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Tour of the Arctic (2/2) – from Greenland to Alaska | DW Documentary

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  • Tour of the Arctic – from Greenland to Alaska | DW Documentary

    42:26

    Two film crews explore the spectacular wilderness of the Arctic. The people who live there face dramatic changes. Part two takes viewers from East Greenland to Alaska.

    The region around the North Pole is one of the greatest and least-known wildernesses in the world - and it’s rapidly changing due to global warming. 350 people, most of them Inuit, live in Ittoqqortoormiit in Greenland. The nearest settlement is on neighboring Iceland. Almost 800 kilometers of Arctic Ocean separate the two islands. The film team accompanies an Inuit family through Scoresby Sound, a fjord system on the eastern coast of Greenland. They travel hundreds of kilometers in small boats through pack ice, passing icebergs as high as skyscrapers. On the way they meet whalers who are hunting for narwhals in summer. In this Inuit culture, narwhal skin and polar bear goulash have ensured survival for thousands of years. Greenpeace and WWF activists want to stop whaling and polar bear hunting - but this poses a threat to the indigenous way of life on Greenland. On the expedition through the world's largest fjord system, the team learns about the consequences of global warming: melting permafrost and a rapid increase in greenhouse gases. The changes are worrying. Some say they have brought benefits to the far north — the ice breaks up earlier and so too does the hunting season. However, the risks outweigh this benefit. The knowledge and way of life that have been passed down from generation to generation may soon be unsustainable.

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  • Tour of the Arctic – from Svalbard to Siberia | DW Documentary

    42:26

    The Arctic is one of the most fascinating regions on our planet, and one of the most threatened. Two film crews explore its spectacular wilderness in a two-part documentary. Part one takes viewers from Norway’s Svalbard archipelago to Siberia.

    The region around the North Pole is one of the greatest and least-known wildernesses in the world, and it’s rapidly changing due to global warming. The retreat of Arctic sea ice can be observed everywhere along the Arctic Circle, presenting those who live there with dramatic changes. This documentary takes viewers on a journey through the Arctic circle and explores those changes.
    It begins in Norway’s Svalbard archipelago, a place to see one of nature’s most spectacular displays — the northern lights. With the ice retreating, cruise ships can now travel further north than was previously possible. This places a strain on the fragile ecosystem. But more visitors may also mean more awareness about the risks that face the region, and more motivation to protect the Arctic.
    But as if often the case, protecting nature in the Arctic is at odds with economic interests. Russia, in particular, is keen to sell Arctic fossil fuels to the rest of world. The film next takes viewers to the gas-rich Yamal Peninsula in northwestern Siberia, where the Russian company Novatek has built the northernmost industrial facility on the globe.

    Further East in Yakutia, two noises fill the air: the relentless buzzing of mosquitoes that infest the Siberian tundra in summer, and the steady dripping of the thawing permafrost on the banks of the Kolyma River. The film’s journey ends in Chukotka in the northeast of Russia, a region closer to Alaska than to the Russian capital Moscow.

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  • Greenland - The Largest Island in the World

    43:46

    Fjords, glaciers and the highest mountains in the Arctic: East Greenland with its spectacular nature is one of the most sparsely populated regions on earth. The people here live in extreme isolation and depend on helicopter flights for their supplies. Despite harsh conditions, the inhabitants here lovingly maintain their traditions and enjoy their outdoor leisure time even at minus 20 degrees Celsius.

    The town of Tasiilaq is the metropolis with 4,000 inhabitants and offers a very special attraction: the only ski lift on the east coast. Thomas Mikaelsen, the lift attendant, is not to be envied for his job. The only 100 meter long lift comes from Switzerland and is already 20 years old. If Thomas gets the drag lift running at all, it often only lasts for an hour. Then the ski crazy's luck depends on his repair skills. The lift is the only frosty open-air pleasure.

    For Salo Kunuk his sled dogs are both pleasure and work. He is currently teaching his daughter Karla how to steer a dog sled, private driving lessons from her father, so to speak. Karla will need it, because in the eternal ice the sled is the only means of transportation.

    Tobias Ignatiussen owns a motorized sled version with 100 HP. He goes, like already his ancestors, on seal hunt. Only with the help of the snowmobile he can reach ice-free places in the fjord. Despite strict hunting restrictions, the Inuit still depend on seal meat and fur to survive.

    A tradition almost as important as hunting is the tupilak, small figures from Greenlandic mythology, made from whale teeth or reindeer antlers. Gideon Quqe made it to the master as a carver, and some of his tupilaks look quite spooky. Because from his ancestors, Gideon knows that the tupilak was intended by its owner to be used as an evil spirit to harm the enemy. Nowadays Gideon also carves nice looking figures, because lucky charms simply sell better.

    At the Klubben, Tasiilaq's only pub, the concert of the year is on: the local combo Dubbi Band, named after the nickname of band leader Tobias Sanimuinaq, performs. They call their wild musical style Greenland Swing. Even in the middle of the white wilderness you can make your audience dance.

  • The Arctic is melting | DW Documentary

    26:02

    Nowhere has experienced global warming like Svalbard, midway between Norway and the North Pole. Readings by a joint Franco-German research team show average temperatures have risen by 1.6 degrees in just ten years.

    Temperatures in Ny Ålesund, a village on the island of Spitsbergen, are rising 15 times faster than elsewhere in the world. Scientists from the AWIPEV polar station are monitoring the rapid changes - all the while keeping an eye out for dangerous polar bears. When Marion Maturilli trudges through the slush to get to her meteorological measuring instruments, station manager Piotr Kupiszewski goes with her, armed with a rifle in case they meet one. Rain in January and melting snow in early May are just the latest indications of global warming that are surprising even the scientists themselves.

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  • The Russians – an intimate journey through Russia | DW Documentary

    42:28

    A very private trip through Russia - a world power with a shrinking population, a myriad of ethnic minorities, and vast distances.

    Encounters with Russians from six different generations help us get to know a Russia beyond Moscow and the Kremlin. Away from the 75th Victory Day parade and displays of military might, we meet the people of Russia. They tell us of a nation poised between tradition and the future. Filmmaker Juri Rescheto travelled through the giant country, meeting with ordinary Russians who share their everyday lives with him. They talk about their joys and sorrows, their hopes and needs, and their experiences - good and bad. The film shows intimate scenes from their homes and their workplaces, as well as glimpses of their political views, their standards of living, and their customs. The protagonists’ personal situations are presented in relation to official Russian studies on the particular generation to which they belong.

    In Part 1 we go to a city halfway between Moscow and Novosibirsk to meet Jelena, who works as a surrogate mother in a children’s home. Then we travel to the boreal forest in western Siberia to meet 16-year-old Veronika, who spends most of the year in a boarding school. Her parents are reindeer herders and members of the indigenous Khanty people. The generation of young adults in Russia is represented by Kirill, who holds down a normal job, but spends his free time practicing a dangerous hobby: no holds barred boxing.

    In Part 2 of the documentary we meet Dmitri, who lives in northwestern Russia and works at Europe’s largest blast furnace. He is a proud steelworker and admires Vladimir Putin. At Lake Baikal, Baba Lyuba tells us many stories about her legendary region and her own eventful life. Finally, we make the acquaintance of Ivan, who earns a livelihood from death as an engraver of tombstones at a gigantic cemetery in central Russia.

    Watch Part 1 here:

    Get to know the Russians a little better in our six-part YouTube special:
    Part 1: Birth -
    Part 2: Childhood -
    Part 3: Youth -
    Part 4: Adulthood -
    Part 5: Old age -
    Part 6: Death -

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  • Antarctica: A message from another planet | DW Documentary

    42:26

    The world's major powers agree: the resources of Antarctica should be exploited peacefully. They have promised to promote peace and scientific research in Antarctica, and to protect its environment. But is this spirit real, or just a lot of talk?

    This documentary features interviews with researchers, activists, diplomats, and military personnel from Spain, Russia, Portugal, Chile, Argentina, and the United States. There's been much debate over how to share control of resources in Antarctica, which is the world's oldest ecosystem. Critics say that behind the scenes, a game of high-stakes poker is underway. Could this competition end in armed conflict? Or will Antarctica serve as a model for peaceful international cooperation? This film addresses these complicated issues with in-depth analysis, accompanied by magnificent images of the Antarctic landscape. The documentary's soundtrack was composed by Javier Weyler, former drummer of the Welsh rock band, the Stereophonics.


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  • Vaccinating against COVID-19 in Alaska | DW Documentary

    12:27

    Fort Yukon in Alaska is one of the most remote villages in the world, and people here are also afraid of Coronavirus. But now that vaccinations are being carried out, scattered families are difficult to reach.

    Fort Yukon lies eight kilometers north of the Arctic Circle. Most of the 500 or so inhabitants are Indigenous members of the Gwich'in tribe. Debra McCarty runs the local hospital and, as a result, is also responsible for vaccinating the village’s inhabitants. Some of the families she is trying to reach are only accessible by plane and snowmobile. The people here have heard of the dangerous coronavirus, and that’s why they pretty much everyone wants to be vaccinated - no matter how remote they are. They say that catching the virus here in the wilderness is pretty much fatal. DW reporter Oliver Sallet traveled to Fort Yukon to report on how people living close to the Arctic Circle are handling the pandemic.

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  • Coronavirus complications | DW Documentary

    28:25

    A growing number of people who recover from COVID-19 are experiencing long-term health problems. This includes younger patients without pre-existing conditions who had only mild symptoms with the virus. How are doctors and patients responding?

    The COVID-19 disease is triggered by the SARS-CoV-2 virus, and can affect multiple organs. The symptoms of the initial illness are now well known. But what about the long-term effects of coronavirus? Not everyone who gets COVID-19 makes a full recovery afterwards. A growing number of people are experiencing reduced physical and abilities and cognitive symptoms. One such patient is 31-year old junior doctor Maria. Five months after falling sick, she is still unable to work normally.

    In October, Germany’s University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein launched the largest study to date on the long-term effects of coronavirus. Teams of doctors specialized in various fields of medicine are planning to examine several thousand former COVID-19 patients who have officially recovered from the virus. They’re looking in particular at the lungs, heart, kidneys and liver, as well as the nervous system and metabolism. Christopher Bley from Berlin would welcome the opportunity to be included in a study like that. The 35-year-old feels he isn’t getting the support he needs from doctors. Ever since the father of two contracted the virus, he has been battling shortness of breath. For a long time, he hoped he would heal naturally, but the problem persists.
    Writer Nina Marewski from Frankfurt feels similarly let down by doctors. She says they either ignore her or don’t take her seriously. She has been writing about her experience with coronavirus online, and is giving a voice to other post-COVID long haulers. This documentary accompanies three people who are struggling with the aftereffects of the virus. What do the health problems mean for them and how do they deal with the uncertainty about whether they will ever make a full recovery?

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  • 8000 Miles to Alaska: A Journey Along the Longest Border in the World | Free Documentary Nature

    1:13:11

    8000 Miles to Alaska: A Journey Along the Longest Border in the World | Free Documentary Nature

    What is America? Just a huge, spacious and naturally wild country - or is it still a project? And who are the Americans? A torn nation of people without roots and history - or more than all of this? What unites, what divides, what characterises and what changes them? How different are their daily lives, even now, in the icy cold, snowbound winter - depending on whether they live on Maine's remote outer islands, or in arctic Deadhorse, near the Great Lakes or in the prairies of the mid-West, in the Blackfoot reservation in the Rocky Mountains, or on board a yacht from Seattle?

    To discover America's characteristics and their transition - always with a view to the people and how they perceive home - Klaus Scherer travels through his host country on a route hitherto neglected by previous reporters: along the north border. Thus, a program event is created, whose highly visual landscape and nature photographs, along with personal experiences, connect with those we meet, visit and accompany along the way - from the dwarf school on Monehegan Island, to the head gaffer of the Niagara Falls; from wolf and bear monitors in Idaho, to the ice fishers at the Arctic Circle.

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  • Disastrous floods in western Germany - The Eifel disaster | DW Documentary

    28:27

    It's the morning after the deadly flood in the small village of Schuld on the river Ahr. The extent of the natural disaster is gradually becoming clear.

    Schuld has a 1000-year history and has survived several wars. But now, it has been stricken by destructive weather. On the night into July 15, following heavy downpours, the river swelled and nearly swept the village away, wreaking havoc on everything that stood in its path. Normally, the Ahr is barely a meter deep as it passes through Schuld. It swelled to a monstrous depth of almost eight meters. Residents barely had time to react.

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  • Russias Icy Northern Sea Coast | Free Documentary Nature

    43:46

    Russia's Icy Northern Sea Coast | Free Nature Documentary

    Murmansk, the metropolis on the Barents Sea, is anything but Russia's cold north. There's always something going on here, for example the Olympic Polar Games. Ice surfing and ice swimming, reindeer racing, the first atom ice breaker in the history of the world, a corner shop in ice and snow, endearing village school lessons and the singing Norwegian Sea Fleet - arctic lifestyle far away, north of the polar circle.

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    Enjoy stories about nature, wildlife, culture, people, history and more to come.

  • A train ride into Japans past | DW Documentary

    42:26

    Kyushu is said to be the wellspring of Japanese civilization. Yet few tourists visit the southernmost of Japan's main islands. This documentary contrasts modern Japanese cities with traditional customs in the countryside.

    The rail journey begins in Fukuoka - a city with a metro population of 2.5 million - and ends at the southern tip of the island, in the city of Ibusuki. As the train rolls along, it travels through time - and reveals the amazing diversity and contrasts of the most southerly of Japan's four main islands. The trip provides spectacular landscape views, as well as deep insight into a foreign culture, and its ancient traditions and modern lifestyles.

    In the West, Kyushu is one of the lesser-known regions in the Land of the Rising Sun. Even for the Japanese, the green, mountainous island is seen mostly as a holiday spot. Europeans rarely visit this part of the country - but there are plenty of restaurants and cafes that have names like Wolfgang, Bavaria, or Côte d'Azur. Travel guides say that these words sound European to Japanese.

    The family of the emperor, or Tenno, comes from Kyushu as well. This is also where the dynasties of the proud warrior class, the samurai, have their roots.
    And there are a number of active volcanoes on Kyushu. One of the most famous is Mount Aso. Its caldera - the cauldron-like hollow at the top -- has a circumference of about 120 kilometers.

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  • Oil promises – how oil changed a country | DW Documentary

    1:24:53

    When oil was discovered in Ghana in 2007, the country began to dream big. It dreamed that the ‘black gold’ would bring economic upswing and long-awaited prosperity to its nation. But what happens when dreams and globalization meet?

    The global economy continues to rely on oil — but the so-called ‘black gold’ is becoming scarce. If a country has oil, so we tend to believe, it has all it needs to become a wealthy country. When oil was discovered in Ghana in 2007, Ghanaians also believed that economic prosperity would soon sweep over their country. By 2010, drilling had started. Ghana was determined to do better than Nigeria, a country that exports oil, but has to import gasoline.

    This documentary, shot over a period of ten years, is a case study of globalization. Filmed in a coastal region where people lived off fishing and rubber cultivation for decades, it shows the impact the oil discovery has had on their lives. Would the promises come true? Would the ‘black gold’ bring modern life and progress, paved streets, electricity and jobs even to small villages? Filmmaker Elke Sasse and journalist Andrea Stäritz spent ten years documenting the developments on Ghana’s western coast. Nigerian animator Ebele Okoye adds her personal perspective through art, as a citizen of a nation hit by the oil curse.

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  • Climate change in the desert | DW Documentary

    28:17

    Climate change is leaving its mark on Morocco’s oases, too. Sandstorms are becoming more and more frequent, groundwater levels are sinking and palm trees are shrivelling up and dying. An age-old way of life is in danger.

    Halim Sbai says an oasis really is a paradise. But drought and desertification are now taking their toll on oases like M'hamid El Ghizlane in southeastern Morocco where he grew up. The survival of a whole region is at stake. Over hundreds of kilometers between the Anti-Atlas mountains and the Sahara desert there is one palm-fringed oasis after the next. Close to two million people live in these settlements. Up to now, many earned their living by harvesting dates from the palm trees. But this is proving more and more difficult. Decreasing and irregular rainfall is having a devastating impact on the trees and their yields.

    Halim Sbai is planting new palm trees and preserving as much precious water as he can in a bid to keep the oasis of M'hamid El Ghizlane and the region’s traditional way of life alive. Up to now, he has also been supplementing his income with earnings from tourism. Global warming could put an end to all this.
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  • Building an ARCTIC AIRPORT | North Pole Ice Airport: Episode 1 | Reel Truth Documentaries

    45:37

    A team of Russian paratroopers skydive onto the frozen Arctic Ocean to build this extraordinary ice camp. Battling temperatures as low as -40° C, they will carve a unique airport on the drifting ice. From here tourists, scientists and explorers will set out to conquer, investigate and discover the secrets of the North Pole. They have just three weeks to realise their dreams before Barneo melts into the sea.

    While the advance team build the airport, Barneo's logistics team are based in the Norwegian town of Longyearbyen, 600miles south. Their job is to handle the demands of the hundreds of visitors heading for the area. Amongst the polar hopefuls are six UK office workers, making a trek to the pole to raise 250,000 for a children's health charity. Twenty year-old skydiver Johnny Strange is attempting to enter the record books as the youngest person to complete the 'Adventurers Grand Slam' by climbing the highest peak on each continent and standing at both poles. Also on the way are a group of Japanese tourists on a luxury trip to the pole by helicopter.

    For each person who makes the journey, the experience will be a mix of mental strength, physical determination and raw natural beauty.

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  • Chinas gateway to Europe – the New Silk Road | DW Documentary

    42:30

    The New Silk Road is an enormous Chinese international development project. It's a trade network that involves Asia, Africa, and Europe -- and more than 70 countries are already involved. It may turn the old world order upside down.

    China is investing in bridges, port facilities, railroads, and roads around the world. Beijing is spending several hundred billion euros on what it calls the Silk Road Economic Belt. Chinese President Xi Jinping says the project will provide development opportunities and wealth for China and the entire world. Beijing will take the lead role in building this infrastructure network.

    After the financial crisis in Greece, no European country wanted to invest there -- but China saw an opportunity, and bought shares in the port of Piraeus. By 2016, Beijing owned a majority of shares. The Greek dockworkers' union still finds it hard to accept that the port no longer belongs to Greece.

    In 2019, Italy joined the Silk Road project -- and signed a memorandum of understanding with China on development of the port of Trieste. But critics warn that the Silk Road project will allow Beijing to spread its influence around the world. Europe is divided between those who favor such cooperation, and those who oppose it.

    Part 2:

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  • Our Planet | Frozen Worlds | FULL EPISODE | Netflix

    53:32

    Experience our planet's natural beauty and examine how climate change impacts all living creatures in this ambitious documentary of spectacular scope.

    In this episode: On the unforgiving frontier of climate change, polar bears, walruses, seals and penguins find their icy Edens in peril.

    For more about Frozen Worlds please visit

    Download free educational resources at

    US Rating: TV-PG. Parental guidance suggested.

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    Our Planet | Frozen Worlds | FULL EPISODE | Netflix

  • Why Planes Dont Fly Over the Pacific Ocean

    8:47

    Why do airlines avoid the Pacific Ocean? You might think it was a safety issue. The Pacific is the largest and deepest of the world’s oceans. If a plane encounters a problem over a seemingly endless and bottomless pond of water, the pilots are going to have a rough time finding a safe spot to set her down.

    Guessing that it is a safety precaution wouldn't be entirely wrong. When planning a route, many pilots prefer to maximize the number of airports along their path. Emergencies are incredibly rare relative to how many planes take to the skies every day. That said, it isn’t the main reason airlines tend to avoid making a straight shot east to west...

    Other videos you might like:
    Why Planes Don't Fly Straight
    Why Planes Don't Fly Over Antarctica
    A Plane Disappeared And Landed 37 Years Later

    TIMESTAMPS:
    It's all about three-dimensional spaces? 1:08
    A little experiment ???? 2:54
    But how do people get to Australia? 5:08
    Turbulence over water 6:01
    Flying with a jet stream VS. flying into it 6:27
    What clear-air turbulence is 7:46

    #planes #aviation #brightside

    SUMMARY:
    - When planning a route, many pilots prefer to maximize the number of airports along their path.
    - Excluding special circumstances such as passing through the jet streams or other meteorological concerns, the fastest route is almost always the one closest to a straight line.
    - On a 2D map, making a giant rainbow to avoid the Pacific Ocean looks like a much longer route. But since the Earth is a sphere, a straight line is going to look very different in three-dimensional spaces.
    - The combination of the two factors, the curvature of the Earth and its extra equatorial width, mean that curving toward the poles is a shorter distance than flying (what seems like on a map) “straight” across!
    - Another reason planes will sometimes brave an oceanic voyage is to take advantage of the smoother ride. Even in clear weather, there’s much less turbulence over water than over land.
    - The other primary consideration for determining flight paths are air currents, namely the jet streams. These high-altitude air currents exist near the top of the troposphere.
    - There are 4 main jet streams, 2 in each hemisphere, and thanks to the Earth’s rotation, they mostly flow west to east.
    - Flying with a jet stream can shave several hours off of a trip, but flying into it can slow the plane down considerably.
    - It’s also worth noting the risks associated with jet streams. The biggest hazard is a kind of turbulence known as clear-air turbulence, which occurs along the edges of the streams.
    - The jet stream mostly affects things tens of thousands of feet in the air, and the curvature of the Earth doesn’t really matter unless you’re traveling hundreds of miles per hour over vast distances.

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  • Can Africas forests help save the world? | DW Documentary

    29:25

    Humans are destroying more and more natural habitats, which brings animals into closer contact with people -- and this can contribute to the outbreak of pandemics, like Covid-19. But several African countries are trying to protect forested areas. For example, most researchers believe that the Covid-19 virus originated in bats, and then crossed over to humans. The precise origins of Covid-19 are not yet clear. But there is no doubt that a number of new viruses have originated in the animal kingdom or are transmitted in the wild. The primary source of Covid-19 is widely believed to be bats; pangolins may have served as intermediate hosts. And the destruction of forests by humans has brought many animals closer to populated areas, which has increased the threat of new diseases.

    In Uganda and Kenya, virologists and zoologists are trying to determine whether there's a connection between human contact with wild animals and the spread of viruses. They're concerned that a deadly virus like Covid can spread from humans to certain species of animals. At the Bwindi National Park in Uganda, Dr. Gladys Kalema-Zikusoka, is working to protect mountain gorillas, an endangered species. She fears that the gorillas could fall victim to Covid-19, transmitted by humans. Her job has become more difficult, because a number of men who lost their jobs due to Covid restrictions have now turned to poaching gorillas.

    Kenyan scientist Augustine Baraza Obuyele is an expert on bats. He's been working at Mount Elgon on the Kenyan-Ugandan border, trying to discover new kinds of viruses among the bat population there -- viruses that could one day spread to humans, as Covid has. As humans continue to encroach on animal habitats, such as clear-cutting forests, there is an increased risk that infections could spread from animals to humans.

    The international community is concerned about these developments. For example, the U-N has declared a decade-long effort, set to begin next year, to protect and revive the world's ecosystems. The project, led by the UN's Environment Programme and its Food and Agriculture Organization, includes a number of re-forestation projects.

    Many African countries are cutting down forests to generate income, but others are committed to conservation efforts. For example, Kenya is trying to protect as much of the Mau Forest as possible. But to do this, the authorities have driven large numbers of indigenous people from their ancestral homeland. It will be difficult to find the right balance between protecting ecosystems and preserving the rights of people who live in those areas.

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  • The Journey to Siberia

    45:28

    Deep in the taiga, where humans are a rare sight, lies the beginning of Siberia’s giant river, the Lena. The taiga surrounding the Lena’s source is like an ocean – endless, immeasurable and dangerous. But it is habitat to many forest dwellers, who go about their lives and call it home. The taiga also opens itself up to people who know and respect the laws of the forest. Our film is about the mysterious beginning of the Lena River, its rapids and dark, ancient woods.

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  • Europe’s toughest dogsled race | DW Documentary

    28:26

    The Finnmarksløpet in Norway is the longest and toughest dogsled race in Europe. Among this year’s competitors are Ben Voigt from Germany and 20-year-old native Hanna Lyrek. It’s a race that is always full of surprises and setbacks.
    Participants face freezing temperatures, stormy weather and a lack of sleep. The Finnmarksløpet is to the Norwegians what the Tour de France is to the French, and it’s broadcast live on TV. Once they start out, the competitors or mushers” only have their Alaskan huskies for company, and have to decide when to take breaks. Each team can have up to 14 dogs, with at least six having to make it to the finish. Given the tough conditions, Ben Voigt trains with his pack every day from August through late May. The German started mushing ten years ago after moving to Norway. He and his wife have 35 dogs in total at their home in Langfjordbotn.

    Hanna Lyrek is a natural-born musher, having learned the art from her mother. Hanna competed in her first competition at the age of four - on her own. In 2018 she became the youngest ever entrant in the Finnmarksløpet, and this year she was among the favorites. Now 20, she’s among the best in the world - and her talents have also earned her welcome sponsorship.

    This report follows the two mushers during training and the big event itself. They tell us about the vital relationships to their trusty animals, and the importance of adapting to their needs. Will they make it to the end of the grueling endurance race? And who will finish first?

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  • How An Igloo Keeps You Warm

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    If you ever find yourself stranded in the snowy Arctic (or bored in Minecraft), you’re gonna need to know how to build an igloo. But how can building a house made of ice keep you warm? The science behind building an igloo is the same reason that otters and reindeer don't freeze to death!

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  • 15 Things They Don’t Tell You About LIVING in ALASKA

    16:39

    Moving or relocating to Alaska is a big adventure and there are a lot of things you need to know. In this video we are discussing critical information that will help you make the right decision before living in Alaska.
    We are covering the following topics, fishing, hunting, homesteading, cabins, law enforcement, taxes, the PFD and working for oil companies.
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  • Reindeer People I SLICE I Full documentary

    50:58

    In Northern Mongolia, a sacred alliance exists between people, ancestor spirits and reindeer. We are invited in a family of Dukha reindeer nomads during their migration through the forests of Mongolia's Hovsgol province. The oldest Dukha, is a divine seer, a 96-year old shaman, called Tsuyan. She is the link between the healing songs of the forest ancestors, her people and their reindeer. To live in harmony with them, people had to learn to respect nature and animals and to pass down their beliefs, from generation to generation, by invoking the song-lines of their deceased ancestors.

    Documentary: “Reindeer People”
    Direction: Hamid Sardar
    Production: ZED & Axis Mundi


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  • Lofoten - The rugged archipelago in the Norwegian Arctic Ocean

    42:58

    Lofoten is the rugged archipelago in the Norwegian Arctic Ocean. Whoever arrives here is really at the end. Moskenes is the end of the line, and anyone who wants to go further needs a boat or a plane. The only way to get to the open sea is via the Maelstrom, which is quite dangerous. On the outermost headland, there are only a few ruins left. The last inhabitants are long gone, a supply was hardly possible. But fishermen are on the way, mainly to catch cod. And there is the coastal administration, which takes care of broken sea marks and lighthouses.

    A visit to one of the luxurious ships of the Hurtig Line is not to be missed. They shuttle off rough coasts on an eleven-day trip between the Russian border and southern Norway. A floating workplace for a wide variety of professions. The island of Andøya is not served by the Hurtiglinie. It lies too far out in the Atlantic. One of the most important observatories in Europe is located here. A young woman, Sandra Blindheim, is the boss. She is responsible for the large laser that delivers important information to scientists around the world. On clear winter nights, there is a wonderful panoramic view of the aurora borealis.

    A corner store in the sparsely populated north - that also exists. Anne's store offers a core range of what you need to survive and is also a social meeting place. Everyone knows everyone here. The Lofoten fishermen's season begins when temperatures reliably stay below zero. Now the fishermen earn most of their annual income. Everywhere you now see stockfish on drying racks. The work is hard, but hardly anyone can imagine anything else. A job and a way of life. Quite simple...

  • Growing greens in the Arctic | DW Documentary

    12:31

    In Spitsbergen, one of the northern-most populated areas inside the Arctic Circle, American Benjamin Vidmar is attempting the unthinkable.

    On an island that is dark for three months of the year, he’s growing fresh vegetables for the local community. enjamin Vidmar has worked all over the world as a chef. It was something of a coincidence that he ended up on the Norwegian island of Spitsbergen, in the Arctic Circle. Because he wanted to have fresh vegetables, he built a special domed-shaped greenhouse and developed his own composting system. His aim is to provide fresh, locally sourced food for the community along with a sustainable waste disposal system - developing global solutions for food production in the process. Now he wants to open his own restaurant which is to operate without producing any waste. A report by Axel Rowohlt. --------------------------------------------------------------------

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  • Melting ice – the future of the Arctic _ DW Documentary #5

    42:24

  • Alaska: Impfen gegen COVID-19 am Polarkreis | DW Reporter

    12:34

    Fort Yukon in Alaska ist eine der abgelegensten Siedlungen der Welt, doch auch hier fürchten die Menschen das Coronavirus. Jetzt aber soll geimpft werden - auch wenn die verstreut lebenden Familien nur schwer zu erreichen sind.


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    #Alaska #Coronavirus #Impfung

  • Greenland | The Largest Ice Sheet In The World Full Documentary HD

    41:55

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  • Resistance to fish farms in Canada and other world stories | DW Documentary

    12:01

    The rise of far-right populists in Germany - the AfD and the German elections; First Nations people fight fish farms in Canada; the fight against AirBnB in Venice - hardly any apartments for locals; Used Hair - the business of beauty in Kenya.
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  • unrecognized nations greenland 2 Documentary Lengh AMAZING Documentary

    22:07

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  • Russia: Petrovich, hero of the taiga | DW Documentary

    12:32

    Once a center of the timber industry, Soyga is now mostly home to the elderly. For many of the village residents, train driver Petrovich with his ramshackle narrow-gauge railway is a link to the outside world, and a kind of guardian angel.

    Petrovich and his train take the spry, old residents of Soyga to the nearby town to run errands. He even brings them groceries and firewood himself, if needed. And he is there to escort them on their final trip - to the cemetery. Ever since the timber industry closed down, there have been no more jobs in Soyga. Most young people have left the village in search of work, leaving Petrovich without much reason to keep the narrow-gauge railway operational. But that hasn’t stopped him. Petrovich has become train driver and mechanic in one. A report by Juri Rescheto.

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  • How Climate Made History Pt. 1 | Full documentary

    51:23

    A unique combination of natural science and history takes us through the ages and along the entire spectrum of natural forces. The gripping narrative exposes surprising connections between volatile climate shifts and major historical events.

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  • Polar power play: Who will win the race for the Arctics riches? | To the Point

    26:06

    Who does the Arctic belong to? The vast region was long seen as little more than snow and ice.
    But now three world powers – Russia, China and the United States – are leading the charge to take control of the immense natural resources and new trade routes that are opening up, even as a potential climate catastrophe takes hold. So, on To the Point, we ask: Who will win the race for the Arctic's riches?

    Guests this week are Michael Paul (security expert), Stefan Rahmstorf (climatologist), Irina Filatova (DW's Russian desk)


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  • Opera during the pandemic | DW Documentary

    12:32

    For its opera season premiere, the Staatstheater Cottbus is staging Carmen”, the tale of passion, jealousy and tragedy set to music by Georges Bizet. Rehearsals were held through November under strict precautions. But will it ever premiere?

    Conductor Mario Venzago and director Stephan Märki have never rehearsed like this before. How can they keep an ensemble's morale up if they don't even know when or if the production they're working so hard on will go on stage? And that's not their only problem. Their singers have to stay shut away behind Plexiglas walls and compete with air purifiers. The climactic stage kiss is blocked by masks. And how can the choir singers maintain the required distance from one another? One thought keeps them going strong through it all: there's no quitting - culture must go on, even - and especially - in the time of corona. A report by Axel Rowohlt.

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  • Can green investment change the world? | DW Documentary

    25:55

    A new generation of investors wants to force businesses to become environmentally-friendly. Even climate conservationists know that money talks, but can green investments really save the world?

    Green investment rewards companies that use sustainable production practices and protect the environment. At the same time, companies that pollute or contribute to global warming are deprived of funds. The strategy converts the once secondary issue of the environment into hard, cold cash.

    Antonis Schwarz is 30 years old -- and an investor, philanthropist, and activist. His slogan is cash against climate change. Schwarz, like many other wealthy millennials, sees climate change as the key variable when it comes to investing money. These people intentionally put their cash into companies and projects that protect the environment.

    Schwarz believes that those who are well-off have a special responsibility to follow this strategy. He says, When you are able to change something and you don't, you're complicit. We all have to become fully involved, so we can prevent a climate disaster.

    This philosophy can be summed up with the following question: What's the point of having loads of money if it becomes worthless because you're living on a planet that's becoming increasingly chaotic?

    Institutional investors have more money at their disposal than wealthy private individuals do. Their approach is also changing -- and not out of pure idealism. Extreme weather events caused by climate change, for example, are bad for business. They can force corporations to write off billions in damages.

    This documentary goes behind the scenes to take a closer look at the financial markets. How well does impact investing work? Can investors really move large, powerful corporations to change their strategies? Politicians have so far failed to do precisely that.

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  • The Greenland Shark: The Search For A 400-Year-Old Monster | Natural Kingdom | Real Wild

    45:08

    Featuring exclusive footage of a species never before filmed in the wild, Searching For A Monster chronicles an incredible four-year scientific quest to find and explore one of nature's most reclusive, little-known creatures; the Greenland Shark.

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    #RealWild #Documentary #GreenlandShark #SearchingForAMonster

  • Abu Dhabis refuge for endangered species | DW Documentary

    42:27

    The Arabian oryx is a beautiful, almost luminously white antelope. But, after being over-hunted by humans in the 20th century, it only narrowly escaped extinction. Today, on the desert island of Sir Bani Yas, the endangered animals find refuge.

    Part of an archipelago west of Abu Dhabi, Sir Bani Yas is home to a large wildlife reserve, where animals from Arabia, Asia and Africa roam freely. You can watch cheetahs hunting, and imagine how the Bedouins once lived, under open desert skies.

    Established in the 1970s, extensive ecological measures turned Sir Bani Yas into a man-made paradise for wild animals. Now, the reserve stands for the region’s desire for a sustainable future. It’s also a great place to see the magnificent Arabian oryx running free, once more.

    #documentary #AbuDhabi #endangeredspecies #naturedocumentary #nature


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  • وثائقي | الأوبرا في زمن كوفيد | وثائقية دي دبليو

    12:32

    بالنسبة لمسرح كوتبوس الحكومي تعد أوبرا كارمن العرض الأول في هذا الموسم. ورغم كورونا، سُمح لفريق العمل بإقامة البروفات في نوفمبر، وسط اجراءات وقاية مشددة. ولكن هل سيقام العرض الأول مع نهاية العام؟

    قائد الأوركسترا ماريو فينزاغو والمخرج شتيفان ماركي لم يعاصروا بروفات كهذه من قبل. فكيف يحفزان فريق عمل في ظل عدم المعرفة إذا كان سيُسمح للفريق بإقامة العرض؟ لكن هذه ليست مشكلتهما الوحيدة. يجب أن يتدرب الفنانون خلف زجاج عازل وبجوار أجهزة تصفية الهواء، ولا يُسمح بالتقبيل على خشبة المسرح إلا باستخدام الكمامة. وكيف ينبغي للجوقة أن تحافظ على مسافة الأمان المطلوبة؟ مع ذلك، يتفق الجميع على شيء واحد: الاستسلام ليس الحل، فالثقافة مهمة - وخاصة في أوقات كورونا. ريبورتاج: أكسل روفولت.

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  • Italian fishermen in Libyan custody | DW Documentary

    12:32

    Eighteen Sicilian fishermen have been in Libyan custody since September 2020. Their offence: Fishing for coveted red prawns off the coast of Libya. Their desperate families fear that more is at stake than sovereign rights at sea.

    The Italian authorities remain silent, despite the fact that experts see Libya's actions as a clear violation of international law: The country also claims the seas outside the internationally defined twelve-mile zone, where the fishermen were sailing, as its territorial waters. But the Italian navy is increasingly withdrawing from the international waters off Libya's coast at the same time. Relatives of the captive fishermen say it’s because so many refugees get into trouble on the open sea and the navy no longer wants to have to rescue them. The fishermen's families are holding vigils in front of the parliament in Rome to try to pressure Italy's politicians into getting the 18 men released at last. A report by Philipp Zahn.

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  • The Vampire Fish I SLICE I Full documentary

    23:46

    In the north of the Kenyan coast in the Kiwayu island, the Bajun people have practiced an extraordinary technique for centuries: remora fishing.

    The remora, a fish whose head contains a small suction cup, attaches itself to turtles, rays and sharks for nourishment. Legend has it that the remora sucks its victims’ blood to tire them out, hence the nickname, “vampire fish”. Alphan and Aruni are Bajun fishermen. During the first days of Ramadan, they get ready to sail out to sea in their traditional boats. The only way they can survive is to fish along the coast, using the vampire fish, will they succeed?

    Documentary: “Master of the spirits – The vampire fish”
    Direction: Jean Queyrat
    Production: ZED & La Cinquième for RAI 3 & Voyage


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  • The last nomads of Borneo | DW Documentary

    42:25

    The Penan are one of the last indigenous hunter-gatherer tribes on earth. They are a semi-nomadic people who live in the rainforests of the Malaysian state of Sarawak on the island of Borneo -- and their way of life is now threatened.
    Peng Megut is one of the last forest nomads who still carry a blowgun as they roam the jungle. Peng and a number of men from his tribe are defending their community against a palm-oil plantation that they believe has trespassed on their land. Until just a few years ago, this region was home to one of the oldest primeval forests in the world. It covered an area that was half the size of Germany.

    Then timber companies started clear-cutting trees, and destroyed 90-percent of the forest. Forty tribes and ethnic groups, including the Penan, live in what's left. The Penan have resisted adopting a modern lifestyle longer than any other indigenous tribe in Borneo. They call their home Tong Tana -- which means both forest and world.

    The woodland is a central component of the Penan's identity. It is the final resting place of their ancestors, and represents the heart of their spirituality, culture, and history. The tribe's existence is sustainable, and the people live in harmony with nature. They hunt for food -- and the forest supplies all their other needs, as well. But since the mid-20th century, the lives of the Penan have changed radically. They still live in the jungle, but most of them have now moved into villages.

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  • How Arctic People Live in the cold

    2:39

    How Arctic People Live in the cold

    The Arctic Circle is one of those places. Average temperatures in the summer hover around 50° F, and in the winter they can drop below -50°F in many places. Hare in this video we talk about the arctic people whose live in cold.

    The extreme Arctic climate makes the region a forbidding place to travel and a challenging place to live. Even so, people have found ways to explore and live in the Arctic. Indigenous peoples have lived in the Arctic for thousands of years. Explorers, adventurers, and researchers have also ventured into the Arctic to explore its unique environment and geography.

    Eight nations circle the Arctic Ocean, infusing it with stories and expertise. A bond with the land is a theme of Arctic life, though Iceland—a verdant dot in the middle of the Gulf Stream—is a far cry from Nunavut, Canada, where sea ice is the main highway for many people.

    The human journey plays out one person at at time. By following recommendations, wherever they lead, our path takes us into the unexpected, where ideas about ice, wilderness, and polar bears are challenged by stories of creativity, industry, and individuality.

    Many people in the Arctic today live in modern towns and cities, much like their neighbors to the south. People also work in the Arctic, extracting oil and gas from rich deposits beneath the permafrost, working in tourism, or conducting research. Other people in the arctic still live in small villages much the way their ancestors did.

    Arctic people today face many changes to their homes and environment. Climate change is causing sea ice to melt and permafrost to thaw, threatening coastal villages with bigger storms and erosion. And the declining sea ice means that the Arctic Ocean could open up for commercial shipping or tourist cruises.

    So, Guys what you think? Make a comment with us. Share your openion with us. And Please subscribe our channel to get more videos. Thanks for watching.


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  • Nomads In The ARCTIC - The Extreme life of Dolgan People

    6:58

    This is the life of the Dolgan nomads, peoples who move across the tundra herding reindeer in the Anabar district. It was the last amazing experience on my bicycle adventure on the world's northernmost road.

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    Questa é la vita dei nomadi Dolgan, un popolo che si sposta nella tundra allevando le renne nel distretto di Anabar. È stata l'ultima incredibile esperienza durante la mia avventura in bici sulla strada più a nord del mondo.





    Nomads In The ARCTIC - The Extreme life of Dolgan People ( Russia, Yakutia)

  • Cash or card – will COVID-19 kill cash? | DW Documentary

    28:27

    More and more people are paying with cards or apps these days. Could COVID-19 spell the end of cash? Many people have switched to contactless payment because of fears that the coronavirus might be transmitted by bills and coins. They even use debit cards for small sums at the bakery or newsagent’s. Electronic payment systems are on the rise.

    Germany is torn. Up to now, Germans have been known for their love of cash. The country has been famously reluctant to embrace payment by card or app. But since the beginning of the coronavirus crisis more and more people have switched to paying electronically. For many months, it was unclear whether the virus could spread on paper currency and coins. It’s now believed that the risk of COVID-19 transmission on money is low. But the pandemic has amped up the trend toward cash-free payments in Germany. According to a survey by the Association of German Banks, almost 60 percent of people in Germany now pay by debit or credit card, or with smartphone apps. Marion Labouré, a strategist at Deutsche Bank and Harvard lecturer, has carried out research in this field. She says South Korea and China have even put bank notes into quarantine and destroyed bills. ‘The US Central Bank is another example,’ she adds. ‘Cash is definitely being used by fewer and fewer people. Last December, one third of Germans paid with cards or apps, now it’s about 50 percent.’

    Credit card companies, which charge fees to retailers, are profiting from this development. But data protection advocates warn that information is gathered, stored and often passed on with each electronic transaction. Sarah Spiekermann, a professor at the University of Economics and Business in Vienna, has warned of the serious consequences of this kind of surveillance capitalism: ‘Ordinary people, people who are quite similar to one another, will find themselves paying different prices for flights and hotel bookings, for instance, or they might be refused insurance or be passed over for job offers.’

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  • The Last Ice Hunters

    2:38

    Director:: Jure Breceljnik, Rožle Bregar
    Production: Film IT d.o.o.
    Slovenia
    2017, 71 minutes

    Merely 4500 people inhabit East Greenland’s 20.000km long coast. It is one of the least populated places on our planet. The environment of East Greenland created one of the most specialized hunting cultures in the world. There are few places on Earth where humans suffered more hardship and coped with an extremely hostile environment than here. A lot has changed and a lot of modern comforts became part of the everyday life. But the cultural roots are still deep and strong and the hunter is the pillar of society in these areas. But the status of the hunter as the economic basis of the society has been severely undermined.
    The undermining of economic structure of their society together with unstoppable cultural influences are threatening the existence of these unique people.

  • World Theme Travel At the Land of Extreme, Greenland Episode 2

    33:54

    At the Land of Extreme, Greenland Episode 2: The winter story of the lnuit (2016.06.06)

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  • Alaskan Pipeline - Documentary

    44:34

  • Cold Rush 2 of 2 - Arctic Meltdown - BBC Our World Environmental Documentary

    10:55

    Cold Rush 1 of 2 - Arctic Meltdown - BBC Our World Environmental Documentary

    David Shukman in Alaska discovers that the massive melt of arctic ice is opening up new opportunities to exploit the natural resources of this northern wilderness. But it's also raising fresh tensions over international boundaries in the arctic circle.

  • Silence in the Arctic - Ultimo Suspiro

    6:03

    watch the follow video for - Últimos suspiró directed by lagartos films
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    Film Producer:
    Lagartos Films
    David Acosta (R.I.P)
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    Band:
    Ana Brenda (Vocalist)
    Alex Muñoz(Lead Guitar)
    Andrew Orsac(Rhythmic Guitar)
    Adrian Hernandez (Bass)
    Alexis Dominguez (Drummer)

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