASA has conducted another deep field survey with Hubble and found that the already unfathomably large observable universe actually has.... about 10x more galaxies than we originally thought, putting the new estimated total at around 2 trillion. That means that there are more galaxies in our viewable universe than there are stars in our own galaxy, by a large margin. And remember, this is all just the parts of the universe we can see. Much of it is obscured behind a cosmic horizon where the light cannot reach us. Truly astounding.

    Source:

  • An Exploration Of Cosmic Phenomena | Secrets Of The Universe Season 1 All Episodes | Spark

    3:17:49

    00:00:00 Black Holes: The Other Side of Infinity
    00:23:48 Dynamic Earth
    00:48:50 Super-volcanoes
    1:13:45 The Mysterious Birth of the Moon
    1:38:29 Oasis In Space
    2:03:37 Undiscovered Worlds
    2:28:45 Death of a Star
    2:53:53 Search for the Edge of the Universe

    A compilation of the best 'Secrets Of The Universe' episodes featuring epic black holes, nuclear furnaces at the core of giant stars and volcanic pressure cookers inside planets - all across the immense reaches of time and space, the universe is being transformed by seething caldrons of energy.
    --
    Subscribe to Spark for more amazing science, tech & engineering videos: ????

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    Content licensed from TVF International to Little Dot Studios.
    Any queries, please contact us at: owned-enquiries@littledotstudios.com

    #SecretsOfTheUniverse #SuperVolcanoes #Space

  • Dyson Sphere Program - Cosmic-Scale Factory! Ep 1

    49:25

    Harness the power of stars, collect resources, plan and design production lines and develop your interstellar factory from a small space workshop to a galaxy-wide industrial empire.

    Want to see more? Make sure to Subscribe and Like!
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    New to the channel? I do Let's Play videos -- these are like walkthrough guides of gameplay with continuous English commentary trying to explain my decisions and what strategy I use. If you're looking for hacks or cheats, you're in the wrong place!

  • Church of the Cosmic Skull - Cold Sweat

    4:59

    Vinyl, CD, Cassettes and Merch:
    Join us:
    Listen:

    Join us. We love you.

    'Cold Sweat' from the second studio album 'Science Fiction'

    Lyrics:

    Go
    Or it’s never gonna matter at all
    Go
    Cause they’re coming, oh they’re coming to call
    Go now
    While you
    Still can
    Go before the coming of dawn
    On and on
    Cause they’re coming, oh they’re coming and it’s never gonna matter at all

    You never woken with a cold sweat?
    No you never talk about it
    You never talk about it
    You never talk about it anymore

    Go
    And you’re running just as fast as you can
    Go
    Running faster than you ever ran
    Go now
    Go now
    Go now
    Go before the coming of dawn
    On and on
    And you never turn your head, you never turn your head, you never turn it

    You never woken with a cold sweat
    No you never talk about it
    You never talk about it
    You never talk about it anymore


    Video by Zorad
    Big thanks to Laura Turner at Fuzzfox

    x x x

  • Dark Energy and the Cosmic Expansion

    38:38

    Science for the Public: Contemporary Science Issues & Innovations 12/14/21. Arjun Dey, Ph.D., Astronomer, NSF National Optical-Infrared Astronomy Research Laboratory (NOIRLab); member, Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) project.
    Arjun Dey is a core member of the Dark Energy Spectroscropic Instrument (DESI) survey project, the largest cosmic cartography project ever undertaken. DESI will provide the most precise measurements to date of the expansion history of the universe and the role of dark energy. In this program, Dr. Dey discusses the enigma of dark energy and the accelerating expansion of the universe, the scope of the DESI project, and the broad impact it will have on astrophysics and cosmology.

  • Cosmic Microwave Background Explained

    7:10

    Want to ask some sort of crazy question about Space?:
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    HAS SPACE ALWAYS BEEN BLACK? As long as we've been around, YES. But the universe gets much more exciting, AND much BRIGHTER, as we start winding our clocks back to the early days of the universe. Near the beginning of the universe, when space was rapidly expanding, that dark night sky we know so well as actually…ORANGE! But why? Did the lights just go out, or did something more spectacular happen? Watch this episode of PBS Space Time and find out!

    Extra Credit:
    CMG Scissored Pair


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  • Intergalactic scale | Scale of the universe | Cosmology & Astronomy | Khan Academy

    10:50

    Intergalactic Scale. Created by Sal Khan.

    Watch the next lesson:

    Missed the previous lesson?

    Cosmology & Astronomy on Khan Academy: The Earth is huge, but it is tiny compared to the Sun (which is super huge). But the Sun is tiny compared to the solar system which is tiny compared to the distance to the next star. Oh, did we mention that there are over 100 billion stars in our galaxy (which is about 100,000 light years in diameter) which is one of hundreds of billions of galaxies in just the observable universe (which might be infinite for all we know). Don't feel small. We find it liberating. Your everyday human stresses are nothing compared to this enormity that we are a part of. Enjoy the fact that we get to be part of this vastness!

    About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content.

    For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything

    Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Cosmology & Astronomy channel:
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  • The Mind-Blowing Scale of Voids and Supervoids

    16:04

    Supervoids are the massive, empty spaces between galaxy clusters and galaxy filaments. But just because they are empty, doesn't mean they can't be fascinating! They have taught us a great deal about galaxy structures and the early universe, and today we'll be venturing into a few of the biggest!

    Do you use these videos to sleep or for night time watching? Check out the new sleeping space playlist, a collection of my most chilled out and ambient videos.


    I don't have a Patreon, but if you would like to support the channel you can become a SeaSquad Member. Members gain access to exclusive badges, emojis, and early video previews! Join with the link below:


    Music, Footage Credits & Sources of Information:

    MUSIC:
    - Long Walks [Emily A Sprague] - YouTube Audio Library
    - Fairy Meeting [Emily A Sprague] - YouTube Audio Library
    - A Slow Dream [Emily A Sprague] - YouTube Audio Library
    - Devoid [ELPHNT] - YouTube Audio Library
    - Rain Cloud Music [Emily A Sprague] - YouTube Audio Library

    FOOTAGE:
    Many scenes in this video were captured using SpaceEngine Pro, a virtual universe simulator! Get SpaceEngine on Steam and try it for yourself:


    Much of the stock footage in this video was provided by Videezy.com. Check them out:


    - Expanding Universe Animation [Hubble ESA]:
    - Dark Energy Expansion:
    - NASA Illustris Collaboration Simulation:
    - Expanding Galaxies:
    - Hubble Images:
    - Pink Galaxy Footage: - Provided by RoyaltyFreeTube under a Creative Commons License
    - Bubble Footage:

    SOURCES OF INFORMATION:
    - Redshift Surveys Confirming Voids:
    - Bootes Void Articles:

    - How Large is the Local Group:
    - Dark Matter's Adbsence in Voids:
    - Atomic Density of Intergalactic Space:
    - Identification of the KBC Void:

    - The CMB Cold Spot Supervoid Study [2015]:

    TIMESTAMPS:
    0:00 Emptiness in Space
    2:04 Defining a Void
    3:52 Mapping Voids Around Us
    4:38 How Voids Form
    7:05 The Bootes Void
    9:16 Voids and Dark Energy
    10:33 The Cold Spot
    12:10 The KBC Void

  • Redshift and the Cosmic Scale Factor

    9:19

    By Cowen Physics (

  • The Cosmic Web, or: What does the universe look like at a VERY large scale?

    4:25

    The Millennium Simulation featured in this clip was run in 2005 by the Virgo Consortium, an international group of astrophysicists from Germany, the United Kingdom, Canada, Japan and the United States. A virtual cube of 2 billion light years on a side was filled with 10 billion particles whose evolution was computed using the physical laws expected to hold in the currently known cosmologies. The initial distribution of matter, that resembled the conditions present when the cosmic microwave background radiation was emitted (about 379,000 years after the universe began) was allowed to evolve, and the formation of galaxies and black holes in the simulation were recorded. After all the computing work was done (28 days, at a rate of 200 billion calculations per second) 20 million galaxies were formed in the initial space. These galaxies and the dark matter around them formed web-like structures that resemble the shapes observed by the most recent data available in cosmic surveys, such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Also very importantly: the simulation provided support for our current standard model of cosmology, the so called: Lambda Cold Dark Matter Model.

    For more info, please check:

    Mullennium I:
    Mullennium II:

  • Classroom Aid - Cosmic Scale Factor

    1:35

    Text at

  • x
  • The Cosmic Microwave Background

    27:39

    The Cosmic Microwave Background [CMB] is the oldest light in the universe that we can see or detect. It was emitted only 380,000 years after the universe was born, back when it was a much less peaceful place. The microwave-band static is fundamentally linked to the Big Bang, and if we map it precisely enough, we can discover a wealth of information about the age, composition and structure of the universe.

    Join the official #SeaSquad Discord Server:
    Business Enquiries: SEA.Enquiries@gmail.com

    Thanks as always to Wimptastic for the thumbnail:

    Do you use these videos to sleep or for night time watching? Check out the new sleeping space playlist, a collection of my most chilled out and ambient videos.


    I don't have a Patreon, but if you would like to support the channel you can become a SeaSquad Member. Members gain access to exclusive badges, emojis, and early video previews! Join with the link below:


    MUSIC:

    - Deep Static:
    - Cosmic Microwave Background Noise:
    - I Knew My Way Downtown - Chris Zabriskie
    - Everyone Will Notice, No One Will Say Anything - Chris Zabriskie
    - You Fiddle, I'll Burn Rome - Chris Zabriskie
    - God be with You til we Meet Again - Chris Zabriskie
    - A Million Thoughts - CO.AG Music:
    - A Person That They Will All Fear - CO.AG Music:
    - Haunted - CO.AG Music:
    - We Can Rebuild Your World - CO.AG Music:

    All songs by Chris Zabriskie are licensed under a Creative Commons 4.0 License (re-use allowed)
    I Made This While You Were Asleep (Album):
    Chris Zabriskie's Website:

    CO.AG's Channel:

    FOOTAGE:

    The space scenes in this video were captured using SpaceEngine Pro, a virtual universe simulator:

    Get SpaceEngine on Steam:

    Some scenes created using Universe Sandbox:

    The stock footage was provided by Videezy.com:

    Other Videos:
    - Satellite Stock Footage:
    - Radio Telescope Stock Footage:
    - NASA Oscillatory Patterns Demonstration:
    - COBE Graphics:
    - WMAP Graphics:
    - NASA WMAP Graphics:
    - Planck Graphics:

    SOURCES OF INFORMATION:
    - CMB at 50:
    - CMB Fluctuations:
    - Dipole Anisotropy:
    - COBE Science Mission:
    - WMAP:
    - Planck Satellite:
    - The Cold Spot:
    - Hawking Points:
    - Conformal Cyclic Cosmology:

    CHAPTERS:
    0:00 Static
    1:48 The Big Bang
    4:58 The CMB: The Final Photons
    8:16 History of Background Radiation Observations
    10:58 Missions to Map the CMB (COBE, WMAP, Planck)
    13:09 What Does the Map Show Us?
    15:17 Cosmic Inflation
    17:04 The Cold Spot (A Parallel Universe?)
    21:15 Hawking Points (An Oscillatory Universe?)
    26:17 The End?

    (NON-ENGLISH VIEWERS)
    To get subtitles in another language, click the [CC] button in the bottom right corner of the screen, then click the Settings (cogwheel) icon next to it, click Subtitles / CC and click Auto-Translate, and select your language from there.

  • Cosmic Address

    2:44

    A Clip from Cosmos: Space Odyssey

    Neil deGrasse Tyson

  • How would a civilisation develop on the cosmic scale ?

    5:35

    The Kardashev Scale is a method of measuring the development of civilisations based on their energy consumption cosmic scale.

    The Kardashev Scale was created by Nikolai Kardashev in 1964 in his a paper published in the Soviet Astronomy Journal. In this paper he explored the energy requirements of a communication system capable of delivering signals across the Universe and being detectable using conventional radio technology.
    The Kardashev Scale emerged from this paper as a way of categorising civilizations based on their energy consumption.

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  • Classroom Aid - Cosmic Scale Factor

    2:27

    Text -

    Music and ad free version -

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    Wiki page


    In this final segment of our “How far away is it” video book, we cover the structure of the visible Universe as we currently know it.
    We start with some galaxy and galaxy clusters beyond our local superclusters, including: Abell 2029 with its supermassive galaxy IC 1101; Quasar Markarian; a massive cluster gravitationally lensing a more distant cluster; El Gordo; some distant supernovae remnants; gravitational lensing in giant galaxy clusters like Abell 1689, Abell 68, and more. We then cover dark matter discovery in the Coma cluster and evidence for it in the Bullet cluster. We see a gravitationally lensed supernova;
    Next, we cover slowly expanding space and the impact that has on measuring distances using GN-z11, currently beyond the visible horizon, as an example. We also cover how recent redshift measurements from distant Type 1a Supernovas have provided evidence that the expansion is accelerating. We explain how this leads to the concept of ‘Dark Energy’ by examining the concept of a cosmic scale factor and how it changes over time. With this we introduce ‘cosmological redshift’ as a measure of the expansion.
    We then cover the creation of the Cosmic Background Microwave (CMB) radiation and what that tells us about the formation of galaxy walls around great voids. We then cover some of the recent galaxy surveys that are helping us understand the fabric of the visible Universe. These include the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey of 52,000 galaxies out to 3 billion light years, and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey that mapped one million galaxies. We show the 3D supercomputer video that shows the fabric of the Universe is like a web of galaxies with massive voids. We show some of the galaxy surveys that show this web-like structure.
    We conclude with a review of the cosmic distance ladder and our last adjustment based on cosmological redshift. And we end with Edwin Hubble’s own words on the limits of our knowledge.


    Music:
    @00:00 Mendelssohn – “Violin Concerto in E Minor Op.64 Andante”; 101 Strings; from the album The Most Relaxing Classical Music, 1997
    @11:55 Mozart - Piano Concerto No.21 in C 'Elvira Madigan' K.467 - Andante; from the album The Most Relaxing Classical Music, 1997
    @21:34 Rachmaninov - Piano Concerto No 2 in C minor; from the album The Most Relaxing Classical Music, 1993
    @32:18 Mozart - Clarinet Concerto in A from the album The Most Relaxing Classical Music, 1997

  • Cosmic background radiation | Scale of the universe | Cosmology & Astronomy | Khan Academy

    11:36

    Cosmic Background Radiation. Created by Sal Khan.

    Watch the next lesson:

    Missed the previous lesson?

    Cosmology & Astronomy on Khan Academy: The Earth is huge, but it is tiny compared to the Sun (which is super huge). But the Sun is tiny compared to the solar system which is tiny compared to the distance to the next star. Oh, did we mention that there are over 100 billion stars in our galaxy (which is about 100,000 light years in diameter) which is one of hundreds of billions of galaxies in just the observable universe (which might be infinite for all we know). Don't feel small. We find it liberating. Your everyday human stresses are nothing compared to this enormity that we are a part of. Enjoy the fact that we get to be part of this vastness!

    About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content.

    For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything

    Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Cosmology & Astronomy channel:
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  • The Cosmic Web: What does the Universe look like at a VERY large scale?

    4:38

    Hey everyone, welcome back to my channel. Don't forget to click Subscribe if you want more weekly updates on science.

    Watch This Interesting Video:


    Recent studies about the structure of the universe revealed that there are even more massive structures than clusters and superclusters of galaxies. Apparently, galaxy clusters and superclusters are structured in forms that resemble filaments, as in a massive web. This movie shows one of the most powerful super-computer simulations of these structures, done by the Virgo Consortium.
    These kind of simulations consist basically of the following:
    1. “Grab” a virtual box of a few billion cubic light years.
    2. Put in there some billion of primordial “particles” (dust, dark matter, etc.)
    3. Program a computer with all the physical laws we know.
    4. Run the simulation and compare the results with actual data.
    Every yellow dot you see here is an entire galaxy!
    The yellow color represent normal matter, while the purple halos represent dark matter.
    This is how a “slice” of universe evolved from the primordial roughness in the time of the microwave background radiation. The universe expansion is visually “normalized” in this sequence. From another simulation. The final state of these simulations matches extremely well the data obtained with galaxy surveys, thus supporting the current “standard model” of cosmology (The Lambda-Cold Dark Matter Model).
    Do you want to navigate through the universe at this scale?
    Let’s Go...

  • Why the Cosmic Calendar Doesnt Make Sense - Ask a Spaceman!

    7:34

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    What is the “cosmic calendar”? What are some important scales in the universe? Why is it so hard to judge “importance” of events? I discuss these questions and more in today’s Ask a Spaceman!

    Follow all the show updates at and help support the show at

    Keep those questions about space, science, astronomy, astrophysics, and cosmology coming to #AskASpaceman for COMPLETE KNOWLEDGE OF TIME AND SPACE! Music by Jason Grady and Nick Bain.

  • COSMIC GALAXY SCALE | Intergalactic BUDOL! Garena League of Legends PH

    6:57

    Be one of the Espers! Don't forget to like, share and subscribe!

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  • The Cosmic Distance Scales

    1:58

    This feature will give an impression of how immense our Universe is by employing a method used many times in Power of 10 films - that is, starting with an image of the Earth and then zooming out towards the furthest visible reaches of our Universe.

    This is not, however, an exercise in powers of 10 - on the contrary, our goal is to show you astronomical distances without scientific notation. We instead focus on the large number of zeros that are in astronomical distances when we measure them with a familiar unit like the kilometer. The number of zeros increase with each zoom, though not at a constant rate.

    Why was this feature written? The Imagine the Universe! Ask An Astrophysicist service gets many questions asking why humans do not travel to the nearest star or galaxy - many people do not realize how spectacularly far away the nearest astronomical objects are.

    Distance Information
    Light Year = the distance that light travels in a vacuum in 1 year; 5.88 trillion miles or 9.46 trillion kilometers;

    Some of the most newly detected objects may be over 13 billion light years away, as derived from a standard model of the Universe. However, a powerful new generation of telescopes, like the James Webb Space Telescope, will be needed to confirm the suspected distances of these objects.

    When 13 billion light years is translated into kilometers, there are a staggering number of zeros - it comes out to approximately 123,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 km.

    As time progresses, so will our ability to see futher and further away - giving us insight on the very beginnings of the Universe's existence!

  • The Cosmic Address

    15:30

    Watch the whole series here: The Milky Way: Our Home Galaxy in the Cosmos. Astronomy class at William Paterson University:

    This is part of my complete intro Astronomy class that I taught at Willam Paterson University and CUNY Hunter. If you want to watch all the videos in the correct order, please visit my website at

    Now we start the process of learning our place in space, by hearing about our Cosmic Address.

    Supplement the videos with OpenStax Astronomy
    target=_blank
    25 The Milky Way Galaxy


    Cosmic distance ladder


    The Cosmic Distance Scale


    The Atlas of the Universe


    The Universe


    Cosmology


    Copernican principle


    Homogeneity


    Isotropy


    Location of Earth

  • The Cosmic Scale

    6:44

    Created using

  • League of Legends - Luxs Cosmic Scale Returns and PRESTIGE EZ CRAFTING!! || Guide and Tips ||

    8:39

    ⚖️ Cosmic Scale is back!
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    ⏰ Ends 19 September 11:59 PM GMT+8
    ➡️ Click on the COSMIC SCALE icon in the client to view
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  • Radius of observable universe | Scale of the universe | Cosmology & Astronomy | Khan Academy

    16:39

    Radius of Observable Universe. Created by Sal Khan.

    Watch the next lesson:

    Missed the previous lesson?

    Cosmology & Astronomy on Khan Academy: The Earth is huge, but it is tiny compared to the Sun (which is super huge). But the Sun is tiny compared to the solar system which is tiny compared to the distance to the next star. Oh, did we mention that there are over 100 billion stars in our galaxy (which is about 100,000 light years in diameter) which is one of hundreds of billions of galaxies in just the observable universe (which might be infinite for all we know). Don't feel small. We find it liberating. Your everyday human stresses are nothing compared to this enormity that we are a part of. Enjoy the fact that we get to be part of this vastness!

    About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content.

    For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything

    Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Cosmology & Astronomy channel:
    Subscribe to Khan Academy:

  • Astronomers Have Directly Observed The Cosmic Web And It Left Them Speechless

    11:12

    Astronomers have directly observed the cosmic web and it left them speechless. Today, we take a look at what astronomers have just discovered.

    Space is one of the last unexplored frontiers, and within in it lays thousands of mysteries. The secrets of the universe are endless. Space has always contained extraordinary and mind-blowing mysteries since we first pointed our telescopes to the sky.

    This wonder and amazement has only grown as our technology has developed, allowing us to travel to these destinations we never believed possible.

    Thank you for watching!

    Thank you to CO.AG for the background music!

  • The Zoomable Universe: A Tour Through Cosmic Scale

    1:01

    The Zoomable Universe: A Step-by-Step Tour Through Cosmic Scale, from the Infinite to the Infinitesimal

    Embark on a breath-taking, cutting-edge voyage through the enormity of our reality - travelling one power of ten or order of magnitude at a time. Echoing the classic film by Charles and Ray Eames, acclaimed astrobiologist Caleb Scharf and artist Ron Miller guide us from the very edge of the observable universe - about 91 billion light-years away - to the subatomic realm, where the fabric of space-time itself behaves in a way that confounds all the rules of physics we currently know.

    Gorgeously designed and visually inspiring, The Zoomable Universe takes a truly unique approach toward explaining our place in the universe, charting an unforgettable course through galaxies, black holes, solar systems, stars and planets, oceans, plants and animals, microorganisms, atoms, quantum fields, and much more. Illustrated with stunning colour artwork and infographics, this is an unforgettable journey that will thrill readers who want to discover more about the incredible reality we inhabit.

    Video Trailer by Ed Bell

  • The speed of light on a cosmic scale.

    1:00

  • The Cosmic Distance Ladder

    12:35

    To the infinite and Beyond! The Cosmic Distance Ladder
    Hi, It's Michael Here from Feed your curiosity!
    The cosmic distance ladder (also known as the extragalactic distance scale) is the succession of methods by which astronomers determine the distances to celestial objects. 

    Let's suppose we are observing two stars in the night sky, and we are wondering which one is the most distant from us.
    This is not a simple question to answer.
    For example, if the two stars were lying at the same distance from us and had the same intrinsic luminosity, we would see them showing the same brightness. 
    But...what if one of them was more distant from us than the other? We would expect to detect a difference in brightness: the more distant a star is, the less bright it will appear in the sky. 
    And that's exactly what we observe: apparent brightness.
    Since intrinsic luminosity provides us with a huge quantity of information about stars, their atmosphere, their surface temperature, and their radius, it has been worth it to spent a lot of effort in the computing of distances. 
    Finally, when we observe the sky, we are seeing a 2-dimension space, without no information about the 3rd one: the stars that form constellations, they are in general separated in the depth dimension.

    Follow me on this journey to learn more about this topic, and to understand how astronomers are measuring the distances in the universe, starting from the measure of Astronomic Unit until we get to the famous Hubble's Law!



    So now we know that if we want to understand the physics behind an astronomical phenomenon, we need to quantify the basic properties of the system under observation.
    Many of these properties cannot be determined unless we know the distance to the object in question. 
    Although we are not able to determine many of the absolute properties of astronomical phenomena without distance information, we can compare their relative properties. 
    For example, the stars in any galaxy outside our own are all at essentially the same distance from us.
    Thus, if observations of a nearby galaxy reveal that all the stars of a particular type have the same apparent brightness, then we know that this class of objects all have the same intrinsic luminosity. 
    We can use this property to measure the relative distances to other galaxies: if we can identify the same type of star in these galaxies and measure their apparent brightness, then the ratio distances follows directly from the ratio of apparent luminosity fluxes. 
    Sources with identical intrinsic luminosities which can be used in this way are known as “standard candles”.

    Think about the procedure once again:
    the distance to a nearby galaxy might be determined by comparing the apparent brightness of its individual stars to those of similar stars in the Milky Way, the distance to a more remote galaxy whose individual stars cannot be resolved can then be measured by comparing the properties of the galaxy as a whole to the properties of the nearby galaxies, and so on...
    This bootstrapping approach has been dubbed the “cosmic distance ladder”, where each rung up the ladder takes us to a greater distance.

    But how do we calibrate the cosmic distance ladder?
    We first need absolute methods that give us absolute distance measurements. 

    So, first: Absolute distance estimators.
    We use some simple geometric techniques as absolute distance estimators.
    The available method includes, for example, the trigonometric parallax.

    Let's see how the Trigonometric Parallax Method works.
    As the Earth revolves around the sun, the point from which we see the stars continually changes. 
    Thus, their apparent directions also change a bit. 
    We can measure this changing in position and write: d (parsecs) = 1/w'', where w is half of the angle variation of the star's position over the year, measured in arcseconds. The w angle it's also called Parallax. 
    This method comes from geometric considerations, so it's an absolute calibrator.
    If we can measure the w angle, we are able to determine the distance of our object. 

    Problems start to arise when we are considering very distant stars, for which we aren't able to determine the Parallax because it is too slight and we don't have the right instruments to measure that little shift in position. 
    The larger known parallax is 0''.75 for Alpha Centauri, which places it at a distance of 1.3 pc, making it our nearest star.

    To make sense of our accuracy in calibrating the distance ladder, we need some other Absolute

  • The Cosmic Scale

    47

    created using The Scale Universe

  • Measuring the Cosmic Distance Scale with SDSS-III

    1:2:54

    Daniel Eisenstein (Harvard University)

  • cosmic scale factor and redshift z

    7:09

    cosmic scale factor and redshift z

  • The Cosmic Scale || Large Quasar Groups

    2:16

    #SeaSquad
    How large is the universe? Where does it begin and end? And how does it expand? These are some of the biggest questions of astronomy. And while humanity is so small that we may never be able to fully understand the true scale of the universe, advancements in technology are helping us to look ever-deeper into the wilds of our existence- towards the edge of our observable universe, known as the Cosmic Horizon. Today, we will analyse the universe, its laws, and its awe-inspiring scale.

  • The Cosmic Classroom - Size Scale of the Solar System

    9:08

    How big is the Sun? How big is the solar system?

  • The Cosmic scale

    1:20

    Yes

  • A Cosmic Web Connects Everything in the Universe | The Space Show

    15:14

    From the surface of Earth it seems the stars and galaxies are randomly placed throughout the universe. But step back to a galactic scale, and a mysterious network of roads and hubs emerges. This is the Cosmic Web, and we are just beginning to learn how it underlies the nature of the cosmos. Mordecai-Mark Mac Low and Carter Emmart from the American Museum of Natural History take us on a tour of the Cosmic Web.

    Use of “The Space Show” title does not imply any affiliation with or endorsement by The Space Show ® podcast produced by Dr. David Livingston.

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  • Cosmological time scale 1 | Scale of the universe | Cosmology & Astronomy | Khan Academy

    7:07

    Cosmological Time Scale 1. Created by Sal Khan.

    Watch the next lesson:

    Missed the previous lesson?

    Cosmology & Astronomy on Khan Academy: The Earth is huge, but it is tiny compared to the Sun (which is super huge). But the Sun is tiny compared to the solar system which is tiny compared to the distance to the next star. Oh, did we mention that there are over 100 billion stars in our galaxy (which is about 100,000 light years in diameter) which is one of hundreds of billions of galaxies in just the observable universe (which might be infinite for all we know). Don't feel small. We find it liberating. Your everyday human stresses are nothing compared to this enormity that we are a part of. Enjoy the fact that we get to be part of this vastness!

    About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content.

    For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything

    Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Cosmology & Astronomy channel:
    Subscribe to Khan Academy:

  • The Cosmic Web, or What does the universe look like at a VERY large scale 720p

    10:18

    Описание

  • Cosmic Scale Sound Sample -10 Inch Stainless Steel Mini-Vibedrum - Stardust Color - 2019 Model

    2:11

    Mini-Vibedrum Cosmic Scale -2019 Stainless Steel Model Notes: F3 (Bass) / A4 / B4 / C#5 / C4 (mid-tone) E4 / F4 / G4 This is a sound sample of our 2019 Stainless Steel Model that is a bit bigger in diameter so the sound quality, durability and note sustain has improved.

    The Cosmic Scale is our highest scale for those of you who love the higher tones. It is available in 440 Hz or 432 Hz. The recording is a 440 Hz the change from 440 Hz to 432 Hz is so slight that you can't really hear the difference in tone over a playback on your Smart Phone / Tablet or PC

    vibedrums.com / vibedrums.co.uk / vibedrums.eu / vibedrums.at

    #steeltonguedrum #vibedrum #handpan #hangdrum #metalophone #steelpan #meditation #relaxation #massagetherapy #musictherapy #soundtherapy

  • The Cosmic Calendar

    5:36

    The history of the universe in a year . Tell me in the comments down below if you would like a future version of this .

    Music -
    Ross Bugden and Ethan Unrau - The Wasteland


    SOURCE -

  • Cosmic Calendar in holy Quran - There Is No Clash

    7:51

    The cosmic calendar scale in Quran, just continues condensing itself to accommodate the increasing age of the cosmos.

    Support us -

  • Dyson Sphere Program - Cosmic-Scale Factory! Ep 9

    45:16

    Harness the power of stars, collect resources, plan and design production lines and develop your interstellar factory from a small space workshop to a galaxy-wide industrial empire.

    Want to see more? Make sure to Subscribe and Like!
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    New to the channel? I do Let's Play videos -- these are like walkthrough guides of gameplay with continuous English commentary trying to explain my decisions and what strategy I use. If you're looking for hacks or cheats, you're in the wrong place!

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