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The Genius of Einstein: The Science, His Brain, the Man

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  • The Genius of Einstein: The Science, His Brain, the Man

    1:22:42

    What made Albert Einstein one of the greatest scientific geniuses the world has ever known? His scientific breakthroughs revolutionized the way we understand the universe. The World Science Festival, in partnership with the 92Y’s 7 Days of Genius Festival, presents an in-depth look into the genius of Einstein. Join physicist Brian Greene, neurologist Frederick Lepore and author and filmmaker Thomas Levenson for a lively and informative conversation on the science, the brain and the life of one of history’s most fascinating men. Moderated by Cynthia McFadden of NBC News.

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    Original Program Date: Mar 6, 2015
    Host: Cynthia McFadden
    Participants: Brian Greene, Thomas Levenson, Fredrick Lepore

    Brian Greene's Introduction. 00:00

    Welcome Cynthia McFadden. 3:44

    Participant Introductions. 4:58

    Albert Einsteins annus mirabilis. 6:00

    Einsteins love of the violin. 9:33

    Keeping the speed of light constant. 14:12

    In 1914 what was Einsteins life like? 21:30

    Einsteins note to on bending light. 31:23

    How did Einstein see himself? 35:44

    why was Einsteins early life more successful that his later life? 42:40

    What do we know about Einsteins brain? 50:39

    Does the brain make the genius? 1:02:11

    Audience questions. 1:09:14

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  • The Extraordinary Genius of Albert Einstein

    1:29:53

    The core of the video is a pedagogical workshop on the Theory of Special Relativity as part of the educational process conducted by our youth leadership.

    Not for the sake of understanding the theory itself, but using Einstein's particular discovery as a case study to demonstrate and walk people through real human thinking, as being something above sense perceptions or opinions.

    We end with reflecting on the principle of relativity in terms of social relations and individual identities or thought processes, asking the question - how was Einstein able to make his breakthrough?

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  • The Extraordinary Genius of Albert Einstein - Full Documentary HD

    1:29:53

    The core of the video is a workshop pedagogical on the Theory of Special Relativity as part of the educational process conducted by our youth leadership, not for the sake of understanding the theory itself, but using Einstein's particular discovery as a case study to demonstrate and walk people through real human thinking, as being something above sense perceptions or opinions.

    We end with reflecting on the principle of relativity in terms of social relations and individual identities or thought processes, asking the question --how was Einstein able to make his breakthrough?

    Einstein's personality, his method of thinking, and his theories. Our narrow path has led us primarily through Kepler, Fermat, Leibniz, Gauss, and Riemann; all representing a higher potential of man's creativity, who contributed to distinct up-shifts in human knowledge.

    Our mission in presenting such material is to provide an example of how a mind overcomes the variable and false nature of the senses to discover true invariant principles.

    In reliving these ideas for one's self, each person gets a chance to become acquainted with what separates them from an animal, their own innate creativity. These mental exercises are not only intended to improve one's knowledge in history, science, and culture, but are intended to help one's understanding generally in economics, politics, and beyond.

  • What Made Albert Einstein A Genius?

    3:22

    Before death Einstein asked not to conduct research on his body he wanted his body to be cremated and ashes scattered secretly. On April 18, 1955, Einstein passed away in Princeton.

    A pathologist Thomas Harvey was called to examine his body. But Harvey stole Einstein's brain and ran away. He kept it in jars in his basement and studied it for 40 years. After 40 years Harvey decided to show up and gave the brain to scientists.

    When scientists studied Einstein's brain they were shocked to see that Einstein's brain had 17% more neurons compared to a normal person. Which means more synapses were being fired giving him more brain power. Further study showed that...

    Last words of Albert Einstein

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  • Inside the genius of Albert Einstein | Big Think

    11:17

    Inside the genius of Albert Einstein
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    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The word genius is often used to describe Albert Einstein, but what exactly earned the German-born theoretical physicist that descriptor? We have his ideas to thank for many facets of the modern world, but it turns out not everyone thought he was that brilliant.

    Everybody knows who Einstein is and people understand that he was a very famous scientist, says NASA astronomer Michelle Thaller. But I think that people often don't grasp the true depth and the profound nature of the things that Einstein introduced to us.

    In this video, Thaller, futurist and business advisor David Bodanis, fellow theoretical physicist Michio Kaku, and others explain why Einstein's best-known contributions (the special theory of relativity and E=mc2) are so important. They also discuss his academic journey, the resistance and criticism he faced from his peers and the public, and his lasting influence on science.
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    TRANSCRIPT:

    MICHELLE THALLER: Albert Einstein was incredibly brilliant and he revolutionized our understanding of the universe.

    MICHIO KAKU: People ask the question what has Einstein done for me lately. And the answer is everything. Everything we see around us – the electronics, the satellites, the atom smashers, all of that in some sense could be traced back to the work of Albert Einstein. In fact, many of the crumbs, the crumbs from his table, have gone on to win Nobel prizes for physicists even today.

    THALLER: Einstein, right. I just say that word and all of a sudden you're thinking about sort of crazy white hair and a mustache, somebody who is brilliant. Those wonderful knowing eyes with lots of smile lines around them. Everybody knows who Einstein is and people understand that he was a very famous scientist. But I think that people often don't grasp the true depth and the profound nature of the things that Einstein introduced to us.

    DAVID BODANIS: His sister thought he was a genius. His father thought he was a genius. But he was stuck in the patent office in Bern, Switzerland and nobody else thought he was a genius at all. He had mouthed off to his professors at university. He didn't get any good job. His department of theoretical physics was the top drawer of his desk and he had slammed it closed. But then, and he had tried all sorts of things. He was about 25-26. He had tried lots of ideas while he was stuck at the patent office. Nothing had really come together and then suddenly in the spring of 1905, it was like a storm burst in his head. He poured out one paper after another. About four of them were worthy of the Nobel prize and the final two were special relativity and E = mc2.

    FREEMAN DYSON: He had just this wonderful gift of talking to the public and in addition, of course, he had a turbulent family life and he was in many ways a selfish and unpleasant character. But on the other hand, he was wonderful with children and so on. I mean there were all sorts of – he had wonderful qualities. And those things I think the public rightly appreciated.

    BODANIS: Einstein once said he wasn't smarter than other people, but he said I have the persistence of a mule. And he was really honest about it. When he was a little kid he'd make card castles. He'd make layer after layer after layer of card castles and if they blew down well, he'd take a deep breath and build it up again. All through his early 20s he was happily married at the beginning to a really hot young Serbian physician student. The only woman in his class at the Polytechnic Conservatory. And they had great dreams of maybe becoming professors together. But reality got in the way. He was stuck at the patent office and until 1905 when he was 25-26 he couldn't get any fresh ideas. And he and his wife they began slowly to drift apart. They didn't have money for childcare. She was stuck at home taking care of the kids. She couldn't really participate in his work.

    THALLER: Einstein was a professor. He actually taught a lot at the University of Bern and also in Berlin and then eventually came to Princeton. He was very much a product of the time and the science that was going on. There were brilliant people at this time. Science was changing in so many different ways, and for a lot of things Einstein found himself in the right place at the right time to see two different things going on and say aha, those things actually go together. And to me that really was some of the real brilliance of Einstein was that he became a bridge between many, many different subject matters...

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  • Einstein the Mad Scientist | Genius

    2:36

    Albert Einstein races to solve the proof of his theory of general relativity before mathematician David Hilbert.
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    From Executive Producers Brian Grazer and Ron Howard, National Geographic's first scripted anthology series, GENIUS, will focus on Nobel Prize-winning physicist Albert Einstein. The all-star cast includes Geoffrey Rush, Johnny Flynn, and Emily Watson.

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  • BBC: Inside Einsteins Mind

    58:21

    The story of the most elegant and powerful theory in science - Albert Einstein's general relativity. When Einstein presented his formidable theory in November 1915, it turned our understanding of gravity, space and time completely on its head. Over the last 100 years, general relativity has enabled us to trace the origins of the universe to the Big Bang and to appreciate the enormous power of black holes. To mark the 100th anniversary of general relativity, this film takes us inside the head of Einstein to witness how his idea evolved, giving new insights into the birth of a masterpiece that has become a cornerstone of modern science. This is not as daunting as it sounds - because Einstein liked to think in pictures. The film is a magical visual journey that begins in Einstein's young mind, follows the thought experiments that gave him stunning insights about the physical world, and ultimately reaches the extremes of modern physics.

  • 15 Surprising Facts About Albert Einstein They Dont Teach You In School

    10:22

    15 Albert Einstein Facts! You've definitely heard his name or quotes of him, but you probably don't know everything like his inventions, awards and even his IQ! This German-born genius was revered for his contributions to theoretical physics — so much so that he received a Nobel Prize in Physics back in 1921. But besides hearing his name associated with E=mc^2, what else do you know about Einstein? Don't worry if your answer is, Not much. We've combed through all of the information out there to bring you 15 Surprising Facts About Albert Einstein That They Don't Teach You in School.

    Interested? Check out other amazing facts & stories about our world and subscribe to the channel! ► ◄

    Like 10 Most Powerful Military Weapons That Had To Be Banned


    And 10 Unbelievable Things Found Deep In The Woods


    Or 10 Creepiest Wikipidia Pages You Should Never Visit


    Back to Einstein, did you know that while many people falsely believe that he was terrible at math as a kid, it was actually one of the subjects that he excelled in the most? He even mastered complex mathematical concepts that were way beyond his years when he was just a teenager! Einstein did fail the entrance exam to get into the Federal Polytechnic School when he was sixteen years old, however, but he didn't fail the math or physics portions. He was just ill-prepared for the more creative portions of the test, which he ultimately passed after taking the test a second time. Did you also know that while Einstein had an esteemed career in academia, he actually had a pretty awful family life? You'll have to watch the video to hear more about what happened to his daughter and son, but he proved time and time again that he was not a great husband. Besides having affairs throughout both of his marriages, he also gave his first wife a list of conditions that she had to follow if she wanted to make their deteriorating marriage work. From the dark secrets of his personal life to the life-changing gift he received and more, you'll be an Albert Einstein expert once we're through with you!


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  • How Einsteins Brain Is Different Than Yours

    3:09

    By any and all measures, Einstein was a genius. But what made him so different from any other person? Turns out his brain was wired in a very different way! Anthony takes a look inside to show you the ways in which Einstein's brain was both different and similar to yours.

    Read More:
    The corpus callosum of Albert Einstein's brain: another clue to his high intelligence?


    Anatomy of the Corpus Callosum Reveals Its Function

    The corpus callosum (CC) comprises axons connecting the cortices of the two cerebral hemispheres and is the principal white matter fiber bundle in the brain.

    Einstein's Corpus Callosum Explains His Genius-Level Intellect

    Einstein was undoubtedly one of the most influential physicists of all time, advancing concepts in quantum physics and gaining enormous notoriety for his theory of relativity.

    THE CORPUS CALLOSUM AND STEREOPSIS

    The corpus callosum, a huge band of myelinated fibers, connects the two cerebral hemispheres. Stereopsis is one mechanism for seeing depth and judging distance.

    Reduced Laterality as a Trait Marker of Schizophrenia-Evidence from Structural and Functional Neuroimaging

    Laterality is a characteristic principle of the organization of the brain systems for language, and reduced hemispheric asymmetry has been considered a risk factor for schizophrenia.

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    We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate functional activity in the brain of adolescents with spina bifida when performing selective attention and response inhibition tasks.

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    Does the structure of an adult human brain alter in response to environmental demands?

    The musician's brain as a model of neuroplasticity

    Studies of experience-driven neuroplasticity at the behavioural, ensemble, cellular and molecular levels have shown that the structure and significance of the eliciting stimulus can determine the neural changes that result.

    Training-induced neuroplasticity in young children

    As the main interhemispheric fiber tract, the corpus callosum (CC) is of particular importance for musicians who simultaneously engage parts of both hemispheres to process and play music.

    Lateralization of Cerebral Functions

    The human brain is clearly divided into hemispheres by a deep longitudinal fissure. Although these hemispheres are similar from a gross anatomical point of view, research over the past century suggests that they have specialized functions.

    The More Hemispheric Lateralization, the Better Thinking Performance

    By examining activity of the living human brain at rest via fMRI, NIMH intramural scientists have discovered a secret to how it enhances thinking ability.

    Brain halves interact differently with each other

    ...findings detailed this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences reveal another fundamental difference between the brain's halves - they interact with each other differently, with left-side regions biased to interact more strongly with the same hemisphere, while right-side areas interact more strongly with both hemispheres.

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  • Time Is But a Stubborn Illusion - Sneak Peek | Genius

    4:34

    Watch an exclusive sneak peek from the first episode of Genius, starring Geoffrey Rush as the older Einstein and Johnny Flynn as the younger.
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    #NationalGeographic #Genius #SneakPeek


    About Genius:
    From Executive Producers Brian Grazer and Ron Howard, National Geographic's first scripted anthology series, GENIUS, will focus on Nobel Prize-winning physicist Albert Einstein. The all-star cast includes Geoffrey Rush, Johnny Flynn, and Emily Watson.

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    National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible.

    Time Is But a Stubborn Illusion - Sneak Peek | Genius


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  • Albert Einsteins brain was stolen and chopped into pieces after his death. |Science Stories|

    3:25

    Einstein's Brain was removed within seven and a half hours of his death. His brain has attracted attention because of his reputation as one of the foremost geniuses of the 20th century.

    Shortly after his death, Thomas Harvey removed Einstein's brain and kept it for himself. Harvey then took the brain to a lab at the University of Pennsylvania where he dissected it into 240 pieces.

    But how does the brain get into the hands of Thomas Harvey?
    Well, after his death, Einstein's autopsy was conducted in Thomas Harvey’s lab. Here, Harvey took Einstein's brain. Whether Einstein's brain was preserved with his prior consent is a matter of dispute. According to the biography of Albert Einstein by Ronald Clark, Einstein had insisted that his brain should be used for research and that he be cremated. However, more recent research has suggested that the brain was removed and preserved without the permission of either Einstein or his close relatives.
    Later, Einstein elder son, Hans Albert Einstein endorsed the removal. He insisted that his father's brain should be used only for research to be published in scientific journals of high standing.

    Thomas Harvey thought studying the brain under a microscope would reveal useful information about Einstein’s genius. He dissected the brain into several pieces. Some pieces, he kept to himself while others were given to leading pathologists. He also photographed the brain from many angles. Harvey also removed Einstein's eyes and gave them to Henry Abrams, Einstein's ophthalmologist. This information remained hidden until its rediscovery by a journalist 2 decades later.

    In 1978, Steven Levy rediscovered Einstein's brain in Harvey's possession. It was preserved in alcohol in two large mason jars within a cider box for over 20 years.
    Harvey's heirs transferred all of his holdings constituting the remains of Einstein's brain to the National Museum of Health and Medicine. This included 14 photographs of the whole brain (which was now in fragments), never before revealed to the public.
    In 2013, some segments of the brain acquired by Mutter Museum went on exhibit in the museum's permanent galleries. The exhibit featured thin slices of Einstein's brain, mounted on microscope slides.
    Today Einstein's brain can be found only in these two museums.
    (Science Stories)

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  • Einstein’s Brain Was Stolen and Chopped Up Into Tiny Pieces...For Science?!

    3:44

    Over 60 years ago, Einstein's brain was stolen, preserved, dissected and sent in pieces across the country. Who was behind this theft for science?

    How NASA Engineers Use Origami To Design Future Spacecraft

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    How Einstein’s Brain Is Different Than Yours

    “By any and all measures, Einstein was a genius. But what made him so different from any other person? Turns out his brain was wired in a very different way! Anthony takes a look inside to show you the ways in which Einstein's brain was both different and similar to yours.”

    Mathematical Ability Revealed in Brain Scans

    “The ways that the brain processes language and complex mathematical concepts are quite different.”

    The Tragic Story of How Einstein’s Brain Was Stolen and Wasn’t Even Special

    “Albert Einstein, the Nobel prize-winning physicist who gave the world the theory of relativity, E = mc2, and the law of the photoelectric effect, obviously had a special brain. So special that when he died in Princeton Hospital, on April 18, 1955, the pathologist on call, Thomas Harvey, stole it.”

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  • Did Albert Einstein believe in God?

    3:17

    What made Albert Einstein one of the greatest scientific geniuses the world has ever known? His scientific breakthroughs revolutionized the way we understand the universe. The World Science Festival, in partnership with the 92Y’s 7 Days of Genius Festival, presents an in-depth look into the genius of Einstein. Join physicist Brian Greene, neurologist Frederick Lepore and author and filmmaker Thomas Levenson for a lively and informative conversation on the science, the brain and the life of one of history’s most fascinating men. Moderated by Cynthia McFadden of NBC News.

    Watch the full program here:
    Original Program Date: March 6th, 2015

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  • Albert Einstein का दिमाग क्यों था खास ? How Albert Einstein Brain Is Really Different Than Others

    6:38

    The brain of Albert Einstein has been a subject of much research and speculation. Einstein's brain was removed within seven and a half hours of his death. Einstein's brain has attracted attention because of Einstein's reputation as one of the foremost geniuses of the 20th century, and apparent regularities or irregularities in the brain have been used to support various ideas about correlations in neuroanatomy with general or mathematical intelligence. Scientific studies have suggested that, within Einstein's brain, regions involved in speech and language are smaller, while regions involved with numerical and spatial processing are larger. Other studies have suggested an increased number of glial cells in Einstein's brain


    Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for fair use for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

    THANKS FOR WATCHING

  • Meet the Accidental Genius

    13:42

    In 2002, Jason Padgett was the victim of a vicious beating outside a karaoke bar in Tacoma, Washington. Upon regaining consciousness, Padgett’s sight was forever altered by a condition called acquired savant syndrome. The brain trauma opened his eyes to an entirely new world—one filled with patterns and strobes, like a stop-motion film. This is a fascinating story into the hidden power of the mind and one man’s inspiring tale of courage and personal triumph. The Acquired Savant is a film by Thomas Petersen.

    This Great Big Film was made in collaboration with our friends at CNN Films. It is one of 12 short films that we will be releasing throughout the year. Stay tuned for more!

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  • Last Words of Albert Einstein?

    2:57

    What Albert Einstein wanted to say during his last moments?
    Do you know what were the Last Words of Albert Einstein?
    Unknown Facts, Truth revealed about Albert Einstein!

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  • Motivational Success Story Of Albert Einstein - How He Overcame Every Obstacle And Won a Nobel Prize

    4:56

    Motivational Success Story Of Albert Einstein - How He Overcame Every Obstacle And Won a Nobel Prize

    Albert Einstein grew up in a middle class family. When he was born his family was scared that something was wrong with him . He had very large and misshapen head. But fortunately, within the first few weeks, the shape of his head became normal.

    But their worries didn't stop there. When he was very young, his parents thought he might be Intellectually disabled because he was very slow to learn to talk and did not speak until he was 4 years old. At that time he often formed full sentences in his thoughts, but did not speak. He used to practice the sentences in his head or whisper them softly under his breath until he got them right and then say them aloud. Many people believed Einstein would never succeed at anything.

    At school Einstein was a good student. Most of his grades were High, and he was near the top of his class, but mainly because of math and science. So His grades depended mostly on his interest in the subject. When Einstein was only 10 years old, he started educating himself. By the age of 12 Einstein taught himself Euclidean geometry and by the age of 15, he mastered calculus.

    He dropped out of school at age 15 and left Germany. He applied to the Swiss Federal Institute of technology but believe it or not he failed the entrance exam. Albert Einstein failed an exam. he excelled in math and physics part, but his knowledge on subjects other than that was not good, so he failed the exam and had to take it a second time. And then he was admitted.
    After finally graduating He couldn't get a job in academia for almost a decade. But young Einstein needed money so, he got a job as a clerk in a patent office. he developed his most important theories while working his boring job. He developed the theory of relativity and the world's most famous equation E = mc2.

    Einstein was nominated for a Nobel Prize, but did not receive it until 11 years later.

    I have no special talent. I am only passionately curious - Albert Einstein

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    Images:
    - Ferdinand Schmutzer [Public domain]
    - YouTube [Public domain]
    - Unknown [Public domain]
    - The authorities of the Canton of Aargau, Switzerland [Public domain]
    - Underwood and Underwood, New York [Public domain]
    - Lucien Chavan [1] (1868 - 1942), a friend of Einstein's when he was living in Berne. [Public domain]
    - Official 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics photograph [Public domain]
    - Publisher: Photoplay Publishing page 2 [Public domain]
    - Sophie Delar, photographer; published in 1955 by unknown press organization per source [Public domain]
    - Al. Aumuller [Public domain]
    - Photograph by Orren Jack Turner, Princeton, N.J. Modified with Photoshop by PM_Poon and later by Dantadd. [Public domain]

    Are you feeling down and empty with all hope lost, or maybe you are having a bad day. Are you feeling depressed and full of anxiety on a daily basis, or you’re feeling like a complete failure?Do you need that spark of inspiration that will make you stand off that couch and stop feeling sorry for yourself? Are you tired of being unhappy, unfulfilled, not confident? It’s time to change your mindset! Do you need just a little bit of motivation to change things? The road to success and the road to failure are almost exactly the same.
    You're on the right place.
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  • The Secret Life of Albert Einstein

    16:20

    Uncovering little-known facts about the famous scientist. The first 1,000 people to use this link will get a 1 month FREE trial of Skillshare:

    *If you enjoyed this bio, here are some others on my channel*
    The Mysterious Man Who Proposed the Big Bang theory
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    The following sources are also attributed:
    3:49 Einstein at Swiss Patent Office in Bern: IGI
    4:54 Acdx, CC BY-SA 4.0 via Wikimedia Commons
    8:43 Blackhole photo courtesy of Dan Wilkins
    9:40 Bundesarchiv, Bild 102-10541 / Georg Pahl / CC-BY-SA 3.0, CC BY-SA 3.0 DE via Wikimedia Commons
    10:07 Bundesarchiv Bundesarchiv, Bild 102-10804 / CC-BY-SA 3.0, CC BY-SA 3.0 DE via Wikimedia Commons
    10:13 Hanno Rein, CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons
    10:37 Bundesarchiv, Bild 183-19000-1918 / CC-BY-SA 3.0, CC BY-SA 3.0 DE via Wikimedia Commons
    12:06 To learn more about the origin of the photo, check out the PBS article and video from an episode of The Antique Roadshow
    13:19 Bundesarchiv, Bild 102-10300 / CC-BY-SA 3.0, CC BY-SA 3.0 DE via Wikimedia Commons
    13:32 Andrew nyr, CC BY-SA 4.0 via Wikimedia Commons
    14:24 Jimhutchins at the English-language Wikipedia, CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons
    14:41 The Mütter Museum of The College of Physicians of Philadelphia
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  • Why Harvey Stole Albert Einsteins Brain?

    6:00

    On March 14, 1879, he was born in the picturesque German city of Ulm, a unique and exceptional individual who revolutionized science forever: Albert Einstein.
    His career led him to create several of the postulates in the area of the most important physics so far: Mass-energy equivalence (E = mc²) and the Theory of Spatial Relativity.
    Fate took him to the United States, where he died of internal bleeding on April 18, 1955.
    It seemed to be the end of a story like no other, but nothing could be further from the truth: Another story was over. A very quirky but interesting story.
    What happened to Einstein's brain after his death?
    After having shown the world exceptional intellectual abilities, a creativity like no other, a humble but charismatic personality that attracted many as a magnet.
    Undoubtedly, more than one had an interest in knowing, what that brain hid, what it was to be one of the most intelligent individuals that ever lived on earth.

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  • 6 Strange Einsteins Habits That Could Have Contribute To His Genius

    8:20

    Some say that great minds think alike, and that’s up for debate, but they do seem to have one thing in common – they have some strange habits. Albert Einstein, one of the smartest people ever, had a lot of quirks! Did you know, for example, that he despised socks for some reason? He never wore them at all. He wrote once in a letter to his wife, Elsa, that he had to wear high boots all the time just to hide his bare feet.

    Also, Einstein had a strange routine linked to his daily naps. While he drifted into dreamland, he held a metal spoon in his hand and had a metal plate lying on the floor right underneath the spoon. When he fell asleep he would drop the spoon on the plate. But why would he do that? Let’s find out!

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    TIMESTAMPS:
    No socks. Ever. 0:29
    Building houses of cards 1:27
    Playing the violin 2:17
    Sleeping 10 hours a day 3:24
    Napping with a metal spoon in his hands 4:58
    Daily walks 5:24
    Adopting routine work as a habit 6:46

    #Einstein #success #inspiration

    Music by Epidemic Sound

    SUMMARY:
    - The only reason Albert Einstein didn’t wear socks was that in his childhood, it took him just a day or two to wear out a hole in a new sock. His thoughts were so important for him that any issue – even annoying socks – wasn’t worth the distraction.
    - Another habit that Albert Einstein adopted in his childhood was building houses of cards. When our brain is busy with something mechanical, it sets free our ability of abstract thinking. The more concentration needed, the greater the possible effect will be!
    - Despite his first reaction, Einstein was curious enough to change his mind about violin playing. Also, there’s no better rest for your brain than a change of activity. Tired of doing math? Play guitar! Tired of playing the guitar? Go for a walk, try out some photography.
    - It’s not that Einstein was lazy or a sleepyhead – that’s for sure. But he was a passionate sleeper. We all know that a healthy night of sleep is good for your brain. But generally, 7 to 9 hours is enough. Still, it’s important to remember that we’re all different. For some of us, 6 hours are alright and others need all 10, like Einstein.
    - His walks had nothing to do with benefiting his health. The thing is, while we walk, we’re not busy; our mind is left to itself. Plus, it’s partially concentrated on the sole process of walking. That’s why a long enough walk can put you in a sort of trance. It’ll allow you to relax and think about things differently.

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  • Einsteins unique way of thinking contributed to his genius

    1:50

    Robbert Dijkgraaf is a theoretical physicist and Leon Levy Professor at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. He is also the co-author of The Usefulness of Useless Knowledge.

    In this video, he explains how Albert Einstein saw the world in a different way from how most scientists see it. Following is a transcript of the video.

    Einstein was a true genius and it’s the example that we all aspire to be as a scientist. But already as a child he had a very original way of thinking.

    So from the very beginning, for Einstein, his imagination was crucial. He was not such a good student because he was a very original thinker.

    And I think that was, kind of, the magic touch that he had. He always had a completely original point of view. He somehow didn’t conform to the existing theories, and he was always thinking in his own particular way.

    His favorite way to operate as a scientist was the thought experiment. And he describes for instance, the crucial moment, where he essentially discovered the theory of general relativity.

    He was watching workers on the roof of a building and suddenly thought whoa what would happen if they fell down. And then he realized, if you fall down, you no longer experience gravity.

    And that, in some sense, that’s the natural motion and that actual led him to derive the theory of general relativity and described that moment as the happiest moment in his life.

    And later he said something that I actually find personally very comforting: Is that imagination is much more important than knowledge because knowledge describes what we know. Imagination is describing everything that we can potentially know in the future.

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  • Tesla And Einstein Hated Each Other And Here Is What They Said!

    3:26

    Tesla and Einstein were two of the greatest minds in the history. They both played an integral role in their respective fields. While Einstein developed the theory of relativity and changed the laws of physics, Tesla was the architect of the modern world with his innovative developments such as alternating current. But what did the two think of each other? Why Einstein and Tesla hated each other and what did they say?

  • Einstein’s Persistence, Not Genius, Is the Reason We Know His Name | David Bodanis | Big Think

    5:28

    Einstein’s Persistence, Not Genius, Is the Reason We Know His Name
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    Einstein had three great character traits. I might not be more skilled than other scientists, he liked to say, but I have the persistence of a mule. If he built a house of cards and it came crashing down, young Einstein would exhale and start again, says biographer David Bodanis. He languished for many years in a patent office in Switzerland, unable to get a job as a high-school teacher, while in the top drawer of his desk were four recently completed papers – two of which were Special Relativity and E=mc2. He pressed on with his work until people noticed. Secondly, Einstein had a thick skin. One bad whisper can shatter most mere mortals, but in 1920 there was an anti-Einstein rally at the Opera House in Berlin, where people opposed to Jewish science. Later still, in 1933, highly educated students from Göttingen, one of the greatest university in the world at the time, burned his books. Thirdly, he was inherently noble. He had a great conscience for his fellow humans, and used a huge amount of his income and other raised money to get people out of Germany and safely to America. Despite having thick skin, he was not callous – he had great sensitivity for humanity as a whole. Though the FBI did not let him be part of the team that built the atom bomb, Einstein’s work paved the way for the technology. When he heard the U.S. had dropped the bomb on Japan, he was grief stricken, and said If I had known I wouldn't have lifted a finger. David Bodanis' most recent book is Einstein’s Greatest Mistake.

    David Bodanis' most recent book is Einstein’s Greatest Mistake.
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    DAVID BODANIS:

    David Bodanis was born in Chicago, lived in France for a decade, and makes his home in London. He studied mathematics, physics and history at the University of Chicago, and for many years taught the Intellectual Tool-Kit course at Oxford University. He is fascinated by story-telling, and the power of ideas.
    As an author his books include the New York Times bestselling THE SECRET HOUSE (1986); the bestselling and Samuel Johnson Prize longlisted E=MC2 (2001), which has been translated into 28 languages, was turned into a Channel 4/PBS documentary, and a ballet at Sadler's Wells (winning the Southbank Award for Best British Dance of 2010); the Royal Society Science Book of the Year Prize winner ELECTRIC UNIVERSE (2006); and the BBC Book of the Week - also featured on the cover of The Economist - PASSIONATE MINDS (2007). His newest work, EINSTEIN’S GREATEST MISTAKE, will be published in 2016.

    As a futurist and business advisor, he has worked for the Royal Dutch Shell Scenario Prediction unit, modelling economic futures, as well as for the future planning unit at the World Economic Forum. He has been a popular speaker at TED conferences and at Davos, and most recently helped run an international study for the UK Treasury on the future of High-Frequency Trading. He has published in the Financial Times, the Guardian, and the New York Times, and appeared on Newsnight, Start the Week, and other programs. When not slumped in front of a laptop, he has been known to attempt kickboxing, with highly variable results.
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Transcript:

    David Bodanis: 1905 Albert Einstein's mother thought he was a genius; his sister thought he was a genius; his father thought he was a genius, but he was stuck in the patent office in Bern Switzerland and nobody else thought he was a genius at all. We had mouthed off to his professor at his university. He didn't get any good job. His department of theoretical physics was the top drawer of his desk and he would slam it close. And he had tried all sorts of things. He was about 25/26, we had tried lots of ideas while he was stuck at the patent office. Nothing had really come together. And then suddenly in the spring of 1905 it was like a storm burst in his head. He poured out one of paper after another about four of them were worthy of the Nobel Prize. And the final two were Special Relativity and E=mc2.

    Einstein once said he wasn't smarter than other people but he said I have the persistence of a mule. And he was really honest about it. When he was a little kid and he made card castles he'd make layer after layer after layer of card castles and if they blew down well he'd take a deep breath and build it up again.
    Read the full transcript on

  • Can playing an instrument make you a genius?

    4:46

    Musical instrument? Your brain? Einstein??
    Yep. We will go exactly over that in today's video.

    Everyone loves music, it is one of the earliest form of arts and its one of the things that evolved alongside us for centuries. We know the effects of music on our mood and emotions but we had no idea how playing an instrument affected the brain.

    Recently with the help of the advancement of technology we've been able to dive deeper into the brain and see what happens inside the brain when someone is playing a musical instrument. Can playing an instrument make you a genius? Uhm.. well the video is here to give you the details. Enjoy!

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  • The genius of Mendeleevs periodic table - Lou Serico

    4:25

    View full lesson:

    The elements had been listed and carefully arranged before Dmitri Mendeleev. They had even been organized by similar properties before. So why is Mendeelev's periodic table the one that has endured? Lou Serico explains via eka-aluminum, an element whose existence Mendeelev predicted years before it was discovered.

    Lesson by Lou Serico, animation by TED-Ed.

  • IQ of 172? Lionel Messi Learns Like A Genius

    5:58

    Lionel Messi is possibly the smartest footballer ever. To get better and to stay unstoppable he adapts his game like nobody else. We can see this especially in the way of shooting his free kicks. But there are many other examples. He is just a genius, check it out!

    Special thanks to Dan Comps

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    Lionel Messi, FC Barcelona, goals, skills, GOAT, football, Champions League, La Liga, 2020, movie, smart, intelligent, cheeky

    MagicalMessi - as magical as Messi

  • Life Changing Albert Einstein Quotes

    20:08

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  • Mileva Marić - Albert Einsteins Forgotten Wife | Science Fiction | Spark

    24:45

    We've dug into the Spark Archives to take you back through time and look at some of science's key turning points.

    This week its Albert Einstein who's one of the biggest names in 20th-century science, the name is part of the language, it means a genius. What if the history books have it wrong and our hero turns out to have feet of clay?

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    Content licensed from Blue Ant Media to Little Dot Studios. Any queries, please contact us at: owned-enquiries@littledotstudios.com

    #Einstein #FlashbackFriday #MilevaMarić

  • These Albert Einstein Quotes Are Life Changing!

    10:09

    What is your favourite Albert Einstein quote? Let us know in the comments.

    These Albert Einstein Quotes Are Life Changing! (Motivational Video)

    TRANSCRIPT of words:

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    #AlbertEinstein #Wisdom #MotivationalVideo

    “Imagination is more important than knowledge.” – Albert Einstein

    “The true sign of intelligence is not knowledge but imagination.” – Albert Einstein

    “Imagination is everything. It is the preview of life’s coming attractions.” – Albert Einstein

    “There are only two ways to live your life. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle.” – Albert Einstein

    “He who can no longer pause to wonder… and stand rapt in awe… is as good as dead; his eyes are closed.” – Albert Einstein

    “Great spirits have always encountered violent opposition from mediocre minds.” – Albert Einstein

    “We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them.” – Albert Einstein

    “Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.” – Albert Einstein

    “A person who never made a mistake never tried anything new.” – Albert Einstein“Learn from yesterday, live for today, hope for tomorrow. The important thing is not to stop questioning. Curiosity has its own reason for existing.” – Albert Einstein

    “I have no special talents. I am only passionately curious.” – Albert Einstein
    “Strive not to be a success, but rather to be of value.” – Albert Einstein

  • Simple Relativity - Understanding Einsteins Special Theory of Relativity

    5:56

    Simple Relativity is a 2D short educational animation film. The film is an attempt to explain Albert Einstein’s Special Theory of Relativity with a simpler visual representation and exciting animation. In a time when our day-to-day life is surrounded by technology, most people find it daunting to understand the science and its application. Simple Relativity is an attempt to excite the viewer about this complex phenomenon of Relativity so that they can approach this, and science in general, with a lot more curiosity rather than inhibition.

  • Einsteins miracle year - Larry Lagerstrom

    5:16

    View full lesson here:

    As the year 1905 began, Albert Einstein faced life as a “failed” academic. Yet within the next twelve months, he would publish four extraordinary papers, each on a different topic, that were destined to radically transform our understanding of the universe. Larry Lagerstrom details these four groundbreaking papers.

    Lesson by Larry Lagerstrom, animation by Oxbow Creative.

  • The Letter That Led to the Atomic Bomb | Genius

    2:12

    Albert Einstein becomes a United States citizen and faces a moral dilemma in service to his new country.
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    About Genius:
    From Executive Producers Brian Grazer and Ron Howard, National Geographic's first scripted anthology series, GENIUS, will focus on Nobel Prize-winning physicist Albert Einstein. The all-star cast includes Geoffrey Rush, Johnny Flynn, and Emily Watson.

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    National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible.

    The Letter That Led to the Atomic Bomb | Genius


    National Geographic

  • Happy Birthday, Einstein! | Genius

    1:16

    Today we pay tribute to Professor Einstein's many accomplishments by looking back at a few of his most memorable birthdays.
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    About Genius:
    From Executive Producers Brian Grazer and Ron Howard, National Geographic's first scripted anthology series, GENIUS, will focus on Nobel Prize-winning physicist Albert Einstein. The all-star cast includes Geoffrey Rush, Johnny Flynn, and Emily Watson.

    Get More National Geographic:
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    About National Geographic:
    National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible.

    Happy Birthday, Einstein! | Genius


    National Geographic

  • Super Senses | Brain Games

    44:25

    We're going to explore deep into the brain to show all the hidden senses you have working to help you navigate everyday life.

    Watch more Brain Games on Disney+:


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  • Elevator Thought Experiment | Genius

    2:23

    Recounting a wild idea he had in an elevator, Albert Einstein pieces together the fundamentals of general relativity.
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    About Genius:
    From Executive Producers Brian Grazer and Ron Howard, National Geographic's first scripted anthology series, GENIUS, will focus on Nobel Prize-winning physicist Albert Einstein. The all-star cast includes Geoffrey Rush, Johnny Flynn, and Emily Watson.

    Get More National Geographic:
    Official Site:
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    About National Geographic:
    National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible.

    Elevator Thought Experiment | Genius


    National Geographic

  • Brain Foods for Brain Health - Boost Brain Health with Good Eats

    1:23:50

    Good Food is Good Medicine blog:

    Dr. Liz Applegate’s presentation discusses specific foods and dietary supplements that may enhance brain health and transform diet to one that supports healthy aging and memory performance. Dr. Applegate is Director of Sports Nutrition and a Distinguished Lecturer at the University of California, Davis. Her educational focus is eating for optimal health and performance. She writes a column for Runner’s World, appears on national TV & radio and speaks to people of all ages about practical and science based approaches to optimizing oneself through diet.

    This lecture is part of UC Davis Health System’s Alzheimer’s Disease Center 2016 Community Lecture Series sponsored by Sunrise Senior Living and Aegis Living. It was delivered live at the Lesher Center for the Arts in Walnut Creek, California on November 29, 2016.

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    #brainhealth #eathealthy #nutrition #snacking

  • Brian Greene and Alan Alda Discuss Why Einstein Hated Quantum Mechanics

    15:14

    Albert Einstein was not a fan of quantum mechanics. He was annoyed by the uncertain, random nature of the universe it implied (hence the famous quote God does not play dice with the universe). So, Einstein tried to develop a unified theory that would circumvent what he saw as quantum mechanics' flaws. In this excerpt from the 2014 World Science Festival Program Dear Albert, Alan Alda and Brian Greene discuss Einstein's relationship with the unruly child of quantum mechanics, and how the famed physicist came up with the Special Theory of Relativity.

    Original Program Date: May 28, 2014

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  • Einstein: The Story of a Genius - Documentary

    1:48:50

    Einstein: The Story of a Genius - Documentary
    Albert Einstein (/ˈaɪnstaɪn/;[3] German: [ˈalbɐrt ˈaɪnʃtaɪn] ( listen); 14 March 1879 – 18 April 1955) was a German-born theoretical physicist. He developed the general theory of relativity, one of the two pillars of modern physics (alongside quantum mechanics).[2][4]:274 Einstein's work is also known for its influence on the philosophy of science.[5][6] Einstein is best known in popular culture for his mass–energy equivalence formula E = mc2 (which has been dubbed the world's most famous equation).[7] He received the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics for his services to theoretical physics, in particular his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect, a pivotal step in the evolution of quantum theory

  • Take A Guided Tour Of Einsteins Brain

    5:07

    What made Albert Einstein one of the greatest scientific geniuses the world has ever known? His scientific breakthroughs revolutionized the way we understand the universe. The World Science Festival, in partnership with the 92Y’s 7 Days of Genius Festival, presents an in-depth look into the genius of Einstein. Join physicist Brian Greene, neurologist Frederick Lepore and author and filmmaker Thomas Levenson for a lively and informative conversation on the science, the brain and the life of one of history’s most fascinating men. Moderated by Cynthia McFadden of NBC News.

    Watch the full program here:
    Original Program Date: March 6th, 2015

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  • Inside The Bizarre Story Of Albert Einsteins Brain, After It Was Stolen From His Body

    5:04

    Because of his world-renowned genius, Albert Einstein's brain became a coveted object even after he died, Within hours of Albert Einstein's death on April 18 1955, an autopsy was performed on him by a doctor who actually stole his brain. While Einstein's son was initially furious, he did later permit the doctor, a man named Thomas Harvey, to give the brain to researchers who wanted to identify whether the physicist's genius, came from a brain that was physically different.

  • Was Einsteins Brain Different From Yours?

    6:27

    Pathologist Thomas Harvey stole the brain of Albert Einstein, after performing the autopsy in 1955 and determining that the distinguished scientist died of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. After that, a whole story was opened halfway between the truculent and extreme scientific curiosity.

    There were many who wanted to know was the secret of his genius, others did not welcome the act of theft. Nevertheless, the results of the analysis that were carried out later were more than revealing, completely breaking the expectations of more than one neurologist.

    Albert Einstein was not only a brilliant physicist, he was also something else: an icon, a media figure and of great social impact. He knew it. And as he knew, being aware of it, he gave very precise guidelines on what he wanted for himself after his death. He wanted to be cremated and his ashes scattered in a river. Only after he had done this, he could announce to the media, his death.

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  • My Search for Einsteins Brain: Steven Levy at TEDxBeaconStreet

    14:45

    To find the segmented brain of one of the world's greatest intellects, where do you start? Steven Levy found himself asking this question in 1978, after his editor tasked him with finding out what happened to Einstein's brain. After it was removed for study upon Einstein's death in 1995, it seemed as though the brain had simply vanished. Following a trail of connections and breadcrumbs, Levy's search led him to Wichita, Kansas to the lab of Dr. Harvey, who had conducted Einstein's autopsy and removed his brain. There, Levy laid eyes on what few have seen in person — the formaldehyde-laden source of Einstein's genius. Join Levy in this TEDxBeacon Street talk in which he takes the audience on his journey of discovery, exploration of the human form, and the mystery of the mind.

    Steven Levy is a senior writer for Wired and author of seven books, including Hackers and In the Plex.

    In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

  • Why Einstein Was A Pure Genius Who Changed The Game Of Physics

    12:27

    Anatomy of a genius
    Albert Einstein was a pure genius, an epic scientist, an innovator, and a visionary, like a few others in the history of mankind. He left an inestimable heritage, a deep footprint not only in the physics of his time.Einstein is unique in the history of physics because, maybe even more than Isaac Newton, he changed the game of physics and in almost any field and worked mainly alone.

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    Whereas the Italian mathematician Ricci Curbastro had developed the absolute tensorial calculus, a generalization of the vectors in n dimensions that Einstein used to express the laws that regulate the phenomena within space-time.
    Whereas the Italian mathematician Ricci Curbastro had developed the absolute tensorial calculus, a generalization of the vectors in n dimensions that Einstein used to express the laws that regulate the phenomena within space-time.
    3- On September 26, “The Electrodynamics of Moving Bodies” was released
    Today we call it special relativity.
    Furthermore, hidden within Einstein’s field equations, there was another stunning prediction: gravitational waves
    EINSTEIN’S MISTAKES , why Einstein was wrong

    Einstein was great even in making mistakes! Few people know that he made huge mistakes.
    Therefore Einstein added a new term, corresponding to a repulsive force to counterbalance gravity and make the universe stable and steady: he named it “cosmological constant”.
    In fact, in 1997 dark energy was discovered: it turned out that the expansion of the universe was even accelerating:

    If You happen to see any content that is yours, and we didn't give credit in the right manner please let us know at Lorenzovareseaziendale@gmail.com and we will correct it immediately

    Some of our visual content is under an Attribution-ShareAlike license. ( in its different versions such as 1.0, 2.0, 3,0, and 4.0 – permitting commercial sharing with attribution given in each picture accordingly in the video.

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    #InsaneCuriosity #alberteinstein #theoryofrelativity

  • Albert Einstein Quotes - Inspirational & Motivational Quotes

    1:59


    ((( Get The Book On Einstein's Ideas And Opinions )))

    Quotes by Theoretical physics and Nobel Prize Winner Albert Einstein:

    A person who never made a mistake never tried anything new.

    Any man who reads too much and uses his own brain too little falls into lazy habits of thinking.

    Do not worry about your difficulties in Mathematics. I can assure you mine are still greater.

    Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted.

    Intellectual growth should commence at birth and cease only at death.

    Intellectuals solve problems, geniuses prevent them.

    It's not that I'm so smart, it's just that I stay with problems longer.

    Nationalism is an infantile disease. It is the measles of mankind.

    We can't solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them.

    When you are courting a nice girl an hour seems like a second. When you sit on a red-hot cinder for a second it seems like an hour. That's relativity.

    Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former.

    Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.

  • what makes einstein a genius?

    3:02

    A new study led by Florida State University evolutionary anthropologist Dean Falk has revealed that portions of the brain of Albert Einstein are unlike those of most people. The differences could relate to Einstein’s unique discoveries about the nature of space and time. Falk’s team used photographs of Einstein’s brain, taken shortly after his death, but not previously analyzed in detail. The photographs showed that Einstein’s brain had an unusually complex pattern of convolutions in the prefrontal cortex, which is important for abstract thinking.
    In other words, Einsteins’ brain actually looks different from yours or mine. Falk and her team published their work on November 16, 2012 in the journal Brain.
    How did Einstein’s brain come to undergo so much scrutiny? Pathologist Thomas Harvey performed an autopsy on Einstein shortly after his death in 1955. At that time, he removed Einstein’s brain and preserved it in formalin. He took dozens of black-and-white photos of the brain. Later, he cut Einstein’s brain up into 240 blocks, took tissue samples from each block, mounted them onto microscope slides and distributed the slides to some of the world’s best neuropathologists.

    So studies of Einstein’s brain began, although the first detailed one didn’t appear for 30 more years. In 1985, a study revealed that two parts of Einstein’s brain contained an unusually large number of non-neuronal cells – called glia – for every neuron, or nerve-transmitting cell in the brain. Ten years after that, Einstein’s brain was found to lack a furrow normally seen in the parietal lobe. Scientists at that time said the missing furrow might have been related to Einstein’s enhanced ability to think in three dimensions, as well as to his mathematical skills.

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  • The man who corrected Einstein! | #Shorts | Nutshell

    30

    Today, on Einstein’s birthday????, we wanted to take a look at a story from his life. After his groundbreaking research on general relativity, Einstein had viewed the Universe as static.???? But Alexander Friedmann, a Russian mathematician, took on Einstein’s calculations and spotted errors, and proved that the Universe could be static, or expanding and in some cases, contracting.???? Einstein initially rejected Friedmann’s work????, but Friedmann wrote him a private letter explaining his work and the errors he spotted.
    Einstein eventually saw that Friedmann was right and graciously admitted his errors as well????????. This goes to show that biases and mistakes can happen to anyone, but it's about keeping an open mind to it. Happy birthday to our favourite genius!????

  • Can anyone become a genius | Mark Diaz | TEDxBlvdTeofiloBorunda

    16:03

    Mark is an online teacher who helps beginners all over the world to improve in animation and drawing. According to him the adage of try harder is misleading, the best way to approach the way to become extraordinary is by trying smarter by finding the smaller steps. Fundador de 2D Animation 101, escuela de animación con más de 52,000 alumnos provenientes de todo el mundo. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at

  • when Einstein was asked about the most genius person in the world ? | Urdu | Nikola Tesla

    1:02

    Most genius man Nikola Tesla
    #Einstein
    #NikolaTesla
    #GeniusMan
    Interesting amazing facts in Urdu .

  • why Albert Einstein brain is really different | what made Albert Einstein a genius

    2:52

    today i am tell about why albert einstein brain is really different than others in bangla


    question - 1 - what made albert einstein a genius?
    question - 2 - who stole albert eistein brain after death?
    question - 3 - strange facts about albert eistein
    question - 4 - amazing facts about albert eistein


    video description - Albert Einstein was a German mathematician and physicist who developed the special and general theories of relativity. In 1921, he won the Nobel Prize for physics for his explanation of the photoelectric effect
    Einstein was born on March 14, 1879, in Ulm, Württemberg, Germany. Einstein grew up in a secular Jewish family
    Einstein died on April 18, 1955, at age 76 at the University Medical Center at Princeton. The previous day, while working on a speech to honor Israel's seventh anniversary, Einstein suffered an abdominal aortic aneurysm
    During Einstein’s autopsy, pathologist Thomas Stoltz Harvey removed his brain, reportedly without his family's consent, for preservation and future study by doctors of neuroscience.

    However, during his life, Einstein participated in brain studies, and at least one biography claimed he hoped researchers would study his brain after he died. Einstein's brain is now located at the Princeton University Medical Center. In keeping with his wishes, the rest of his body was cremated and the ashes scattered in a secret location.

    In 1999, Canadian scientists who were studying Einstein’s brain found that his inferior parietal lobe, the area that processes spatial relationships, 3D-visualization and mathematical thought, was 15 percent wider than in people who possess normal intelligence. According to The New York Times, the researchers believe it may help explain why Einstein was so intelligent.


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  • Albert einstein genius kese bane | albert einstein - biography in hindi

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    Albert einstein genius kese bane | albert einstein - biography in hindi


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    Albert Einstein was a German mathematician and physicist who developed the special and general theories of relativity. In 1921, he won the Nobel Prize for physics for his explanation of the photoelectric effect. immigrated to the U.S. after being targeted by the German Nazi Party.
    Einstein is generally considered the most influential physicist of the 20th century........ Story continueing in video



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