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What's Under The Ice In Antarctica?

  • Discovering Life Under Antarctica’s Ice

    3:14

    Drew Lohrer is the principal investigator at Science Under the Ice, a project dedicated to studying the resilience of organisms under Antarctica’s frozen ocean. Along with his team of nine scientists, Lohrer dives deep to collect data on sea organisms and deploy incubation chambers along the seafloor. The team of scientists and technicians endure life in one of the most extreme places on Earth, all in the name of discovering the effects of climate change on our marine biodiversity.

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  • Whats Under The Ice In Antarctica?

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  • Diving below the Antarctic Ice Sheet with No Escape | Seven Worlds, One Planet | BBC Earth

    2:54

    The Seven Worlds, One Planet crew dived beneath the surface of the Antarctic ice sheet with only a tiny bore hole for escape. Discover the wonders they found in the frozen seas.
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  • What’s Under The Sea Ice In Antarctica?

    5:48

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    Join me for a rarely seen look under the sea ice in Antarctica. About as many people have been into space as have scuba dived in Antarctica. I wasn’t diving however but I put a Go Pro down two dive holes to see what is on the bottom of the ocean under the sea ice.

    The footage I got blew me away.

    20m down on the bottom of the sea there is fish and starfish everywhere! In some spots there is huge sponges and Weddell Seals

    This was one of my favourite videos to make and I hope you enjoy it too!

    Lots more Antarctic vlogs to come so stand by!

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  • The Hidden World Beneath the Antarctic Ice Sheet | John Priscu | TEDxBozeman

    11:19

    Following more than a decade of international and national planning and an intense week of on-ice weather delays, Priscu led the field team successfully drilled through the overlying ice sheet and sampled directly the waters and sediments of a lake hidden beneath the Antarctic ice sheet. The groundbreaking exploration of Antarctica's subglacial environment marks the beginning of a new era in polar science, opening the window for future interdisciplinary scientific investigations of one of Earth's last unexplored frontiers.

  • Lakes Beneath Antarctic Ice: Deep Dark and Mysterious

    52:08

    (2:52 - Helen Fricker, 44:07 - Q & A)
    In 2006, Helen Amanda Fricker was sitting at her desk studying new satellite data when she made a starting discovery – a set of active lakes that exist underneath the ice in Antarctica. Join Helen, a 25-year veteran of Antarctic ice sheet research, and learn about the discovery, exploration and drilling of these mysterious phenomena at the southern reaches of our planet. Recorded on 01/14/2019. [3/2019] [Show ID: 34393]

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  • Scientists find shrimp-like creature under Antarctic ice sheet

    2:17

    (15 Mar 2010)
    Pine Island Glacier Ice Shelf, Antarctica - December 2009
    1. Shrimp-like creature swimming around camera cable inside bore hole
    Greenbelt, Maryland, USA - 12 March 2010
    2. SOUNDBITE: (English) Robert Bindschadler, NASA Ice Scientist: (++AUDIO OVERLAID OVER PREVIOUS SHOT++)
    What the video shows is the view of the bottom of a bore hole through about a 200 metre thick ice shelf close to McMurdo Station. And so while we were looking at the video examining the hole, lo and behold this marine organism came swimming by. I called it a shrimp-like thingy, because I don''t know anything about marine biology. But it was just fascinating to see this amphipod, is what it''s actually, its proper name is, swimming around and being very curious, looking at the cable and we were all huddled around the monitor just fascinated with what we were seeing at the bottom of our hole. Well, when I showed this to a marine biologist she was quite surprised because we are a long way from the open ocean - about 20 miles (32 kilometres) - and this is a higher life form, this is pretty far up the food chain and if it is swimming around that means that there is quite a lot of life at this location and that was a surprise to us because it was a surprise to them. One of the funny things about this was that we were staring at it and it was probably, we had lots of questions in our mind and it probably had lots of questions in its mind. It probably was just swimming along and something new and different showed up in front of it and so it was extremely curious. It was swimming around and sitting on the cable and looking at it from every angle, going up and down and I''m sure this was a very interesting day in the life of that amphipod, as it was for us. Yeah, this was not the only indication of life there. We lowered this camera almost all the way to the seafloor, we didn''t have quite enough cable to go the full 800 metres (2624 feet), and when we pulled the cable up we also saw what looked like tentacles from a jellyfish attached to the cable. So, there is a lot of life down there and I think we don''t really know the first thing about it. It''s a entirely new frontier for us to explore.
    STORYLINE:
    Scientists have discovered a shrimp-like creature and a jellyfish deep beneath a massive Antarctic ice sheet.
    Six hundred feet (180 metres) below the ice where no light shines, scientists had thought nothing much more than a few microbes could exist.
    But a NASA team was surprised when they lowered a video camera to get the first long look at the underbelly of the ice sheet in Antarctica.
    A curious shrimp-like creature came swimming by and then parked itself on the camera''s cable.
    Scientists also pulled up a tentacle they believe came from a foot-long jellyfish.
    NASA ice scientist Robert Bindschadler, who will be presenting the initial findings and a video at an American Geophysical Union meeting on Wednesday said his team was operating on the presumption that nothing was living underneath the ice sheet.
    This is a higher life form, this is pretty far up the food chain and if it is swimming around that means that there is quite a lot of life at this location and that was a surprise, he said of the 3-inch-long, orange creature starring in their two-minute video.
    The creature is not actually a shrimp, but a Lyssianasid amphipod, which is distantly related to shrimp.
    The video is likely to inspire experts to rethink what they know about life in harsh environments.
    And it has scientists musing that if such creatures can exist below 600 feet (180 metres) of Antarctic ice in subfreezing dark water, other hostile places such as Europa, a frozen moon of Jupiter, could also host life.
    The key unanswered question is how they survive, Kim said.


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  • Antarcticas Ice on the Move - Antarcticas Climate Secrets

    7:35

    Antarctica is the iciest place on Earth, but not all of the ice on the continent is the same -- nor is it sitting still. Antarctica has both floating ice and land-based ice. What is the difference between ice sheets, ice shelves and sea ice? How does this ice affect the stratification and circulation of global oceans? How does it affect climate? And why does melting sea ice not raise sea level but melting land-based ice sheets do? For more of Antarctica's Secrets, including teachers' guides, visit

  • Under the ice

    3:41

    Buried deep beneath the Antarctic ice lies Lake Whillans. Despite being one of the most inhospitable places on Earth, Lake Whillans was nevertheless thought to contain life. In early 2014 a team of scientists trekked across the ice, tasked with drilling 800 metres down to the lake and looking for life. Reporter Douglas Fox went with them, and he tells us about his experiences.

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  • An ancient Antarctic rainforest

    2:36

    An expedition drilling into the sea-floor near the South Pole has discovered the root network of an ancient forest. It reveals surprisingly high temperatures in the Antarctic during the Cretaceous period, and the existence of a rich, temperate rainforest just 900km from the Pole.

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  • NASA | The Arctic and the Antarctic Respond in Opposite Ways

    1:43

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    The Arctic and the Antarctic are regions that have a lot of ice and acts as air conditioners for the Earth system. This year, Antarctic sea ice reached a record maximum extent while the Arctic reached a minimum extent in the top ten lowest since satellite records began. One reason we are seeing differences between the Arctic and the Antarctic is due to their different geographies. As for what's causing the sea increase in the Antarctic, scientists are also studying ocean temperatures, possible changes in wind direction and, overall, how the region is responding to changes in the climate.

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  • NASA | The Bedrock Beneath

    1:59

    Our understanding of what lies beneath the world's biggest ice sheet has taken another leap forward. In this video we strip away Antarctic ice to reveal a new, and much more detailed map of the bedrock below. This map, called Bedmap2, was compiled by the British Antarctic Survey and incorporates millions of new measurements, including substantial data sets from NASA's ICESat satellite and an airborne mission called Operation IceBridge.



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  • Scientists Make Surprising Discovery Deep Beneath Antarctic Ice Sheet

    1:22

    A National Science Foundation-funded team of researchers has made a surprising discovery 2400 feet beneath the Ross Ice Shelf in Antarctica...fish, invertebrates living and thriving in the brutally cold and perpetually dark waters beneath the ice so far away from the open ocean. The team says the discovery opens new questions about the ability of life to thrive in extreme environments.

    The Whillans Ice Stream Subglacial Access Research Drilling or WISSARD Team for the first time ever, drilled down to the “grounding zone”, 530 miles from the edge of the Ross Sea...where Antarctic ice, land and sea all converge. The team used a specially designed hot water drill to bore through a half mile of ice, working around the clock to collect sediment samples. While the borehole remained open, the team deployed a remotely operated vehicle or ROV called Deep SCINI into the hole. Developed at Northern Illinois University, the ROV was fitted with a number of oceanographic instruments, including a downward looking camera to record data.

    The grounding zone is extremely important for the stability of the ice shelf and studying core samples from this remote area will provide scientists with clues about the mechanics of ice sheets, future changes in climate, and sea-level rise.

  • What Does Record-High Antarctic Sea Ice Say About Climate Change? | Video

    1:43

    Record lows in sea ice have been recently recorded in the Arctic but ice around the opposite pole of the planet is on the rise. This is probably not due to climate stabilization: The rate of sea ice loss is substantially more than the Antarctic growth-rate. But further study in ocean temperatures, wind direction and more is needed to explain why this is occurring.

    Credit: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center/Joy Ng

  • 91 New Volcanoes Discovered Underneath The Antarctic Ice | Mach | NBC News

    1:24

    Researchers at the University of Edinburgh just discovered 91 new volcanoes in Antarctica, bringing the total number of volcanoes in the region up to 138. Their biggest concern is that some of these volcanoes might be active.
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    91 New Volcanoes Discovered Underneath The Antarctic Ice | Mach | NBC News

  • Eerie noises recorded from Antarcticas ice shelf

    45

    Take a listen to the sounds scientists discovered near the Antarctic ice shelves.

    Using special instruments, scientists have discovered weird sounds at the bottom of the world. The noise is actually vibrating ice, caused by the wind blowing across snow dunes, according to a new study.

    “It's kind of like you're blowing a flute, constantly, on the ice shelf,” study lead author Julien Chaput, a geophysicist and mathematician at Colorado State University, said in a statement.

    Another scientist, glaciologist Douglas MacAyeal of the University of Chicago, likened the sounds to the buzz of thousands of cicadas. The sounds are too low in frequency to be heard by human ears unless sped up by the monitoring equipment.

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  • See the Extreme Ice Changes Near the Antarctic Peninsula | Short Film Showcase

    5:27

    Join the Extreme Ice Survey (EIS) team on an expedition to South Georgia Island near the Antarctic Peninsula. This trip adds the Southern Hemisphere to a network of 43 time-lapse cameras placed worldwide on 24 glaciers. Capturing one photo per hour of daylight, the cameras placed on South Georgia will document the story of the island's melting glaciers.
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    See the Extreme Ice Changes Near the Antarctic Peninsula | Short Film Showcase


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  • Antarctica is losing ice at an accelerating rate. How much will sea levels rise?

    9:41

    The frozen continent of Antarctica contains the vast majority of all freshwater on Earth. Now that ice is melting at an accelerating rate, in part because of climate change. What does this transformation mean for coastal communities across the globe? William Brangham reports from Antarctica on the troubling trend of ice loss and how glaciers can serve as a climate record from the past.

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  • Antarctica melting: Journey to the doomsday glacier - BBC News

    3:00

    Glaciologists have described Thwaites Glacier as the most important glacier in the world, the riskiest glacier, even the doomsday glacier.

    A team of 40 or so scientists are part of the International Thwaites Glacier Collaboration, a five-year, $50m (£38m) joint UK-US effort to understand why it is changing so rapidly.

    The project represents the biggest and most complex scientific field programme in Antarctic history.

    The BBC's chief environment correspondent Justin Rowlatt went to meet the scientists behind the project.

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  • Researchers capture audio of Antarctic ice ‘singing’

    34

    A haunting sound captured by researchers could help monitor changes to Antarctica’s Ross Ice Shelf from afar. Extremely sensitive sensors were buried two metres under the surface to capture ‘seismic motions’. Winds blowing across the icy surface create vibrations, producing a ‘near-constant set of seismic tones’, according to the study in Geophysical Research Letters. The frequency is too low to be heard by human ears and, according to the American Geophysical Union, it was only made audible by speeding up the recording about 1,200 times
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  • Conspiracy Theories About Antarctica That Might Be True

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    What do you really know about Antarctica?

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  • A mysterious hole has reappeared in the middle of Antarctica

    2:05

    A mysterious 'hole' larger than Maryland has reappeared in the middle of Antarctica after 42 years. Scientists aren't sure how it got there. But this isn't the first time it's appeared. The hole is a type of polynya. Polynyas are a region of open water surrounded by sea ice. But the Weddell polynya is unlike any other. While most polynyas form near the shore, this polynya is located hundreds of kilometers from the coast. Scientists first saw it in 1974. Back then, the opening was as large as Oregon. But in 1976, the opening closed up seemingly for good. Then, in 2016, a NASA satellite spotted a small opening. It was the first sighting of the polynya in over 40 years. Since then, the opening has grown considerably larger. Now, it's large enough to fit Maryland. It's still 5X smaller than it was in the '70s. But this polynya's reappearance is a mystery to scientists. One expert said it was like someone had punched a hole in the ice.

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  • A Dead Satellite Is Unlocking the Secrets Lurking Beneath Antarctica

    4:48

    A hypothetical ocean model called a geoid is helping us uncover the hidden gravity points underneath our landmasses; including the ever mysterious Antarctica.

    A New State of Water Reveals a Hidden Ocean in Earth’s Mantle -

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    Earth tectonics as seen by GOCE - Enhanced satellite gravity gradient imaging

    This is particularly apparent for the cratonic regions of the Earth. The comparisons demonstrate that the combination of seismological, and satellite gravity gradient imaging has significant potential to enhance our knowledge of Earth’s structure. In remote frontiers like the Antarctic continent, where even basic knowledge of lithospheric scale features remains incomplete, the curvature images help unveil the heterogeneity in lithospheric structure, e.g. between the composite East Antarctic Craton and the West Antarctic Rift System.

    The Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer

    It was launched on 17 March 2009. Owing to its sleek shape, GOCE is often cited as one of ESA's most elegant space probes. The mission ended on 11 November 2013 after a planned destructive re-entry into the atmosphere.

    Beneath Antarctica’s Ice Is a Graveyard of Dead Continents

    The eastern section of Antarctica is buried beneath a thick ice sheet. Some scientists simply assumed that under that cold mass there was nothing more than a “frozen tectonic block,” a somewhat homogeneous mass that distinguished it from the mixed up geologies of other continents.

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  • Moment Massive Slab of Ice Breaks Off of Glacier in Antarctica

    56

    The moment a tower block of ice broke off from a glacier in Antarctica was captured on camera, Thursday, January 30.

    The slab of ice toppled from the William Glacier and rolled into the waters of Börgen Bay, Anvers Island.

    Scientists on an Antarctic survey ship, the James Clark Ross, estimate that the block weighed thousands of tons and was at least 40 meters high. (AP)

  • Nazis and pyramids: Whats really going on in Antarctica? | Newshub

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  • Antarctica Secrets: Scenic Journey to the Bottom of a Lake - Into the Blue | The New York Times

    2:45

    Michael Becker, a researcher from McGill University, takes a camera along during a dive to the bottom of an Antarctic lake.

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  • What happens under the ice in Antarctica?

    5:42

    Which impact have the climate changes on the water under the ice? Wallenberg Academy Fellow Sebastiaan Swart, University of Gothenburg, and his colleagues sends underwater robots under the ice of Antarctica to measure the properties of the water. For the mighty waters here, take care of enormous amounts of carbon dioxide and heat from the entire planet. What happens in Antarctica therefore affects all countries. South Africa as well as Sweden.

  • Deep Bore Into Antarctica Finds Freezing Ice, Not Melting as Expected | National Geographic

    2:20

    At the Ross Ice Shelf in Antarctica, scientists used a hot-water drill hose to create a hole through the thick ice until they reached the perpetually dark water. What they found surprised them. Christina Hulbe/University of Otago/K061
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    This is the Ross Ice Shelf – the biggest floating ice shelf in Antarctica. Such shelves are important because they hold back a vast amount of ice. If all such West Antarctic shelves were to collapse and spill the ice into the ocean then global sea level would rise by 10 feet. Beneath the Ross Ice Shelf is one of the least explored bits of ocean on Earth. New Zealand scientists used a hot-water drill hose to create a hole through the thick ice until they reached the perpetually dark water. They hoped to study the health and history of the shelf. Their findings surprised them. They found that the ice in the hole itself and along the base of the shelf was crystalizing and freezing rather than melting. Measurements will be taken for the next few years, to see how the Ross Ice Shelf is changing over time.

    Read more in Deep Bore Into Antarctica Finds Freezing Ice, Not Melting as Expected


    Deep Bore Into Antarctica Finds Freezing Ice, Not Melting as Expected | National Geographic


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  • Colorful World Revealed Under Antarcticas Sea Ice

    1:19

    A group of Australian scientists sent an underwater robot with a camera under East Antarctica’s sea ice. Here is what the camera captured. Photo: Australian Antarctic Division via Storyful

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  • Crack Splitting an Antarctic Ice Shelf In Two | National Geographic

    2:19

    Stunning drone footage captures Chasm 1, a huge crack on the Brunt Ice Shelf. When it inevitably intersects with the nearby Halloween Crack, an iceberg the size of Houston, Texas will break off into the ocean.
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    #NationalGeographic #Antarctica #Iceberg

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    Crack Splitting an Antarctic Ice Shelf In Two | National Geographic


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  • Under Sea Ice in Antarctica | Explorer

    1:51

    In Antarctica a team of elite divers risks their lives to further the study of climate change.
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  • First Person to Swim UNDER The Antarctic ICE SHEET | Mashable Originals

    4:36

    Lewis Pugh is an endurance swimmer and the first person to ever swim underneath the melting Antarctic ice sheet.

    Pugh put his life at risk to demonstrate the rapid effects of climate change and advocate for a marine protected area in East Antarctica.

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    #Antarctica #ClimateChange #ProtectTheEnvironment

  • NASA | Surprise Shrimp Under Antarctic Ice

    2:14

    At a depth of 600 feet beneath the West Antarctic ice sheet, a small shrimp-like creature managed to brighten up an otherwise gray polar day in late November 2009. This critter is a three-inch long Lyssianasid amphipod found beneath the Ross Ice Shelf, about 12.5 miles away from open water. NASA scientists were using a borehole camera to look back up towards the ice surface when they spotted this pinkish-orange creature swimming beneath the ice. Credit: NASA

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  • View Under the Antarctic Ice - Sixty Symbols

    3:21

    Before heading to the south pole for some serious science, Denis Barkats shows us the view under the sea ice at McMurdo Station, Antarctica.
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  • Exploring the Rock Bottom of the Food Web Beneath Antarctic Ice

    58:20

    (Visit: Ice caves on the Mt. Erebus Volcano, frozen lakes in the Dry Valleys and the ice covered McMurdo Sound offer diverse and extremely cold environments in which highly adapted microbial communities use chemical energy from rocks and volcanic gases to build new organic compounds. Join Hubert Staudigel as he presents initial laboratory results and stunning images from the 2012/13 field expedition, including SCUBA diving under the ice and alpine exploration of ice caves. Series: Perspectives on Ocean Science [1/2014] [Science] [Show ID: 25710]

  • The Bedrock Beneath Antarctica

    1:59

    Our understanding of what lies beneath the world's biggest ice sheet
    has taken another leap forward. This video strips away Antarctic ice to
    reveal a new, and much more detailed map of the bedrock below. This
    map, called Bedmap2, was compiled by the British Antarctic Survey and
    incorporates millions of new measurements, including substantial data
    sets from NASA's ICESat satellite and an airborne mission called
    Operation IceBridge.

    Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

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  • Teaser: Dive with scientists under the ice in Antarctica | Science under the ice

    41

    Scientists taking part in a six-week long diving expedition in Antarctica are finding out how climate change affects marine life. The diving expedition takes place near Scott Base on Ross Island, Antarctica in October and November 2017.

    During the whole expedition the scientists will be reporting about their daily life and work on and under the ice.

    The entire expedition will be captured in 360 degree Virtual Reality.

    You can follow the expedition on:


    Read the story here:

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    Video: Pata Degerman
    Music: Jonathan Streng
    Editor: Vera Schoultz

  • This is what an Antarctic Ice Shelf sounds like

    43

    Winds blowing across snow dunes on Antarctica’s Ross Ice Shelf cause the massive ice slab’s surface to vibrate, producing a near-constant drumroll of seismic “tones” scientists could potentially use to monitor changes in the ice shelf from afar, according to new research.

    The ice shelf’s “song” is too low in frequency to be heard by human ears, but it has been made audible here by geophysicist and mathematician Julien Chaput, who sped up a 2015 recording of the ice shelf’s vibrations about 1,200 times.

    Read more about the Ross Ice Shelf’s song here:

    And read a new research paper about it here:

    Image credits: Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego/Matt Siegfried/Momme Hell.

    Video produced by Lauren Lipuma at AGU.

  • Whats Causing Antarcticas Ice to Melt?

    2:07

    More warm water is washing up against large swathes of the Antarctic ice sheet. What does that mean for global sea levels? WSJ's Jason Bellini has #TheShortAnswer

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  • Secret life may thrive in warm caves under Antarctica’s glaciers

    1:06

    A new study led by The Australian National University (ANU) has found that animals and plants may live in warm caves under Antarctica’s glaciers.

    Around Mount Erebus, an active volcano on Ross Island in Antarctica, steam has hollowed out extensive cave systems.

    Lead researcher Dr Ceridwen Fraser from the ANU Fenner School of Environment and Society, said forensic analyses of soil samples from these caves have revealed intriguing traces of DNA from algae, mosses and small animals.

  • Whats hidden under the Greenland ice sheet? | Kristin Poinar

    9:02

    The Greenland ice sheet is massive, mysterious -- and melting. Using advanced technology, scientists are revealing its secrets for the first time, and what they've found is amazing: hidden under the ice sheet is a vast aquifer that holds a Lake Tahoe-sized volume of water from the summer melt. Does this water stay there, or does it find its way out to the ocean and contribute to global sea level rise? Join glaciologist Kristin Poinar for a trip to this frozen, forgotten land to find out.

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  • First dive completed: Visions under the ice in Antarctica | Science under the ice

    2:17

    Scientists taking part in a six-week long diving expedition in Antarctica are finding out how climate change affects marine life.

    The diving expedition takes place near Scott Base on Ross Island, Antarctica in October and November 2017. During the whole expedition the scientists will be reporting about their daily life and work on and under the ice.

    You can follow the expedition on:

    Video: Pata Degerman
    Music: Jonathan Streng

    Want to know more about the University of Helsinki:

  • Scientists drill over 2km through ice layer in West Antarctica for first time ever

    3:32

    For the first time, scientists in West Antarctica have drilled 2km through the ice sheet to the sediment below.

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  • How we look kilometers below the Antarctic ice sheet | Dustin Schroeder

    11:12

    Antarctica is a vast and dynamic place, but radar technologies -- from World War II-era film to state-of-the-art miniaturized sensors -- are enabling scientists to observe and understand changes beneath the continent's ice in unprecedented detail. Join radio glaciologist Dustin Schroeder on a flight high above Antarctica and see how ice-penetrating radar is helping us learn about future sea level rise -- and what the melting ice will mean for us all.

    Check out more TED Talks:

    The TED Talks channel features the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and more.

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  • What Diseases Frozen in Ice could be Hidden in our Glaciers? | Earth Lab

    5:58

    Permafrost has kept viruses and bacteria frozen for centuries, but global warming could uncover some unpleasant surprises from the past. While in Iceland, Greg Foot looks at what the consequences could be.
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    Welcome to BBC Earth Lab! Here we answer all your curious questions about science in the world around you (and further afield too). If there’s a question you have that we haven’t yet answered let us know in the comments on any of our videos and it could be answered by one of our Earth Lab experts.

  • See rare footage of colourful marine life under Antarcticas ice sheet

    44

    Deep below the frozen Arctic sea ice, colourful marine life is flourishing. Take a dive with an Australian robotic submarine and learn about the threats to this unique subzero habitat.

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  • Antarctica has lost more ice in four years than the Arctic has in 34 years

    3:07

    Until 2014, Antarctic sea ice levels were actually increasing- but since then according to satellite data, there's been a 'precipitous' nosedive in ice levels. Scientists are now trying to find out why, and what it might mean.…
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  • New sea life found in Antarcticas lost world deep under the Southern Ocean

    1:19

    Scientists have discovered what they call a lost world more than 2,000 metres below the surface in the Southern Ocean, near Antarctica.

  • Swimmer Lewis Pugh To Take Frigid Antarctica Plunge For Climate Awareness | NBC News NOW

    3:16

    Endurance swimmer Lewis Pugh is training for the hardest swim of his life, a kilometer across a lake on the Antarctic ice sheet. in order to raise awareness for climate change.
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    Swimmer Lewis Pugh To Take Frigid Antarctica Plunge For Climate Awareness | NBC News NOW

  • Meet the Robot Explorers Hunting for Alien Life | WSJ

    3:52

    Scientists from The Georgia Institute of Technology are using a robot called ICEFIN to explore the world beneath Antarctica's sea ice. WSJ followed the team during a recent deployment to find out why the project might one day enable exploration of the solar system's far-flung ocean worlds.

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    #WSJ #Antarctica #Aliens #WSJ

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