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Viking House: Full Bushcraft Shelter Build with Hand Tools | Vikings

  • Viking House with Grass Roof: Full Bushcraft Shelter Build with Hand Tools

    1:05

    Building a grass roof bushcraft viking house with hand tools. We build an icelandic - style turf roof viking shelter using simple bushcraft tools and natural materials from the forest. The tiny house is build using traditional hand tools, such as drawknife, auger, axe and saw. We built the timber frame from scots pine, making mortise and tenon joints and burning the ends of the logs that go in the ground. This is an ancient technique used by our ancestors, it helps to prevent the wood rotting by driving out bugs and forming a protective layer. To support the turf on the roof of the viking home, we used hazel hurdles. These are simply green hazel sticks woven together. When they dry they set hard and form a solid structure. We also built the perimiter wall of the bushcraft shelter using this woven stick method. This viking house was inspired by the vikings of iceland. Where trees were used in building regularly, they soon became scarce and so they had to improvise. Iceland has good quality sod, and plenty of stone. And so they built a large stone foundation and then used layers of sod and turf to insulate their homes from the strong atlantic storms. We had no stone in this woodland, but the overall style of the structure was inspired by these resourceful tribes. Thank you for watching.

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    #bushcraft #viking #vikinghouse #building #taoutdoors

  • Building a Medieval House | 10 Day Bushcraft Shelter Build

    29:24

    Building a medieval house in the woods, a 10 day bushcraft shelter. This is a full build video of the anglo saxon house with thatch roof that we built using simple hand tools. This medieval-era bushcraft camp was inspired by the anglo saxon pit house. The saxons occupied Britain from the 5th to the 11th century. Many of their houses were built by digging a pit in the ground which would not only help to keep a consistent temperature in their homes throughout the year, but it would also mean that they needed less building materials to build the house upwards. We used simple hand tools: axe, saw, knife, pick axe, hand auger and drawknife to build this tiny house in the forest. I built this with my Dad in 10 days. See below for individual episodes of the Saxon House series where we talk about what we are doing and why.

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    Dad's Channel:

    Watch our video series on building shelters inspired by our ancestors:

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    #building #medieval #house #bushcraft

  • Amazing Viking Turf House Tour - Stunning Green Building!

    4:04

    Thank you to Squarespace for sponsoring this video :) You can visit to get 10% off your first purchase!

    In this video, we're excited to share the re-created 1000-year-old Viking settlement at L'Anse aux Meadows in Newfoundland, Canada. We visited the site last fall and had we really enjoyed learning more about the settlement, but also about the traditional construction techniques they used for the turf dwellings and workshops.

    The turf houses are built with timber frames that are load-bearing, and walls that are built with peat bricks that have been cut and dried from a nearby bog. Each wall actually has two layers of the bricks, with a layer of gravel sandwiched in the middle to help drain any moisture before it infiltrates to the interior of the structure.

    It's incredible that the Vikings were able to build such beautiful and functional structures with limited building materials, and in such a harsh environment.

    Another thing that we found really neat that didn't have anything to do with the structures was the fact that the bog not only provided peat for building but bog iron they could use to create nails and other hardware they needed to repair their ships.

    If you're interested, here's a link to our longer, more in-depth video about an Icelandic turf house:

    And here's a link where you can learn more about the L'Anse aux Meadows historic Viking settlement in Newfoundland:


    Thanks for watching!

    Mat & Danielle

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    VIDEO CREDITS
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    Music & Song Credits: 
    All music in this video was composed, performed, and recorded by Mat of Exploring Alternatives.

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  • Viking bushcraft trip - snow, tipi, pine tea, wilderness, reindeer skins, cooking meat etc.

    13:00

    Day 2 on a trip. I finish building the tipi, enjoy the beauty of last nights snowfall and do primitive cooking. Open the full video description for more information.

    This is part 2. Here can you see all videos from the camp

    ----------------------------

    Date: 17-10-2019

    Day: 0°C (32°F)
    Night: -4°C (24.8°F)

    Location: Sapmi - the land of the Sami people in Norway, Sweden, Finland and Russia. Clean and remote classic northern wilderness. Fresh water rivers. Pine, spruce and birch forrest. Mountains, bears, wolves, eagles, reindeers etc. No wildlife is giving campers problems. I can't give you any information about my location, only that I am somewhere in Sapmi. You need to be the owner or get the owners permission if you want to do the same in Sapmi.

    Consuming: Water and pine tea. Meat (cow).

    _________________

    A few questions:

    1. Is reindeer skins warm enough?
    Yes - absolutely. It is some of the best. Native people in some of the coldest areas of the world, such as Inuit and Sami, used reindeer fur for the warmest winter gear - coats, boots and sleeping bag etc.

    2. Is the water safe?
    Yes - Sapmi is clean and remote nature.

    7. Why add wood on the outside on the tipi?
    It help prevent the moss from falling down. In this case am I only planing on using the shelter doing winter and soon will all the moss freeze together and a lot more snow will come and add a lot of weight... Because of that can I get way with only two poles, one on each side of the door opening.

    8. Is the shoes waterproof?
    Yes - or just the same as all leather shoes. Keeps a lot of water out - but only if they are well made and you take care of the leather. It is some of the most comfortable shoes I have tried to use on trips like this.

    _________________

    Video gear: Canon EOS RP, Canon 50 1.8, Røde videomicpro+, Zoom h2n, iMovie.

    _________________

  • 5 Bushcraft Shelters - Full Camp Builds Start to Finish

    41:44

    I show you 5 different bushcraft shelters that I have built over the years. These bushcraft camp builds use a variety of natural materials and man-made materials such as a tarp. The bushcraft shelters range from a simple build with no tools at all, just your hands. To ones where you may need an axe, saw, bushcraft knife etc. Hope you enjoy the film, thank you for watching.

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    Powerbank:
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    GoPro Action Cam:
    GoPro Chest Mount:
    GoPro Head Mount:
    Camera SD Cards:
    Editing Laptop:

    BUSHCRAFT GEAR I USE:
    Bushcraft Pants/Trousers:
    3x3 Metre Tarp:
    Hammock:
    Hammock underblanket:
    Thermal Camping Air Mattress:
    Awesome Affordable Bushcraft Knives:
    Medium Axe:
    Gransfors Bruks Small Forest Axe:
    Small Hatchet:
    Affordable Firesteel:
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    #bushcraft #camp #taoutdoors #camping

  • Building A Winter Bushcraft Shelter Full Build

    13:10

    I built a bushcraft shelter in the woods. I only used hand tools. The shelter is not perfect, but it is enough to have a shelter that protects you from wind and cold temperatures. All the logs was sawn by hand and the branches were removed with the axe.

    If you wonder why ...

    Why is sometimes nice weather and there is snow elsewhere in the video?

    I built the shelter within 2 days. One day the weather was nice and the sun was shining. The next day it was - 10 degrees Celsius and there was snow.

    Are the posts in the earth stable?

    Yes, I first buried them about 40 centimeters into the earth, then hit them further into the earth with a heavy tree trunk and then added a string.

    I hope you like it.

  • Off Grid Log Cabin with Moss Roof - Cruck Frame Shelter

    31:50

    I head to a bushcraft log cabin in the forest which was built as a cruck frame shelter. I do an overnight camp and explore the forest with Ben and Lewis from BandL bushcraft. We start work on the cruck frame shelter as soon as we arrive in the forest. They started building the off grid rustic log cabin just over a year ago and it’s come along way. As their bushcraft and shelter building skills have developed, so has the cabin. During the afternoon I set up the polish canvas lavvu and the boys set up their shelters. As evening draws we get a camp fire going and cook lunch. When it gets dark we move the camp fire into the tiny Log Cabin that ben and lewis had built and we cook up more food over the fire! The next day we awake to fresh late autumn weather. We then scavenge for hazel saplings with the axe and use these as wattle to create the wall for the cruck frame shelter. This gives it all a stronger foundation. In the later stages of the day we use birch logs to create the rafters for the roof, which Ben and Lewis will eventually put a moss roof on to make it a living roof. On the inside of the off grid cabin Ben and Lewis have decided to make raised beds using some large logs and flat pieces of wood, this will be an ongoing building project. Follow them on instagram to keep up to date with their build! Thanks for joining me on this 2 day adventure

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    FILMING & CAMERA GEAR I USE:
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    Zoom Lens:
    50mm fixed Lens:
    Main Camera Microphone:
    Secondary Camera Mic:
    Radio Microphone:
    Camera Light:
    Powerbank:
    Tripod:
    GoPro Action Cam:
    GoPro Chest Mount:
    GoPro Head Mount:
    Camera SD Cards:
    Editing Laptop:

    BUSHCRAFT GEAR I USE:
    Bushcraft Pants/Trousers:
    3x3 Metre Tarp:
    Hammock:
    Hammock underblanket:
    Thermal Camping Air Mattress:
    Awesome Affordable Bushcraft Knives:
    Medium Axe:
    Gransfors Bruks Small Forest Axe:
    Small Hatchet:
    Affordable Firesteel:
    Folding Camp Grill:
    Durable GPS Watch:

    These are Amazon associate links and help to support my channel.

    #logcabin #cabin #bushcraft

  • Winter Bushcraft Shelter Build - Overnight Camping, Raised Bed, Natural Shelter, Fire Reflector

    15:07

    Preparing for the winter, I build a small bushcraft camp. I build a natural shelter, a raised bed, and a fire pit with a fire reflector wall.

    My sleep kit includes two 100% wool blankets. I folded both in half, used one as my sleep pad and slept underneath the other (two layers of wool under me and two layers on top). I stayed warm and comfortable all night.

    Temperature during this trip:
    High: 5 degrees Celsius
    Low: -3 degrees Celsius

    I made the raised bed out of small diameter pine trees to make the bed have a bit of spring to it. In the future I will craft a sleep pad and use that on my trips instead of a blanket.

    The wood pack frame is holding up great, and is a pleasure to hike with in the woods.
    Fully loaded for this trip it weighed 20 lbs.
    I used my waxed cloth tarp as the pack to carry all of my smaller items (cook kit, kettle, food, matches, string, sewing case, saw, honing stone) then used small diameter cord to lash it to the pack frame.
    I will be hand sewing a canvas pack soon that will get lashed permanently onto the wood pack frame.

    The shelter frame was made from well seasoned pine poles from dead-standing pine.
    After the frame was built, I gathered dead spruce boughs and covered the frame with them.
    Last I gathered ground moss and covered the whole shelter with the moss.
    The shelter is waterproof and will offer good protection from snow storms throughout the winter.
    I tested the strength of the frame with my body weight and it held solid despite the weight. I have no doubt it will be able to withstand heavy snow accumulation.

    If you have any questions or comments please leave them below.

    Thank you to all who watch.

    Follow me @ryleyk4 on instagram for more frequent updates and exclusive content.

  • Viking House: Full Bushcraft Shelter Build with Hand Tools | Vikings

    1:15

    We build a bushcraft viking house from the viking age using hand tools only. Inspired by vikings, who were very resourceful and created buildings using the natural materials they scavenged around them. We used simple hand tools such as axe, saw, auger, drawknife, bushcraft knife and other simple tools.
    To begin with we cut cedar logs from trees that had been felled in the forest. We used an axe and saw to make log cabin notches and built the foundation of the viking house two logs high. We then used the hand auger to build the timber frame. This consisted of 3 large A frames. We burnt the ends of the logs in fire to evaporate any moisture and create a rot-proof layer of charred wood which will help to preserve the timber frame foundation when the poles are in the ground. We used a long cedar log as the ridge pole which sits on top of the a frame of the bushcraft shelter. The next stage was building a viking longpit or firepit. This we wanted to make as historically accurate as we could. So we dug a pit about 4 feet long and 2 feet wide. We lined the pit with large stones found in the nearby area. In order to reduce waste of any materials, we used the clay from the pit to secure the stones. We added water to the clay to make it easier to work with and we filled in the gaps between the stones. We then lit a small fire in the pit and let the clay dry out for a few days. At this point we realised we could make our job easier by building a diy saw horse. So we used the drawknife to remove bark from a log (helps to prevent rot). We used the auger to drill four holes for legs and then we made four wood pegs for the top of the saw horse. For the rafters we used more cedar logs and again burnt the ends. It is an ancient japanese technique to preserve wood which is called shou sugi ban.
    It was then finally time to build the roof of the house. For this, we peeled the bark off the cedar logs. We then put this on the rafters and secured it with some roofing tacks. We had to be fast when doing this, as the cedar bark shrinks and cracks when it dries. We put it on in layers like roof tiles. We built a wood ladder to get up high on the roof and secure the final bark layers.
    Using an axe and bushcraft, we made some wooden wedges and split a few large cedar logs. We then hewed these logs and built a raised viking bed for the inside of the house. We also made some benches to sit near the fire. At the back of the viking house, we built a folding window and support arm so that we could let light into the house and also improve the airflow. We dug an air vent too, to allow more oxygen to get to the fire. To make the shelter more secure, we built a perimeter wall use cedar posts and hazel saplings (also known as wattle wall). To help further improve the airflow inside the shelter, we cut a hole in the roof and built a ridge cap or ridge vent to act like a chimney and let the smoke out. Overall this viking house took about 10 days to build. It was in winter, so we were restricted by daylight hours. This is not a historically correct viking house. Traditional viking houses were built with large timbers that were hewn from big logs. They had large gable ends almost like log cabins and the roof was made from wood shingles. Often they looked like viking longships or longboats and had many decorative viking features. In a viking longhouse, there would be enough room for many people and animals as well. But this was our take on it.
    We have done a number of different camping overnight trips in this shelter. We have cooked meat over fire, had great viking feasts and spent many hours keeping warm around the firepit. I hope you enjoyed this vikings inspired bushcraft build. To watch the whole series of individual episodes (where we talk and explain what we are doing) then please follow links below.

    VIKING HOUSE BUILD (Each Episode):

    Bushcraft Tools Channel:
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    #vikings #viking #vikinghouse #bushcraft

  • Viking House: Overnight Bushcraft Camp in the Viking Shelter

    40:04

    Join us at the bushcraft viking camp for an overnight in the viking home we built using simple hand tools. We use bushcraft and primitive technology to get the fire going. Once the fire was burning in the viking longpit we cooked meat over the coals and enjoyed a night in the bushcraft shelter. The method of lighting the fire was the bow drill, the wood used was a hazel spindle on to a lime hearth board. We collected wild food from the forest to add to our viking feast. Be sure to like and subscribe for more viking style episodes!

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    #bushcraft #viking #vikinghouse #building #taoutdoors

  • Building a Viking House with Hand Tools: A Bushcraft Project

    26:47

    We build a bushcraft viking house in the woods using hand tools only. Part 1 focuses on cutting the cedar logs for the foundations of the viking house. The foundations are only going to be two cedar logs high. The hand tools we use are an axe, saw, hammer, and wrecking bar. We begin by using an axe and saw to create saddle notches to make the log cabin foundation. We are only building the foundation two cedar logs high, because the timber frame of the roof will come right down to the forest floor. We use 10 logs overall for the foundation of the viking shelter. We burned the ends of the support stakes using Shou-Sugi Ban. An ancient wood preserving technique invented by the Japanese. It helps to evaporate any moisture in the wood and creates a sealed, protective layer to help prevent it from rotting as quickly. Cedar is pretty rot proof and is often used in Log Cabin building. We cook up some food over the fire and then finish the foundation of the Bushcraft Viking House in the woods.
    In Part 2, we will be focusing on building the timber frame of the structure. Using cedar logs and hand tools. We hope to build a viking long pit, raised beds, a door and a porch. Eventually we hope to cook venison and other food over the open fire inside the viking camp. Thanks for watching and be sure to subscribe so you don't miss the next episode!

    VIKING HOUSE PLAYLIST (EVERY EPISODE):

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    INSTAGRAM:
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    FILMING & CAMERA GEAR I USE:
    Main Camera:
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    Standard Lens:
    Wide Angle Lens:
    Zoom Lens:
    50mm fixed Lens:
    Main Camera Microphone:
    Secondary Camera Mic:
    Radio Microphone:
    Camera Light:
    Powerbank:
    Tripod:
    GoPro Action Cam:
    GoPro Chest Mount:
    GoPro Head Mount:
    Camera SD Cards:
    Editing Laptop:

    BUSHCRAFT GEAR I USE:
    Bushcraft Pants/Trousers:
    3x3 Metre Tarp:
    Hammock:
    Hammock underblanket:
    Thermal Camping Air Mattress:
    Awesome Affordable Bushcraft Knives:
    Medium Axe:
    Gransfors Bruks Small Forest Axe:
    Small Hatchet:
    Affordable Firesteel:
    Folding Camp Grill:
    Durable GPS Watch:

    These are Amazon associate links and help to support my channel.

    #vikinghouse #viking #bushcraft #taoutdoors

  • Thatch Roof House: Full Bushcraft Shelter Build with Hand Tools | Saxon House

    1:21:06

    We build a bushcraft saxon house with thatch roof using just simple hand tools. Inspired by anglo saxons, this iron age bushcraft shelter was built by a father and son using natural materials found in the surrounding forest. We used spades to dig a deep pit which was to be the foundations for the bushcraft shelter. The saxons built their houses over pits so that they did not need so many materials for their roof, and also to maintain a consistent temperature inside all year round. We then added four foundation logs to form the perimeter of the house. Using a chisel, we made some simple mortise and tenon joints and built a basic post and beam timber frame structure. We used the drawknife to peel off the bark which helps prevents bugs from eating away at the wood and rotting it quicker. We burnt the ends of the posts that went in the ground using an ancient Japanese technique called Shou Sugi Ban. This helps to make the wood more rot resistant when it goes into the ground. We then made some rafters and attached these to the frame. For the walls of the house, we used hazel and birch sticks. These are flexible and bent around the upright supports. We sourced some clay and straw and mixed these together and put this on the hazel walls. This is also and ancient technique known as wattle and daub. Once the clay had set hard, we focused on building the front and rear gable ends of the bushcraft shelter. We built these with pine logs, and rather than use vertical logs we used them horizontal to make a more solid structure. This gave the appearance of a log cabin. Now that the whole frame was complete, we built the roof. For the roofing material we used water reed to thatch it. We attached the thatch using hazel spars and liggers and we lashed this to the frame.. Again, a very traditional building method. To cap the ridge off, we built a ridge roll of water reed and then used long straw to form an A shape over the ridge. This made sure that water would run off the roof and down the outside of the thatch. To make the structure warmer, we used moss to fill in the gaps in the wall logs. Later we will add clay to this to weather seal it. Once the thatch was on the roof, we dressed it smooth so water would run off easily.
    This was a really fun bushcraft project which I did with my Dad. We built it over the period of a few months using basic building techniques, some diy and simple hand tools such as: axe, saw, chisel, spade, auger, drawknife and a few others. Thank you for watching.

    Every Episode of the Saxon House Build in detail:

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    Zoom Lens:
    50mm fixed Lens:
    Main Camera Microphone:
    Secondary Camera Mic:
    Radio Microphone:
    Camera Light:
    Powerbank:
    Tripod:
    GoPro Action Cam:
    GoPro Chest Mount:
    GoPro Head Mount:
    Camera SD Cards:
    Editing Laptop:

    BUSHCRAFT GEAR I USE:
    Bushcraft Pants/Trousers:
    3x3 Metre Tarp:
    Hammock:
    Hammock underblanket:
    Thermal Camping Air Mattress:
    Awesome Affordable Bushcraft Knives:
    Medium Axe:
    Gransfors Bruks Small Forest Axe:
    Small Hatchet:
    Affordable Firesteel:
    Folding Camp Grill:
    Durable GPS Watch:

    #bushcraft #thatchroof #saxon #building #taoutdoors

  • Building a Viking House with Hand Tools: Stone Clay Pit | Bushcraft Project

    32:26

    We continue to build a bushcraft viking house in the woods with hand tools. Part 3 focuses on building a viking long pit, or stone fire pit, for the inside of the viking house. We dig the foundations of the pit using a shovel and our hands. We dig through the soil layer and then dig down to the clay layer. We store the clay for later use. We then head into the forest to find some large stones to line the fire pit. We used the clay to help set the stones in place and we do more pointing on the stone slabs around the edge of the pit. The viking house build is coming along nicely. It now has a foundation of cedar logs, secured together using log cabin notches or saddle notches. We have a timber frame built using wood dowels to hold it in place. We burnt the ends of the frame to prevent the rot from the ground. We stop for lunch and Dustin cooks fresh caught squid in egg and bread crumbs over a bed of fresh salad with sweet chilli sauce dip. We also grill whole fish over the fire viking style. Next we will focuses on building more viking beds in the camp. Thanks for watching and subscribe so you don't miss the next episode!

    VIKING HOUSE PLAYLIST (EVERY EPISODE):

    Subscribe to Dustin's Channel Bushcraft Tools:

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    Get TA OUTDOORS MERCH:

    TA OUTDOORS PATCHES:

    INSTAGRAM:
    FACEBOOK:
    TWITTER:

    FILMING & CAMERA GEAR I USE:
    Main Camera:
    Drone:
    Standard Lens:
    Wide Angle Lens:
    Zoom Lens:
    50mm fixed Lens:
    Main Camera Microphone:
    Secondary Camera Mic:
    Radio Microphone:
    Camera Light:
    Powerbank:
    Tripod:
    GoPro Action Cam:
    GoPro Chest Mount:
    GoPro Head Mount:
    Camera SD Cards:
    Editing Laptop:

    BUSHCRAFT GEAR I USE:
    Bushcraft Pants/Trousers:
    3x3 Metre Tarp:
    Hammock:
    Hammock underblanket:
    Thermal Camping Air Mattress:
    Awesome Affordable Bushcraft Knives:
    Medium Axe:
    Gransfors Bruks Small Forest Axe:
    Small Hatchet:
    Affordable Firesteel:
    Folding Camp Grill:
    Durable GPS Watch:

    These are Amazon associate links and help to support my channel.

    #vikinghouse #viking #bushcraft #handtools

  • Primitive Bushcraft Shelter - Stone Roofed Lean-To

    1:2:26

    In this video I build a permanent lean-to with a stone roof. It was built by myself with mostly young maple trees, poplar bark, flagstone and earth, all gathered from the immediate area of the building site.

    No outside materials were used and only 4 tools: a Cold Steel Special Forces Shovel, Cold Steel Spike Hawk, Svord Von Tempsky Bowie and a Svord Pig Sticker.

    During the warm months I like to stay away from water to avoid insects. This was built on one of the finger ridges of the middle ridge of the property and is nice and dry.

    The build took five days to complete and I stayed out there during that time period. Food consisted of a pound and a half of pemmican, half a pound of jerky and approximately 5 liters of water each day.

    Due to our location up in the Appalachian mountains sound travels very far and the distant train can be heard along with the occasional survey helicopter (especially during the hand drill fire)

    This is our first video and as our channel grows the first investment we'll make is high quality cameras, microphones and a decent computer. Until then we'll go with what we got and keep shooting.

    If you like our content please subscribe, more is to come shortly! Thanks and enjoy.

  • Building a Native American Longhouse with Hand Tools | The Best Natural Bushcraft Shelter

    44:36

    #bushcraft #shelter #logcabin
    The ultimate natural shelter that helped native north americans survive this harsh northern climate for thousands of years is the longhouse, a bushcraft shelter made from logs, saplings and bark, lashed together with natural cordage and heated with central pit fires. Up to dozens of families would live in this primitive hut, with each family sharing a section of the longhouse, sleeping and sitting on a large bed near the ground with tools, clothing and food stored in upper shelves and hanging from the rafters.
    Episode 1:
    5 guys build the frame of this shelter on my land in one weekend using cedar logs, cedar saplings, cedar bark for cordage and ash trees for the ridge pole and for the bark siding that will cover the natural structure. Using hand tools only, we quickly assemble timber frame, post and beam structure on day one and install the curved saplings that form the walls and roof on day two.
    Over the fire in front of the oversized wigwam, we cook a huge batch of chili for lunches and on the second day, we spit roast two large turkeys on a maple tripod and spit, smoking the fowl all day over a low smokey fire.
    In the evenings, we head back to my log cabin where we cook up moose burgers and more for dinner, and a huge skillet of bacon and eggs for breakfast. Tune in later this week for the behind the scenes video of the cabin life, and check back periodically, or subscribe, to see us finish the ultimate bushcraft natural shelter and then use it to practice First Nations and European bushcraft skill, including woodworking, tool making, carving, fishing, foraging, harvesting wild game, preserving food, tanning hides and making, clothing and much more.
    Thank you to Doug Linker, Jim Baird, Ted Baird, Terry Junior and Scott Way for their invaluable help on this and future projects.
    Please check out the social media accounts of my friends to see their perspective on this epic hand tool build.

    Doug Linker -

    Jim Baird -

    Terry -

    Ted Baird -


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    My Other Channel: Shawn James

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    Watch the ENTIRE cabin and Forest Kitchen SERIES here:

    HOW TO BUILD A LOG CABIN:
    SEASON 2 - The Interior:
    SEASON 3 - The Sauna/Bathhouse:

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  • Building a Celtic Roundhouse with Hand Tools: Bushcraft Project

    25:09

    We build a bushcraft celtic roundhouse in the forest using hand tools only. In part 1 we collect timber resources, and cut logs ready for the foundations of the bushcraft shelter. The hand tools we will be using for this build are: axe, knife, saw, drawknife and an auger. To begin with we clear a site ready for the construction to begin. We cut a large log using the metre long silky saw. This is to be used for chopping logs. We then re-built our saw horse that we had made in the bushcraft viking house series. We hewed it flat with some wood wedges and axes. Then we made new legs for it. This was also used as a bark peeling jig. We cut 14 logs from the nearby area (all the wood in the immediate area is being forested and we had permission to use these resources). We de-barked the logs and burnt the ends of them. This is an ancient Japanese technique, which helps to make the logs more rot-resistant when they are buried in the ground. These 14 logs will become our vertical posts. The wood we are using is cedar. This is commonly used for Log Cabi building across Europe, especially Scandinavia. It is very rot resistant and although not the hardest of woods, it has proved well when we have built with it in the past. The Celts occupied what we know as Britain over 2,000 years ago. Around the year 500BC. They were incredibly resourceful people and very tribal. Their houses were known as a roundhouse. In the north of England the walls were made with stone, and in the south of Britain they were made with wood as there was more wood available. The roof was thatched and the house had a central firepit with sleeping areas around the outside. This is an important part of British and Irish History and we hope you enjoy joining us on this adventure!
    In Part 2 we will continue to build the foundation and start to put together the timber frame. We will also be including cooking, feasts and more adventures! Be sure to subscribe so you don't miss an episode!

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    #celtic #roundhouse #bushcraft #building #taoutdoors

  • Fire Cabin - Bushcraft build with hand tools. The ground structure

    24:35

    Fire Cabin - Bushcraft build with hand tools. (2) The ground structure

    TOOLS
    Saw: Silky Bigboy 2000:


    Axe: DSI (Danish Steel Industry) Broad ax - The firm do not exist any more.
    Leuku (big knife): Lauri blade. The handle i made from birch burl, leather and bone.

  • Building an Iron Age Roundhouse with Hand Tools: Bushcraft Project

    33:39

    We continue to build the bushcraft iron age celtic roundhouse in the forest using just simple hand tools. For part 3 we build the archway using a piece of ash. We also gather hazel sticks and weave them together to form a ring for the rafters to lean on. Using a bushcraft knife and seasoned wood, we carve some wood pegs and use these to secure the rafters to the horizontal beams. The tool used to make the holes in the wood is a hand auger. We also secured the rest of the horizontal beams in, and notched them using a viking carving axe. For each rafter we use, we have to peel the bark off using a drawknife, this helps to reduce the chance of bugs eating the wood. The timber frame is starting to get more sturdy with the more rafters we put on. In order to get the hazel ring at the top of the structure, we had to modify the viking house ladder by turning it into more of a step ladder and adding some support struts and braces to the side of the ladder. Thanks for watching and be sure to subscribe to follow the rest of the series.

    FULL CELTIC ROUNDHOUSE SERIES:

    Dustin's Video:

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    #bushcraft #roundhouse #ironage #building #taoutdoors

  • Bushcraft Camp: Viking Turf House | Building the Walls

    25:10

    We're back at the bushcraft camp, this time building the perimeter walls of the turf roof viking house using woven hazel sticks. The turf roof is now white where the grass has died back, but in spring/summer it should grow green again. The timber frame of the bushcraft shelter is still holding strong, which it needs to be with all the weight of the turf on top. We also get the fire going at camp and cook some soup to warm us up on this cold winter day. We still need to build the rest of the walls as well as a door and raised beds for inside the shelter. We also built a perimiter fence around the shelter to keep the deer from walking and grazing on the roof. Thanks for watching and be sure to subscribe to see the rest of the progress of the viking camp!

    Watch all the big shelters that we have built:

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    Affordable Firesteel:
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    #viking #vikinghouse #bushcraft #building #taoutdoors

  • Building a Turf Roof Viking House with Hand Tools: Bushcraft Project

    28:53

    Join us in the forest as we continue to build a bushcraft viking house with turf roof. Using simple hand tools, we built a basic timber frame using mortise and tenon joints. We then added some rafters with some log cabin notches to support them and we lashed these to the ridgepole of the shelter. For part 3 we focused on harvesting the turf for the roof. With the wovel hazel hurdles attached to the roof, these acted as a strong support for the turf to sit on top. It also helps to spread the weight of the turf across the frame itself. We used a spade and dug the turf from nearby glades in the forest. We have never done this before and it is not historically correct to the icelandic turf roof viking house that gave us the inspiration for this build. However, our thinking is that the roots of the turf and moss will grow and intertwine with the wovel hazel hurdles below it and in theory we hope to create a living roof. We are not sure on how well the roof will drain yet, or how long the grass will stay living. I guess time will tell! We then cook up a chilli feast in a cast iron dutch oven over the fire. In Part 4 we hope to build the walls of the shelter and perhaps the beds inside. Thanks for watching! Please subscribe if you enjoyed it.

    Petromax Cooking Gear (US):

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    #viking #vikinghouse #bushcraft #building #taoutdoors

  • Build A Beautiful Real Life Viking House To Living & House Steam

    17:14

    Build A Beautiful Real Life Viking House To Living & House Steam

    Have great to hear this new from us Brave Wilderness Life This video want to show you how live the real wilderness life to lives for and builds the old ancient. All my videos, we will include the technique & Technology to build different kind of houses and any things ales. Furthermore, we will show you about how to survive into the forest and how to use some primitive tools as well as. Finally, we would like to thank you so much for always to support us. Your support is our motivation!
    Please help us like, share, comment, good idea and subscribe
    Wish you all the best blessing.
    Best regards...
    Brave Wilderness Life

  • Building a Saxon House

    33:09

    We continue building a bushcraft saxon house or grubenhaus in the forest using hand tools only. For part 5 we carry on with building the roundwood timber frame and roof. We use a mixture of traditional tools and modern day hand tools. The bark peeling jig has been really useful when using the drawknife to debark the logs. We finished off putting up the rafters and then continued to put up the roof battens or lath. The whole saxon pit house structure is build using pine, which is not ideal for roundwood construction but we are trying to use as much of the resources in the area. Most of the wood has actually been recycled from my bushcraft camp which was built in the nearby area. Dad had also built a pallet wood wheel barrow using reclaimed pallet wood. This has helped us to recycle all of the bark peelings and keep them dry in our pallet wood log store. We get the fire going and pan fry some fish with potatoes. Thanks for watching and see you in Part 6 where we hope to build the walls. After that it will be time to build the roof of the saxon house. It is also sometimes known as a grubenhaus, grub hut or a pit house.

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    Bushcraft Pants/Trousers:
    3x3 Metre Tarp:
    Hammock:
    Hammock underblanket:
    Thermal Camping Air Mattress:
    Awesome Affordable Bushcraft Knives:
    Medium Axe:
    Gransfors Bruks Small Forest Axe:
    Small Hatchet:
    Affordable Firesteel:
    Folding Camp Grill:
    Durable GPS Watch:

    These are Amazon associate links and help to support my channel.

    #saxonhouse #saxon #bushcraft #taoutdoors

  • Building a Bushcraft Viking Turf House with Hand Tools - Timber Frame

    52:28

    Join me as I build a bushcraft viking house with turf roof. I use basic hand tools and simple building techniques to make a timber frame. This viking house is inspired by the Icelandic vikings. 30% of Iceland was forrested when it was settled. This meant that the vikings had to be resourceful and creative with their building constructions and so they used turf and stones to build the majority of the house. For this build, I am doing it slightly different. As I am in a dense woodland and have plenty of wood supply, I am building the foundations of the house using a basic roundwood timber frame with simple mortise and tenon joints. Traditionally, the vikings of Iceland would have built a foundation of stone and then built turf layers above this. This added great insulation to their houses and protected them from the strong winds and extreme cold. It meant that the house maintained an even temperature all year round.
    In this video I use basic woodworking techniques and tools to create the timber frame. I make 6 posts from scotts pine (not ideal for timber frame as it is a softwood, but plenty of it around to use). I burn the ends of the posts. By taking the bark off with a drawknife and charring the ends of the poles, it helps make the post more resistant to rot when it is in the ground. I did 6 holes in the ground, right down to the gravel layer. I pack the posts in and then harvest more wood for the support beams. I use a wood mallet, chisel and auger to make mortise holes for the beams to sit on top of the posts. With the basic timber frame now made, I am ready to collect the wood for rafters.
    In Part 2 I will finish building the rest of the frame. Collecting rafters of different lengths to give the bushcraft shelter a unique look. Be sure to subscribe to keep up to date with the series.

    Watch All Viking Turf House Episodes here:

    Building a Viking House with Bark Roof (ALL EPISODES):


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    3x3 Metre Tarp:
    Hammock:
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    Thermal Camping Air Mattress:
    Awesome Affordable Bushcraft Knives:
    Medium Axe:
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    #bushcraft #vikings #viking #building

  • Building a Viking House with Hand Tools: Timber Roof, Bed | Bushcraft Project

    33:54

    We continue building a bushcraft viking house using traditional hand tools. Part 5 focuses on using hand tools to build the timber frame roof using cedar logs. We also use the axe, saw, hammer and auger to build a bushcraft viking bed for the viking shelter. Now that the saw horse is built, it is much easier for us to saw wood efficiently. We cook steak over the fire and eat good food in the viking camp. The rafters on the house are now up and secured to the ridge pole. We burned the ends of the rafters using the ancient Japanese technique called shou sugi ban. This helps to preserve the wood and prevent rot. We did this in the same style as the a frame shelter. The raised bed still needs work. Dad got to work on building a log store for firewood. We can't wait to cook meat over the viking fire pit! We also began work on taking the bark of the cedar logs ready for the bark roof which will be our shingles. We use a bushcraft knife and hands to peel the bark off the logs. A drawknife could be used but we would only get small pieces of bark.
    In Part 6 we focus on building the rest of the rafters and getting to work on building the bark roof of the viking house. This will be a difficult and time consuming job but once it is done the viking bushcraft camp will almost be complete! Thanks for watching and be sure to subscribe so you don't miss the next episode!

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    #vikinghouse #viking #bushcraft #taoutdoors

  • MAKING A RAISED SHACK SHELTER CAMP - Axe, Saw, Bushcraft, SOLO BUILD

    46:54

    Join me as I build a raised shack shelter at the bushcraft camp site. I use minimal tools. An axe, saw and bushcraft knife. I make wood supports using 'Y' shaped sticks to build a raised platform that forms the foundation of the shelter. Using wood already cut from my bushcraft camp, I then make the shelter stilted or raised to keep it off the ground. The structure is completely self supporting, and although cordage isn't needed, I decided to scavenge for some tree roots and processed them down with my knife to use as cordage for the timber frame. This is part 1 of the camp build. In part 2 I will build the lean to roof and collect natural materials to cover it. Thanks for joining the adventure!


    THE BOOK THAT INSPIRED THIS BUILD:
    Shelters, Shacks and Shanties by D.C. Beard
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    #bushcraft #taoutdoors #shelter

    Music: epidemicsound.com

  • Building a Saxon House with Hand Tools: A Bushcraft Project

    34:19

    We build a bushcraft saxon house (pit house) with hand tools only. Part 1 focuses on building woodworking stations and digging the pit foundations for the anglo saxon house. The pit house is also known as Grubenhaus across Europe and Germany. With our previous bushcraft viking house project, we started building the viking camp first, without building work stations. Now we take our time and begin with building a woodland workshop. First we choose a site for the foundations of our saxon house. There was a large pine tree in the way so we used a vintage traditional crosscut two person saw to cut it into sections and clear the site. Then we marked out the area for our pit house or grub hut, and began digging the foundations. We then used the saw horse to take the bark off the pine logs using a drawknife. We used a sledge hammer to drive the logs into the ground and then a chisel to create a notch in one of the logs. This will now be our bark peeling station for making rafters for the roof of the saxon house. We also built a log chopping block and axe work station. Much of the wood we will be using is from my old bushcraft camp. We will be adding cast iron cooking and over the fire cooking to this camp series. Part 2 will focus on building a few more woodworking stations and then we will begin on building the anglo saxon house! Thanks for watching and hit subscribe if you want to follow us on the adventure!

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    Hammock:
    Hammock underblanket:
    Thermal Camping Air Mattress:
    Awesome Affordable Bushcraft Knives:
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    Small Hatchet:
    Affordable Firesteel:
    Folding Camp Grill:
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    #saxonhouse #saxon #bushcraft #taoutdoors

  • Viking Camp: Overnight in the Viking House - Clay Walls, Smoked Fish - Bushcraft Project

    27:09

    Join us back at the bushcraft viking house for an epic overnight viking camp! We live like vikings for 2 days. We have been building this viking house using hand tools only. The house is almost complete. We have built the foundations, timber frame using joinery and framing techniques, viking longpit, cedar rafters and cedar bark roof. Now we use clay to seal the back walls of the viking house. We cook smoked fish viking style over the fire. Bake fresh bread in a cast iron dutch oven and grill pork belly over the viking longpit - We chase it down with fine ale from the mead horns and have ourselves an awesome overnight camp in the woods! We sleep on deer hides and cook up an awesome breakfast the next day. The viking house is very nearly finished. We still need to clay the inside of the back wall for added insulation, plus we need to figure out a way of sealing the gaps in the bark roof. We are hoping to build a few more viking projects to add to the camp and then the house will finally be complete! Thanks for joining us folks!

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    GoPro Action Cam:
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    BUSHCRAFT GEAR I USE:
    Bushcraft Pants/Trousers:
    3x3 Metre Tarp:
    Hammock:
    Hammock underblanket:
    Thermal Camping Air Mattress:
    Awesome Affordable Bushcraft Knives:
    Medium Axe:
    Gransfors Bruks Small Forest Axe:
    Small Hatchet:
    Affordable Firesteel:
    Folding Camp Grill:
    Durable GPS Watch:

    These are Amazon associate links and help to support my channel.

    #vikinghouse #viking #bushcraft #vikings

  • Building a Viking House in the Forest: Timber Frame | Bushcraft Project

    24:17

    We continue building a viking house in the forest using hand tools only. In Part 2 we build a timber frame bushcraft style. We use a bit and brace and make wood dowels to build the a frame timber roof structure. The foundations of the viking shelter consists of cedar logs which we notched using log cabin notches (saddle notches) and we made the walls two cedar logs high. We burned the ends of the a frame and dug a deep hole down into the clay layer. By burning the ends using the ancient Japanese technique shou sugi ban it will help to preserve the wood and make the structure last longer. We then scavenged for a long cedar log to use as the ridgepole which runs down the top of the viking house.
    In Part 3 we build a viking long pit for a long fire. We use clay and stones that we scavenged from the woods. We also cook fresh fish and squid over the fire pit which is outside of the viking camp.

    VIKING HOUSE VIDEO PLAYLIST:

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    FILMING & CAMERA GEAR I USE:
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    Editing Laptop:

    BUSHCRAFT GEAR I USE:
    Bushcraft Pants/Trousers:
    3x3 Metre Tarp:
    Hammock:
    Hammock underblanket:
    Thermal Camping Air Mattress:
    Awesome Affordable Bushcraft Knives:
    Medium Axe:
    Gransfors Bruks Small Forest Axe:
    Small Hatchet:
    Affordable Firesteel:
    Folding Camp Grill:
    Durable GPS Watch:

    These are Amazon associate links and help to support my channel.

    #vikinghouse #viking #bushcraft #taoutdoors

  • Building a Thatch Roof House with Hand Tools: Bushcraft Saxon Shelter

    35:12

    We're in the woods building a bushcraft saxon house using hand tools. In part 12 we use an auger and hand drill to build the door, we then use long straw or combed straw to cap the ridge on the top of the thatch roof of the saxon shelter. The combed straw is called triticale and is a mix of wheat and rye. The reason we used it to build the top of the roof is because it is much more pliable and easy to bend then water reed. It also has the disease resistance of wheat and the hardiness of rye, which makes it last longer on the roof. To finish off the roof, I used a barrel eye scotch auger and some hand carved wood pegs to fix some cross supports to the top of the thatch roof. This will help pin down the ash liggers (battens) and keep the thatch pinned down during heavy rain and wind. We finish the clay walls inside, using the wattle and daub technique. The Saxon House is now pretty much finished. We have tried to keep it as historically correct as we could. But for things such as the door, we used recycled pallet wood and iron hinges. The reason we did this is because we wanted the door to last and not rot away. It has been an incredible experience building with hand tools. Working with nature to create an ancient home of our ancestors. The Anglo Saxons were very resourceful and would have used whatever natural materials they could find to build their bushcraft shelters and wood houses.

    DAD'S CHANNEL TA FISHING:
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    FILMING & CAMERA GEAR I USE:
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    GoPro Action Cam:
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    Camera SD Cards:
    Editing Laptop:

    BUSHCRAFT GEAR I USE:
    Bushcraft Pants/Trousers:
    3x3 Metre Tarp:
    Hammock:
    Hammock underblanket:
    Thermal Camping Air Mattress:
    Awesome Affordable Bushcraft Knives:
    Medium Axe:
    Gransfors Bruks Small Forest Axe:
    Small Hatchet:
    Affordable Firesteel:
    Folding Camp Grill:
    Durable GPS Watch:

    #bushcraft #building #offgrid

  • Fire Cabin - Bushcraft build with hand tools. - Rake - Birch Sap - Planning - Earth Bank

    18:32

    The ground, and shelter is full of branches, bark and wood pieces. I make a rake to clean it up. Tap birch sap the most gentle way. Dig up and plan the inside of the fire cabin, and make a small hill in front of the shelter.

    My Dog:
    My dog is a labradoodle. She is half brown labrador and half black/white toy puddle.
    Her name is Effie, but i only call her that, when she doesn't want to listen. Else i call her Musen (the mouse). She is almost 5 years old.
    She always has a bowl of water available and when i eat, she eats. She gets a raw chicken leg every day, and dry food if she is more hungry.

    Saw:
    Sillky Gomboy 210


    Pocket knife:
    Lionsteel Opera (damascus / modified to Scandi grind)


    Axe:
    Made by my good friend Bertram.

    Trousers: (leather)
    Deerhunter.eu

    Jacket:
    Fjallräven Hydratic

    CAMERA GEAR
    Camera:
    Canon 5d mkII


    Lenses
    Canon LENS EF 50 mm. 1:1.4


    Canon ZOOM LENS EF 16 - 35mm 1:2.8 L II USM


    Canon MACRO LENS EF 100mm 1:2.8 USM


    Canon FISHEYE LENS EF 15mm 1:2.8


    Extender
    2X TELEPLUS PRO 300 KENKO C-AF


    Microphone:
    RØDE VideoMic Pro

  • Iron Age Roundhouse: Building with Hand Tools: Bushcraft Project

    26:19

    Join us on this bushcraft trip where we continue building a historic iron age celtic roundhouse using simple hand tools. For part 4 we peel bark off hazel saplings and lash these to the timber frame to make the battens ready for the thatch to be put on. In next episode of the celtic roundhouse series we will be focusing on building the walls to the bushcraft shelter.

    FULL CELTIC ROUNDHOUSE SERIES:

    Dustin's Channel:

    Watch all of our Big Shelter Builds Here:

    GET TA OUTDOORS MERCHANDISE:
    TA OUTDOORS PATCHES:

    My Bushcraft, Survival and Filming Gear:
    These are amazon affiliate links

    OUR OTHER CHANNEL TA FISHING:

    Building a Viking House with Bark Roof (ALL EPISODES):


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    #bushcraft #roundhouse #ironage #building #taoutdoors

  • Viking Camp - First Night in the Viking House: Bushcraft Project

    31:49

    Join us as at the viking camp as we spend our first night in the bushcraft viking house. We have been building the viking house using hand tools only. Now the house has foundations, the timber frame with rafters, a bark roof, a stone fire pit built with clay, some raised beds using traditional woodworking techniques. We felt that now the viking house has a roof, it would be a good time to do the first overnight camp in the house. For part 7 of the series we cooked up a feast! Dustin cooked a leg of lamb over the fire. He also cooked fresh bread in the cast iron dutch oven. We ate lamb which was slow cooked over the fire and we put it on the fresh bread with some avocado and potatoes. It was viking food with a twist! We have had great fun building this viking house with hand tools. We still have some more things to build so Part 8 will be out soon!
    Come and meet me at The Bushcraft Show 2019! I'll have a stand there so come and chill and chat at my stand. I'm going to be camping there for the whole weekend.
    Get 10% off your tickers with the code: taoutdoors10 on their website:

    VIKING HOUSE PLAYLIST (EVERY EPISODE):

    Subscribe to Dustin's Channel Bushcraft Tools:

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    BUSHCRAFT BROTHERHOOD MERCHANDISE:

    Get TA OUTDOORS MERCH:

    TA OUTDOORS PATCHES:

    INSTAGRAM:
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    FILMING & CAMERA GEAR I USE:
    Main Camera:
    Drone:
    Standard Lens:
    Wide Angle Lens:
    Zoom Lens:
    50mm fixed Lens:
    Main Camera Microphone:
    Secondary Camera Mic:
    Radio Microphone:
    Camera Light:
    Powerbank:
    Tripod:
    GoPro Action Cam:
    GoPro Chest Mount:
    GoPro Head Mount:
    Camera SD Cards:
    Editing Laptop:

    BUSHCRAFT GEAR I USE:
    Bushcraft Pants/Trousers:
    3x3 Metre Tarp:
    Hammock:
    Hammock underblanket:
    Thermal Camping Air Mattress:
    Awesome Affordable Bushcraft Knives:
    Medium Axe:
    Gransfors Bruks Small Forest Axe:
    Small Hatchet:
    Affordable Firesteel:
    Folding Camp Grill:
    Durable GPS Watch:

    These are Amazon associate links and help to support my channel.

    #vikinghouse #viking #bushcraft #vikings

  • Medieval Bushcraft Build in Forest - THE FINISHED ROOF FRAME!

    29:07

    Join us on this bushcraft Adventure into Iron Age / Medieval History, building an Irish Celtic Roundhouse. Follow the complete series here:
    ON THIS EPISODE: Thomas brings in the Purlin horizontals for the roof, the Roof Frame is finally finished when the time is there to cut the center ridge pole... We also get to deal with heavy rainfall and Dylan acrobatically climbs a tree... Enjoy!

    Support this project by becoming our Patreon: or
    One-off PayPal donation:
    Thanks a lot!

    Smooth Gefixt - Nature, Survival, Trekking & Crafts:
    You like the outdoors? Then this is the right place!
    We would like to bring you with us, as entertainment or education, whether you are into hiking or survival, or somewhere in-between.
    Many aspects will be covered: adventurous trips into the wilderness, backyard challenges, shelter building, how to survive..., bushcraft skills, crafting of items and much more!

    All our videos:

    Check out our little Q&A series for FAQ and to get to know us more:

    Popular 'Smooth Gefixt' video's:
    Extreme Ice fall-through Survival:
    Surviving on an Island:
    Raft Survival:
    Igloo building adventure:
    Shelter building Battle:
    Axe vs Knife:

    Follow us on social media, for some extras and previews:



    Support us on Patreon:
    Thanks a lot!

  • BIG & ROUND! ~ Iron Age inspired Bushcraft Build

    16:18

    Join us on this bushcraft Adventure into Iron Age History, building an Irish Celtic Roundhouse.
    Every FRIDAY a New Episode: 3pm ET (US) / 8pm (UK) & 21.00u (Central Europe).
    Follow the complete series here:

    Support us on Patreon:
    Thanks a lot!

    Smooth Gefixt - Nature, Survival, Trekking & Crafts:
    You like the outdoors? Then this is the right place!
    We would like to bring you with us, as entertainment or education, whether you are into hiking or survival, or somewhere in-between.
    Many aspects will be covered: adventurous trips into the wilderness, backyard challenges, shelter building, how to survive..., bushcraft skills, crafting of items and much more!

    All our videos:

    Check out our little Q&A series for FAQ and to get to know us more:

    Popular 'Smooth Gefixt' video's:
    Extreme Ice fall-through Survival:
    Surviving on an Island:
    Raft Survival:
    Igloo building adventure:
    Shelter building Battle:
    Axe vs Knife:

    Follow us on social media, for some extras and previews:



    Support us on Patreon:
    Thanks a lot!

  • Building Primitive Off Grid Viking House | Hand Tools Only | Part 1

    14:04

    Building a primitive off grid viking house with hand tools only, has always been our homesteading dream. We have always loved Bushcraft building and the simple life that a viking longhouse provides. Vikings were the first homesteaders. They crafted incredible nordic homes, raised livestock and were masters of gardening. We have always been inspired by them and are so ecstatic to finally start building our viking homestead. Join us in this series where we take you through the whole process of building our primitive off grid viking house.

  • Bushcraft Longhouse | Pt.1 Log Foundation

    28:02

    After a long winter and a heavy snow load the boy's bushcraft camp and debris/tarp shelter was crushed and reclaimed by the hazelnut tree saplings in the shaded poplar and aspen woods. With the help of some good friends we begin this mini-series clearing the camp and thinning out the dead standing, dying and diseased trees and build a solid log cabin type foundation for a communal space in the woods. This is the beginning of The Bushcraft Longhouse!

    In Part 2 we'll be digging in the end posts, putting up the ridgepole and installing the rafters for the longhouse. Be sure to subscribe to follow along as we rebuild a bigger and better bushcraft camp.

    #bushcraft #longhouse #bushcraftshelter

  • Building a Saxon House with Hand Tools: Rafters and Roof Frame | Bushcraft Project

    26:48

    We continue building a bushcraft saxon house in the forest using hand tools only. In part 4 we finish building the timber frame roof and build some rafters. We use log cabin notches to help secure the rafters in place. For each rafter, we de-barked the log with a drawknife to prevent bugs from breaking it down over time. This will help our roof to last longer. The bark peeling jig we made in part 1 of the saxon house build is really coming in useful now. I also made primitive pine pitch glue from the resin that was leaking from pine trees in the area. I melted the pitch down in a tin can over the fire, and then used the molten pine pitch or tar to pour over our exposed mortise and tenon joints. This will help to weather-seal the joints and prevent water and moisture from rotting them away. We also secured the mortise and tenon joints by drilling holes with a bit and brace and an auger, and hammering in wooded pegs. In Part 5, we will be building battening on the roof ready for the final roof material. We will also make a start on the walls. Thanks for watching.

    SAXON HOUSE PLAYLIST (EVERY EPISODE):

    Subscribe to Dad's Channel TA Fishing:

    VIKING HOUSE PLAYLIST (EVERY EPISODE):

    GET TA OUTDOORS MERCHANDISE:

    TA OUTDOORS PATCHES:

    INSTAGRAM:
    FACEBOOK:
    TWITTER:

    FILMING & CAMERA GEAR I USE:
    Main Camera:
    Drone:
    Standard Lens:
    Wide Angle Lens:
    Zoom Lens:
    50mm fixed Lens:
    Main Camera Microphone:
    Secondary Camera Mic:
    Radio Microphone:
    Camera Light:
    Powerbank:
    Tripod:
    GoPro Action Cam:
    GoPro Chest Mount:
    GoPro Head Mount:
    Camera SD Cards:
    Editing Laptop:

    BUSHCRAFT GEAR I USE:
    Bushcraft Pants/Trousers:
    3x3 Metre Tarp:
    Hammock:
    Hammock underblanket:
    Thermal Camping Air Mattress:
    Awesome Affordable Bushcraft Knives:
    Medium Axe:
    Gransfors Bruks Small Forest Axe:
    Small Hatchet:
    Affordable Firesteel:
    Folding Camp Grill:
    Durable GPS Watch:

    These are Amazon associate links and help to support my channel.

    #saxonhouse #saxon #bushcraft #taoutdoors

  • Bushcraft Viking House - Meat, Fish, Fire, Knife, Axe | VIKING FEAST

    20:01

    Join us at the bushcraft viking house in the woods for a viking feast! The building of this bushcraft shelter was done using hand tools only, over the period of roughly 9 days. We used an axe, knife, and saw for most of the build, but we also used traditional woodworking tools such as an auger and a drawknife for some of the mortise and tenon joints and timber framing. The house is based on an a-frame design and we used cedar logs for this. In this special episode of the bushcraft viking house, we created an edited down version of all of the feasts and cooking that we have done throughout the series. We cooked on Petromax cast iron dutch ovens and wrought iron skillets. Please see below for recipes of each feast:

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    FEAST 1:
    FRIED CALAMARI - SQUID RINGS
    Oil
    Squid – clean and cut into rings
    Flour
    Egg
    Panko breadcrumbs
    Extras: Sweet chilli sauce, salad, spring onion, lemon, salt & pepper

    FEAST 2:
    WOODLAND FRIED CHICKEN (WFC)
    Oil
    Chicken wings
    Flour mixed with cayenne pepper, chilli powder, garlic powder
    Extras: Salad, mayonnaise & garlic dressing

    FEAST 3:
    STEAK & POTATO FLATBREADS
    Beef steak – beat thin
    Potatoes (par-boiled)
    Saussage - cut into pieces
    Dried mixed pepper & herb (seasoning)
    Dip: Mayo, garlic, smoked paprika
    Extras: Flatbreads, mixed green leaves

    FEAST 4:
    ENGLISH BREAKFAST
    Saussage
    Bacon
    Tomato
    Beans
    Egg

    FEAST 5:
    THE LAMB COPTER
    Bread mix – add crushed walnuts
    Lamb (leg)
    Rub: Oregano, thyme, rosemary, smoked paprika
    New potatoes in a drip pan under the lamb
    Toasted bread topping: smashed avocado, lime, salt

    FEAST 6:
    ASIAN STYLE WOODLAND FEAST
    Beef – skewered on hazel sticks
    Chicken – skewered on hazel sticks
    Stir fry: ginger, garlic, thinly sliced mixed vegetables
    Add cooked egg noodles
    Satay dip: Peanut butter, lime juice, ginger, garlic, chilli, chive, soy sauce
    Asian dipping sauce: Soy sauce, sesame oil, sesame seeds, ginger, wild garlic

  • How To Build house, Full Shelter Build with Hand Tools | Primitive Skills

    35:48

    IIf you want to watch longer videos, next few days I will upload it here:

    In addition, I need you to contribute, suggest titles, translate titles into other languages, all contributions send to email: huyduong.primitiveskills@gmail.com
    ---------------
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  • Building a Viking House with Hand Tools: Axe, Hammer, Auger, | Bushcraft Project

    25:08

    We continue building a bushcraft viking house in the forest using hand tools only. Part 4 focuses on using the axe, auger and draw knife to build a viking bench, saw horse and spit for the stone clay fire pit ready to roast meat over the fire. Now that the cedar log foundations are in place, and the timber frame has been built, we are able to focus on making viking furniture such as the saw horse and bench using traditional woodworking techniques and hand tools. We use a draw knife to take off the bark of the cedar logs to help preserve them and prevent bugs and water from rotting the logs. I use an auger to drill holes for the legs of the saw horse. We then use a sledge hammer to drive in the legs. Using an axe and some wood wedges we also split a cedar log to make a bench for inside the viking house. We cook up food over the fire, this time southern fried chicken in the cast iron dutch oven over the viking long pit.
    In Part 5 we focus on finishing the wood frame roof of the Viking House. We build the rafters, and build some pirlins too. As well as begin collecting the cedar bark ready for the cedar shingle roof. Thanks for watching and be sure to subscribe so you don't miss the next episode!

    BUSHCRAFT BROTHERHOOD MERCHANDISE:
    (Worldwide Shipping)

    VIKING HOUSE PLAYLIST (EVERY EPISODE):

    Subscribe to Dad's Channel TA Fishing:

    Subscribe to Dustin's Channel Bushcraft Tools:

    Get TA OUTDOORS MERCH:

    TA OUTDOORS PATCHES:

    INSTAGRAM:
    FACEBOOK:
    TWITTER:

    FILMING & CAMERA GEAR I USE:
    Main Camera:
    Drone:
    Standard Lens:
    Wide Angle Lens:
    Zoom Lens:
    50mm fixed Lens:
    Main Camera Microphone:
    Secondary Camera Mic:
    Radio Microphone:
    Camera Light:
    Powerbank:
    Tripod:
    GoPro Action Cam:
    GoPro Chest Mount:
    GoPro Head Mount:
    Camera SD Cards:
    Editing Laptop:

    BUSHCRAFT GEAR I USE:
    Bushcraft Pants/Trousers:
    3x3 Metre Tarp:
    Hammock:
    Hammock underblanket:
    Thermal Camping Air Mattress:
    Awesome Affordable Bushcraft Knives:
    Medium Axe:
    Gransfors Bruks Small Forest Axe:
    Small Hatchet:
    Affordable Firesteel:
    Folding Camp Grill:
    Durable GPS Watch:

    These are Amazon associate links and help to support my channel.

    #vikinghouse #viking #bushcraft #taoutdoors

  • Building a Dome Hut: Bark Roof Bushcraft Shelter

    15:29

    We build a dome hut using primitive technology and simple hand tools. The frame of the bushcraft shelter was built using hazel saplings woven and lashed together with inner bark of cedar tree. Using a bushcraft knife, we carved up a bark peeler and used these to peel the bark off of the tree. The tree bark was placed in lake water overnight to keep the moisture in it. We then placed the bark over the frame of the hut and lashed it to the frame with more inner bark cordage. After a few days the bark dries and moulds to the frame, creating a waterproof roof. For bedding we used cedar boughs. The door was built with a few more hazel sticks lashed to a large boar hide which we can open and close to get into the bushcraft shelter. For the bedding inside the shelter we used cedar boughs and when we did the first overnight in the bushcraft camp we slept on deer hides and sheepskins.
    This dome hut is also known as a Wigwam. It was traditionally built by Native American tribes in North America. Typically, the roof would have been built using silver birch bark. But they were resourceful people and would have used whatever resources they had around them. This type of Wigwam would typically sleep a small family. However, larger long house structures were built by American Native Indians of the Northeast Woodlands. However, they built their structures using birch bark, juniper bark and willow saplings. We enjoyed doing this piece of living history. Please find more of our historic build series below:

    VIKING HOUSE:
    SAXON HOUSE:

    Wigwam Part 1:
    Wigwam Part 2:
    Wigwam Part 3 (first overnight):

    Dustin's Channel:

    GET TA OUTDOORS MERCHANDISE:
    Subscribe to Dad's Channel TA Fishing:

    INSTAGRAM:
    FACEBOOK:
    TWITTER:

    FILMING & CAMERA GEAR I USE:
    Main Camera:
    Drone:
    Standard Lens:
    Wide Angle Lens:
    Zoom Lens:
    50mm fixed Lens:
    Main Camera Microphone:
    Secondary Camera Mic:
    Radio Microphone:
    Camera Light:
    Powerbank:
    Tripod:
    GoPro Action Cam:
    GoPro Chest Mount:
    GoPro Head Mount:
    Camera SD Cards:
    Editing Laptop:

    BUSHCRAFT GEAR I USE:
    Bushcraft Pants/Trousers:
    3x3 Metre Tarp:
    Hammock:
    Hammock underblanket:
    Thermal Camping Air Mattress:
    Awesome Affordable Bushcraft Knives:
    Medium Axe:
    Gransfors Bruks Small Forest Axe:
    Small Hatchet:
    Affordable Firesteel:
    Folding Camp Grill:
    Durable GPS Watch:

    These are Amazon associate links and help to support my channel.

    #hut #building #primitive #bushcraft

  • Iron Age Celtic Roundhouse: Building the Timber Frame Foundation | Bushcraft Project

    26:02

    We start work building the iron age celtic roundhouse shelter. Merchandise: In part 2 of this bushcraft project we dig foundation holes for the vertical posts that we collected in part 1. We bury the posts primitive style and compact them down with a stick and using the clay that we dug up to make the hole. The posts are buried about 15-18 inches into the ground. We burnt the ends of the logs to make them more rot-resistant.
    We cooked up a duck stew over the fire in a cast iron dutch oven. Whilst the food was cooking over the fire we sourced some wood for beams. We took the bark off the logs using the drawknife and then notched them using the axe. Originally we had planned to put a hole in each vertical post with the auger, and then peg the beams in. However, we soon realised this would make our roof rafters uneven. So instead we made notches with an axe and angled the logs so that they would sit flush on the posts. In episode 3 we will peg these in with wood pegs and then finish the rest of the foundation frame of the bushcraft shelter.

    Dustin's Video:
    FULL CELTIC ROUNDHOUSE SERIES:

    GET TA OUTDOORS MERCHANDISE:
    TA OUTDOORS PATCHES:

    OUR OTHER CHANNEL TA FISHING:

    Watch all VIKING TURF HOUSE Episodes Here:

    Building a Viking House with Bark Roof (ALL EPISODES):


    SAXON HOUSE BUILD:

    INSTAGRAM:
    FACEBOOK:
    TWITTER:

    FILMING & CAMERA GEAR I USE:
    Main Camera:
    Drone:
    Standard Lens:
    Wide Angle Lens:
    Zoom Lens:
    50mm fixed Lens:
    Main Camera Microphone:
    Secondary Camera Mic:
    Radio Microphone:
    Camera Light:
    Powerbank:
    Tripod:
    GoPro Action Cam:
    GoPro Chest Mount:
    GoPro Head Mount:
    Camera SD Cards:
    Editing Laptop:

    BUSHCRAFT GEAR I USE:
    Bushcraft Pants/Trousers:
    3x3 Metre Tarp:
    Hammock:
    Hammock underblanket:
    Thermal Camping Air Mattress:
    Awesome Affordable Bushcraft Knives:
    Medium Axe:
    Gransfors Bruks Small Forest Axe:
    Small Hatchet:
    Affordable Firesteel:
    Folding Camp Grill:
    Durable GPS Watch:

    #celtic #roundhouse #bushcraft #building #taoutdoors

  • Viking House Revisited - Fire Cooking - Foraging - Friction Fire

    23:56

    Myself and TA Outdoors built this Viking House a little over a year ago. It was an epic challenge building through the winter months, battling the wind, rain, snow and cold British weather. The whole thing was built using Cedar wood and cedar bark for the roof tiles.

    In this episode, we re-visit the Viking House for an overnighter and cook up a feast….with a little help from some foraged plants.


    Thanks for watching!

    ....PLEASE SUBSCRIBE, THANKS!

    JOIN THE LIVESTREAMS TOO...HIT THE BELL NOTIFICATION BUTTON AND CHAT TO ME LIVE!

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  • FULL BUILD - BUILDING A WOODLAND VIKING HOUSE using hand tools with TA OUTDOORS. ASMR / NO TALKING

    25:21

    During the winter of 2018 / 2019, a Viking House was born. The Viking House was constructed using hand tools; knife / axe / saw and took over 100 hours to complete. This low-budget video is the full build with no talking.

    Credit to Greg Funnell for the drone shots and a huge thanks to TA outdoors and TA fishing for being part of this build.


    TA OUTDOORS
    GREG FUNNELL


    #asmr #bushcraft #woodland # viking

  • Saxon Camp - First Night in the Saxon House: Bushcraft Project

    47:59

    Join us at the saxon camp as we spend our first night in the bushcraft saxon house. For 7 episodes we have been building the saxon bushcraft shelter using hand tools only. For this episode, we wanted to do an overnight in the shelter and do some more building work to it. We are currently still waiting on the thatching material so that we can build a traditional thatched roof to the house. However, due to the dry summer last year, we have to wait until the next batch of thatching material has been cut. The saxon house or grubenhaus is so close to being finished. We have built the foundations by digging the pit, we then used traditional mortise and tenon joints to secure the timber frame together. We built rafters and then built walls using wattle and daub, making a clay and straw mix.
    In this episode we build two raised beds using reclaimed wood from the old bushcraft camp. We then throw some straw down on the floor to act as thermal insulation for inside the saxon house. We cook up some food and have a good father and son chat by the fire. Join us for Part 9 soon where we hope to finish building the roof!

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    SAXON HOUSE PLAYLIST (EVERY EPISODE):

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    VIKING HOUSE PLAYLIST (EVERY EPISODE):

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    INSTAGRAM:
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    FILMING & CAMERA GEAR I USE:
    Main Camera:
    Drone:
    Standard Lens:
    Wide Angle Lens:
    Zoom Lens:
    50mm fixed Lens:
    Main Camera Microphone:
    Secondary Camera Mic:
    Radio Microphone:
    Camera Light:
    Powerbank:
    Tripod:
    GoPro Action Cam:
    GoPro Chest Mount:
    GoPro Head Mount:
    Camera SD Cards:
    Editing Laptop:

    BUSHCRAFT GEAR I USE:
    Bushcraft Pants/Trousers:
    3x3 Metre Tarp:
    Hammock:
    Hammock underblanket:
    Thermal Camping Air Mattress:
    Awesome Affordable Bushcraft Knives:
    Medium Axe:
    Gransfors Bruks Small Forest Axe:
    Small Hatchet:
    Affordable Firesteel:
    Folding Camp Grill:
    Durable GPS Watch:

    These are Amazon associate links and help to support my channel.

    #saxon #bushcraft #camp #taoutdoors

  • Building a Saxon House with Hand Tools: Front Entrance, Wattle, Walls | Bushcraft Project

    24:49

    The building of the bushcraft saxon house with hand tools only continues. This time we build the door frame, wattle the side walls and build the gable ends out of logs. The timber frame structure is much sturdier now that we have built the rafters and battens or lath. It also helped that we used traditional mortise and tenon joints for the roundwood timber frame. We finished building the gable end and decided it would nice looking more like a log cabin at the front. For the back we used vertical logs for the gable end. We used pine and birch for the wattle, although for traditional wattle we would have used green hazel saplings, there are none in this area of the woods. In Part 7 we will be using traditional wattle and daub technique which was used by the Saxons hundreds of years ago. We will put the daub material onto the wattle walls and hopefully it will set hard like concrete. Then it will be onto the roof. Thanks for watching!

    SAXON HOUSE PLAYLIST (EVERY EPISODE):

    Subscribe to Dad's Channel TA Fishing:

    VIKING HOUSE PLAYLIST (EVERY EPISODE):

    GET TA OUTDOORS MERCHANDISE:

    TA OUTDOORS PATCHES:

    INSTAGRAM:
    FACEBOOK:
    TWITTER:

    FILMING & CAMERA GEAR I USE:
    Main Camera:
    Drone:
    Standard Lens:
    Wide Angle Lens:
    Zoom Lens:
    50mm fixed Lens:
    Main Camera Microphone:
    Secondary Camera Mic:
    Radio Microphone:
    Camera Light:
    Powerbank:
    Tripod:
    GoPro Action Cam:
    GoPro Chest Mount:
    GoPro Head Mount:
    Camera SD Cards:
    Editing Laptop:

    BUSHCRAFT GEAR I USE:
    Bushcraft Pants/Trousers:
    3x3 Metre Tarp:
    Hammock:
    Hammock underblanket:
    Thermal Camping Air Mattress:
    Awesome Affordable Bushcraft Knives:
    Medium Axe:
    Gransfors Bruks Small Forest Axe:
    Small Hatchet:
    Affordable Firesteel:
    Folding Camp Grill:
    Durable GPS Watch:

    These are Amazon associate links and help to support my channel.

    #saxonhouse #saxon #bushcraft #taoutdoors

  • Building a Viking House with Hand Tools: Bushcraft Project | Bark Roof

    28:48

    We continue to build a bushcraft viking house using hand tools only. Part 6 focuses on building the bark roof for the viking house. The hand tools we use in for this project is a viking axe, hammer, auger, saw, drawknife and a few others. We use bark from cedar logs for the shingles for the roof of the house. We tile the bark and use tacks and nails to secure it to the rafters and timber frame. We had to use a wood ladder to get up onto the roof of the house. Once we were finished building the bark roof, we focused on digging a tunnel to the viking long pit to help with air flow inside the camp and reduce the smoke. We then cooked food over an open fire in the woods. We hung some deer hides and antlers above the viking long house to make it look more rustic. With the roof complete, the viking camp is now ready for camping overnight in! We are really looking forward to cooking meat over the fire pit.
    In Part 7 we will focus on finishing the viking camp. The gable end at the back and front of the viking house still need to be built. We will also add a folding window to this Log Cabin like structure. Thanks for watching and be sure to subscribe so you don't miss the next episode!

    VIKING HOUSE PLAYLIST (EVERY EPISODE):

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    Get TA OUTDOORS MERCHANDISE:

    TA OUTDOORS PATCHES:

    INSTAGRAM:
    FACEBOOK:
    TWITTER:

    FILMING & CAMERA GEAR I USE:
    Main Camera:
    Drone:
    Standard Lens:
    Wide Angle Lens:
    Zoom Lens:
    50mm fixed Lens:
    Main Camera Microphone:
    Secondary Camera Mic:
    Radio Microphone:
    Camera Light:
    Powerbank:
    Tripod:
    GoPro Action Cam:
    GoPro Chest Mount:
    GoPro Head Mount:
    Camera SD Cards:
    Editing Laptop:

    BUSHCRAFT GEAR I USE:
    Bushcraft Pants/Trousers:
    3x3 Metre Tarp:
    Hammock:
    Hammock underblanket:
    Thermal Camping Air Mattress:
    Awesome Affordable Bushcraft Knives:
    Medium Axe:
    Gransfors Bruks Small Forest Axe:
    Small Hatchet:
    Affordable Firesteel:
    Folding Camp Grill:
    Durable GPS Watch:

    These are Amazon associate links and help to support my channel.

    #vikinghouse #viking #bushcraft #taoutdoors

  • Raised Bushcraft Shelter Bed with Hand Tools: Full Build from Start to Finish

    21:26

    I finish building the bushcraft camp with hand tools only. I merged the other shelter building videos into this one build episode from start to finish with no talking. The raised shack bushcraft shelter is now ready for me to spend a solo overnight or two in it. I started out building the raised platform using some Y shaped sticks. I used small logs for cross members to create the raised bed. I then dug two holes to support the front frame of the natural shelter. I lashed these frames to some posts using natural tree root cordage made from pine roots which I split with my bushcraft knife. I then collected some larger logs to build the roof of the camp. I scavenged for bark around the forest and used this as shingles. But it did not cover the whole shelter. So I went to collect some evergreen boughs to make the bushcraft camp more waterproof and to add insulation. This whole bushcraft shelter was built using hand tools only and is built from entirely natural materials from the woods. Thanks for joining me on the adventure and I will spend the night in this soon!

    PART 1:

    PART 2:

    Get TA OUTDOORS MERCHANDISE:

    TA OUTDOORS PATCHES:

    INSTAGRAM:
    FACEBOOK:
    TWITTER:

    FILMING & CAMERA GEAR I USE:
    Main Camera:
    Drone:
    Standard Lens:
    Wide Angle Lens:
    Zoom Lens:
    50mm fixed Lens:
    Main Camera Microphone:
    Secondary Camera Mic:
    Radio Microphone:
    Camera Light:
    Powerbank:
    Tripod:
    GoPro Action Cam:
    GoPro Chest Mount:
    GoPro Head Mount:
    Camera SD Cards:
    Editing Laptop:

    BUSHCRAFT GEAR I USE:
    Bushcraft Pants/Trousers:
    3x3 Metre Tarp:
    Hammock:
    Hammock underblanket:
    Thermal Camping Air Mattress:
    Awesome Affordable Bushcraft Knives:
    Medium Axe:
    Gransfors Bruks Small Forest Axe:
    Small Hatchet:
    Affordable Firesteel:
    Folding Camp Grill:
    Durable GPS Watch:

    These are Amazon associate links and help to support my channel.

    #bushcraft #camping #survival #taoutdoors

  • Building a Roundhouse House by Hand: Celtic Roundhouse | Bushcraft Camp

    18:34

    We continue using ancient medieval building techniques to build our iron age celtic roundhouse. This time we focus on the interior walls, using the traditional wattle and daub technique. The daub being a mix of clay, straw, ash and water. We mix it together and put it on the wall by hand. With the walls almost complete, the next step will be to reinforce the roof ready for thatching. We then cook handmade pizza over the fire in a dutch oven. Thanks for watching and be sure to subscribe to follow each episode of the celtic roundhouse build!

    FULL CELTIC ROUNDHOUSE SERIES:

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    #building #ironage #roundhouse #bushcraft

  • Viking House Build - Behind the Scenes with TA Outdoors

    23:19

    The final part of Graeme's Behind the Scenes Viking House Build with his son Mike from TA Outdoors. This time the lads finish building the Bark Roof for the Viking House. Dustin from Bushcraft Tools cooks up a full English Breakfast on a skillet over the fire. Thanks for watching!

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    ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ FILMING GEAR WE USE ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬
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