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What did NASA's New Horizons discover around Pluto?

  • What did NASAs New Horizons discover around Pluto?

    13:44

    In 2015, NASA's New Horizons space probe whizzed by Pluto. Now it has sent back all of its data, what did it see and discover?


    In this video, I showcase the journey New Horizons took in order to get to Pluto, its moons, geological features, and Pluto's atmosphere.


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  • NASA’s New Horizons Mission to Pluto

    19:39

    How did a team of explorers become the first people in history to capture images of Pluto’s surface in 2015?

    DCODE the amazing journey of the New Horizons mission, in this fascinating 2016 series - Space’s Deepest Secrets.

  • What Did New Horizons See During Its Journey To Pluto And Beyond? 2006-2019

    10:05

    New Horizons was the first Spacecraft to explore Pluto and the strange Kuiper belt object, Ultima Thule more than 3 billion miles away. But what did the incredible spacecraft see during its decade long journey towards the fringes of the solar system?

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  • New Horizons Found Something Strange on Pluto

    7:51

    New Horizons found lots of interesting things about the previously unexplored Pluto. The former planet is home to ice-mountains floating in nitrogen, methane-ice towers as big as sky scrapers and maybe even a subsurface ocean!

    It's moon, Charon, was also explored by New Horizons and has some strange features. Nix, Hydra, Kerberos and Stix were chartered by the probe.

    After studying the Pluto system, New Horizons blasted off into the Kupier belt, to study Ultima Thule. New Horizons is still going, nearing the edge of the solar system.

    Thanks for watching Elderfox, please subscribe to keep up to date with the latest space exploration.

    Credit: NASA/JPL/Galileo/Universities

  • New Horizons Flyover of Pluto

    2:00

    Using actual New Horizons data and digital elevation models of Pluto and its largest moon Charon, mission scientists have created flyover movies that offer spectacular new perspectives of the many unusual features that were discovered and which have reshaped our views of the Pluto system – from a vantage point even closer than the spacecraft itself.

    This dramatic Pluto flyover begins over the highlands to the southwest of the great expanse of nitrogen ice plain informally named Sputnik Planitia. The viewer first passes over the western margin of Sputnik, where it borders the dark, cratered terrain of Cthulhu Macula, with the blocky mountain ranges located within the plains seen on the right. The tour moves north past the rugged and fractured highlands of Voyager Terra and then turns southward over Pioneer Terra -- which exhibits deep and wide pits -- before concluding over the bladed terrain of Tartarus Dorsa in the far east of the encounter hemisphere.

    Digital mapping and rendering were performed by Paul Schenk and John Blackwell of the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston.

  • The Year of Pluto - New Horizons Documentary Brings Humanity Closer to the Edge of the Solar System

    58:34

    New Horizons is the first mission to the Kuiper Belt, a gigantic zone of icy bodies and mysterious small objects orbiting beyond Neptune. This region also is known as the “third” zone of our solar system, beyond the inner rocky planets and outer gas giants. Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Maryland, designed, built and operates the New Horizons spacecraft, and manages the mission for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The Year of Pluto - NASA New Horizons is a one hour documentary which takes on the hard science and gives us answers to how the mission came about and why it matters. Interviews with Dr. James Green, John Spencer, Fran Bagenal, Mark Showalter and others share how New Horizons will answer many questions. New Horizons is part of the New Frontiers Program, managed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.

  • NASAs incredible mission to Pluto, explained

    3:47

    A tiny spacecraft has been traveling 9 years for this moment — the day we finally get a close look at Pluto. Here's what you need to know about NASA's New Horizon's mission.

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  • Watch NASA reveal new Pluto pictures from New Horizons

    1:1:41

    At a news conference on Wednesday, a NASA team unveiled the latest data and imagery of Pluto taken by the probe New Horizons, which did a flyby of the dwarf planet early Tuesday.

  • Pluto and Beyond

    53:33

    Pluto and Beyond


    Since it explored Pluto in 2015, the New Horizons spacecraft has been zooming toward NASA's most distant target yet. Join the mission team as the probe attempts to fly by Ultima Thule, an object 4 billion miles from Earth.

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  • New Horizons Extreme Close-Up of Pluto’s Surface

    1:36

    This is the most detailed view of Pluto’s terrain you’ll see for a very long time. This mosaic strip – extending across the hemisphere that faced the New Horizons spacecraft as it flew past Pluto on July 14, 2015 – now includes all of the highest-resolution images taken by the NASA probe. With a resolution of about 260 feet (80 meters) per pixel, the mosaic affords New Horizons scientists and the public the best opportunity to examine the fine details of the various types of terrain on Pluto, and determine the processes that formed and shaped them.

    The width of the strip ranges from more than 55 miles (90 kilometers) at its northern end to about 45 miles (75 kilometers) at its southern point. The pictures in the mosaic were obtained by New Horizons’ Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) approximately 9,850 miles (15,850 kilometers) from Pluto, shortly before New Horizons’ closest approach.

    Note: Video is silent/no audio.

    Credits: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI

  • Documentary Film New Horizons Mission to Pluto King of Kuiper Belt

    58:34

    THE YEAR OF PLUTO is a documentary film dedicated to the New Horizons Mission to Pluto, King of Kuiper Belt.
    Video by NASA.

  • Pluto Revealed! Latest Results from NASAs New Horizons Mission

    1:5:35

    Speaker: Richard Binzel (MIT)
    Host: Mark Gurwell

  • New Horizons Arrives at Pluto

    26:12

    At approximately 7:49 a.m. on July 14, NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft is scheduled to be as close as it will get to Pluto, approximately 7,800 miles (12,500 kilometers) above the surface. This historic moment is part of NASA’s coverage of New Horizons’ nine year, three billion mile journey to the Pluto system to gather data about Pluto and its moons.

  • A Colorful ‘Landing’ on Pluto

    1:48

    What would it be like to actually land on Pluto? This movie was made from more than 100 images taken by NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft over six weeks of approach and close flyby in the summer of 2015. The video offers a trip down onto the surface of Pluto -- starting with a distant view of Pluto and its largest moon, Charon -- and leading up to an eventual ride in for a landing on the shoreline of Pluto's informally named Sputnik Planitia.
    To create a movie that makes viewers feel as if they’re diving into Pluto, mission scientists had to interpolate some of the panchromatic (black and white) frames based on what they know Pluto looks like to make it as smooth and seamless as possible. Low-resolution color from the Ralph color camera aboard New Horizons was then draped over the frames to give the best available, actual color simulation of what it would look like to descend from high altitude to Pluto’s surface.
    After a 9.5-year voyage covering more than three billion miles, New Horizons flew through the Pluto system on July 14, 2015, coming within 7,800 miles (12,500 kilometers) of Pluto. Carrying powerful telescopic cameras that could spot features smaller than a football field, New Horizons sent back hundreds of images of Pluto and its moons that show how dynamic and fascinating their surfaces are. Credits: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI
    The original black-and-white “landing” movie can be viewed at:

  • What Has New Horizons Taught Us About Pluto?

    6:18

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    Since New Horizons flew by Pluto on July 14, 2015, it's completely redefined what we know about the dwarf planet and its largest moon Charon. New Horizons' mission will continue to be full of surprises, but here's what we've learned so far
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    What are tholins? Why Pluto looks red:
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  • New Horizons probe sends back first images of Ultima Thule

    2:47

    NASA says it will release new images Wednesday of Ultima Thule, the most distant object ever explored by humans, taken by the New Horizons spacecraft. Scientists believe the icy world, more than a billion miles beyond Pluto, will reveal clues about the origins of the solar system. Mark Strassmann reports.

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  • NASA Loses Contact with New Horizons on Pluto Approach

    2:58

    As NASA's New Horizons probe was about to fly by Pluto, the probe's computer suddenly went offline breaking communication with scientists on Earth.

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  • Arrokoth: Naming the Kuiper Belt Object Visited by NASAs New Horizons

    1:29

    In a fitting tribute to the farthest flyby ever conducted by spacecraft, the Kuiper Belt object 2014 MU69 has been officially named Arrokoth, a Native American term meaning “sky” in the Powhatan/Algonquian language.

    With consent from Powhatan Tribal elders and representatives, NASA’s New Horizons team – whose spacecraft performed the record-breaking reconnaissance of Arrokoth four billion miles from Earth – proposed the name to the International Astronomical Union and Minor Planets Center, the international authority for naming Kuiper Belt objects. The name was announced at a ceremony at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC.

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  • The Mission to Pluto Begins | Mission Pluto

    3:38

    Meet the elite team of space scientists at mission control and learn the incredible odds behind New Horizons' historic voyage to Pluto.
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  • The journey to Pluto, the farthest world ever explored - Alan Stern

    6:10

    Check out Alan Stern's Chasing New Horizons:

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    As of 1989, mankind had successfully sent craft to every known planet in the solar system except one: Pluto. Located in an mysterious region called the Kuiper Belt, Pluto is a scientific goldmine, and could hold clues to the formation of our solar system. Alan Stern explains how NASA's New Horizons mission is going to allow us to see Pluto for the first time.

    Lesson by Alan Stern, animation by Eoin Duffy.

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  • Latest Results from NASAs New Horizon Pluto Mission

    1:41

    NOTE: Due to the poor video quality, the audio portion has been posted on the TWiST Podcast Stream here:

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    Apparently, the Hangouts on Air Technology messed up during the archiving of the live stream.

    The spectacular New Horizons spacecraft flew through the Pluto-system and is on its way to a small Kuiper Belt object called 2014 MU69. It will survey this reddish object to learn more about the outer solar system, but up close.

    New Horizons also has been quite busy: continuing to observe Pluto and a cameo observation of the Kuiper Belt object Quasar (Kwa-war”), roughly half the size of Pluto (690 miles or 1,100 kilometers in diameter).

    In addition to the amazing results from the encounter with Pluto and its five moons, data from New Horizons continues to reveal more details about the atmosphere of Pluto, changes on Pluto’s surface and other intriguing information.

    Join Tony Darnell and Carol Christian as they discuss with John Spencer, Kelsi Singer and Amanda Zangari from Southwest Research Institute/Boulder, about these latest exciting results and the findings being uncovered in the New Horizons data.

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  • New Horizons: Imagining a Landing on Pluto

    1:42

    Imagine a future spacecraft following New Horizons’ trailblazing path to Pluto, but instead of flying past its target, the next visitor touches down in the midst of tall mountains on the icy plains of Pluto’s heart.

    There’s no need to wait for that fantasy trip, thanks to new video produced by New Horizons scientists. Made from more than 100 New Horizons images taken over six weeks of approach and close flyby, the video offers a “trip” to Pluto. It starts with a distant spacecraft’s view of Pluto and its largest moon, Charon – closing the distance day by day – with a dramatic “landing” on the shoreline of Pluto’s frozen plains.

    “Just over a year ago, Pluto was just a dot in the distance,” said New Horizons Principal Investigator Alan Stern, of the Southwest Research Institute, Boulder, Colorado. “This video shows what it would be like to ride aboard an approaching spacecraft and see Pluto grow to become a world, and then to swoop down over its spectacular terrains as if we were approaching some future landing.”

    Image credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI

  • What did NASAs New Horizons Find Near Pluto?

    12:07

    Discoveries by NASA's New Horizons spacecraft! From Pluto's moon Charon to a special kind of ice we look at what the mission found.

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    Kuiper Belt
    It's all good though, because Pluto, and its main moon Charon , along with four more, made worthy targets for investigation. All of the planetesimals , dwarf planets, comets, and millions of smaller objects are part of the Kuiper Belt that surrounds our whole solar system. Most of the Kuiper Belt objects have unusual orbits that aren't well-aligned with the planetary plane of the ecliptic where most of the full-sized planets are. In comparison, our Asteroid Belt, between Mars and Jupiter, is nothing like you see in bad Sci-Fi films. The odds of two objects being within sight of each other are actually remarkably small. While there are over 200 objects that are more than 100 kilometers across and at least one million one-kilometer objects, they are very far apart in a very big space. The Kuiper Belt, on the other hand, has thousands of times more objects so there is a lot to investigate out there. It possesses untouched and uncontaminated leftovers from the formation of the Solar System. It's like a history book just waiting to be read.

    Almost a Decade to Get There
    It's pretty hard to believe, but the New Horizons Mission faced a lot of apathetic opposition. The detractors actually thought that Pluto was going to be pretty dull and not worth the effort of visiting. The mission was on and off again so many times that it took an immense amount of focus from the New Horizons scientists to finally get it, literally, off the ground and into space. They used the biggest rocket available, The Atlas, and made the lightest spacecraft they could manage. As a result, at launch it made it to the moon in nine hours, compared to the Apollo Program, which took nearly four days to get to the Moon. They also used a gravity slingshot effect around Jupiter to add another few kilometers per second, shaving about 3 years off of the total flight time. They got to Pluto in just nine years with the fastest traveling spaceship in human history. It hit speeds of 1.6 million kilometers per day. That's 66,000 kilometers per hour, or 1,100 kilometres per minute, or 18.5 kilometers per second.

    What did New Horizons Find?
    The enthusiasts knew it was going to be good, and all the detractors were surprised at just how interesting it really was. In mid-2014, at a distance of about 430 million kilometers, approximately three times the distance between Earth and Sun, the team powered the systems back on and started to take multiple daily images. Details started to become clearer and clearer; the surface was surprisingly multihued with light and dark patches and, finally, as they closed in, vivid colors like reddish browns. The first big surprise was the giant Valentines heart-shape about the size of Texas on one side. With a data rate of only 1 Kilo-bit per second, it took a very long time to start getting picture data, not to mention the 4.5 hour time delay due to the speed of light. From this data they could watch the orbital dance of Charon and Pluto as they spun about their barycenter.

  • What Did We Learn About Pluto? Highlights from NASAs New Horizons MIssion

    6:10

    We've only had blurry images of Pluto up until New Horizons. So what did we learn when we got up close and personal with Pluto and its moons?
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    Clyde Tombaugh first discovered Pluto in 1930. He saw only see a single speck of light moving slowly in front of the background stars as he flipped photographic plates back and forth. Sadly, this was the best anyone could do for decades.

    Even the mighty Hubble, the most sensitive instrument ever focused on Pluto, could only resolve a few grainy pixels.

    It’s because Pluto is really really far away: 7.5 billion kilometers. Just the light alone from there takes over 4 hours to reach us.

    In order to get any more information, humanity needed to reach out and send a spacecraft to Pluto, and photograph it, up close and personal.

    In 1989, Alan Stern and a group of planetary scientists began working on a mission. Their work culminated in NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft, launched in 2006, beginning a 9 and a half year journey.

    And unless you’ve been living in a lunar lava tube, you know that New Horizons finally reached its destination in mid July 2015, passing a narrow 12,472 kilometers above the surface.

    For the very first time in human history, we saw a member of the Kuiper Belt right up in it’s business.

    And now I retire these old low quality images Pluto! Begone artist’s illustrations!

    From here on out, we’re all about sick high def photos of the surface and its moons. I for one am going to revel in them for a while.

    So fashion shoots aside, what did we actually learn about Pluto?

    The primary mission was to map the geography of Pluto and its biggest moon, Charon.

    It would study the surface chemistry of these icy worlds, and measure their atmospheres, if they even exist at all.

    The mission had a few other objectives, and of course, planetary scientists knew that the spacecraft would just surprise us with stuff we never expected.

    Kuiper Belt objects like Pluto and Charon are ancient; geologists expected them to be pockmarked with craters, large and small.

    Surprisingly, New Horizons showed relatively smooth surfaces on both worlds. Pluto has a Texas-sized region newly named Sputnik Planum, where exotic ices flow like glaciers. Frozen nitrogen, carbon dioxide and methane ices act just like the ones we have here on Earth. We can see from the relative lack of craters that this process is still happening.

    Pluto has mountains. Mountains! Close ups show a young range with peaks as high as 11,000 feet, or 3,500 meters.

    Here’s the crazy part. Those exotic chemicals that act like snow and ice? They’re not hard enough to make mountain peaks like this.

    At extreme cold temperatures, water ice becomes as hard as rock. These mountains are made of ice, and they’re very young, probably less than 100 million years old. There could be plate tectonics on Pluto, but with ice, not rock. My mind is blown.

    Pluto’s moon Charon has a huge chasm longer and deeper than the Grand Canyon in Arizona and although scientists hoped to see an atmosphere, the reality was beyond anyone’s expectations.

    New Horizons detected a thin nitrogen atmosphere at Pluto. It could be snowing nitrogen on Pluto right now.

    There could be faint winds, since there are regions on Pluto that look like they might have undergone weathering.

    Take a look at this photograph as New Horizons zipped away. You can see the atmosphere clearly surrounding the dwarf planet, interacting with the solar wind and creating a tail that stretches away from the Sun.

    Here’s my favorite thing we learned.

    Pluto is about 80 km larger than previous estimates, which makes it the largest Kuiper Belt Object found so far. Even bigger than Eris, which is still a little more massive. So maybe it’s time to revisit that Pluto planethood debate again.

    I’m just messing with you. No good will ever come from having that debate. It will only end in tears.

    Interestingly, the data connection between Earth and New Horizons is tenuous. Possibly the worst internet since AOL.

    It can only transmit back about 1kb of data per second, which means that we’ll need to wait about 16 months for the photographs and data to be sent home during the first few days of the flyby.

  • Was fand die interplanetare Raumsonde New Horizons auf Pluto?

    13:30

    Auf zu neuen Horizonten! Noch niemals zuvor war eine Raumsonde zum äußersten Planeten unseres Sonnensystems entsandt worden. Das NASA-Projekt New Horizons ist eines der aktuellsten und liefert heute noch ständig neue Daten. Nachdem sie das Pluto-System unter die Lupe genommen hatte, flog die Raumsonde New Horizons weiter zum Kuipergürtel.

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  • NASA | EXTENDED VIEW: New Horizons Best Close-Up of Plutos Surface

    20:31

    Extended View: Over 20 minutes of footage giving you more time to take in the wonderful images returned by New Horizons

    Bringing you the BEST Space and Astronomy videos online. Showcasing videos and images from the likes of NASA,ESA,Hubble etc.

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    This is the most detailed view of Pluto’s terrain you’ll see for a very long time. This mosaic strip – extending across the hemisphere that faced the New Horizons spacecraft as it flew past Pluto on July 14, 2015 – now includes all of the highest-resolution images taken by the NASA probe. (Be sure to zoom in for maximum detail.) With a resolution of about 260 feet (80 meters) per pixel, the mosaic affords New Horizons scientists and the public the best opportunity to examine the fine details of the various types of terrain on Pluto, and determine the processes that formed and shaped them.

    “This new image product is just magnetic,” said Alan Stern, New Horizons principal investigator from Southwest Research Institute, Boulder, Colorado. “It makes me want to go back on another mission to Pluto and get high-resolution images like these across the entire surface.”

    The view extends from the “limb” of Pluto at the top of the strip, almost to the “terminator” (or day/night line) in the southeast of the encounter hemisphere, seen below. The width of the strip ranges from more than 55 miles (90 kilometers) at its northern end to about 45 miles (75 kilometers) at its southern point. The perspective changes greatly along the strip: at its northern end, the view looks out horizontally across the surface, while at its southern end, the view looks straight down onto the surface

  • What did NASAs New Horizons discover around Pluto

    11:53

    In 2015, NASA's New Horizons space probe whizzed by Pluto. Now it has sent back all of its data, what did it see and discover?
    In this video, I showcase the journey New Horizons took in order to get to Pluto, its moons, geological features, and Pluto's atmosphere.

  • NASAs New Horizons discover around Pluto

    11:48

    What did NASA's New Horizons discover around Pluto?
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  • NASAs New Horizons Spots Mystery Rogue Planet Beyond Pluto

    2:23

    Nasa's New Horizon's probe may have passed Pluto, but it is still surprising scientists. It recently took the closest images ever of a distant Kuiper Belt object, capturing a mysterious object passing 3.3 billion miles from the sun.

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  • Launchpad: New Horizons Heads Toward Pluto

    6:04

    On our NASA st=ite at:
    Find out about the fastest spacecraft to ever leave Earth's orbit. See what information scientists hope to gain from NASA's New Horizons spacecraft as it hurls through space. Check out the instruments that will help us get our first up-close look at Pluto.

  • NASA | New Horizons Latest Images From Pluto

    5:19

    Bringing you the BEST Space and Astronomy videos online. Showcasing videos and images from the likes of NASA,ESA,Hubble etc.

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    The New Horizons spacecraft is still sending back data it amassed of its flyby on Pluto in July. These are some of its latest images

  • Pluto New Horizons: What have we discovered?

    3:08

    The debate surrounding Pluto’s size has finally been settled, according to brand new results returned by NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft.

    Pluto has been found to be about 2.370 kilometres (1,473 miles) in diameter, making it somewhat larger than previous estimates of the dwarf planet. Images taken by the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI), confirms what astronomers already suspected: the dwarf planet is larger than all other known Solar System objects beyond the orbit of ice giant Neptune.

    A new estimate of Pluto’s size means that the dwarf planet’s density is slightly lower than previously thought and the fraction of ice found in its interior is higher. The atmosphere that encompasses the world is also shallower than initially thought. It’s because of Pluto’s atmosphere that astronomers have been unable to get a better idea of the dwarf planet’s size. Its largest moon Charon, on the other hand, doesn’t have a substantial atmosphere – that means that we’ve been able to determine just how big it is with relative ease using ground-based telescopes on Earth. Observations from New Horizons confirm previous estimates of 1208 kilometres (751 miles).

    The dwarf planet’s icy surface is becoming more fascinating and complex. The spacecraft’s latest image suggests features that may be cliffs and impact craters, snow and even a large heart-shapes bright area measuring some 1,200 miles (2,000 kilometres) across, giving Pluto the nickname of the small planet with the big heart!

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  • Why do Pluto and Charon orbit around nothing?

    1:51

    Astrum Answers! Pluto's moon, Charon, does not orbit Pluto. In fact they both revolve around an empty point in space. But how? And why?

    This is a new series of short format videos answering questions my viewers have. Have a burning question that needs answering? Ask in the comments and your question might be the topic for the next video.

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  • New Horizons Flyover of Pluto : Nasa new view of Pluto

    2:22

    Using actual New Horizons data and digital elevation models of Pluto and its largest moon Charon, mission scientists have created flyover movies that offer spectacular new perspectives of the many unusual features that were discovered and which have reshaped our views of the Pluto system – from a vantage point even closer than the spacecraft itself.

    This dramatic Pluto flyover begins over the highlands to the southwest of the great expanse of nitrogen ice plain informally named Sputnik Planitia. The viewer first passes over the western margin of Sputnik, where it borders the dark, cratered terrain of Cthulhu Macula, with the blocky mountain ranges located within the plains seen on the right. The tour moves north past the rugged and fractured highlands of Voyager Terra and then turns southward over Pioneer Terra -- which exhibits deep and wide pits -- before concluding over the bladed terrain of Tartarus Dorsa in the far east of the encounter hemisphere.

    Digital mapping and rendering were performed by Paul Schenk and John Blackwell of the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston.

  • Nasas New Horizons Pluto pictures: What weve learned

    1:48

    Dr Robert Massey explains what we've learned from Nasa's New Horizons images and talks about the 11,000 ft high ice mountains

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  • New Horizons on course for Pluto flyby - BBC News

    2:38

    It's 3 billion miles away (4.7bn km) and has never been seen in detail but now Pluto, at the very edge of the solar system, is on the brink of being revealed in a new light. On Tuesday, Nasa's New Horizons spacecraft will sweep past the icy dwarf planet and send back the clearest ever images of it.
    David Shukman reports.

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  • Pluto on the horizon

    4:15

    An interview with Alan Stern, New Horizons principal investigator, about the upcoming Pluto encounter, and what is next for his NASA spacecraft. Read more --

  • Plutos Intriguing Moons

    1:36

    We talk a lot about Charon, Pluto's largest moon that's about half the size of its host planet. But what about Pluto’s other moons? They're strange, to say the least.

    Pluto’s four smaller moons — Styx, Nix, Kerberos and Hydra — are differently fascinating than Charon. These moons are each 20 to about 50 times smaller than Charon, they aren’t round like Charon, and unlike pretty much every other moon in the solar system, they are not in synchronous rotation with their host planet — they don’t always show one face to their host.

    Instead, they are spinning incredibly fast! Hydra, for example, the most distant of the four, spins 89 times for every orbit it makes around Pluto.

    New Horizons mission scientists suspect these chaotic spin rates could be due to Charon exerting a strong torque on the bodies that stops them from settling into a more common, synchronous rotation.

    But that’s not all. These moons also wobble far more than scientists expected small moons would. They behave more like spinning tops than anything else. This uncommon movement could be explained by observations that suggest these four moons were formed when multiple smaller moons merged. Which means at some point in Pluto’s history — likely in the aftermath of the theorized impact that formed Charon — the tiny planet had more than five moons, but the smaller moons coalesced into the ones we see today.

    And it’s worth mentioning that these are Pluto’s only moons. New Horizons scientist expected to find more small moons – leftover debris from the impact – but none were found. Surprisingly, Pluto only has the five moons discovered from Earth.

  • All about Pluto

    1:55

    On July 14 2015, New Horizons will flyby Pluto at a closest approach of 7,750 miles (Earth diameter = 7,918 miles).

    We'll be able to resolve features as small as 200 feet across. What will we find at this icy world?

  • Hubbles Pluto Discoveries

    4:37

    From HubbleCast. Before NASA’s New Horizons probe flew past Pluto in July 2015, almost all of the information scientists had about this mysterious dwarf planet came from observations made by Hubble. What discoveries did Hubble make in the Pluto system and how will the greatest telescope ever built advance our knowledge of this distant, icy world following New Horizons’ flyby?

  • Top 10 Pluto - What We Discovered on Pluto | New Horizons: NASAs Mission to Pluto

    1:55

    New Horizons is a NASA spacecraft that was the first to visit dwarf planet Pluto in July 2015. Learn More About What New Horizons Spacecraft Discovered on Pluto.

    Top 10 Images Of Pluto.

    Images: NASA

    ** Images Are Used For Educational Purpose Only , All credit Goes to its Respective Owner ***

  • New Horizons: Phone Home & First Images of Ultima Thule

    44:49

    The New Horizons team shares the first image of Ultima Thule, as well as updates on spacecraft status and flyby success, from the Mission Operations Center at Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab.

  • 4K UHD 60FPS - New Horizons NASAs Pluto probe enters key flyby phase

    3:36

    Cheers, whoops and flag waving broke out at NASAs New Horizons control centre on July 14th 2015, as scientists celebrated the spacecraft’s dramatic flyby of Pluto, considered the last unexplored world in the solar system.

    The probe shot past at more than 28,000 mph (45,000 km/h) at 12.49pm BST (7.49am ET) on a trajectory that brought the fastest spacecraft ever to leave Earth’s orbit within 7,770 miles (12,391 km) of Pluto’s surface.

    The moment, played out on July 14th 2015, to the sound of The Final Countdown by the 1980s glam metal band Europe, marked a historic achievement for the US, which can now claim to be the only nation to have visited every planet in the classical solar system.

    Bristling with cameras and other instruments, the New Horizons probe was programmed to gather a wealth of images and data as it sped past Pluto and its five small moons, Charon, Styx, Nix, Hydra and Kerberos.

    Images beamed back from New Horizons have shown Pluto in shades of red and orange, with hints of valleys, mountains and craters. On July 14th 2015, NASA released a new image of Pluto. The picture was taken at about 9pm BST (4pm ET) on July 13th 2015, about 16 hours before the moment of closest approach. The spacecraft was 476,000 miles (766,047 km) from the surface.

    Though Pluto has a varied terrain, with dark patches on the equator and brighter regions to the north, its surface looks younger and smoother than that of its largest moon, Charon. The reason may be geological activity, which refreshes the body’s surface.

    Mission scientists at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore were out of contact with the spacecraft as it hurtled past the icy body 3bn miles from Earth. Instead the probe captured images and took measurements automatically and stored them on board to send back later.

    At such a great distance, direct control from the ground is impossible, because radio signals take more than nine hours to travel to the spacecraft and back again. It will take 16 months to beam all of New Horizon’s data back to Earth.

    Scientists now face an agonising wait for news from the spacecraft, which is due to call home at 2am BST Wednesday (9pm ET Tuesday). Only when that 15 minute-long signal is received will NASA officials know whether New Horizons survived the flyby.

    One of the greatest hazards the spacecraft faces is dust that may form a hazy cloud around Pluto after being knocked off its moons by meteorite strikes. Hal Weaver, a scientist on the mission, said that colliding with a dust particle the size of a grain of rice could potentially destroy the mission. But the risk of such a catastrophic failure was low, at less than one in 10,000.

    New Horizons blasted off in January 2006, carrying the ashes of Clyde Tombaugh, the astronomer who discovered Pluto in 1930. Several months later, astronomers at the International Astronomical Union voted to change the definition of the word “planet”, a move that downgraded Pluto to the more diminutive “dwarf planet”. The flyby may resurrect the debate and see Pluto restored to full planetary status.

    In a live interview on NASA TV on Tuesday, Charles Bolden, NASAs chief administrator, said he hoped the scientists would reconsider the name. “I call it a planet, but I’m not the rule maker,” he said, adding that arguments over Pluto’s status should not detract from the achievement. “It should be a day of incredible pride.”

    Pluto lies in a region of space at the edge of the solar system called the Kuiper belt. Astronomers call it the third zone of space. The first zone contains the rocky, terrestrial planets of Mercury, Venus, Earth and Mars. The second zone is home to the gas giants, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. Alongside the Pluto system in the Kuiper belt are comets and more than 100,000 miniature worlds.

    New Horizons is expected to continue its mission into the Kuiper belt. The spacecraft is powered by a nuclear generator that runs on plutonium, a substance named after the dwarf planet. The generator should run until the 2030s, when New Horizons will be 100 times further away than Earth is from the sun.

    --CREDITS--

    This film was made possible through contributions from New Horizons mission partners Aerojet Rocketdyne, Ball Aerospace, Lockheed Martin, United Launch Alliance & mixedmultimedia®

    Visual Director: Erik Wernquist
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    Visual Artists: Mikael Hall, Kim Nicosia, Erik Wernquist
    Composer: Cristian Sandquist
    Colorist: Caj Müller/Beckholmen Film
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    Photos and textures: NASA/JPL/CICLOPS/Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualisation Studio/mixedmultimedia®

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  • Pluto & Charon Flyby- Epic Photos & Videos! NASA New Horizons Journey to #Pluto, Pt.2:

    22:44

    Welcome to Episode 5 of Ultra Frontier Explorer, presented by Dr. Jon Overton. This week we follow up on our coverage of NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft on its Journey to flyby Pluto – this is Part.2 of two about this awesome mission!

    New Horizons has spent the last six months beaming back the observations it made as it flew by Pluto & Charon last July, and I've pulled some of the very best photos & footage all together in this Episode. We know so much more about Pluto now than we did before flyby.

    All kinds of mysteries are explained in this episode, including:
    Why does New Horizons wear a bullet-proof jacket?
    How is New Horizons powered, so far from the Sun?
    What is Pluto's heart made of?
    Is Pluto a living, (geologically active) world? or a dead one?
    What are Pluto's mountains made of? And how high are they?
    What's all the red stuff on Pluto? And how does it connect to the origin of life?
    Why does Charon have a red hat?

    In this Ep.5 of UFEx, Dr. Jon O answers all these questions and more!

    If you enjoyed this video, please like, share and subscribe!

    To watch the entire UFEx series, click here:

  • NASA Images - A Look Back At Pluto New Horizons

    4:19

    As New Horizons heads towards Ultima Thule we look back to the its views of Pluto

    The New Horizons team requested, and received, a mission extension through 2021 to explore additional Kuiper belt objects (KBOs). During this Kuiper Belt Extended Mission (KEM), the spacecraft will perform a close fly-by of (486958) 2014 MU69 and conduct more distant observations on an additional two dozen objects

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  • NASA recaps New Horizons Pluto flyby

    3:1:09

    NASATV holds a news conference on the images captured and lessons learned from the New Horizons Pluto flyby. Watch live starting at 1:00 p.m.

  • NASAs New Horizons Hangout: Countdown to Pluto!

    59:51

    Join us for a discussion of what we have seen so far of Pluto and its system of moons, and learn what we will be observing in the final month leading up to the closest approach of the New Horizons spacecraft on July 14th, 2015.

  • Raw: NASA Video Shows Pluto Approach

    1:17

    NASA released video of the view from the New Horizons spacecraft as it approached Pluto. The video is made up of more than 100 high resolution images, taken over six months as the spacecraft approached the dwarf planet, flying by in July, . (Jan. 24)

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  • New Horizons Detects Next Flyby Target on This Week @NASA – August 31, 2018

    3:38

    New Horizons spots its next flyby target, Administrator Bridenstine visits our west coast facilities, and using data from space to fight a life-threatening disease … a few of the stories to tell you about – This Week at NASA!

    This video is available for download from NASA's Image and Video Library:

  • NASA | New Horizons Best Close-Up of Plutos Surface

    5:10

    Bringing you the BEST Space and Astronomy videos online. Showcasing videos and images from the likes of NASA,ESA,Hubble etc.

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    This is the most detailed view of Pluto’s terrain you’ll see for a very long time. This mosaic strip – extending across the hemisphere that faced the New Horizons spacecraft as it flew past Pluto on July 14, 2015 – now includes all of the highest-resolution images taken by the NASA probe. (Be sure to zoom in for maximum detail.) With a resolution of about 260 feet (80 meters) per pixel, the mosaic affords New Horizons scientists and the public the best opportunity to examine the fine details of the various types of terrain on Pluto, and determine the processes that formed and shaped them.

    “This new image product is just magnetic,” said Alan Stern, New Horizons principal investigator from Southwest Research Institute, Boulder, Colorado. “It makes me want to go back on another mission to Pluto and get high-resolution images like these across the entire surface.”

    The view extends from the “limb” of Pluto at the top of the strip, almost to the “terminator” (or day/night line) in the southeast of the encounter hemisphere, seen below. The width of the strip ranges from more than 55 miles (90 kilometers) at its northern end to about 45 miles (75 kilometers) at its southern point. The perspective changes greatly along the strip: at its northern end, the view looks out horizontally across the surface, while at its southern end, the view looks straight down onto the surface

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