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Why so many Covid-19 variants are showing up now

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  • Why so many Covid-19 variants are showing up now

    6:22

    And what that tells us about the pandemic.

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    Like any virus, SARS-CoV-2 has been mutating constantly since the beginning of the pandemic. Until November of 2020, though, that didn’t seem to matter. That’s when scientists in the United Kingdom noticed an alarming change: The virus had mutated in a way that made it more transmissible. Within a month, similar reports were emerging from places around the world. Suddenly, it seemed the virus was changing at an alarming rate.

    SARS-CoV-2 hasn’t actually been mutating faster, though. Instead, by letting it spread around the world, we’ve just given it more and more opportunities to mutate as it replicates. The result is that, after countless random mutations, there are signs that the virus is beginning to adapt to our natural defenses. And because it’s completely normal for a virus to change over time, we shouldn’t expect it to stop. The only real way to stop those changes is to stop giving the virus so many opportunities.

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  • Coronavirus variants: What you need to know

    5:50

    As the global COVID-19 pandemic continues - viral variants have become the latest concern

    But variants are complicated. Each one is made up of a collection of mutations, all of which have the potential to change the SARS-CoV-2 virus in unexpected ways.

    So what do scientists mean when they talk about variants and what might this mean for the future of the pandemic?

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  • COVID-19: Should we be scared of virus variants? | COVID-19 Special

    12:07

    Many countries are racing to vaccinate their populations against the coronavirus amid fears that the highly transmissible delta variant could spark another COVID wave and overwhelm health systems.

    Scientists have predicted that the delta variant could account for 90% of all new cases in Europe by the end of August. However, evidence shows that the spread of the delta variant is cause for caution — but not panic.

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    #COVID19 #Delta #pandemic

  • Mayo Clinic Insights: What is a COVID-19 variant strain

    3:22

    Mayo Clinic Insights: Dr. Binnicker provides information on the current COVID-19 variants and how we can help stop the spread of new strains in our communities.

    For more up to date information about COVID-19, visit

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  • The Science Behind Why New Covid Variants Are Spreading Faster | WSJ

    7:02

    As highly transmissible coronavirus variants sweep across the world, scientists are racing to understand why these new versions of the virus are spreading faster, and what this could mean for vaccine efforts. New research says the key may be the spike protein, which gives the coronavirus its unmistakable shape. Illustration: Nick Collingwood/WSJ

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    #WSJ #Covid #Variants

  • New COVID-19 Variant Emerges Out of South Africa

    3:07

    Scientists in South Africa have discovered a new variant of COVID-19, worrying doctors that this one may be more resistant to vaccines as it has a high number of mutations. NBC national correspondent Gabe Gutierrez has the latest.» Subscribe to TODAY:
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    New COVID-19 Variant Emerges Out of South Africa

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  • Covid-19 Has Many Months, Variants to Go: Johns Hopkins

    6:02

    Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security Senior Scholar Gigi Gronvall discusses the spread of the omicron variant, stress on the U.S. health care system, and the increase of antibodies from Covid-19 vaccines. The Bloomberg School of Public Health is supported by Michael R. Bloomberg, founder and majority owner of Bloomberg LP, the parent company of Bloomberg News.

  • What You Need to Know About the Delta Variant

    7:25

    Several COVID-19 variants are acting uniquely enough to qualify as a distinct strain. And you might have heard about one on the news: the Delta variant. Today we’re going to talk about what it is, why it’s here, and what you need to know about it.

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  • What You Need To Know About The ‘Mu’ Covid-19 Variant

    4:52

    NBC News medical contributor Dr. Natalie Azar is back on TODAY breaking down the latest in the pandemic and how concerned people should be about the “Mu” variant. She also talks COVID-19 and flu vaccines and what’s to come this fall.

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  • Even more mutations than omicron: Is the new COVID variant a cause for concern? | DW News

    3:36

    Just when we thought things were looking up at least a little, because the omicron variant, while being more contagious, often takes a milder course than delta, a new variant has emerged. We do not yet know how dangerous it is, or even where it originated.

    The new variant was detected in early December in a traveler who returned to France from Cameroon, the hospital IHU Mediterrannee in Marseille announced. The returnee from Cameroon reportedly infected 12 people in southern France.

    This new mutant, called B.1.640.2, has 46 mutations in an atypical combination, according to a preprint study that has not yet been peer-reviewed.

    According to this study, the two already known spike protein mutations N501Y and E484K are also found in the new coronavirus variant. The N501Y mutation, for example, was detected very early in the alpha variant. It causes the pathogen to bind more strongly to human cells and thus to spread more easily in the body.

    E484K is one of the escape mutations located directly in the spike protein and thus possibly reduces the effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccines.

    But what these mutations mean and whether the new coronavirus variant B.1.640.2 is actually more contagious than the original SARS-CoV-2 virus cannot yet be said with any real confidence, due to the lack of available data and the small number of cases.

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  • Omicron: What we know so far about the new COVID-19 variant | DW News

    10:04

    There's growing global alarm over Omicron - the new coronavirus variant that first emerged in South Africa. Researchers say it could be the most infectious form of the virus so far, and it might even beat current vaccines. The international response has been swift. Many countries have shut down air travel from southern Africa. The South African government says the bans are an overreaction.
    Omicron has moved quickly. Now countries around the world are racing to get ahead, banning flights from the region where the variant was first discovered. South Africans suddenly find themselves cut off from the world.
    Since the UK announced its travel ban, many other countries have followed suit. South Africa’s government says they acted too quickly.
    As quickly as the travel restrictions were announced, they are more likely to slow down rather than completely stop the spread of omicron. Dutch health officials fear that dozens of COVID-infected passengers who arrived in Amsterdam on Friday might also be infected with the new variant.
    Hong Kong, Israel, and Belgium have already confirmed cases.
    The world has made progress in the fight against the coronavirus, but the new variant shows that the battle is far from won. The message for now from many officials: Get the vaccine, get the booster, and follow public health regulations.


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  • New COVID-19 variant: How dangerous is Omicron? | DW News

    14:00

    Scientists in South Africa are warning of a new strain of COVID-19. The variant, which is yet to be named, appears to have a high number of mutations, and there's a possibility it could be able to evade our immune response and be even more transmissible.
    At first, health officials thought they were seeing a small cluster of outbreaks in South Africa's most populous province. But after examining specimens, they realized they were dealing with something far more serious - a new variant that could be the hardest yet to contain.
    Officials are worried that the new variant, known simply as B.1.1.529, could quickly spread through the country and beyond. Only about 35% of adults in South Africa are fully vaccinated, and the rate of vaccination has slowed. And given the findings so far, even current vaccines may not be enough to stop it.
    Several countries, including the UK and Germany have announced a ban on flights from South Africa and five neighboring countries as cases of the new variant have already appeared in Botswana and in Hong Kong. No matter where the variant started, it could quickly become a global problem.

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  • Omicron: New COVID Variant

    17:40

    Roger Seheult, MD of MedCram discusses the new omicron COVID variant. View all Dr. Seheult's videos at:

    (This video is MedCram COVID 19 update 138 and was recorded on November 29, 2021)

    Roger Seheult, MD is the co-founder and lead professor at
    He is Board Certified in Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Disease, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine and an Associate Professor at the University of California, Riverside School of Medicine.


    LINKS / REFERENCES:

    Coronavirus Cases (Worldometer) |


    All coronavirus updates are at MedCram.com (including more discussion on new COVID variants, Omicron Africa, COVID Omicron, omicron variant, and more).


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    #COVID19 #Omicron #Coronavirus

  • COVID-19 variants mu, delta and what to know about mutations

    2:07

    A new COVID-19 variant called B.1621 or mu by the World Health Organization is being monitored by scientists. While this variant is making news, it is not the dominant strain in the U.S. or elsewhere, says Dr. John O'Horo, a Mayo Clinic infectious diseases physician.

    The delta variant is really the predominant strain everywhere at this point. And while it is important that scientists and public health officials keep an eye on this, we're still in a space right now where the mu variant is something to keep an eye on for the future rather than a concern.


    For the safety of its patients, staff and visitors, Mayo Clinic has strict masking policies in place. Anyone shown without a mask was recorded prior to COVID-19 or recorded in an area not designated for patient care, where social distancing and other safety protocols were followed.

    FOR THE PUBLIC: More health and medical news on the Mayo Clinic News Network.

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  • Why So Many Covid-19 Variants Are Showing Up Now | Delta Variant in United States

    5:42

    The pandemic is still here & with each passing day, it is showing a different wave of destruction. What started with a single Covid virus has now become a series of multiple variants operating in various forms and at different levels but for the same cause, the destruction of life.

    So why is it happening? Why are there so many variants of this deadly virus showing up? What is the source of this? And where and how does it all stop?

    If questions like these have kept your mind and concern, then this video is going to be the perfect place for you. So, sit back and stay with us till the end to know the significant causes of the generation of multiple variants of Covid.

    a. The genetic diversity of the virus has multiplied over time.
    First, it would be helpful to give a refresher on how evolution works. Evolution essentially needs two things: individual differences and natural selection. Evolution is a continuous process.

    Organisms – as a group – accumulate change over time through mutations, and the environment helps determine which changes in a population are permanent and which are becoming less common.

    Viruses mutate because they are constantly making vast numbers of copies of themselves. If you were drafting something very quickly on the computer millions of times, you would probably make some typos. This has happened millions and billions of times around the world. The longer the pandemic lasts, the greater the chance of the virus developing.

    b. There is a possibility that the virus has evolved in response to increased human immunity.
    The increasing genetic diversity of the virus explains only part of the story. The other part of the story: natural selection.

    Some genetic changes of the virus provide an advantage, which leads these variants to outperform older strains of the virus. Some of these substitutions actually help the virus replicate better, Cobey says, which could lead to variants infecting more and more people than other variants.

    c. There is a chance that the virus has seeded its roots deep enough that even extreme cases have started happening.
    It seems to have acquired significant genetic changes in a short period - so many scientists suspect that the variant may have arisen in an immunocompromised person.

    Hodcroft explains that the immune system launches a full attack of the virus in most people, eliminating it within a few weeks. There is a very different dynamic in people with weak immune systems, he says. So, for one thing, the virus can stay inside them for months instead of weeks. This gives the virus more time to evolve, accumulating mutations that can make it easier to overwhelm the immune system.

    d. Some Covid-19 treatments may have triggered an evolution in the virus.
    The rise of these variants may have something to do with the use of healing plasma, says Michael Worobey, head of ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Arizona.

    Convalescent plasma treatments are blood plasma transfusions from people who have recovered from SARS-CoV-2. The idea is that with a blood transfusion comes antibodies that can help someone else with Covid-19 fight the disease.

    With few exceptional cases, the issue is that the plasma itself generates conditions that are pretty much favorable for accommodating even a more potent variant of the virus.

    Watch the video completely to go through these above points in detail.
    #coronavirusdeltavariant
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    #covid19deltavariant

  • Where the Covid delta variant has its highest transmission rates in the U.S.

    3:56

    CNBC's Meg Tirrell reports on the Delta variant of Covid-19 and the latest numbers of its transmission and spread across the United States. For access to live and exclusive video from CNBC subscribe to CNBC PRO:

    The delta variant’s “rapid rise is troubling,” CDC director Dr. Rochelle Walensky said of the dangerous Covid strain in a White House press briefing Thursday.

    The more transmissible delta variant is now the most dominant strain of the coronavirus in the United States, representing over 50% of cases across the country, according to data released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Wednesday.

    Pfizer and BioNTech announced Thursday that they are developing a booster shot to target the delta variant. The authorized Covid vaccines appear to work well at preventing severe disease, hospitalization and death from the delta variant. But pockets of the country remain unvaccinated and therefore at risk.

    Delta’s speed and high transmissibility makes it able to “pick off the more vulnerable more efficiently than previous variants,” Dr. Mike Ryan, executive director of the WHO’s health emergencies program, said during a news conference on June 21.

    Getting fully vaccinated is the best way to protect yourself from the delta variant.

    Here’s what else you need to know about the strain:

    Vaccinated people can get breakthrough infections

    In theory, vaccinated people can still get a breakthrough infection. However, White House chief medical advisor Dr. Anthony Fauci said it’s unlikely that a vaccinated person could transmit the virus because the amount of virus in their system would be so low.


    ″[W]e are looking at situations where you have vaccinated people who have breakthrough infections,” the White House chief medical advisor told Chuck Todd during an interview with NBC’s “Meet the Press” on July 4. “Namely, they’re infected despite the fact that they’ve been vaccinated.”

    It’s important to note, however, that vaccinated people who get infected have significantly less virus in their nasopharynx, Fauci said.

    “When you look at the level of virus to be lower, that would mean you could make a reasonable assumption that those individuals would be less likely to transmit the infection to someone else,” he said.

    Delta is already causing Covid spikes in parts of the U.S. and could cause ‘major outbreaks’ this fall

    To date, 47.6% of the U.S. population is fully vaccinated. But delta is surging in pockets of the country where vaccine rates are concerningly low such as the South and Midwest. In some parts of the Midwest and upper mountain states, delta accounts for 80% of Covid cases, Walensky said in the press briefing.

    Virtually all new Covid deaths and hospitalizations are among unvaccinated people.

    ″[T]here will likely continue to be an increase in cases among unvaccinated Americans and in communities with low vaccination rates, particularly given the spread of the more transmissible Delta variant,” White House coronavirus response coordinator Jeff Zients said at a press briefing on Thursday.

    Lawrence Gostin, director of the World Health Organization’s Collaborating Center on National and Global Health Law, told CNBC that there could be “major outbreaks” in the fall, just as many people are going back to offices and schools.

    That said, a nationwide spike like the U.S. witnessed last fall and winter is unlikely given the proportion of people who are now vaccinated, Fauci said.

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  • Covid-19: Can vaccines keep up with variants? | The Economist

    6:32

    The race between covid-19 vaccines and variants is on. Alok Jha, The Economist’s science correspondent, and Natasha Loder, health policy editor, discuss what this means for the future

    Read more of our coverage on coronavirus:

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    Which countries are considering a booster jab?

    Why are covid variants named using the Greek alphabet?

    Can vaccines help solve environmental issues?

    Why is the Delta variant the most dangerous mutation yet?

    What’s Britain’s strategy for mass vaccination?

    Where will you need proof of vaccination?

    How the pandemic has brought re-examination of intellectual-property rights:

    Why are the unvaccinated at risk?

    Which vaccine is the most widely accepted for international travel?

  • Understanding the COVID-19 Variants

    1:52

    With new variants of SARS-CoV-2 emerging across the globe, what do you need to know?

    We got some answers from Andy Pekosz, PhD, vice chair and professor in our department of molecular microbiology and immunology.

    Learn more on our website:

  • The COVID-19 Delta Variant Explained

    3:11

    Dr. Lorena Garcia, professor of epidemiology at UC Davis School of Medicine, explains how the COVID-19 Delta variant is different, what you can do to stay safe and how vaccines could make a difference in preventing future COVID-19 variants.

    Learn more about the Delta variant:
    For the latest information and resources on COVID-19, visit
    See the latest news from UC Davis Health:

    0:00 What should we know about the COVID-19 Delta variant?
    0:57 How does the Delta variant compare to other COVID-19 variants?
    1:58 How do vaccines affect COVID-19 variants?

    #delta #deltavariant #covid19 #coronavirus #ucdavis

  • Delta Variant Versus Previous COVID 19 Infection vs. Vaccines

    16:18

    Roger Seheult, MD of MedCram explains how natural immunity (from a previous COVID-19 infection) compares with vaccines (Pfizer, Moderna, AstraZeneca) VS. the Delta coronavirus variant. (This video was recorded on July 24, 2021).

    Correction: Strasbourg is in France (near the German border), not in Germany.

    TOPICS IN THIS VIDEO INCLUDE:

    00:00 Is natural immunity from previous COVID-19 infection strong enough against Delta variant?
    00:32 Research study of 50,000+ patients from the Cleveland Clinic
    03:07 Qatar airport study shows previous infection with SARS-CoV gives reasonable immunity against reinfection
    05:46 UK data suggests low risk of COVID-19 reinfection among population
    07:04 Study on antibody response effectiveness (from vaccines and natural infection) at neutralizing several COVID-19 variants, including Delta
    13:33 Monoclonal antibodies shown to have little effectiveness against Delta variant
    14:31 Patients urged to get both doses of Pfizer or Moderna, especially for protection against Delta variant
    14:59 MedCram resources for medical providers treating COVID-19 patients and the case for lung ultrasounds

    Roger Seheult, MD is the co-founder and lead professor at
    He is Board Certified in Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Disease, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine and an Associate Professor at the University of California, Riverside School of Medicine.

    See the video Dr. Seheult references about Lung Ultrasound in COVID 19:

    LINKS / REFERENCES:

    Can You Get Delta Variant if You Already Had COVID-19? (Healthline) |

    Necessity of COVID-19 vaccination in previously infected individuals (medRxiv) |

    Associations of Vaccination and of Prior Infection With Positive PCR Test Results for SARS-CoV-2 in Airline Passengers Arriving in Qatar (JAMA) |

    New national surveillance of possible COVID-19 reinfection, published by PHE (GOV.UK) |

    Study highlights need for full Covid vaccination to protect against Delta variant (STAT) |

    All coronavirus updates are at MedCram.com (including more discussion on delta variant covid, delta plus variant COVID, COVID delta variant, and more).


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    Video Produced by Kyle Allred


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    DISCLAIMER:

    MedCram medical videos are for medical education and exam preparation, and NOT intended to replace recommendations from your doctor.

    #COVID19 #Deltavariant #Coronavirus

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  • Coronavirus Update 127: Delta Variant and Vaccines

    18:09

    Professor Roger Seheult, MD of MedCram with an update on the effectiveness of four major vaccines against the delta variant of COVID-19: Pfizer / BioNTech, Moderna, AstraZeneca, and Johnson and Johnson Vaccine (This video was recorded on July 19, 2021).

    See the video Dr. Seheult references: 10 Tips if you Get COVID-19 here:

    Please see our most recent video on Previous Infection vs. The Delta Variant:


    TOPICS IN THIS VIDEO INCLUDE:

    00:00 General overview of SARS-CoV-2 variants
    02:44 Characteristics of the SARS-CoV-2 delta variant (B.1.617.2)
    03:21 Preliminary data on delta variant infection rates by age & risk of severe infection
    05:14 How delta variant is affecting COVID-19 case numbers in the UK, Israel, and United States
    06:55 How do the COVID-19 vaccines stack up against delta variant? Effectiveness of Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine
    12:20 Data on the effectiveness of Moderna vaccine against the delta variant
    12:42 Data on effectiveness of Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine against the delta variant
    13:41 Information on Johnson & Johnson vaccine effectiveness against related SARS-CoV-2 variants (no current data on delta variant)
    15:29 Vaccination rates across the United States
    17:04 What to do if you’re infected with COVID-19?


    Roger Seheult, MD is the co-founder and lead professor at
    He is Board Certified in Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Disease, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine and an Associate Professor at the University of California, Riverside School of Medicine.


    LINKS / REFERENCES:

    5 Things To Know About the Delta Variant (Yale Medicine) |

    REACT-1 round 12 report: resurgence of SARS-CoV-2 infections in England associated with increased frequency of the Delta variant (Imperial College) |

    SARS-CoV-2 Delta VOC in Scotland: demographics, risk of hospital admission, and vaccine effectiveness (The Lancet) |

    Vaccines highly effective against B.1.617.2 variant after 2 doses (GOV.UK) |

    Effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccines against hospital admission with the Delta (B.1.617.2) variant (Public Health England) |

    Moderna Provides a Clinical Update on the Neutralizing Activity of its COVID-19 Vaccine on Emerging Variants Including the Delta Variant First Identified in India (Moderna) |

    How much protection COVID-19 vaccines give you against the Delta variant, according to the best available data (Business Insider) |

    The total number and mass of SARS-CoV-2 virions (NIH) |

    Covid vaccine: How many people in the UK have been vaccinated so far? (BBC News) |

    All coronavirus updates are at MedCram.com (including more discussion on delta variant covid, delta plus variant COVID, COVID delta variant, and more).


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    DISCLAIMER:

    MedCram medical videos are for medical education and exam preparation, and NOT intended to replace recommendations from your doctor.

    #COVID19 #SARSCoV2 #Coronavirus

  • 232 - The COVID-19 Variants Explained

    14:51

    What caused the variants seen in the SARS-CoV-2 virus in the UK and elsewhere? Why is the UK variant more contagious? Is it more lethal? Will the current vaccines still work against these variants? Is there anything we should be doing differently to protect ourselves? Expert virologist Dr. Andy Pekosz talks with Dr. Josh Sharfstein about how the virus that causes COVID-19 is changing, and what it means for 2021.

  • More than one million dead in Latin America as variants spread | COVID-19 Special

    11:20

    Experts say Latin America is fast becoming the new epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic. More than one million people there have died.
    The only exception is Chile, where 80 percent of the population are fully vaccinated. Otherwise, health systems are struggling to cope. COVID-19 has claimed the lives of nearly 200,000 people in Peru, where the vaccination campaign is only slowly getting underway. Just 16 percent of the population are completely inoculated. The country is battling several coronavirus variants.
    Colombia is experiencing one of the longest peaks of infection since the coronavirus arrived in the country. This third spike has put the national medical system to the test. Quarantine measures have been struggling to strengthen an already strained system. ICUs in the country's second largest city Medellín are over 95 percent occupied. Doctors insist the national model of pandemic care has failed.


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  • The Delta Variant: Current Evidence and Literature - COVID-19 | SARS-CoV-2 | Vaccine Efficacy

    1:11:44

    Official Ninja Nerd Website:
    You can find the NOTES and ILLUSTRATIONS for this lecture on our website at:


    In this lecture Professor Zach Murphy will be presenting on The Delta Variant: Current Evidence and Literature - COVID-19 | SARS-CoV-2 | Vaccine Efficacy- as of August 16, 2021.

    During this lecture we will be providing you with the most up to date evidence and literature discussing the Delta Variant and current state of the COVID-19 pandemic. We will begin this lecture by referring to the whiteboard on the current variants of concern and their pathophysiology. Next, we will take a look at current research supporting variants of concern and their relevant attributes. We will then be discussing the research defining the viral load of the Delta variant, and will then support this with evidence from a variety of reputable sources including UpToDate and the CDC. The next chapter of this lecture is a brief discussion on the overall transmissibility of the Delta variant. We look at the transmissibility or the spreadability of this Delta variant in comparison to ancestral strains and the Alpha variant. We will support these findings with current evidence on transmissibility from Public Health England and the CDC. Following this discussion, we move into the severity of the Delta variant in comparison to ancestral strains and the Alpha variant. Once again, we utilize the whiteboard and recently published articles to support our findings on the severity of the Delta variant. We will then transition into the prevalence / most affected populations in regard to the Delta variant. We support our lecture through the use of articles / research studies published by Public Health England, CDC, and The New York Times. The next chapter of our lecture is a discussion on the symptoms and treatment of COVID-19, particularly those affected by the Delta variant. We highlight the different symptoms patients are presenting with in comparison to ancestral strains and the Alpha variant. Finally, we conclude this lecture with a very important discussion on vaccine efficacy, and the potential risk of reinfection rates in regard to the Delta variant. We hope you enjoy this lecture and be sure to support us below!

    References:

    Table of Contents:
    0:00 Lab
    0:08 The Delta Variant Introduction
    0:40 Variants of Concern / Pathophysiology
    8:42 Viral Load
    10:44 Transmissibility
    14:27 Severity
    18:55 Prevalence / Populations Affected
    28:32 Symptoms associated with Delta Variant
    33:04 Treatment of COVID-19
    45:43 Vaccine Efficacy | Pfizer/BioNTech + Moderna + AstraZeneca
    1:01:14 Prevention, Masks, NPI
    1:04:20 Reinfection Rates
    1:10:09 Comment, Like, SUBSCRIBE!

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  • Delta Variant: Top 10 COVID Questions and How to Prepare

    22:27

    A coronavirus (COVID-19) variant has become dominant in the USA and Roger Seheult, MD of MedCram responds to 10 common questions including:

    00:00 If someone is fully vaccinated or already had COVID, how worried should they be about the Delta Variant?
    02:16 Should we be getting booster COVID vaccine doses?
    05:36 Will there continue to be more variants, perhaps even variants more challenging that the Delta variant?
    07:24 Is Long COVID occurring in the fully vaccinated?
    08:26 When is this surge going to peak? Can we learn from other countries?
    12:52 Are more children getting hospitalized with COVID 19 Delta variant?
    14:03 What happens when school starts?
    16:06 Have treatment and testing strategies changed for Delta variant?
    19:45 What can we do to protect ourselves and our communities from the coronavirus Delta variant and future COVID mutations?

    This video was recorded on August 6, 2021

    Roger Seheult, MD is the co-founder and lead professor at
    He is Board Certified in Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Disease, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine and an Associate Professor at the University of California, Riverside School of Medicine.

    Interviewer: Kyle Allred, Physician Assistant, Producer, and Co-Founder of MedCram.com

    LINKS / REFERENCES:

    COVID-19 Ventilator Course:

    Lung Ultrasound in COVID 19:

    Delta Variant vs. Previous COVID-19 Infection | MedCram:

    Delta Variant vs. Vaccines | MedCram:

    10 Tips If You Get COVID-19 | MedCram:

    Worldometer:

    Covid-19 Breakthrough Infections in Vaccinated Health Care Workers
    List of authors | NEJM:



    WHO calls for halting COVID-19 vaccine boosters in favor of unvaccinated |

    AMA Physicians Survey |

    Covid-19 Breakthrough Infections in Vaccinated Health Care Workers | NEJM:

    Six Month Safety and Efficacy of the BNT162b2 mRNA COVID-19 Vaccine | MedRxiv:

    The key numbers from the CDC’s new assessment of the delta variant | WP:

    All coronavirus updates are at MedCram.com (including more discussion on delta variant covid, delta plus variant COVID, COVID delta variant, Delta variant in US, Delta variant Canada, and more).


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    MedCram medical videos are for medical education and exam preparation, and NOT intended to replace recommendations from your doctor.

    #COVID19 #Deltavariant #Coronavirus

  • COVID-19 mutant variant strains and herd immunity

    10:22

    By now, you’ve likely heard about the new variant strains of COVID-19 that are circulating around the world. There are a number of concerns with these new strains, as they may make it easier to spread COVID-19 to others, and they may increase the severity of COVID-19 illness. This video aims to explain what is known about the different strains and how they may affect achievement of herd immunity.

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    Medical disclaimer: Knowledge Diffusion Inc (DBA Osmosis) does not provide medical advice. Osmosis and the content available on Osmosis's properties (Osmosis.org, YouTube, and other channels) do not provide a diagnosis or other recommendation for treatment and are not a substitute for the professional judgment of a healthcare professional in diagnosis and treatment of any person or animal. The determination of the need for medical services and the types of healthcare to be provided to a patient are decisions that should be made only by a physician or other licensed health care provider. Always seek the advice of a physician or other qualified healthcare provider with any questions you have regarding a medical condition.

  • Addressing the misconceptions around COVID-19 variants, including Omicron | 7.30

    6:33

    Political leaders and some epidemiologists believe that the number of daily new cases may be peaking in some of the eastern states, with some commentary even suggesting that it could mark the end of the pandemic, and that we are now going to enter a relatively harmless — a so-called endemic — phase. But as Norman Swan reports, that might not be the case.

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  • COVID-19: Vaccine efforts must redouble or new variants will emerge, doctor says

    9:36

    #COVID-19 #Vaccine #Coronavirus
    Dr. Peter Hotez, Co-Director of the Center for Vaccine Development at Texas Children's Hospital, discusses global vaccination efforts, the Omicron wave, high demand for testing, and coronavirus cases.

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  • How omicron broke through coronavirus vaccines

    3:30

    The highly transmissible omicron variant of the coronavirus has taken over as the dominant strain in the United States, resulting in breakthrough infections among the vaccinated.

    Omicron has sparked alarm both internationally and in the United States, where it accounted for more than 98 percent of new infections during the week ending Jan. 8, according to the most recent data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    The variant has an unusually high number of mutations that make it significantly more contagious and capable of eluding the body’s first line of immune defenses. Read more: Subscribe to The Washington Post on YouTube:

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  • Fact check: Do COVID-19 vaccines protect against the delta variant? | DW News

    6:04

    Worldwide, some people died of the delta variant despite being fully vaccinated. Is the COVID-19 vaccination no longer sufficient? A look at the facts shows: Yes, complete vaccinations are still the best protection you can get against delta.

    Key sources:








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    #CovidVaccine #DeltaVariant #FactChecking

  • COVID Delta Variant: Booster Shots, Nasal Vaccine, Rapid Testing, with Eric Topol, MD

    16:08

    A leading scientist discusses COVID testing in the US, booster shots, how contagious and dangerous the Delta variant is, new vaccine technology, and what we can do to protect ourselves from coronavirus infection and hospitalization. (Recorded Aug 11, 2021)

    TOPICS IN THIS VIDEO INCLUDE:

    00:00 Introducing Dr. Eric Topol, Physician-Scientist, Author, and Professor
    00:44 Main ideas behind Dr. Topol’s article, “America if flying blind when it comes to the Delta variant”
    01:49 How do surveillance and testing in the US compare to other countries experiencing Delta variant surge?
    03:03 Benefits of rapid COVID-19 testing and why we haven’t adopted it in the United States
    05:02 What’s “special” about Delta variant, and what really are “breakthrough” infections?
    06:50 What are “intranasal vaccines,” and what are their advantages against highly transmissible viruses, like the Delta variant?
    09:37 Dr. Topol’s stance on “booster shots” of current vaccines versus new, targeted vaccines
    11:31 Hospitalizations in United States compared to Israel and UK per capita -- why these numbers are alarming
    13:18 How contagious is the Delta variant compared to other viruses?
    14:12 How have perspectives changed with regard to mask-wearing and physical distancing?
    14:59 Importance of taking care of our immune systems

    Eric Topol, MD is the Founder and Director, Scripps Research Translational Institute; and the Executive Vice President and Professor of Molecular Medicine, Scripps Research. Dr. Topol has published over 1,200 peer-reviewed articles and is one of the top 10 most cited researchers in medicine. He was the first physician researcher to raise questions about the safety of Vioxx and testified against the medication's manufacturer: Merck.

    Interviewer: Kyle Allred, Physician Assistant, Producer, and Co-Founder of MedCram.com

    LINKS / REFERENCES:

    America is flying blind when it comes to the Delta variant | The Guardian:

    At Home COVID-19 Testing with Dr. Mina |



    Germany Makes Rapid Virus Tests a Key to Everyday Freedoms | New York Times:

    To Beat COVID, We May Need a Good Shot in the Nose | Scientific American:

    Scent of a Vaccine | Science:

    (Dr. Topol's Twitter Page)


    All coronavirus updates are at MedCram.com (including more discussion on delta variant covid, delta plus variant COVID, COVID delta variant, COVID 19 Delta Variant, Eric Topol coronavirus, rapid antigen testing, nasal vaccines, and more).


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    MedCram medical videos are for medical education and exam preparation, and NOT intended to replace recommendations from your doctor.

    #COVID19 #Deltavariant #Coronavirus

  • Explained: Why is Delta variant more transmissible than other COVID-19 strains? | Coronavirus | WION

    2:49

    The Delta Variant has been driving a surge in COVID-19 cases across the globe. Countries are grappling with new infections and growing hospitalisations. WION tells you why the Delta variant is more transmissible than other strains?

    #DeltaVariant #COVID19 #Coronavirus

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  • Alarming new COVID-19 variant raising concerns

    5:47

    The new variant first identified in South Africa, omicron, is spreading quickly, causing concern among health officials around the world.

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  • WHO, vaccine makers move quickly against new omicron Covid variant

    3:55

    CNBC's Meg Tirrell reports on the latest data from the omicron covid variant, which the World Health Organization has labeled a variant of concern. For access to live and exclusive video from CNBC subscribe to CNBC PRO:

    The World Health Organization on Friday labeled a new heavily mutated strain of Covid-19 a variant of concern.

    “This variant has a large number of mutations, some of which are concerning,” the WHO said in a statement released Friday. “Preliminary evidence suggests an increased risk of reinfection with this variant, as compared to other VOCs.”

    The variant, first known as B.1.1.529 and now named omicron, has been detected in small numbers in South Africa, WHO officials said. However, the number of omicron cases “appears to be increasing” in almost all of South Africa’s provinces, the WHO reported on Friday. The omicron variant has since been found in the U.K., Israel, Belgium, the Netherlands, and Hong Kong.

    Here’s what we know so far:

    Multiple mutations

    South African scientist Tulio de Oliveira said in a media briefing held by the South Africa Department of Health on Thursday that the variant contains a “unique constellation” of more than 30 mutations to the spike protein, the component of the virus that binds to cells. This is significantly more than those of the delta variant.

    Many of these mutations are linked to increased antibody resistance, which may affect how the virus behaves with regard to vaccines, treatments and transmissibility, health officials have said.

    De Oliveira said the variant contains around 50 mutations in total. The receptor binding domain, the part of the virus that first makes contact with cells, has 10 mutations, far greater than just two for the delta Covid variant, which spread rapidly earlier this year to become the dominant strain worldwide.

    This level of mutation means it’s possible that it came from a single patient who could not clear the virus, giving it the chance to genetically evolve. The same hypothesis was proposed for the alpha Covid variant.

    Maria Van Kerkhove, the WHO’s technical lead on Covid-19, said in a livestreamed Q&A on Thursday that scientists “don’t know very much about this yet” and that it would take a few weeks to gain a full picture of how the variant reacts to existing vaccines.

    ‘Most significant variant’ to date

    The U.K. immediately moved to ban flights from South Africa, Lesotho, Botswana, Namibia, Eswatini and Zimbabwe from noon Friday to 4 a.m. local time Sunday.

    The U.K. Health Security Agency is investigating the variant, which Health Secretary Sajid Javid said is “potentially concerning.” No cases have yet been identified in the U.K., and Javid emphasized that although more data is needed at this early stage, the government had opted to take precautions.

    “This is the most significant variant we have encountered to date and urgent research is underway to learn more about its transmissibility, severity and vaccine-susceptibility,” said U.K. HSA Chief Executive Jenny Harries.

    Israel has also barred travel to several southern African nations over the new variant, as well as Singapore and other nations. Israel has reported one case of the new variant in a traveler returning from Malawi.

    Israeli Prime Minister Naftali Bennett met with health experts Friday to discuss the country’s response, which could reportedly include declaring a state of emergency.

    Belgium on Friday afternoon became the first European country to report a case of the B.1.1.529 variant.

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  • NEW COVID Variants - How Concerned Should We BE?

    12:24

    NEW COVID Variants - How Concerned Should We Be?

    Genetic variants of COVID are expected as viruses mutate all the time. Coronaviruses mutate slower than most RNA viruses, with an average rate of two nucleotide changes per month. A random mutation may make a virus more fit leading to an evolutionary advantage, as in what happens with natural selection, the survival of the fittest.. from the virus's standpoint.
    …or the mutation could have no impact on its survival. Eventually, a viral variant with an evolutionary advantage will become the dominant form of the virus. Worldwide there are twelve key clades of covid or variants of covid.

    Sometimes the increased spread of a viral variant can only be attributed to chance. If a virus with a new mutation is carried by a super-spreader, moves to a new uninfected location, or is introduced to a new population segment, its spread rate will increase. The UK variant has become the dominant variant in multiple world regions, which means it’s less likely a coincidence.
    Each time scientists identify a new variant. It raises the question: does the mutation increase the viral transmission rate, cause more severe disease, and will the current vaccines or a previous infection still provide protection?

    Viruses can be sloppy with their replication process. Proofreading to ensure that there are minimal errors in the genetic code takes time. Organisms usually reproduce slowly and with fewer errors or reproduce quickly and make more errors. Multiple variants of a virus with slight changes in the genetic code are then replicating in an environment that encourages the fittest survival. Viral variants are more deadly or transmissible to win out over those with a lower ability to survive and flourish.

    The only way to slow the development of new viral variants of covid is to hinder their replicating. Therefore, the best way to slow the replication process is vaccination. Achieving herd immunity by vaccinating 80% of the population is what will get this done.

    The COVID strain called B.1.1.7 identified in the UK has spread across the country, with studies out of London suggesting that the UK covid variant is 55% more infectious, which raised the reproduction rate, a measurement of how contagious an infectious disease is, to an estimated range of 1.5 to 1.7 and prompted the lockdowns in London. The reproduction rate has since decreased to around 0.8 to 1.0. The prevalence of the UK covid variant has essentially doubled, which means more infections, more hospitalizations, and deaths. Also, it means more long-haulers, the often overlooked group of people still suffering the effect of COVID long after they came down with the infection.

    The UK viral variant has been identified in Canada and 20 states in the U.S. Scientists are unsure how the new viral variant increases its infectivity. One possibility is that people who are infected with the new variant of covid may shed more viruses. Higher viral loads in the nose can increase infection risk when an infected droplet lands on your eyes, mouth, or nose. Another possibility is that the new variants of covid increase when someone may shed the virus and are contagious. Another possibility is that the virus is more stable in the environment. But the most likely explanation is that it binds better to the human ACE2 receptor, and so far, this is what the evidence suggests. In the UK, PCR tests can distinguish the old variant of covid from the B.1.1.7 variant.

    Mathematicians compared the death rates between those who have died from the old covid variant and those who have died from the new covid variant. This analysis led to a statement that the new covid variant, besides being more contagious, may also be more deadly. The New and Emerging Virus Threats Advisory Group (Nervtag) says that there is a realistic possibility that the virus had become more deadly, but this was far from certain. They report that there are hints that the UK covid variant is 30% more deadly, raising the deaths per 1000 from 1% to 1.3%. The Pfizer and Oxford AstraZeneca vaccines are expected to work against the UK covid variant, as there is no biologically significant difference in neutralization activity, based on the evidence so far.

    The spike protein's mutation can weaken the expected antibody response after an infection with a previous SARS-CoV-2 virus or vaccination variant. When the immune system is first exposed to the viral antigen using either an infection or vaccination, it activates its arms-producing antibodies and cellular response. Memory cells are held in reserve to mount a quicker and more substantial immune response to neutralize a repeat infection.

    The Pfizer vaccine has demonstrated the ability to neutralize the N501Y mutation found in the UK covid variant in the laboratory.

    Doctor Mike Hansen, MD
    Internal Medicine | Pulmonary Disease | Critical Care Medicine
    Courses:

    #covid #variants

  • Dr. Anthony Fauci On New COVID-19 Omicron Variant: ‘Do Not Pull Back On Your Guard’

    5:18

    Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and chief medical adviser to the president, joins Weekend TODAY to discuss the omicron variant and whether Americans should be concerned about the newly discovered COVID-19 strain.

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  • New COVID-19 variant described as worst one yet emerges in South Africa | ABC News

    2:04

    South African scientists are investigating a new COVID variant, which is believed to be the most mutated version of the virus to date.
    Subscribe: Read more here:
    The B.1.1.529 strain could be responsible for a surge of infections in Africa.
    Twenty-two cases have so far been linked with infections in South Africa, Botswana and Hong Kong.
    The UK government has temporarily cancelled flights from six African nations and placed them on its travel red list.

    ABC News provides around the clock coverage of news events as they break in Australia and abroad, including the latest coronavirus pandemic updates. It's news when you want it, from Australia's most trusted news organisation.

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    #ABCNews #ABCNewsAustralia

  • How effective are vaccinations against the new COVID variants? | COVID-19 Special

    12:06

    How effective are approved COVID vaccines against new forms of COVID-19? A preliminary study from Israel appears to suggest the BioNTech-Pfizer jab offers less protection against the Delta variant than previous strains - just 64%. That's a lot lower than other estimates of nearly 90%. Does this change how we fight the pandemic?
    The good news is that fully vaccinated people rarely suffer severe effects - even with the Delta variant. And despite rising cases, Israel hasn't seen a death in over two weeks. In Israel, coronvirus case numbers are creeping up again. The country has been roundly praised for its swift vaccination programme, but health officials there are proceeding with caution. With a local study suggesting the BioNTech-Pfizer jab is not as effective against the invading Delta variant as previously thought, younger Israelis are being encouraged to get vaccinated.


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  • Lambda variant pushes up death toll in Peru | COVID-19 Special

    12:02

    Alpha, beta, gamma, delta ... and now lambda. The WHO classes it as a variant of interest. For Peruvians, it's much worse. The country has the highest death toll per capita in the world. And now the lambda variant accounts for almost all cases.

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  • NEW CORONAVIRUS VARIANTS - EXPLAINED SIMPLY

    56:40

    This video explains coronavirus variants, mutations, PCR tests in simple terms, so that you can make more sense of media reports and the changing restrictions to our daily lives. You will also learn some cool molecular biology! The video is intended for a wide audience.
    The video will cover four areas of science so you will be able to follow the facts behind the global pandemic:
    • The main features of the SARS-CoV2 virus, which causes the COVID19 pandemic.
    • How the main PCR test for COVID19 works, as unexpected results in these tests are linked to the rapid spread of a new variant of COVID19 in the United Kingdom.
    • How mutations arise and how they can affect the behaviour of the virus.
    • The two mutations found in rapidly spreading coronavirus variants that are causing concern and a new wave of strict lockdown restrictions

    You can use these timestamps to jump to any section to watch it again.
    1:56 The SARS-CoV2 virus, its life cycle and genome
    7:37 Summary of the tests for COVID19
    12:00 A description of the genetic material, DNA and RNA
    17:17 How the PCR assay works
    28:31 How the clinical COVID19 PCR test works
    30:50 Overview of SARS-CoV2 mutations
    32:06 The Central Dogma of Biology – How DNA codes for proteins
    36:12 The Genetic Code
    38:26 Why some mutations matter more than others
    45:35 Mutations of the SARS-CoV2 spike protein
    50:01 The “S dropout” in PCR tests caused by variant

    This presentation is brought to you by Dr Adam West in the College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. We hope you found this video useful. Please support us by liking the video and consider subscribing for more informative content. Feel free to ask questions or provide feedback in the comments section below. Thank you.




    Introduction video clips from Pixabay
    SARSCoV2 model from Sketchfab by Annabel Slater, MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research
    Graphics © Adam West and Biorender.com

  • Omicron, when to be exposed

    29:11

    Link to free download of my 2 textbooks



    Physiology book in hard copy


    Pathophysiology book in hard copy


    US variants data





    US omicron history

    November 29

    Index patient, 48 year old unvaccinated man, Nigeria

    Nebraska, 6 people diagnosed by PCR and genomic sequencing

    Onset was 73 hours (range = 33–75 hours)

    Incubation period



    Original version, five days

    The Delta variant, four days

    Omicron, 2 to 3 days

    Viral Load



    Alpha and Delta variants

    Peak viral load 3 days after infection

    Clear the virus about six days after that

    Infectious viral load in unvaccinated and vaccinated patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 WT, Delta and Omicron



    Omicron and Delta produced similar levels of infectious virus

    Infections a day shorter with omicron compared to delta

    Omicron infects upper airways as opposed to lungs

    Omicron antibodies neutralise delta virus

    Offshoot of Omicron variant, England





    BA.2 may be even more contagious than original omicron

    UK Health Security Agency

    Designating BA.2 a variant under investigation

    increasing numbers of BA.2 sequences identified both domestically and internationally

    May have an increased growth rate over BA.1

    Vaccine effectiveness with omicron



    After a 2-dose primary course of vaccination

    Vaccine protection against mild disease has largely disappeared by 20 weeks after vaccination

    After a booster dose

    Protection initially increases to around 65 to 70%
    but drops to 45 to 50% from 10+ weeks

    Therefore

    It is therefore likely that current vaccines offer limited long-term protection against infection or transmission.

    Protection against severe disease

    Vaccine effectiveness against hospitalisation is estimated at 92%

    and remains high at 83% 10+ weeks after the booster dose

    John’s booster

    20th November

    So my protection against hospitalisation goes down from 92% to 83% by soon

  • New, Highly Contagious Covid-19 Variant Discovered In Vietnam

    3:57

    Vietnam has discovered a new Covid-19 variant, calling it a hybrid of the highly contagious India and U.K. strains of the virus. NBC News’ Janis Mackey Frayer explains how the Vietnamese government is working to contain the new surge in cases and why the WHO is changing the way it names new variants. 

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  • Does the COVID-19 Vaccine Protect Against Variants?

    48

    For more information on the latest COVID-19 variants and mutations, please visit

    The COVID-19 vaccines have protection against every variant, so far. Even with more breakthrough cases reported with the delta variant, the vaccines are effective at preventing serious illness and death.

    #CovidUpdate #CovidVarient #Covid19Vaccine

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  • What are the early symptoms of Omicron variant of COVID-19? Heres what one doctor has seen

    4:19

    Dr. David Winter at Baylor, Scott & White in Dallas said some early symptoms of Omicron variant are different than other variants of COVID-19.

    The ultra-contagious omicron mutant is pushing cases to all-time highs and causing chaos as an exhausted world struggles, again, to stem the spread. But this time, we're not starting from scratch.

    Vaccines offer strong protection from serious illness, even if they don't always prevent a mild infection. Omicron doesn't appear to be as deadly as some earlier variants. And those who survive it will have some refreshed protection against other forms of the virus that still are circulating — and maybe the next mutant to emerge, too.

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  • How many COVID-19 variants are there?

    1:55

    Many variants of the coronavirus are circulating around the world, but scientists are primarily concerned about three.

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  • Why so many Covid-19 variants are showing up now! Issues Video #11

    12:17

    I react to Vox’s video Why so many Covid-19 variants are showing up now!
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  • Mu Covid Variant Reported In Nearly Every State

    4:03

    As children head back to school across the country, a new Covid-19 Mu variant is emerging and has been detected in nearly every state. NBC News senior medial correspondent, Dr. John Torres, breaks down the latest on the emerging variant and how parents can keep their kids safe from the virus. 

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    #MuVariant #Coronavirus #Covid

  • What to know about new coronavirus variant mu l GMA

    2:35

    Dr. Ashish Jha, dean of the Brown University School of Public Health, discusses what people should know about the emerging variant called mu.

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  • There will be more COVID-19 variants than Greek letters to name them after: Expert

    2:30

    알파, 베타, 감마, 이제는 람다까지... 멈추지 않는 코로나 바이러스 변이

    From Alpha to Lambda, and Delta-plus it might be difficult to keep track of them all.
    One expert suggests there will be more variants than there are Greek letters to name them after.
    Kim Yeon-seung sheds light on the concerning developments.
    Viruses survive by hijacking human cells and using them as vessel to replicate themselves.
    But every so often, viruses misprint their copies,... and produce a replica with a slightly altered genetic code.
    This is how a virus variant is formed.
    So for COVID-19,... a virus that has infected more than 200 million people worldwide, it's of little surprise that it has been able to produced different versions of itself.
    The World Health Organization has named four main strains that are a cause for concern.
    There's Alpha which is estimated to be 50 percent more transmissible than most other variants.
    Beta 50 percent more contagious than the original strain and also suspected to reduce the effects of the vaccine.
    Gamma twice as contagious as the original coronavirus.
    And,... Delta,... the most dangerous with a 60-percent higher transmission rate than Alpha.

    The Delta variant is not only very contagious but also has a high fatality rate. Even in South Korea, the amount of critically ill patients in their 30s and 40s has increased. After this week, Delta will account for up to 70 percent of identified cases in South Korea.

    Delta has been reported in at least 135 countries worldwide and is now the most dominant strain.
    It has even produced a variant of its own, the Delta plus.
    South Korea on Tuesday reported that they have found Delta-plus infections for the first time in two of its breakthrough cases.
    Variants of interests,... are also emerging.
    These are strains to look out for,.. including Lambda which has been the latest to emerge... and has spread to more than 40 countries.
    But one expert says that COVID-19 won't stop here.

    There's already more than 10 types of known variants. There are 24 letters in the Greek alphabet, with Omega as the last. But there will be so many variants that we will need to use all 24 letters naming them,.. and perhaps need another alphabet for the new strains.

    The expert also added that in the future there will be a variant that renders the vaccine completely useless and developing a cure will be the only way forward.
    Kim Yeon-seung, Arirang News

    #COVID19 #variant #coronavirus

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    2021-08-06, 22:00 (KST)

  • Why Guy | Why are some COVID-19 variants labeled differently by the CDC?

    1:49

    The CDC labels some COVID-19 variants as variants of concern, while naming others variants of interest. Here's the big difference between the two.

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