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The Milky Way as You’ve Never Seen It Before – AMNH SciCafe

  • The Milky Way as You’ve Never Seen It Before – AMNH SciCafe

    26:24

    Fly through the galaxy with Museum astrophysicist Jackie Faherty, who takes us on a dazzling tour of new research and data visualizations made possible by recently released data from the Gaia space telescope.

    In April 2018, the European Space Agency’s Gaia observatory released its second data catalog, which includes the distances to over 1.3 billion stars. Faherty breaks down why this information is so revolutionary, and explains how this information is helping scientists and non-scientists alike understand the universe like never before.

    Listen to the full SciCafe event, including a Q&A session, by downloading the Science@AMNH podcast on iTunes, Soundcloud, or wherever you get your podcasts.

    This SciCafe took place on October 3, 2018.

    The SciCafe series is proudly sponsored by Judy and Josh Weston.

    #Gaia #MilkyWay #Astronomy #Astrophysics #Telescope #Satellite #SciCafe #JackieFaherty #Exoplanets #Stars

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    This video and all media incorporated herein (including text, images, and audio) are the property of the American Museum of Natural History or its licensors, all rights reserved. The Museum has made this video available for your personal, educational use. You may not use this video, or any part of it, for commercial purposes, nor may you reproduce, distribute, publish, prepare derivative works from, or publicly display it without the prior written consent of the Museum.

    © American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY

  • Are We Alone in the Universe? with Lisa Kaltenegger - AMNH SciCafe

    20:28

    Who can look out into space and not ask the age-old question: Are we alone in the universe? Astronomers have already identified dozens of planets beyond the edges of our solar system which could be like our own Earth.

    Join astrophysicist Lisa Kaltenegger, who is the director of the Carl Sagan Institute at Cornell University, as she explains the different methods astronomers use to detect exoplanets orbiting distant stars, what these planets would need to support life, and how Earth and its range of species might serve as a Rosetta Stone—a key to detecting the existence of extraterrestrial life.

    This SciCafe program took place at the Museum on November 1, 2017.

    To listen to the full lecture including Q&A session, download the podcast:

    To learn about upcoming SciCafe events, visit amnh.org/scicafe

    The SciCafe series is proudly sponsored by Judy and Josh Weston.

    #Space #Universe #AlienLife #Exoplanets #Planets #Galaxy #Trappist #Stars #SolarSystem #Extraterrestrial

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    This video and all media incorporated herein (including text, images, and audio) are the property of the American Museum of Natural History or its licensors, all rights reserved. The Museum has made this video available for your personal, educational use. You may not use this video, or any part of it, for commercial purposes, nor may you reproduce, distribute, publish, prepare derivative works from, or publicly display it without the prior written consent of the Museum.

    © American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY

  • Microbial Worlds of the Deep Sea with Jeffrey Marlow – AMNH SciCafe

    20:01

    From lava lakes to hydrothermal vents, microbial communities can survive in some of the most extreme conditions on the planet—and nowhere is that more apparent than the peculiar landscapes of the deep sea. Dive deep with geobiologist Jeffrey Marlow to explore the hidden worlds inside a volcano and at the bottom of the oceans and discover how the incredible microbes that live there are essential to the health of our planet in ways we’re only just beginning to understand.

    Listen to the full SciCafe, including Q&A, on the Science@AMNH podcast. Available on iTunes, Soundcloud, and right here:

    This SciCafe took place at the Museum on April 3, 2019. For information on upcoming events at the Museum, visit

    #OceanFloor #DeepSea #Microbes #HydrothermalVent #SciCafe #LavaLake

    This program was made possible by OceanX, an initiative of the Dalio Foundation, as part of its generous support of the special exhibition Unseen Oceans and its related educational activities and public programs.

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    This video and all media incorporated herein (including text, images, and audio) are the property of the American Museum of Natural History or its licensors, all rights reserved. The Museum has made this video available for your personal, educational use. You may not use this video, or any part of it, for commercial purposes, nor may you reproduce, distribute, publish, prepare derivative works from, or publicly display it without the prior written consent of the Museum.

    © American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY

  • Hacking the Stars with Hakeem Oluseyi – AMNH SciCafe

    18:14

    Astrophysicist, inventor, science communicator, and humanitarian Hakeem M. Oluseyi “hacks” existing data to answer questions about the stars such as “what is matter made of” and “where does light come from?” In his SciCafe talk, Oluseyi explores significant milestones in his career, from early days building rockets that photograph the sun at different temperatures to pioneering new ion propulsion technology inspired by the Sun’s jets.

    This SciCafe took place at the Museum on December 4, 2019.

    #Astronomy #HakeemOluseyi #Astrophysics #Rockets #Telescopes #SolarJets

    Visit AMNH.org for a transcript of the episode:

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    This video and all media incorporated herein (including text, images, and audio) are the property of the American Museum of Natural History or its licensors, all rights reserved. The Museum has made this video available for your personal, educational use. You may not use this video, or any part of it, for commercial purposes, nor may you reproduce, distribute, publish, prepare derivative works from, or publicly display it without the prior written consent of the Museum.

    © American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY

  • End of the Megafauna with Ross MacPhee – AMNH SciCafe

    29:51

    You’ve probably heard of woolly mammoths and giant ground sloths—but what about gorilla-sized lemurs and 500-pound birds? Beginning about 50,000 years ago, many of these strange animals–megafauna–went extinct.

    Ross MacPhee, curator in the Museum’s Department of Mammalogy, uses colorful illustrations to take us on a journey back in time to the world of the “megafauna,” and explains what scientists think may have happened to them.

    To listen to the full SciCafe talk, including Q&A, download the Science@AMNH podcast on iTunes, Soundcloud, or wherever you get your podcasts.

    Or listen here:

    This SciCafe took place at the Museum on December 5 2018.

    #Extinction #Mammoth #Megafauna #Pleistocene #AMNH #SciCafe #Paleontology


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    This video and all media incorporated herein (including text, images, and audio) are the property of the American Museum of Natural History or its licensors, all rights reserved. The Museum has made this video available for your personal, educational use. You may not use this video, or any part of it, for commercial purposes, nor may you reproduce, distribute, publish, prepare derivative works from, or publicly display it without the prior written consent of the Museum.

    © American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY

  • When Black Holes Collide - AMNH SciCafe

    26:25

    When black holes collide, the energy of the event generates intense gravitational waves. These waves were predicted by Einstein in his theories, but scientists have only recently been able to detect them experimentally. In this SciCafe, Barnard College professor and astronomer Janna Levin shares her scientific research on the first recordings of a gravitational wave from the collision of two black holes 1.3 billion years ago.

    #blackholes #SciCafe #AMNH #collisions #astronomy #space #universe

    This lecture took place at the Museum on December 7, 2016. To learn about upcoming SciCafe events, visit amnh.org/scicafe. To listen to the full lecture, download the podcast here:

    The SciCafe series is proudly sponsored by Judy and Josh Weston.

    This video and all media incorporated herein (including text, images, and audio) are the property of the American Museum of Natural History or its licensors, all rights reserved. The Museum has made this video available for your personal, educational use. You may not use this video, or any part of it, for commercial purposes, nor may you reproduce, distribute, publish, prepare derivative works from, or publicly display it without the prior written consent of the Museum.

    © American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY

  • Teaming Up with Robots with Julie Shah – AMNH SciCafe

    24:12

    The next generation of robots won’t just work harder—they’ll also work smarter. Robots that can learn by example, mimicking the way that human beings learn by experience, have the potential to revolutionize everything from manufacturing to healthcare.

    Julie Shah of MIT introduces the fascinating new robots that are launching us into the future.

    To listen to the full SciCafe talk, including Q&A, download the Science@AMNH podcast on iTunes, Soundcloud, or wherever you get your podcasts. Or click here:

    This SciCafe took place at the Museum on January 2, 2019.

    #Robots #ArtificialIntelligence #MarchineLearning #Engineering #ComputerScience

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    This video and all media incorporated herein (including text, images, and audio) are the property of the American Museum of Natural History or its licensors, all rights reserved. The Museum has made this video available for your personal, educational use. You may not use this video, or any part of it, for commercial purposes, nor may you reproduce, distribute, publish, prepare derivative works from, or publicly display it without the prior written consent of the Museum.

    © American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY

  • How the Brain Shows its Feminine Side - AMNH SciCafe

    29:29

    Typically the first question asked of new parents is, Is it a boy or a girl? But what is the brain biology behind sexual differences? Join Bridget Nugent, a researcher from the University of Pennsylvania, to learn about how sex differences are created in the brain.

    #brain #gender #AMNH #SciCafe #biology

    This SciCafe took place at the Museum on November 4, 2015.

    The SciCafe Series is proudly sponsored by Judy and Josh Weston.

    This video and all media incorporated herein (including text, images, and audio) are the property of the American Museum of Natural History or its licensors, all rights reserved. The Museum has made this video available for your personal, educational use. You may not use this video, or any part of it, for commercial purposes, nor may you reproduce, distribute, publish, prepare derivative works from, or publicly display it without the prior written consent of the Museum.

    © American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY

  • Technology Inspired by Nature – AMNH SciCafe

    26:14

    What does a carnivorous plant have in common with the design for a water-saving toilet? What about a hungry cell with surgical equipment? It may be surprising to learn that engineers still turn to the natural world for inspiration.

    For Tak-Sing Wong, a professor of engineering at The Pennsylvania State University, nature is a constant source of inspiration. In our November SciCafe, Wong introduces two cutting-edge technologies that have been directly modeled after natural phenomena.

    To listen to the full SciCafe talk, including Q&A, download the Science@AMNH podcast on iTunes, Soundcloud, or wherever you get your podcasts.

    This SciCafe took place on November 7, 2018.

    SciCafe: Engineering Technologies Inspired by Nature and related activities are generously supported by the Science Education Partnership Award (SEPA) program of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

    #Bioengineering #PitcherPlant #Engineering #Technology #Biotechnology #AMNH

  • Science of Love with Bianca Jones Marlin – AMNH SciCafe

    18:29

    Oxytocin, the so-called “love drug,” has been the subject of ongoing debate surrounding its impact on the human brain—but what does the latest science show? Bianca Jones Marlin, a neuroscientist and postdoctoral researcher at Columbia University, looks at the brains of female mice to see how oxytocin affects the behavior of mothers, and explores how this research could offer solutions for human children who suffer neglect.

    This SciCafe took place at the Museum on February 6, 2019.

    To listen to the full talk, download the Science@AMNH podcast on iTunes, Soundcloud, or wherever you get your podcasts. Or click here:

    For information about upcoming events at the Museum, visit amnh.org/calendar.

    #Oxytocin #Neuroscience #LoveDrug #BrainScience #Genetics #Parents

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    This video and all media incorporated herein (including text, images, and audio) are the property of the American Museum of Natural History or its licensors, all rights reserved. The Museum has made this video available for your personal, educational use. You may not use this video, or any part of it, for commercial purposes, nor may you reproduce, distribute, publish, prepare derivative works from, or publicly display it without the prior written consent of the Museum.

    © American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY

  • Trilobite Takedown – AMNH SciCafe

    18:59

    Although they’ve been extinct for about 252 million years, trilobites still manage to fascinate us today.

    These fossil arthropods were among the first animals to appear in large numbers, and they lived for almost 300 million years before going extinct. Assistant Curator Melanie Hopkins explains where these diverse creatures fit into the fossil record across the globe, delves into her research on trilobite growth patterns, and discusses the amazing diversity of their shapes.

    This SciCafe took place at the Museum on February 7, 2018.

    To listen to the full lecture, including Q&A, download the podcast on our blog:

    Or search for Science@AMNH on iTunes, Soundcloud, or wherever you get your podcasts.

    Read a full transcript of this video here:

    For information on upcoming events at the museum, including future SciCafes, visit AMNH.org/calendar.

    The Scicafe Series is proudly sponsored by Judy and Josh Weston.

    This program is made possible by OceanX, an initiative of the Dalio Foundation, as part of its generous support of the special exhibition Unseen Oceans and its related educational activities and public programs.

    #Trilobites #AMNH #Fossils #TrilobiteTuesday #Cambrian #Paleontology

    This video and all media incorporated herein (including text, images, and audio) are the property of the American Museum of Natural History or its licensors, all rights reserved. The Museum has made this video available for your personal, educational use. You may not use this video, or any part of it, for commercial purposes, nor may you reproduce, distribute, publish, prepare derivative works from, or publically display it without the prior written consent of the Museum.

    © American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY

  • This 3D Star Map Is the Most Accurate Image of the Universe Weve Ever Had

    5:21

    GAIA recently released a galactic census that covers our Milky Way Galaxy and beyond. Watch this video to learn more about it, but also be sure to check out the information for yourself at

  • National Geographic Journey Through the Milky Way

    1:29:59

  • Orangutans, Obesity, and Human Evolution – AMNH SciCafe

    24:03

    While wild orangutans in the rainforests of Borneo feed on a remarkable variety of plant life, they also endure unpredictable cycles of feast and famine. Erin Vogel of Rutgers University explains how research on these primates’ diet and health may help us to better understand the evolution of early human diets, as well as provide insight into today’s global obesity epidemic.

    This SciCafe took place on June 6, 2018.

    To listen to the full lecture, including Q&A, download the podcast on our blog:

    Or search for Science@AMNH on iTunes, Soundcloud, or wherever you get your podcasts.

    For information on upcoming events at the museum, including future SciCafes, visit AMNH.org/calendar.

    The Scicafe Series is proudly sponsored by Judy and Josh Weston.

    This SciCafe event is presented in collaboration witht The Leakey Foundation.

    SciCafe: Primate Palate: Orangutans, Obesity, and Human Evolution, and related activities are generously supported by the Science Education Partnership Award (SEPA) program of the National Institute of Health (NIH).

    #Orangutan #Primate #Monkey #Health #Diet #HumanHealth #Indonesia #Borneo #Obesity #Evolution

  • The mystery of the Milky Way - New Documentary

    55:48

    The mystery of the Milky Way - New Documentary 2016
    Nova examines the physics of telescope design. Following the development of the telescope over several centuries the program explains the challenges that the major design innovations solved and the inevitable major discoveries they produced.

  • Emily Levesque Public Lecture: The Weirdest Stars in the Universe

    1:8:47

    In her March 7 public lecture at Perimeter Institute, Emily Levesque discusses the history of stellar astronomy, present-day observing techniques and exciting new discoveries, and explores some of the most puzzling and bizarre objects being studied by astronomers today.

  • Prof. Amina Helmi - Formation of the Milky Way

    3:40

    Ten billion years ago, the Milky Way merged with a large galaxy. The stars from this partner, named Gaia-Enceladus, make up most of the Milky Way’s halo and also shaped its thick disk, giving it its inflated form. A description of this mega-merger, discovered by an international team led by University of Groningen astronomer prof. Amina Helmi, was published in the journal Nature on 1 November 2018.

  • 4 hours of Deep Space Journey Ambience for Deep Sleep Relaxation |Nature Ambience Sounds #8

    4:01

    ???? View our playlist Nature Ambience Sounds for Deep Sleep ????

    ???? The visual of this video shows space

    ???? Please visit our channel and discover dozens of amazing videos that will help you sleep, relax, concentrate and meditate.

    #whitenoise #spaceambience #ambience #starship #spacetravel #relaxingsound

  • From the Big Bang to Black Holes: Time, the Universe, and Everything

    57:04

    Aspen Lecture Series: From the Big Bang to Black Holes: Time, the Universe, and Everything
    Janna Levin

    Astrophysicist and writer Janna Levin offers an epic tour through time from the beginning of the universe in a big bang, through black holes, past the emergence of life on at least one little planet spinning in a conceivably infinite cosmic ocean, to the possible end of time.

    The Aspen Ideas Festival is the nation's premier, public gathering place for leaders from around the globe and across many disciplines to engage in deep and inquisitive discussion of the ideas and issues that both shape our lives and challenge our times. Learn more at:

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  • New Milky Way 3D Map Reveals S-Like Structure

    4:07

    An S-Like structure in the Milky Way’s warped stellar disk has been revealed in a new three dimension map. -- 3D Map Best Yet:

    Credit: OGLE / University of Warsaw, Press Office / M. Kazmierczak / S. Brunier / Y.
    Beletsky

  • How Do We Know What the Milky Way Looks Like?

    3:52

    How do we know what the Milky Way looks like if we've never been outside of it?

    Hosted by: Caitlin Hofmeister

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  • Restoring Grass in the American Bison and Pronghorn Diorama

    4:10

    Light and heat took a toll on the prairie grasses in the American bison and pronghorn antelope diorama since its installation in 1942, leaving them brittle and dry. With buffalo grass and blue grama grass in short supply, the Museum coordinated with a prairie preserve to secure the replacements needed. Volunteers were enlisted to arrange the grasses into realistic clumps placed within grazing range of the bison.

    The restored Hall of North American Mammals reopened October 2012.

    CREDITS:

    PHOTOGRAPHY
    AMNH Archives
    AMNH/D. Finnin
    National Park Service
    Pangaea Designs/Dennis Wilson

    VIDEO
    AMNH/J. Bauerle
    AMNH/J. Reynolds
    S. Sfarra

    Special thanks to Matthew Shanley

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  • Is this really the Milky Way?

    3:49

    SUBSCRIBE to Space with Sarah:

    Partially funded by NSF grant AST-1715944 and NSF grant AST-1715582.

    We’re living inside the disk of a spiral galaxy, the Milky Way. But how do we know we live in a disk Galaxy, how do we know what it looks like, and how do we know that it is a spiral Galaxy? It might not be as simple as you think, because we can’t just fly out of the Milky Way and take a nice photo - the distances are far too great! So when you’re seeing one of those “you are here” t-shirts with an arrow pointing to a spiral galaxy, you’ve actually been fooled! However, don’t be too disappointed - with the new Gaia telescope astronomers can actually start to map out what the structure of our Galaxy looks like from within!

    Season 2 is still in the making - stay tuned!

    Creator/host: Sarah Pearson (@spacewsarah)
    Producer: Brett Van Deusen
    Editor: Christian Marchi

    Episode background from Via Lactea II by Diemand, Kuhlen, Madau et al. 2008, Nature
    Intro graphics by Frederik Olufsen:
    Episode music by Ace Baron:
    Intro music: Hello, Space:

    Image credits:
    The Illustris Project:
    NASA
    ESA

  • How was the Milky Way created?

    8:09

    Sofia Feltzing, Lund University, wants to understand how the Milky Way was created. The stars, functioning as time capsules, are her best tools.

  • A Colorado Town Goes Dark To Let The Milky Way Shine Bright | TODAY

    4:56

    In many cities across the country, artificial light is making it more difficult to see stars in the night sky. Reporting for Sunday TODAY, NBC’s Harry Smith travels to a small town in Colorado where residents are putting covers on lights in order to let constellations light up the sky.
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    A Colorado Town Goes Dark To Let The Milky Way Shine Bright | TODAY

  • Why Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson Gave In To Talking To TMZ Paparazzi

    3:37

    He’s one of the smartest people *ever*-- but even Neil deGrasse Tyson loves some trashy TV.

  • Exploring the Universe from the South Pole

    1:23:36

    (Visit: The study of the origin, evolution and make-up of the universe has made dramatic and surprising advances over the last decades John E. Carlstrom, Professor at the University of Chicago and the deputy director of the UCSB Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, describes new measurements being carried out with the 10-m South Pole Telescope to test the inflation theory of the origin of the Universe and to investigate the nature of dark energy. Series: Scientific Horizons
    [Science] [Show ID: 24126]

  • Can We Save Hubble and Where is the James Webb Space Telescope?

    9:21

    The Hubble Space Telescope has given us some of the most amazing views of the universe for 25 years and although it could go on for many years more, things are starting to go wrong but without the shuttle, we have no real way the fix it.

    But its successor the James Webb Space Telescope was due to have been in space years ago. However, now it isn't due to launch until 2021, so could we save Hubble and why is the JWST taking so long.


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    Kosmonaut, Muhammad Tauha Ali, Pascal Hausammann, Florian Hesse.

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    And a big thank you to all our other Patreon supporters.

    Presented by Paul Shillito

    Written and Researched by Paul Shillito

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  • Everything You Wanted to Know About BLACK HOLES

    31:06

    Greg talks with astrophysicist Janna Levin, host of NOVA's Black Hole Apocalypse:

  • The movement of tiny galaxies surrounding the Milky Way caught by Gaia

    2:04

    Credits: A. Villalobos, G.Battaglia, T. Fritz (animation); NASA: Milky Way rendition. Based on Fritz et al. 2018, A&A, 619, 103

    The video shows the movement of tiny galaxies surrounding the Milky Way as described in the paper: Gaia DR2 proper motions of dwarf galaxies within 420 kpc - Orbits, Milky Way mass, tidal influences, planar alignments, and group infall by T.K. Fritz et al.

    A story to explain the findings in the above paper can be found here:

  • Are We Alone In The Universe? - Professor Joseph Silk

    45:37

    The question of whether we are alone in the Milky Way (or in the universe) is one of the most intriguing questions in science and astronomy. Our solar system formed half way through the history of the universe, and many sun-like stars that host planetary systems are billions of years older than our Sun.

    The odds of finding evidence for life are unknown, but the search continues as astronomers observe the nearby universe for earth-like planets and seek signs of life on exoplanets that resemble the earth in terms of atmosphere, composition and climate.

    The answer to are we alone? affects our claim for being special in the cosmos, and we shall never know unless we search.

    The transcript and downloadable versions of the lecture are available from the Gresham College website:

    Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website. There are currently over 2,000 lectures free to access or download from the website.

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  • Exercise Your Brain - AMNH SciCafe

    30:38

    Need some extra motivation to get to the gym? Neuroscientist and exercise enthusiast Wendy A. Suzuki explains how physical aerobic activity can change your brain. Dr. Suzuki gives an overview of her research into how exercise can improve cognitive function and even demonstrates a routine you can follow along at home.

    This SciCafe lecture took place at the Museum on June 7, 2017.

    To learn about upcoming SciCafe events, visit amnh.org/scicafe. To listen to the full lecture, download the podcast:

    The SciCafe series is proudly sponsored by Judy and Josh Weston.

    #Exercise #Memory #BrainHealth #Brain #MemoryLoss #Cardio #IntenSati #WendySuzuki #Aerobic #Routine #Neuroscience

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    This video and all media incorporated herein (including text, images, and audio) are the property of the American Museum of Natural History or its licensors, all rights reserved. The Museum has made this video available for your personal, educational use. You may not use this video, or any part of it, for commercial purposes, nor may you reproduce, distribute, publish, prepare derivative works from, or publicly display it without the prior written consent of the Museum.

    © American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY

  • Which Came First - the Bird or the Bird Brain? - AMNH SciCafe

    29:46

    It's no surprise that birds have specialized brains that support the complicated act of flight, but new research shows that dinosaurs evolved the brain necessary for flight well before they actually took to the air as birds.

    In this SciCafe, join Museum paleontologist and curator Mark Norell and research associate Amy Balanoff as they discuss the cutting-edge research and techniques that have continued to illuminate the evolutionary history of living birds, and their extinct dinosaur ancestors.

    #AMNHSciCafe #birds #brains #birdbrains #evolution #dinosaurs #paleontology #paleontologists #research

    This SciCafe took place at the Museum on January 8, 2014. To hear this program in full, download the podcast at amnh.org. Visit amnh.org/scicafe to view a schedule of upcoming SciCafe programs.

    The SciCafe series is proudly sponsored by Judy and Josh Weston.

    This video and all media incorporated herein (including text, images, and audio) are the property of the American Museum of Natural History or its licensors, all rights reserved. The Museum has made this video available for your personal, educational use. You may not use this video, or any part of it, for commercial purposes, nor may you reproduce, distribute, publish, prepare derivative works from, or publicly display it without the prior written consent of the Museum.

    © American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY

  • The Raw Truth About Cooking with Rachel Carmody – AMNH SciCafe

    28:15

    Chopping and sautéing aren’t just steps in a recipe, they can fundamentally alter the chemical properties of the foods we eat and the ways our bodies respond to nutrients. Join Harvard University’s Rachel Carmody on a journey behind the chemistry of cooking, the effect it has had on human evolution, and why nutritional information on food labels only tell part of the story.

    This SciCafe took place at the Museum on March 6, 2019.

    To listen to the full talk, download the Science@AMNH podcast on iTunes, Soundcloud, or wherever you get your podcasts. Or click here:

    For information about upcoming events at the Museum, visit amnh.org/calendar.

    #Raw #Diet #Calories #Nutrition #Cooking #FoodScience #Health

    SciCafe: The Raw Truth About Cooking and related activities are generously supported by the Science Education Partnership Award (SEPA) program of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

    This SciCafe event is presented in collaboration with The Leakey Foundation.

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    This video and all media incorporated herein (including text, images, and audio) are the property of the American Museum of Natural History or its licensors, all rights reserved. The Museum has made this video available for your personal, educational use. You may not use this video, or any part of it, for commercial purposes, nor may you reproduce, distribute, publish, prepare derivative works from, or publicly display it without the prior written consent of the Museum.

    © American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY

  • The Power of Poop — AMNH SciCafe

    24:05

    Did you know that some of the bacteria living inside us are essential for our health? Gastroenterologist Ari Grinspan delves into the complex world of the microbiome in the human digestive system.

    He explains how transplanting bacteria from healthy people to patients with a debilitating, sometimes lethal, disease has had astonishing success—despite a method of transfer that might be a little surprising. This SciCafe took place at the American Museum of Natural History on January 4, 2018.

    To listen to the full lecture, including Q&A, download the podcast on our blog:


    Or search for Science@AMNH on iTunes, Soundcloud, or wherever you get your podcasts.

    For information on upcoming events at the museum, including future SciCafes, visit AMNH.org/calendar.

    The Scicafe Series is proudly sponsored by Judy and Josh Weston.

    SciCafe: The Power of Poop and related activities are generously supported by the Science Education Partnership Award (SEPA) program of the National Institute of Health (NIH).

    #Gut #Microbiome #Bacteria #Health #Probiotics #Cdiff #Antibiotics #SciCafe #AriGrinspan #Gastroenterology #FecalTransplant #FMT #Stomach #ClostridiumDifficile #AMNH #American Museum of Natural History

    This video and all media incorporated herein (including text, images, and audio) are the property of the American Museum of Natural History or its licensors, all rights reserved. The Museum has made this video available for your personal, educational use. You may not use this video, or any part of it, for commercial purposes, nor may you reproduce, distribute, publish, prepare derivative works from, or publically display it without the prior written consent of the Museum.

    © American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY

  • Dinosaurs Among Us

    2:33

    The evolution of life on Earth is full of amazing episodes. But one story that really captures the imagination is the transition from the familiar, charismatic dinosaurs that dominated the planet for around 170 million years into a new, small, airborne form: birds.

    The Museum’s new exhibition, “Dinosaurs Among Us,” explores the continuities between living dinosaurs—birds—and their extinct ancestors, showcasing remarkable new evidence for what scientists now call one of the best-documented evolutionary transitions in the history of life.

    #dinosaurs #birds #evolution #documentary

    The Museum gratefully acknowledges the Richard and Karen LeFrak Exhibition and Education Fund.

    Dinosaurs Among Us is proudly supported by Chase Private Client.

    Additional support is generously provided by Dana and Virginia Randt.

    VIDEO CREDITS:

    VIDEO
    AMNH/J. Bauerle
    AMNH/S. Galloway
    Dahlia Kozlowsky
    Erica Rowell
    Ben Tudhope

    PHOTOGRAPHY
    AMNH/C. Chesek
    AMNH/M. Ellison
    AMMH/R. Mickens

    ILLUSTRATION
    Zhao Chuang
    Mick Ellison

    ANIMATION
    Bob Peterson

    MUSIC
    “Enlighten” by Tim Butcher/
    Warner Chappell Production Music

    ADDITIONAL VIDEO
    AMNH/E. Chapman
    athurstock/Shutterstock.com
    A. M. Balanoff
    Ashley M. Heers
    Heinsbergsphotos/Shutterstock.com
    Bret Tobalske/University of Montana
    Stock media provided by Alcedo, ammit, bobhof, EcoMedia, erectus,
    faraways, , Robert Howard, Mark O’ Connell, Sergey Panayotov, pzaxe/Pond5.com

    This video and all media incorporated herein (including text, images, and audio) are the property of the American Museum of Natural History or its licensors, all rights reserved. The Museum has made this video available for your personal, educational use. You may not use this video, or any part of it, for commercial purposes, nor may you reproduce, distribute, publish, prepare derivative works from, or publicly display it without the prior written consent of the Museum.

    © American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY

  • Searching for Human Ancestors in East Africa

    4:47

    Travel to Turkana, Kenya on a search for hominin fossils with paleoanthropologist Ashley Hammond, assistant curator in the Division of Anthropology at the American Museum of Natural History. Discover the techniques Hammond uses to find fossils in the field, how 3D scanning lets scientists study specimens from anywhere in the world, and what studying the pelvis can tell us about the evolution of humans and our relatives.

    Learn more about Dr. Hammond's research:

    #Evolution #HumanEvolution #Paleontology #Anthropology #Fossils #EastAfrica #Kenya #HumanAncestors #Turkana

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    This video and all media incorporated herein (including text, images, and audio) are the property of the American Museum of Natural History or its licensors, all rights reserved. The Museum has made this video available for your personal, educational use. You may not use this video, or any part of it, for commercial purposes, nor may you reproduce, distribute, publish, prepare derivative works from, or publicly display it without the prior written consent of the Museum.

    © American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY

  • Earth Day 1970 – 2018: Sea Changes

    4:26

    The first Earth Day was in 1970. Since then, our population has doubled. On average, each person is eating more meat, throwing out more plastic, and producing 21% more CO2. Our habits on land are recorded in the oceans. See what’s changed for our oceans since 1970, and how you can take action.

    Check out our Earth Day playlist here:


    This video and all media incorporated herein (including text, images, and audio) are the property of the American Museum of Natural History or its licensors, all rights reserved. The Museum has made this video available for your personal, educational use. You may not use this video, or any part of it, for commercial purposes, nor may you reproduce, distribute, publish, prepare derivative works from, or publicly display it without the prior written consent of the Museum. © American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY

  • This Blind Astrophysicist Sees the Universe in the Most Amazing Way | Short Film Showcase

    5:36

    Wanda Diaz-Merced studies the universe through sound. After losing her eyesight in early adulthood, she found a way to continue her work as an astrophysicist by converting scientific data into sound.
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    Through a process known as sonification, Diaz-Merced listens to the stars to detect patterns in seemingly random astrophysical data. As she says, “If we only see with our eyes, our perception is very narrow.”

    In this short from Emic Films, blind astrophysicist Wanda Diaz-Merced explains her passion for listening to the music of the cosmos.

    Follow Emic Films



    This Blind Astrophysicist 'Sees' the Universe in the Most Amazing Way | Short Film Showcase


    National Geographic

  • Science Bulletins: The Cosmic Microwave Background—A New View from the South Pole

    7:57

    The icy South Pole desert is a harsh and desolate landscape in which few life-forms can flourish. But the extreme cold and isolation are perfect for astronomical observations. Taking advantage of the severe conditions, scientists are using the new South Pole Telescope—the largest ever deployed in Antarctica—to observe the oldest light in the Universe, the cosmic microwave background (CMB).

    Related Links:


    South Pole Telescope
    pole.uchicago.edu

    Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics at the University of Chicago
    kicp.uchicago.edu

    National Science Foundation: Office of Polar Programs (OPP)


    UCLA: Cosmic Microwave Background


    NASA Science: The Big Bang
    science.nasa.gov/astrophysics/focus-areas/what-powered-the-big-bang/

  • Why Are Most Galaxies Spiral-Shaped?

    3:54

    The structure of spiral galaxies is more complex than we thought. Here's how the laws of physics contribute to the shaping of galaxies.

    Everything We Know About The Andromeda Galaxy -
    Sign Up For The Seeker Newsletter Here -

    Read More:

    What Process Creates And Maintains The Beautiful Spiral Arms Around Spiral Galaxies? I've Been Told That Density Waves Are Responsible -- So Where Do The Density Waves Come From?

    The basic physics of why galaxies have spirals is known, but the details remain controversial, sometimes intensely so. Spirals exist only among flattened or 'disk' galaxies. These galaxies are differentially rotating--that is, the time to complete a full rotation increases with distance from the center. Differential rotation causes any disturbance in the disk to wind up into a spiral form. The trouble with this simple explanation is that the differential rotation would cause spiral features to wind up too quickly, so galaxies would not look like spirals for any appreciable length of time.

    How Do Spiral Galaxies Keep Their Shape?

    Astronomers sometimes call this the wind-up problem of the spiral arms. It has been observed that the inner parts of galaxies rotate faster than the outer parts. If so, are the inner parts of the spiral arms moving faster than the other parts? If that is happening, then the galaxy would have no choice but to wind up so much that the spiral structure would be thinned out and ultimately destroyed.
    But we can see galaxies billions of light-years away - as well as those relatively nearby - that have maintained their spiral structure. How?

    Astrophysicists Discover Mechanism For Spiral-Arm Formation In Disk Galaxies

    Astrophysicists at the University of Arkansas have discovered a mechanism for the formation of the spiral arms in disk galaxies. The finding was published in the Astrophysical Journal Letters, the journal of the American Astronomical Society. The discovery provides a better understanding for the formation of spiral arms in a kind of disk galaxy known as a spiral galaxy, said Hamed Pour-Imani, a physics doctoral student at the U of A and lead author of the study.

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  • Jackie Faherty Discusses Brown Dwarfs and Her PhD with Mike Shara and Adam Burgasser

    19:55

    Last fall, Museum astrophysicist Jacqueline Faherty, who studies brown dwarfs and completed her doctorate under the supervision of Curator Michael Shara, defended her dissertation at Stony Brook Unisersity. On the train ride after her defense, Faherty discussed her work with Shara and advisor Adam J. Burgasser. This month, Faherty was one of five students at Stony Brook University who received the 2011 President's Award for Distinguished Doctoral Students.

  • NASAs hunt for exoplanets in the Goldilocks zone | Watch This Space

    6:19

    Exoplanets are planets just like ours, orbiting stars in a completely different solar system. But how do we find them? And what do they look like? Claire Reilly takes a look at the Earth analogs that might actually support life.

    Read Super-Earth exoplanets full of water are a good sign for extraterrestrial life -

    NASA’s planet hunting satellite to start looking for exoplanets while Kepler naps -

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    #NASA #EXOPLANET #NASAiTech

  • From the Archives - Central Asiatic Expeditions: Fossils and Artifacts

    4:55

    Archival Museum footage shows the discovery of the perfect dozen nest of dinosaur eggs found during Roy Chapman Andrews's expeditions to the Gobi Desert in the 1920s.

    Excerpts from the Central Asiatic Expeditions, filmed during the American Museum of Natural History's Third Asiatic Expedition to China and Mongolia, 1921-1930. The film records some of the paleontological finds of the expedition. The most important is shown first: the discovery of the dinosaur eggs by George Olsen, paleontologist, at the Flaming Cliffs of Shabarakh Usu in the Gobi Desert. The skull of a protoceratops is also uncovered, and archaeologist Nels Christian Nelson studies Neolithic artifacts.

    #dinosaurs #paleontology #RoyChapmanAndrews #dinosaureggs #dinosaur #Gobi

    AMNH Library catalog record:

    AMNH Library Moving Image Collection:

    AMNH Research Library:

    This video and all media incorporated herein (including text, images, and audio) are the property of the American Museum of Natural History or its licensors, all rights reserved. The Museum has made this video available for your personal, educational use. You may not use this video, or any part of it, for commercial purposes, nor may you reproduce, distribute, publish, prepare derivative works from, or publicly display it without the prior written consent of the Museum.

    © American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY

  • A Tour of the Galactic Center Visualization

    2:31

    It's often debated whether doing a sequel to a beloved movie is a good idea or not. A new visualization of the Milky Way's center is showing that part two of a galactic story is indeed better than the first.

    This new movie is actually an immersive, ultra-high-definition visualization that allows viewers to view the center of our Galaxy as if they were sitting in the position of the Milky Way's supermassive black hole known as Sagittarius A* (Sgr A* for short) and could see X-rays. This new 360-movie offers an unparalleled opportunity to look around the center of the Milky Way in any direction the user chooses.

    By combining NASA Ames supercomputer simulations with data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, the latest visualization provides a new perspective of what is happening in and around the center of the Milky Way galaxy. From the vantage point of Sgr A*, the viewer can witness the effects of dozens of massive stellar giants with fierce winds blowing off their surfaces in the region a few light years surrounding Sgr A*. Watch as these winds provide a buffet of material for the 4-million-solar-mass black hole to feed upon. Sometimes dense clumps of material stream toward Sgr A*, and other times clumps of gas will collide resulting in a flash of X-rays.

    Viewers can explore the Galactic Center in this new visualization using their laptop, smartphone, or virtual reality goggles.

  • Formation of the Milky Way in short - by Prof. Amina Helmi

    1:07

    Ten billion years ago, the Milky Way merged with a large galaxy. The stars from this partner, named Gaia-Enceladus, make up most of the Milky Way’s halo and also shaped its thick disk, giving it its inflated form. A description of this mega-merger, discovered by an international team led by University of Groningen astronomer prof. Amina Helmi, was published in the journal Nature on 1 November 2018.

  • The ESA Gaia Mission and dark matter in the Milky Way

    53:14

    The ESA Gaia Mission and dark matter in the Milky Way
    David Hogg, New York University
    Physics Colloquium 2018-11-08

    The Gaia Mission is making the most precise measurements ever made of stars. These measurements have the promise to resolve physics issues with the Solar System, stars, and the Milky Way, among others. One hope is that the Mission's kinematic measurements might give us an image of the dark matter in the Milky Way or produce results that identify the detailed physical characteristics of the dark matter particle. I will explain how the Mission works, and how it might deliver on these hopes. I will also show evidence we have already found in the data for a dark-matter substructure orbiting in the Milky Way halo.

  • European Space Agency maps the Milky Way

    3:33

    BBC News at Six 14 September 2016

  • 2018 Tencent WE Summit- Mark McCaughrean: James Webb Space Telescope-From first light to new planets

    21:23

    Mark McCaughrean: The James Webb Space Telescope-From first light to new planets

  • Particule interagissant faiblement

    29

    Institut Périmètre de Physique Théorique

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