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What Makes Lagrange Points Special Locations In Space

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  • What Makes Lagrange Points Special Locations In Space

    13:31

    Lagrange Points are special locations in planetary systems where gravitational and rotational forces cancel out. Sometimes we find asteroids or dust clouds lingering near these places. Space missions may use some of these locations for spacecraft as they offer many advantages over orbiting in the Earth directly.

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  • What Are Lagrange Points?

    4:49

    I break down the nature of Lagrange Points, and their applications in Sci-Fi.




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  • What are Lagrange Points? We Asked a NASA Scientist

    1:43

    Lagrange points are places around a planet where the pull of its gravity, the Sun's gravity and the motion of the orbit are balanced. Things at these points take very little energy to stay in place. NASA’s Lucy mission will visit Lagrange points where Trojan asteroids have been trapped for billions of years, holding clues to the formation of our solar system. NASA’s Dr. Adriana Ocampo has more.

    Learn more about Lagrange Points:
    All about the Lucy mission: nasa.gov/lucy
    All about the James Webb Space Telescope:

    Credits: NASA
    Producer: Scott Bednar
    Producer/Editor: Jessica Wilde

  • A Tour Of The Lagrange Points. Part 2 - Space Telescopes At L2 And Nothing At L3

    17:01

    Lagrange Points. Stable spots in space that you just can’t stop thinking about. What spacecraft work best in which places? What are some amazing ideas that could utilize these regions across the Solar System?

    In the last episode, I gave an overview of the Lagrange points, and then went into the details of spacecraft missions sent to L1, the perfect place to constantly observe the Sun, the Earth, or to block radiation coming from the Sun. The best place for a lunar elevator, or a spot to put a space station at the Moon.

    This week, we’re going to talk about L2 and L3, the other meta-unstable spots that you can park a spacecraft at.

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  • JAMES WEBB TELESCOPE Orbit & Trajectory Explained - Where Is It Flying To?

    6:28

    JAMES WEBB TELESCOPE Trajectory & Orbit Explained - Where Is It Flying To & What It's Destination?
    Webb has LAUNCHED on December 25, 2021 07:20 am EST (2021-12-25 12:20 GMT)

    Webb Telescope will not be in orbit around the Earth, like the Hubble Space Telescope is - it will actually orbit the Sun, 1.5 million kilometers (1 million miles) away from the Earth at what is called the second Lagrange point or L2. What is special about this orbit is that it lets the telescope stay in line with the Earth as it moves around the Sun. This allows the satellite's large sunshield to protect the telescope from the light and heat of the Sun and Earth (and Moon).

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  • Lagrange Points - Sixty Symbols

    8:54

    Discussing Lagrangian (Lagrange) points, orbits and gravity.
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  • James Webb Space Telescope Orbit

    2:00

    The James Webb Space Telescope will not be in orbit around the Earth, like the Hubble Space Telescope is — it will actually orbit the Sun, 1.5 million kilometers (1 million miles) away from the Earth at what is called the second Lagrange point or L2.

    What is special about this orbit is that it lets the telescope stay in line with the Earth as it moves around the Sun. This allows the satellite's large sunshield to protect the telescope from the light and heat of the Sun and Earth (and Moon).

    Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

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  • James Webb Space Telescopes L2 arrival explained

    1:14

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is expected to complete its final arrival maneuver at the Earth-sun Lagrange point 2 (L2) on January 24, 2022. L2 provides a very cold gravitationally stable orbit that is perfect for JWST. Why NASA's James Webb Space Telescope will orbit nearly 1 million miles from Earth:

    Credit: Space.com | animations courtesy: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center | produced & edited by Steve Spaleta (

    **An earlier version of this video was updated.

  • James Webb Space Telescope: Sunshield Deployment - Mission Control Live

    2:32:40

    James Webb Space Telescope experts give real-time updates in the final stages of the telescope’s sunshield deployment. A major milestone, the successful shield tensioning will ensure Webb’s mirrors stay cold enough to #UnfoldTheUniverse.

    The five-layer, tennis court-sized sunshield is a critical part of the telescope because the infrared cameras and instruments aboard must be kept very cold and out of the Sun's heat and light to function properly.

    About the sunshield:
    Where is Webb?:

    Credit: NASA

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  • James Webb Space Telescope Heads for Orbit after Mirror Alignment - EXCLUSIVE!

    6:36

    James Webb Space Telescope Heads for Orbit after Mirror Alignment - EXCLUSIVE! After nearly a full month in space, the James Webb Space Telescope, also known as JWST or Webb, is nearly at the end of its deployment work. The complicated series of deployments has seen the telescope transform from its tightly-folded launch configuration to what looks like a real observatory
    NASA's massive new observatory has notched another milestone.


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  • NASA starts bringing James Webb Space Telescope into focus

    1:03

    As the James Webb Space Telescope continues its journey to its final orbit around the second Lagrange point, also known as L2, NASA starts bringing the new space telescope into focus. The process is expected to last months

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  • Animation: The James Webb Space Telescopes Orbit

    20

    James Webb Space Telescope orbit as seen from above the Sun's north pole and as seen from Earth's perspective.

    The James Webb Space Telescope will not be in orbit around the Earth, like the Hubble Space Telescope is - it will actually orbit the Sun, 1.5 million kilometers (1 million miles) away from the Earth at what is called the second Lagrange point or L2. What is special about this orbit is that it lets the telescope stay in line with the Earth as it moves around the Sun. This allows the satellite's large sunshield to protect the telescope from the light and heat of the Sun and Earth (and Moon).

    This animation has no sound and is not to scale.

    Learn more about our orbit:

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  • Designing Lucy’s Path to the Trojan Asteroids

    6:28

    Lucy is the first mission to explore the Jupiter Trojans – two swarms of asteroids that share Jupiter’s orbit, leading and trailing the giant planet by sixty degrees. These primitive bodies are thought to be the “fossils” of planet formation, trapped by Jupiter’s gravity at the dawn of the solar system. Now, NASA is sending Lucy on a winding, twelve-year-long path to visit one main-belt asteroid and seven Jupiter Trojans. Lucy will provide the first up-close look at these mysterious objects, helping scientists to better understand the evolution of the solar system.

    Learn more about Lucy’s path to eight asteroids:

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  • Inside the James Webb Space Telescope’s Orbit Around the Sun

    4:57

    NASA spent billions on the James Webb Space Telescope and now we’re going to launch it really far away. But why do we need to send it so far? And what technologies are on board to support its success?
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    Mostly known as the successor of the incredibly popular Hubble Space Telescope, Webb will observe the universe with detectors that target near and mid infrared wavelengths. This means that the instruments on board Webb are specially designed to combat some of the historic challenges astronomers have faced when trying to observe the early universe, like huge dust clouds that block the view of celestial objects, cosmological redshifting, and even interference from other bodies.

    In fact, there are three things necessary to create the perfect environment for an infrared telescope; a large mirror to collect as much light as possible, extremely cold temperatures, and a clear line of sight to your target. Each detail has been thought out meticulously over the past two decades leading to this point, like orbital selection. 1.5 million kilometers is a bit of a trip to say the least.

    So why are we putting Webb in such a distant orbit? Well, it’s heading to L2, the second Lagrange point around the Sun and Earth. These five points are stable configurations that allow bodies to orbit each other, but still remain in the same position relative to one another. The key to L2 is centripetal force, which you can imagine as the tension in a rope on a tether ball that keeps it connected to the pole. At L2, the centripetal force required for a small satellite-sized object to move with respect to the Earth is equal to the gravitational pull of the two larger masses. Meaning that this particularly cozy orbit has several benefits to support Webb’s mission.

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    'The Webb represents the culmination of decades, if not centuries, of astronomy,' says Sara Seager, a planetary scientist and astrophysicist at MIT. 'We’ve been waiting for this a very long time.'

    NASA's new telescope will show us the infancy of the universe

    The J.W.S.T. will then continue on its own, for twenty-nine days, toward a lonely, lovely orbit in space, about 1.5 million kilometres from Earth, where we will never visit it, though it will stay in constant communication with us. From Earth, it will appear ten thousand times fainter than the faintest star.

    The Five Big Ways the James Webb Telescope Will Help Astronomers Understand the Universe

    Webb’s conception is inspired by the Hubble Space Telescope—the 31-year-old observatory famous for capturing stunning photos of our universe's galaxies. But Webb picks up where its predecessor falls short, says Eric Smith, Webb’s program scientist and chief scientist of NASA’s Astrophysics Division. There’s really no telescope like Webb so far, he says.

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  • The Parking Spaces of Space: The Lagrange Points

    3:56

    The Lagrange Points are places where the forces acting on an object are perfectly balanced so that its orbit does not change. The James Webb Space Telescope will be parked near the Earth's L2 point. There are thousands of asteroids near Jupiter's Lagrange points which are called the trojans.

    This video has made use of data provided by the International Astronomical Union's Minor Planet Center.

  • Lagrange Points: Space Parking Spots

    5:31

    In this video we explore the physics and scientific use of Lagrange points.
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    In a system of any two massive objects in space, such as the Earth and Sun, there are five points where the gravitational forces between them balance out perfectly. If you were to park a small object, such as a satellite, in one of these spots, it would be able to remain perfectly in its position, relative to the two large bodies, without the need of much, if any, energy to keep it there.

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  • The Most Useful Places in an Orbit

    8:58

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    If we want a space probe to be stationary relative to the Earth, then we need a Lagrange point! They’re five points of gravitational stability, but how do we know they’re there?
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  • What are LAGRANGE POINTS - Useful Space PARKING SPOTS

    12:33

    Several practical cases of three-body systems can be faced in a simplified version. Simplified problems have been studied by many famous mathematicians and physicists, including Joseph-Louis Lagrange (in the 18th century ), Henri Poincaré (in the late 19th century ) and the 'Italian Tullio Levi-Civita (in the 20th century).
    Poincaré's work on the three-body problem underlies the theory of deterministic chaos and the consequent theory of complex systems.
    In the case of bodies (planets) in a reciprocal circular motion, one of which has negligible mass compared to the other two (as it's the case for the Sun-Earth system or Earth-Moon system), there are five points of equilibrium called Lagrangian points. Three of these five points (L 1, L 2, L 3 ) lie on the line of the two major bodies, one included in the segment having the two major bodies as extremes and two external to it; these positions are unstable. The remaining two points (L 4, L 5 ) are placed on the orbit of the planet of intermediate-mass and, for the latter, one point is 60 ° in advance and the other is 60 ° behind; then the imaginary segments that connect the two major bodies and with the points L 4 and L 5 form two equilateral triangles.

  • Calculating Lagrange Points

    5:37

    Lagrange points are locations in space where the gravitational force from two bodies, such as the Sun and a planet, balance in such a way that another object, like an asteroid or spacecraft, can be parked there and co-orbit with the planet.

    Asteroids that get stuck at a planet's Lagrange points are called Trojans. Some Lagrange points are also very useful places to park certain kinds of spacecraft studying our planet and solar system.

    In this video, I show a simple and intuitive way to calculate Lagrange points.

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    Music:
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    Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License

  • Finding Lagrange Point 2 orbit where James Webb Telescope will be deployed

    7:36

    In this video, I discuss what Lagrange points are for a system of two massive bodies and then calculate, step by step, the Lagrange Point 2 orbit which is a golden location for many satellite operations including NASA's upcoming James Webb Space Telescope (launched on December 25, 2021).

    Credits:
    JWST video Clip by 'NASA Goddard' YouTube channel-

    #L2Orbit #NASA #JWST

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  • A Tour Of The Lagrange Points. Part 1 - Past And Future Missions To L1

    13:57

    Thanks to gravity, there are places across the Solar System which are nicely balanced. They’re called Lagrange Points and they give us the perfect vantage points for a range of spacecraft missions, from observing the Sun to studying asteroids, and more.

    Various spacecraft have already visited Lagrange Points, used them for some or all of their missions, and there are fascinating plans in the works that could put new missions and even space colonies into these balanced places in the Solar System.

    Let’s explore the Lagrange Points.

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  • What Are The Lagrange Points? Finding Stable Points in Space

    7:44

    There are places in the Solar System where the forces of gravity balance out perfectly. Places we can use to position satellites, space telescopes and even colonies to establish our exploration of the Solar System. These are the Lagrange Points.

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    Being stuck here on Earth, at the bottom of this enormous gravity well really sucks. The amount of energy it takes to escape into the black would make even Captain Reynolds curse up a gorram storm.

    But gravity has a funny way of evening the score, giving and taking in equal measure.

    There are special places in the Universe, where the forces of gravity nicely balance out. Places that a clever and ambitious Solar System spanning civilization could use to get a toehold on the exploration of the Universe.

    These are known as the Lagrange Points, or Lagrangian Points, or libration points, or just L-Points. They’re named after the French mathematician Joseph-Louis Lagrange, who wrote an “Essay on the Three Body Problem” in 1772. He was actually extending the mathematics of Leonhard Euler.

    Euler discovered the first three Lagrangian Points, even though they’re not named after him, and then Lagrange turned up the next two.

    But what are they?

    When you consider the gravitational interaction between two massive objects, like the Earth and the Sun, or the Earth and the Moon, or the Death Star and Alderaan. Actually, strike that last example…

    As I was saying, when you’ve got two massive objects, their gravitational forces balance out perfectly in 5 places. In each of these 5 places you could position a relatively low mass satellite, and maintain its position with very little effort.

    For example, you could park a space telescope or an orbital colony, and you’d need very little, or even zero energy to maintain its position.

    The most famous and obvious of these is L1. This is the point that’s balanced between the gravitational pull of the two objects. For example, you could position a satellite a little above the surface of the Moon. The Earth’s gravity is pulling it towards the Moon, but the Moon’s gravity is counteracting the pull of the Earth, and the satellite doesn’t need to use much fuel to maintain position.

    There’s an L1 point between the Earth and the Moon, and a different spot between the Earth and the Sun, and a different spot between the Sun and Jupiter, etc. There are L1 points everywhere.

    L2 is located on the same line as the mass but on the far side. So, you’d get Sun, Earth, L2 point. At this point, you’re probably wondering why the combined gravity of the two massive objects doesn’t just pull that poor satellite down to Earth.

    It’s important to think about orbital trajectories. The Sun is here and the the Earth is orbiting around it. The satellite at that L2 point will be in a higher orbit and would be expected to fall behind the Earth, as it’s moving more slowly around the Sun. But the gravitational pull of the Earth pulls it forward, helping to keep it in this stable position.

    You’ll want to play a lot of Kerbal Space Program to really wrap your head around it. Sadly, your No Man’s Sky time isn’t helping you at all, except to teach you that hyperdrives are notoriously finicky and you’ll never have enough inventory space.

    L3 is located on the direct opposite side of the system. Again, the forces of gravity between the two masses balance out so that the third object maintains the same orbital velocity. For example, a satellite in the L3 point would always remain exactly hidden by the Sun.

    Hold on, hold on, I know there are a million thoughts going through your brain right now, but bear with me.

    There are two more points, the L4 and L5 points. These are located ahead and behind the lower mass object in orbit. You form an equilateral triangle between the two masses, and the third point of the triangle is the L4 point, flip the triangle upside down and there’s L5.

    Now, it’s important to note that the first 3 Lagrange points are gravitationally unstable. Any satellite positioned there will eventually drift away from stability. So they need some kind of thrusters to maintain this position.

  • What is a Lagrange Point?

    3:45

    This was my first attempt at a #VeritasiumContest video - I tried to make this as short as possible, but it wasn't under the 1 minute requirement.

    I still think it's too short.

    #jwst #lagrangepoints #l2

  • Earth/Moon Lagrange points animation

    2:41

    Animation showing the Earth/Moon system and it's Lagrange points. It's not precise but it shows how these points revolve around Earth while staying fixed relative to The Moon and this was the overall goal here. Specifically, it clearly shows how the L2 point can never be seen from Earth even though it's constantly orbiting our planet - a source of confusion for many. From our perspective here on Earth the L2 point will always be behind The Moon and I hope this small animation illustrates that in a way that can be understood.

    More info ...

    Georgia State University:

    Music: 'Becoming' by Andrea Baroni

  • Is Lagrange L2 Point Getting Crowded?

    5:06

    A Lagrange point is a point in space where the gravitational forces of two large bodies, such as the Earth and the sun or the Earth and the moon, equal the centrifugal force experienced by a considerably smaller third body.

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  • JAMES WEBB TELESCOPE Orbit & Location - What Its Position?

    6:39

    JAMES WEBB TELESCOPE Trajectory, Location, Orbit & Maintenance Explained - Where Is It Flying To & What It's Position?
    The launch date was on December 25th, 2021 not 26th!

    JWST will be placed in an orbit about the Sun-Earth L2 Lagrange point located about 1.5 million km from Earth, which is four times the distance between the Earth and the Moon.

    It is incorrect to say that JWST will be at L2. Rather, JWST will orbit around L2.

    At Lagrange points, the gravitational pull of two large masses precisely equals the centripetal force, required for a small object to move with them
    The distance of JWST from the L2 point varies between 250,000 to 832,000 km.
    The period of the orbit is about 6 months. The maximum excursion above or below the ecliptic plane is 520,000 km. The maximum distance from the Earth is 1.8 million km, and the maximum Earth-Sun angle is less than 33°.
    L2 is a saddle point in the gravitational potential of the Solar System. Because saddle points are not stable, JWST will need to regularly fire onboard thrusters to maintain its orbit around L2. These station-keeping maneuvers will be performed every 21 days.
    To maintain solar power, the orbit is designed such that JWST is never in the shadow of the Earth or the Moon during the mission.

    Credit:
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    NASA Goddard Media Studios

    Music:
    Hiding Your Reality Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
    Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 License

  • Lagrange points explained | Orbital parking spots

    4:31

    Do you know where spacecrafts park on our planet orbit ?, let's find out .

    Lagrange points are the parking spots on planetary system. In celestial mechanics, the Lagrange points are points near two large orbiting bodies. Normally, the two objects exert an unbalanced gravitational force at a point, altering the orbit of whatever is at that point. At the Lagrange points, the gravitational forces of the two large bodies and the centrifugal force balance each other. This can make Lagrange points an excellent location for satellites, as few orbit corrections are needed to maintain the desired orbit. Small objects placed in orbit at Lagrange points are in equilibrium in at least two directions relative to the center of mass of the large bodies.


    In this video we tried to explain all 5 lagrange points - L1, L2, L3, L4 and L5 .


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  • Colonizing Cislunar Space and the Lagrange Points

    30:27

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    Credits:
    Colonizing Cislunar Space and the Lagrange Points
    Science & Futurism with Isaac Arthur
    Episode 255; September 10, 2020
    Produced & Narrated by Isaac Arthur

    Written by:
    Isaac Arthur
    Jerry Guern
    Keith Blockus

    Cover Art:
    Jakub Grygier

    Graphics:
    Bryan Versteeg
    Jeremy Jozwik
    Ken York
    Kris Holland (Mafic Studios)
    Katie Byrne
    Sergio Botero
    SpaceResourceCGI
    Tristand3D
    Udo Schroeter

    Music
    Sergey Cheremisninov, Sirius

    Reign Pagaran, Distant Voyager
    Aerium, Fifth Star of Aldebaran

    Denny Schneidemesser, Across the Universe & Luminous Rays

    Chris Zabriskie, Wonder Cycle

  • Lagrange Points: Lucy Goes to Space

    2:21

    Discover the mysteries of the solar system through the eyes of the Lucy mission and its team members. This second episode features Principal Investigator Hal Levison, who discusses the Trojan Asteroids located at Jupiter's Lagrange Points and how the Lucy mission will plot its trajectory out to visit them.

    Music is 256 Kenaston Ave by Jean-Christophe Beck and It's Decision Time by Peter Keith Yelland-Brown of Universal Production Music.

    Video credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

    James Tralie (ADNET):
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    Animator

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    Art Director

    Harold Levison (SwRI):
    Scientist

    Aaron E. Lepsch (ADNET):
    Technical Support

    This video can be freely shared and downloaded at While the video in its entirety can be shared without permission, the music and some individual imagery may have been obtained through permission and may not be excised or remixed in other products. Specific details on such imagery may be found here: For more information on NASA’s media guidelines, visit

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  • Finding Lagrange points L4 and L5

    26:25

    Here is my continuing series on Lagrange points. You can find the rest in this playlist



    Here is the code

  • Calculating the location of Lagrange points L1 and L2

    16:53

    Here is a numerical method to determine the location of Lagrange points L1 and L2



    UPDATE:
    I just realized I made a mistake. I made the assumption that the Sun (the large mass) doesn't move. This method won't work for a more generic system. Hopefully I will make a new video soon.

  • Easy explanation of L2 - Where is the James Webb Space Telescope?

    7:13

    On December 25, 2021, NASA, ESA and their partners launched the James Webb Space Telescope and it's is going to collect the light from the earliest stars and galaxies in the universe. Most of our satellites that we bring into space stay in orbit around the earth, but not the JWST. The James Webb Space Telescope will be in orbit of the second Lagrange point, or short L2. There are actually 5 of these Lagrange points between the sun and earth, and also between the sun and other planets. These places are handy parking places for a satellite, and maybe, in the future, also for other things. In this video I try to give an easy explanation of these 5 Langrange points and the pros and cons of each point. After watching this video, you'll know where L2 is and why James Webb goes to this Lagrange point.

    Consulted sources:
    - NASA Image and Video Library
    - NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
    - The Five Points of Lagrange by Neil deGrasse Tyson (Natural History Magazine, April 2002)
    - NASA Solar System Explanation - What is a Lagrange Point?
    - ESA - What are Lagrange points?
    - Space.com - Lagrange Points: Parking Places in Space

    Thanks for watching this video! It turned out to be a different video than usual, so I'm curious what you think about this. Don't forget to subscribe to my channel and leave a comment!

  • What are the Lagrange points?

    6:09

    From my weekly live video chat, I answered a question about the points of gravitational balance called the Lagrange Points.

    More info on the science:

    More info on WMAP:

    More info on JWST:

    More info on the L5 Society:

    Images courtesy those above sites.

  • A Tour Of The Lagrange Points. Part 3 - Trojans and Space Colonies at L4/L5

    11:50

    We’ve reached the third part of our series on Lagrange Points, those stable spots in the Solar System, where you can sort of hover with the minimum amount of fuel.

    This episode we’re going to look at the L4 and L5 points which share the orbit with a more massive object.

    Part 1 -
    Part 2 -

    Building an artificial magnetosphere


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  • Q&A 6: Surfing the Lagrange Points and More...

    13:28

    Can you use Lagrange Points to easily travel around the Solar System? Could we use a giant slingshot to just launch objects into space? Fraser answers these questions and more.

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  • Explaining Lagrange Points in Less Than a Minute - #VeritasiumContest

    1:00

    What are Lagrange points? Why would you try to explain this in less than a minute? It's all @Veritasium 's fault. This is part of his #veritasiumContest

    Oh, you want to play along too? You should -

  • Lagrange Points - Parking Points in Space

    4:19

    Satellites need to be parked in the space at locations where they can be stable (atleast partially stable). Lagrange Points were discovered by Euler and Lagrange. These points are the stable or partially stable points where it is possible to park your space shuttle. This Star Trek themed video presents a user friendly guide to discovering the Lagrange Points.
    Instagram -

    #lagrangepoints

  • Classroom Aid - Lagrange Points

    2:14

    Text at

  • How can we circle around the Lagrange Point? A new type of satellite.

    14:51

    We have opened up the vast new territory for a possible new type of satellite around us. The Chinese relay satellite is the breakthrough of space science.

  • Lagrange Point Calculation

    10:59

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  • Demonstration of L4 and L5 Lagrange points using Universe Sandbox

    1:54

  • Lagrange Points: A Space Exploration

    3:00

    Lagrange Points explained!

    Planets, asteroids, etc. are in motion because of GRAVITY. But there are some places where the gravity of 2 bodies cancel each other out. Watch this video to learn more! ????????

    If you have any questions or something to say, don't hesitate to leave a comment below!

    Good luck to all entrants!
    -Ved Ambre

    _______________
    #breakthroughjuniorchallenge

  • ARTEMIS Orbiting Lagrange Point

    1:28

    This visualization shows one segment of ARTEMIS orbital paths. The satellite trails are are constructed in a lunar-centric inertial coordinate system so the trails reveal the motion of the satellites relative to the Lagrange points in INERTIAL space (fixed with the distant stars).

  • Lagrange Point Stability: L2 vs. L4 using Monte Carlo

    23:02

    There's a bunch of stuff here - but first, here is my full Lagrange Point Playlist:

    Now for some other useful videos:
    What is a Lagrange Point? My super short explanation (too short)

    How do you find L2:

    How do you find L4:

    What is a numerical calculation:

    Intro to Lists in Python:

    Finally, here is the code used in this calculation.

  • Jwst in the second Lagrange point

    15

  • Lagrange L2 orbit - Simple explanation - NASAs James Webb Telescopes future home

    4:35

    A simplified model explaining the L2 Lagrange point, where NASA's James Webb telescope will spend the remainder of its useful life. Some explanations of Lagrange points are heavy in math. This explanation of the L2 Lagrange point is more of an intuitive explanation.

  • Lagrange Point क्या है ?

    8:05

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    आदित्य -1 मिशन की कल्पना 400 किग्रा वर्ग के उपग्रह के रूप में की गई थी, जिसमें एक पेलोड, विज़िबल एमिशन लाइन कोरोनग्राफ (वीईएलसी) था और इसे 800 किमी कम पृथ्वी की कक्षा में लॉन्च करने की योजना थी।
    सूर्य-पृथ्वी प्रणाली के लग्रांगियन बिंदु 1 (L1) के चारों ओर प्रभामंडल कक्षा में रखा गया एक उपग्रह बिना किसी गुप्त ग्रहण / ग्रहण के सूर्य को लगातार देखने का प्रमुख लाभ है।

    लैग्रेंज पॉइंट अंतरिक्ष में ऐसी स्थितियाँ हैं जहाँ वहाँ भेजी जाने वाली वस्तुएँ रुकी रहती हैं। लैग्रेंज बिंदुओं पर, दो बड़े द्रव्यमानों का गुरुत्वाकर्षण खिंचाव एक छोटी वस्तु के साथ चलने के लिए आवश्यक अभिकेन्द्रीय बल के बराबर होता है।

    अंतरिक्ष में इन बिंदुओं का उपयोग अंतरिक्ष यान द्वारा स्थिति में बने रहने के लिए आवश्यक ईंधन की खपत को कम करने के लिए किया जा सकता है।
    लैग्रेंज बिंदुओं का नाम इतालवी-फ्रांसीसी गणितज्ञ जोसेफी-लुई लैग्रेंज के सम्मान में रखा गया है।

  • Lagrange Point

    1:54

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  • Views Of Earth and the Seasons From A Million Miles Away - DSCOVR & EPIC

    6:10

    It's been months since DSCOVR stopped sending out regular images of the Earth, from the L1 point between the Earth and the Sun. At this point the prospects for recovery seem remote so I took the data we have and compiled some cleaned up animations showing views of the Earth from the space. The video shows how the viewpoint changes through the year as the Earth orbits the sun and the spacecraft librates around the Lagrange point.

    Code for warping images is here:

  • Space Colonies Locations

    26:08

    Space colonization, also refers to as space settlement, space humanization, or space habitation, is the concept of permanent, autonomous (self-sufficient) human habitation of locations outside Earth. It is a major theme in science fiction, as well as a long-term goal of various national space programs.

    Building colonies in space would require a combination of many factors, including access to space, food, construction materials, energy, transportation, communications, life support, simulated gravity (using steady circular rotation), entertainment, and radiation protection.

    To justify the colonization of space, supporters have given a variety of reasons, including survival of the human species (in case of nuclear warfare or other planetary catastrophe), protection of Earth's environment, access to additional natural resources, and the spreading of life in the universe, stimulate the cooperative and unified efforts of people of various nationalities, and that the financial expense has been greatly overestimated.

    There are arguments on where to locate space colony. Some researchers suggested space colonies on the Moon, Mars and in orbit.

    In this video, Astronautics4Xploit presents Space Colonies Locations such as Planetary Locations , Natural Satellite Locations, Space Locations, Trans-Neptunian Region and Beyond the Solar System .

    For more information, contact Astronautics4Xploit at:

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